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J U LY – A U G U S T , 2 0 1 1

ONLINE MAGAZINE


Dear readers, The July issue of the Tourism Review Online Magazine devoted two supplements to the tourism industry stakeholders. The Professional part highlights the importance of truly studying tourism and getting your degree. The Spa supplement on the other hand presents a few spa shows and conferences regarded as the must-visit events. Discover the beauty of Florence, enjoy taking pictures by the tower in Pisa, explore the medieval charm of Siena. Tuscany and its heritage is the topic of the Destination supplement. Adventurous souls will appreciate the Heritage part presenting several islands worth visiting. Community based tourism and homestays are the theme of the Ethical supplement. Expand your views and visit a community living a life that is quite different from yours. Milada Sovadinova Editor


CONTENTS HERITAGE

SPA

Presenting sPas: shows & exhibitions

I s l a n d n at I o n s : H I d d e n Pa r a d I s e

Sandy beach, crystal clear water, palm trees on the shore – is it really possible to visit such paradise? Explore Grenada and Saba in the Caribbean, the Maldives, Kiribati or even Taiwan.

HERITAGE:

Island Nations: Hidden Paradise............................................ 4

Unfamiliar Grenada Is Authentic Caribbean............................................................... 5 The Gateway Taiwan – Waiting for Discovery.............................................................. 8 The Maldives – Remarkable Mix of Cultures.............................................................. 11 Kiribati: Atolls, Lagoons and Battles......................................................................... 13 Saba – The Island of Dreams......................................................................................... 16

SPA:

Presenting Spas: Shows & Exhibitions............................. 40

Wellness Summit: The Premiere Spa Event in Asia..................................................... 41 Host 2011: Hotel Industry and Spas in Italy............................................................... 43 Global Spa Summit: A Conference for the Top-Level Executives............................. 45 Indonesia: Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo.................................................. 47

T u s c a n y : a n a r T i s T i c B e au T y

B ac k t o S c h o o l : S t u d y t o u r i S m

Professional:

Back to School: Study Tourism............................................................... 19 Why Study Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management?...................................... 20 Tourism Education at Universities – A Diverse Field of Study................................ 21 Swiss Hotel Schools Ranked Among World’s Best................................................... 24 Tourism Education Trends and Challenges in 21st Century.................................. 26 Careers in the Global Economy – ucation in Tourism and Hospitality................. 28 ETHICAL

Tuscany is one of the most visited cities in Italy. Florence, Pisa, Siena – all these beautiful cities with marvelous architecture welcome crowds of tourists every year.

Destination:

Tuscany: An Artistic Beauty.........49 Tuscany: Medieval Towns and Charming Countryside............................................ 50 Three Must-See Destinations for the Beginners....................................................... 52 Top Ten Places to Visit in Florence.............................................................................. 55 Spa and Wellness – The Thermal Springs of Tuscany............................................... 57 Off the Beaten Path n Tuscany?................................................................................... 59

Fairs & Exhibitions

Cultural ExChangE: livE likE a loCal

Experience your destination in a different way. Learn how to milk a cow or plant rice – get connected with the locals and stay in their house. Discover cultural exchange projects in Thailand, Nepal, Ethiopia, and Kenya.

Spa and wellness is a dynamically growing industry all around the world. Get to know some of the most important shows and summits essential for any spa provider.

Destination

PROFESSIONAL

Why study tourism? Why get a degree in hospitality? Learn about the importance of tourism education and about the latest trends.

CONTENTS

J ULY – AUGUST , 2 0 1 1

T r av e l / T o u r i s m i n J u lY - a u G u s T 2 0 1 1 b Y r e G i o n s

ETHICAL:

Fairs & Exhibitions:

ICultural Exchange: Live like a Local............................................ 30

Travel/Tourism in JULY-AUGUST 2011 by regions.........................................61

Travel and Become Part of Thai Community............................................................. 31 Community Based Tourism: Rural Villages in Ethiopia............................................ 33 Nepal: Home Stays on Offer in Chitlang..................................................................... 35 Nakuru, Kenya: Help the Villagers through Community Tourism Project........... 37

Western Europe............................................................................................................. 62 North AmericaT.............................................................................................................. 63 Asia & Pacific................................................................................................................... 64


HERITAGE

I s l a n d N at i o n s : H i d d e n Pa r a d i s e

Sandy beach, crystal clear water, palm trees on the shore – is it really possible to visit such paradise? Explore Grenada and Saba in the Caribbean, the Maldives, Kiribati or even Taiwan.


HERITAGE

Unfamiliar Grenada Is Authentic Caribbean

Grenada's most respected nature guide, Telfor Bedeau, is a 72-year-old nature ambassador with a lifetime of stories to share. Photo credit: Alison Gardner

July – August, 2011

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Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Mention a vacation in Grenada (pronounced gre-nay-da), and most people think you are visiting a city in Spain (gre-nah-da) even if you pronounce the difference very carefully. That is how unfamiliar this three-island nation is, located in the southeast Caribbean Sea near Trinidad. Since a government overthrow and brief occupation by US and Caribbean forces that ended in 1984, Grenada has rested peaceably in the deepest shadows of global tourism, a repeat destination mainly to those who would like it to stay that way forever. With strong French and British historical connections and easy charter flight access from Europe, the majority of visitors are European. However, new seasonal and year round direct flights from Canada and the US are encouraging exploration by those looking for alternative Caribbean horizons where pristine white sand beaches are only one focus of this diverse country. For the active environmentally-conscious traveler, Grenada offers many hiking trails, rainforests, waterfalls and sustainable activities. Development in Grenada has been deliberately unobtrusive. With none of the country's hotels (all family owned) allowed to exceed the height of the palm trees, unobstructed views of beautiful surroundings abound from every hillside and lookout. One ninth of the nation is dedicated to wildlife sanctuaries and rainforest parks. Telfor Bedeau is the country's ultimate nature ambassador who has spent much of his 72 years hiking, sailing, and rowing around


HERITAGE

his precious islands. On our hike to the Seven Sisters Waterfall, we talked plants, birds and animals, and how to look after them on these fragile islands. Telfor does guide groups and individuals who share his passion for nature, best contacted through the Grenada Board of Tourism (Grenadagrenadines.com). The country is proud of its nickname, The Spice of the Caribbean, and there is certainly no exaggeration about that claim. With its own micro-weather and volcanic soil peculiarities, Grenada has near-perfect growing conditions for nutmeg, allspice, mace, cloves, cinnamon, turmeric and bay leaves. After Indonesia, it is the world's second largest producer of nutmeg and mace so the odds are very high that back home you are seasoning your food with something grown in Grenada. There are wonderful opportunities to sample delicious local cuisine whether staying at resorts or smaller local properties. With a countryside abundantly sprouting both cultivated and wild fruit and vegetables and fresh fish a major part of the daily diet, the robust health of Grenadians of all ages says a lot about the quality of food accessible to everyone. Don't miss a traditional "Fish Friday" street celebration while wandering the antique streets of Grenada's fishing capital, Gouyave. This is where locals from all over the main island meet each other at the many stalls offering creativelycooked, super-fresh seafood delivered in newspaper or on paper plates. Visitors are always welcome at this colorful local event. Still focusing on cuisine delights, agritourism richly-laced with history is one of Grenada's most attractive features. Best sampled with a July – August, 2011

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Grenada’s multi-cultural capital, St George’s, is a safe and picturesque historic stroll both day and night. Photo credit: Joshua Yetman

rental car, visitors can easily spend several days discovering authentic countryside properties that offer deeply educational tours and free tastings, product gift shops and local-menu restaurants. Not to be missed are the Dougaldston Spice Boucan, the Gouyave Nutmeg Processing Station, the Laura Herb & Spice Garden, Belmont Estate's cocoa/chocolate operations, and the River Antoine Rum Distillery, in business since 1785. Most international travellers explore only the main island of Grenada, though a high speed catamaran ferry service (Ospreylines.com) makes it easy and efficient to visit the smaller islands of Carriacou (pop. 5,000) and Petite Martinique (pop. 1,000) either for the day or longer. Despite the French having given up colonial ownership to the British in 1763, these islands

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have retained more of a visible French heritage, not only with their geographical names but also with the patois language and many unique music and dance festivals (Carriacoupetitemartinique.com/festivals.html) around which to dovetail a visit. On the main island of Grenada, I headquartered at the Flamboyant Hotel & Villas, (Flamboyant.com) which offers best-value rooms and modern self-catering apartments overlooking Grenada's finest beach, Grand Anse. As well as staff providing excellent service and insider advice, there are locally-themed menus in the beachfront restaurant and weekly steel drum performances. The hotel has special offers year round so check the website. On Carriacou I stayed at the Grand View Hotel, (Carriacougrandview.com) owned by an island couple with a gracious personal style of


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HERITAGE

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

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erich schmid t verl ag

erich schmidt verl ag


HERITAGE

The Gateway Taiwan – Waiting for Discovery

Penghu Tongpan isle basalt pillars July – August, 2011

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Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

With inflowing mass tourism, and FITs starting in July 2011, from mainland China, Taiwan has become a sought-after tourism destination. Today a number of islands make up the Republic of China’s rump territory, which although sovereign is still claimed by China. Besides the main island, once called Formosa (the “Beautiful”) by the early Portuguese seafarers, some volcanic isles emerge off the east coast: Lu dao (Green Island) and Lan yu (Orchard Island), the latter one inhabited by the Austronesian Tao tribe who still hunt flying fish in their tiny colorful boats. The others lie off the continental coast in visible distance to China’s Fujian province (the drowned granite mountains of Kinmen and Matsu), and a unique archipelago bridges the Formosa Strait: Penghu (Pescadores: the “Fishermen islands”). Penghu – the undeclared world heritage of a shattered, drowned basalt plateau – recalls a million year long erosion. Tongpan yu (“kettledish isle”) juts out with impressive volcanic pillars, with cliffs like pencil-sticks turning away arrivals. Qimei (“Seven Belles”) is also thrilling  – freshly congealed lava flows are seemingly straight away contracting into hexagonal columns. Sea waves have left a miniature map of Taiwan at one corner, while another shore site beguiles with a fish trap. Due to its twin heart shape this stone weir has become a queer landmark attracting throngs of romanticists. Sharply contrasting are some rare blazing beaches, composed of coral, shell and radiolarian sands on Jibei, where bathers and snor-


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kelers find a tropical paradise. But Penghu has more: abundant seafood from pristine waters (anchovies, abalone shellfish, squids, crabs …), caught from seawaters or harvested in floating farms. The warm waters of Kuroshio current and their cold counter stream of Oyashio from the north have brought off a rich marine fauna, discovered by those early emigrants from Fujian who in 1604 built the first Matsu temple in thanks to their protectress Mazu. Penghu’s repulsing rock castles are the oldest time window of Taiwan. It was here that some 150 million years ago the Eurasian continent began to break up, allowing magma to creep through the earth crust’s cracks and to form undersea pancake plateaus. Only later has the Central Mountain chains emerged from their heavy deepwater sediment charge that today form the main island’s backbone. Densely industrialized and populated (with over 23 million people on 36.000 km2 ), Taiwan has become a global player, but also retains an abidingly bucolic appearance. Nothing could subdue the sensitive nature, neither strong trade winds and summer monsoons, humidity and heat, typhoons, flooding and earthquakes, nor the overall exploitation by man, instead silent sensations are hidden all around. For example the world’s single museum of full-fledged Chinese culture (the old Palace Museum) or the 101 skyscraper in the capital city Taipei. Or the 17th century heritage sites of Dutch traders in Tainan. Or the green-blue belts of the Ocean City Kaohsiung. Once the key site of heavy industry and pollution, old Takao (Kaohsiung) attracts now with forested coral hills and open waterfronts along the July – August, 2011

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Kenting Chenggong festival

country’s largest seaport. Nearby on Gaoping River, Tang palace-style halls remind of the bygone Golden Age of Buddhism at Foguang Shan (“Buddha Light Mountain”) monastery, a remarkable international Mahayana center combining Eight Schools of Chinese Buddhism. On the adjacent forelands extend the fields of Meinong, home of southern Taiwan’s Hakka community. Their backdrop is the towering Central Mountain Range, which has overall 165 peaks of over 3000m above sea level (Mount Jade: 3952m), steep valleys, spectacular hiking

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trails, and far-flung settlements inhabited by mountain people such as the Baiwan tribe at Maolin or Shandimen. The island’s southern tip is preserved in Kenting National Park (one out of eight NPs) surprising with tropical flora, beaches and a bustling resort. Its cramped tourism is now competing with Sun-Moon Lake, the classic uplands highlight in the very center, or with Taroko gorge, the awe inspiring marble ravine to the northeast. As spectacular the diversified sceneries are, as exciting are the ethnics, their


HERITAGE

Hanging bridge at Dongbu

cultures, languages and religions, evidencing an enviable harmony. Some 12,000 years ago the earliest dwellers had arrived, followed by those Austronesians who had spread all over the endless Indo-Pacific oceans. Taiwan had become their northernmost destination, contested only thousands of years later, when in 17th century Han-Chinese immigrants arrived. More Chinese settlers followed after 1875, as well as after World War II (the “external provincials” or waishengren) when Japan’s 50-year long rule had ended. The social amalgamation now shows a mixture of 2% “aborigines”, 14% Hakka (Kejia) and 70% ho-lo-lan

July – August, 2011

(the “HuangHe  – LuoHe” people) whose last homeland once was southern Fujian. Next to the diverse vernaculars come the gaudy temples with their hard to discern deities and protectors that contrast with the more prosaic multi-denominational churches mainly spread across the mountainous regions. Han cultures, intermingled in noisy festivals, are also experienced in drama performing street theatres, or demonstrated by the countless pilgrim streams that satisfy minds and economies alike. How many Mazu birthdays are celebrated throughout the year, and how lavish is the pomp for “King of Yue” who is sent to the sea in gorgeous boats flaring off in untamed seawaters? Along with the ancient Austronesian cultures the classic Han Chinese heritage has miraculously survived, embedded in an enchanting nature with lush vegetation (banyan trees, the dateless false cypresses and hinoki trees …), abundant wildlife (muntjacs, Formosan Sika deer, black bears, pangolins, Macaque monkeys …) and exotic sceneries. Taiwan is truly a gateway of discovery. By Dr. Engelbert Altenburger I-Shou University, ass. prof. at the Faculty of International Business, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, amadeus78@web.de

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Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

www.caucasusexplorer.com


HERITAGE

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

The Maldives – Remarkable Mix of Cultures Maldives has deep blue seas, turquoise reefs, white sandy beaches and palm trees. While it is the perfect place to sit on a beach and watch a sunset with a cocktail balanced on your hand, it is also a geographical marvel, knowing that there are thousands of fish swimming around the vivid corals just a few feet away from where you sit. Coral Reefs

The Maldives lies in two rows of atolls in the Indian Ocean, just across the equator. The country is made up of 1,190 coral islands formed around 26 natural ring-like atolls, spread over 90,000 square kilometers. These atolls structures are formed upon a sharp ridge rising from the ocean, making way for their secluded uniqueness. Each atoll in the Maldives is made of a coral reef encircling a lagoon, with deep channels dividing the reef ring. A string of islands take their places among this atoll ring; each island has its own reef encircling the island lagoon. The reefs of the islands, alive with countless types of underwater creatures and vibrant corals, protect the islands from wind and wave action of the surrounding vast oceans. This unique structure of reefs and channels makes navigation almost impossible for the passer-by without sufficient information about these waters. July – August, 2011

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Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

the genes passed on by South and Southeast Asians, Africans, and Arabians. The language, Dhivehi, differs in dialect in some regions in the south of Maldives, possibly due to the secluded nature and subsistent ways of island life. Maldivian beliefs have been very much based around religion and superstition, often used together in matters of significance but given separate positions in society. In matters of faith, Islam dominates, but influence of the supernatural still continues to play a major role in most island communities, possibly giving credit to the folklores and Buddhist traditions of the islands’ first settlers before conversion to Islam in 1153 AD. Ninety-nine percent of the Maldives is made up of sea. The people of the islands are widely dispersed across the atolls, with about 200 inhabited islands. About 90 islands are developed as tourist resort and the rest are uninhabited or used for agriculture and other livelihood purposes. Mix of Cultures

The islands of Maldives appear in-between the trading route of the Indian Ocean. Thus settlers, and visitors from neighbouring regions and around the world have come in contact with the islands for as long as history has been recorded. Such is the to-and-fro flow of people and their cultures, that a marked effect has been left in the Maldivian people, the language, beliefs, arts, and attitudes. The looks of the Maldivian people may differ from one atoll to the other, attributing to July – August, 2011

The Locals Unique Arts

The mixing of cultures is very much seen in Maldivian arts. The music played with the local bodu-beru (big-drum) resemble that of African drumming. The dhoni (a unique Maldivian sailboat) is an art form itself built with skilled craftsmanship, with significant similarities to the Arabian dows. The fine artistry of Maldivians, seen in the intricate details on wooden beams in antique mosques, represents what we have gained from Southeast Asian architecture. Then there is the undefined: the distinct geometric designs used in mats woven from local materials, the embroidered neckline of women’s traditional dresses and their ornaments too, expose another story brought in from an unknown culture that has seeped in to Maldivian society.

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Maldivians are quite open to adaptation and are generally welcoming to outside inspiration. The culture has always continued to evolve with the times. Locals still eat fish and fishermen still spend days out at sea, but tourism now takes a standing prominence. Most Maldivians still want to believe in upholding unity and oneness in faith, but recent waves of reform in the country have created a whole new culture of new ideas and attitudes. The effects of the modern world are now embraced, while still striving to uphold the people’s identity, traditions and beliefs.

Photos: Visit Maldives http://www.visitmaldives.com/en


HERITAGE

Kiribati: Atolls, Lagoons and Battles

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Kiribati (pronounced Kiribas) is an independent republic within the Commonwealth of Nations, located in the central Pacific Ocean, about 4,000 km (about 2,500 mi) southwest of Hawaii. It is part of the division of the Pacific islands that is known as Micronesia. Kiribati consists of 33 coral islands divided among three island groups: the Gilbert Islands, the Phoenix Islands, and the Line Islands. Kiribati is for travellers – those who have a passion for exploring and discovering, people who like an adventure off the tourist trail to places where few have been before, and people who want to understand a country – not just see it. Kiribati will challenge your view of how life should be and show you a less complicated way of living where family and community come first. Situated in the equatorial pacific, in the east Kiribati offers world class fishing (both game and bone fishing) from Kiritimati Island. In the west is the Gilbert Group of islands, which offer amazing and unique cultural experiences. Bone and Sports Fishing

Whether you prefer the deep blue waters with big game fish, or prefer the crystalline waters and serenity of saltwater flyfishing, Kiribati is the destination for you. One big reason anglers come to Kiribati though is the mighty bonefish – by fly or saltwater spin, Kiritimati (Christmas) Island is the place to be. There's also some world class game fishing, having obtained many International Game Fishing World Records, the waters in Kiribati are open for international anglers to try their July – August, 2011

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Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

while walking and flying. The costumes are made out of local materials. The frigate bird symbolizes many important things in the traditional living context of the I-Kiribati. It provides navigation to fishermen while lost at sea, provides weather information for the people and also gives a sign of peace and harmony. Visitors can experience I-Kiribati culture in many shapes and forms. However we do recommend the best way is to take the plunge and live on an outer island for a week and to immerse fully in our daily culture. World War II Sites

The Islands of Kiribati was a place of several bloody battles of the World War II. Sixty years on and much of the evidence of these battles still remain available for travellers to view as hand. With the bonefish, Giant Trevally, or Sail Fish and Marlin, Kiribati won’t disappoint you. Living Traditions

The culture of Kiribati is complex and diverse, with each island having its own unique ways. Though a living body, many people remain true to the century old traditions and practices that define what it means to be I-Kiribati. Cultural practices such as community meetings under the maneaba (traditional meeting house) to socialize and feast (a botaki), respect to elderly people, guest hospitality and importance of family remain important facets in the local culture. July – August, 2011

The way of living is very simple and people plan their living for a day only, without worrying about their future, living with the motto “Tomorrow is another day”. Survival revolves around strength, motivation and ambition to live within that particular day. Daily lives revolve around the rise and fall of the tide, dictating fishing conditions and timing and availability of transport. Dancing Like Birds

The traditional dances of Kiribati are a unique form of art and expression. The movement of the feet, hands and of course the whole body imitates the movement of the frigate birds

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33 Islands of Kiribati All of the islands are atolls (ring-shaped islands with central lagoons) except for the island of Banaba in the Gilbert Islands which is a raised limestone Island. Of the 33 islands of Kiribati, 21 are inhabited. Most of the population is concentrated in the Gilbert Islands and only one of the islands in Phoenix Group (Kanton Island) is inhabited and three of the Line Islands are permanently inhabited. The capital of Kiribati is Tarawa, an atoll in the Gilbert Islands. Bairiki, an islet of Tarawa, serves as an administrative center.


HERITAGE

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Take the chance to welcome new Russian travellers

Join My Planet Travel Awards www.myplanetawards.com Moscow September 2011 International travel awards voted for exclusively by the Russian public and organised in partnership with Moya Planeta TV, Russia’s leading travel and leisure network. The Awards offer participating companies a unique opportunity to reach millions of Russian consumers directly, as well as hundreds of potential industry partners.

a living museum of this part of history; in particular Tarawa, Butaritari and Abemama of the Gilbert group, and Banaba island. The Japanese entered the pacific and invaded the Gilberts in December of 1941, two days after they bombed Pearl Harbour. In August of 1942, the US Marines held three major operations in an attempt to remove the Japanese, including "The Battle of Tarawa", reputedly one of the bloodiest battles ever fought in World War II. July – August, 2011

On Tarawa and Butaritari Atoll there are still physical relics of the occupation and operations. This includes four eight inch coastal defense guns, and solid concrete bunkers and pillboxes. Rusted tanks, amtracs, ship wrecks, and plane wrecks can also be seen on the shores at low tide. http://kiribatitourism.gov.ki/

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HERITAGE

Saba – The Island of Dreams

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Saba is ideal for the traveler looking for a secluded haven, in peaceful and friendly surroundings. Rising steeply from the azure sea, the tiny island in the Caribbean is a magical experience far away from the cares and worries of today's hurried world. Four small villages are as quaint and charming as the gentle, friendly manner of the Saban people, descended from hardy 17th century pioneers. Visitors feel they have stepped back in history, yet many modern luxuries are here to be enjoyed. Saba is a monument to nature's best above and below the ocean's surface. The famous Saba Marine Park is second to none. Saba is a magical place for scuba diving, hiking, admiring the nature or honeymooning! The Unspoiled Queen

Saba has a population of only 1,400, so the island’s surface of 13 square kilometres (5 square miles) is scarcely inhabited. The people of Saba proudly refer to their island as “The Unspoiled Queen.” Imagine an island largely untouched by the 21st century, with the yearround climate of your dreams. Imagine landscapes that resemble those encountered by the earliest explorers. Lush, pristine, mysterious, alluring. No matter how you arrive on Saba, on the island there’s only one road to travel. Travelling by taxi along “the road that couldn’t be built” takes you to your destination within twenty minutes. On your way you’ll find out what it means to travel back in time. No one’s in a hurry. The taxi driver is busy greeting friends and making July – August, 2011

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July – August, 2011

“ T H E O S C A R S O F T H E T R AV E L I N D U S T R Y ” WA L L S T R E E T J O U R N A L

G R A N D TO UR 2011 — 17 — awards@worldtravelawards.com

worldtravelawards.com

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

Global Reach • Global Recognition • Global Rewards

HERITAGE

Dubai • Antalya • Sharm el Sheikh • Bangkok • Montego Bay


HERITAGE

Is l a nd N a t i ons : H i dde n P a r a di s e

The Road That Could Not Be Built There is one road on Saba, aptly called “The Road”. Its construction was masterminded by Lambert Josephus Hassell who, despite the common opinion of Dutch engineers, believed that a road could be built. He took a correspondence course in civil engineering, and started building the road with a crew of locals in 1938. After five years of work, the first section of the road, from Fort Bay to The Bottom, was completed. It was not until 1947, however, that the first motor vehicle arrived. In 1951, the road to Windwardside and St. Johns was opened, and in 1958 the road was completed.

small talk with everyone who passes by. The houses are pleasingly uniform, their architecture harmonious.

crater contains a rainforest jungle of ferns, tropical flowers and mahogany trees. You’ll feel that you’re in heaven as you gaze over the island.

Climbing Mt. Scenery

Hiking the Island

Climbing Mount Scenery is one of the principal attractions of Saba, an adventure you’ll never forget. Visitors are advised, however, that because of the altitude and the demands of the climb, only those in good physical condition should attempt the trek. Mount Scenery 877 metres (2,877 feet) is not only the highest mountain on the island, it is the highest point in the Kingdom of the Netherlands. When you reach the summit, indulge yourself in the breathtaking view. The volcano

Hikers from all over the world are attracted to Saba. The island features a network of trails, carefully marked and maintained. Some are designed for easy trekking, others require a guide, enriching the experience through a greater appreciation of Saba’s botany and history. Everyone can hike to the trailhead then into Saba’s rainforest, tide pools, historic ruins and rich nature wonderland. Even a walk along Saba’s winding road will lead you through many breathtaking and memorable views.

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Diving Kingdom

Saba's beauty extends below the waterline into an exciting marine environment rich in corals and active with fish life. A busy population of colorful tropical fish as well as large groupers and jacks live around Saba. Lava tunnels and hot springs remind divers of the dramatic volcanic beginnings of the island. The small leeward side hosts gentle, medium depth, spur and groove formations. Along the edge of Saba's sheer wall dives, divers can sight turtles and rays of all shapes and sizes. Since the island is so small, dive boats can reach all sites within minutes. http://www.sabatourism.com


PROFESSIONAL B ac k t o S c h o o l : S t u d y T o u r i s m

Why study tourism? Why get a degree in hospitality? Learn about the importance of tourism education and about the latest trends.


PROFESSIONAL

B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Why Study Tourism, Hospitality and Event Management? The related areas of tourism, hospitality and events offer huge opportunities for rewarding management careers in the UK, Europe and around the world, working in a professional, people-focused environment. Tourism, together with travel, is now regarded as the world’s fastest growing industry. It provides a wide range of career opportunities both at home and overseas in many and varied industry sectors, such as tour operators, airlines, tourist attractions and hotel groups. The hospitality industry is in continuous need of managerial staff with graduate status, and varied, challenging and rewarding careers await enthusiastic and committed managers in all areas of hospitality. The industry embraces hotel management, restaurant management, public house management, nightclub management, and even includes working on cruise liners and in theme parks. Hospitality is a truly international industry with career opportunities at home and abroad. The events industry is flourishing and the management of events has become increas-

July – August, 2011

ingly important within the hospitality, tourism, leisure and sports sectors. Event managers can be found working on a wide range of events from weddings to conferences, meetings to product launches, at festi-

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vals and major sporting occasions. High profile events include, for example, the Notting Hill Carnival, Glastonbury Festival and the Olympic Games to name but a few. http://www.uclan.ac.uk


PROFESSIONAL

B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Tourism Education at Universities – A Diverse Field of Study Quite often when being asked what field my doctorate was in, and I say “tourism”, I look into surprised faces, and get the response “I didn’t know you can study tourism at university”. According to the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), 940 million international tourists spent US$ 919 billion in 2010, and the first two months of 2011 saw a healthy growth of 5% over the same months the previous year. It is thus widely recognized that tourism is globally one of the largest industries and the top generator of foreign exchange earnings for many of the world’s economies. An industry of that size has to be managed just as any other industry, and the different stakeholders in the millions of businesses need well educated and well trained employees and entrepreneurs. In many countries, tourism is increasingly replacing primary industries, and it is no surprise that academic tourism programmes, including hospitality and events, are growing steadily and gain in popularity. Tourism is probably one of the most diverse fields of study, and heavily relies on a multidisciplinary approach. The reality that tourism research includes many disciplines, including, but not limited to economics, marketing, social sciences, geography, anthropology, biology, July – August, 2011

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B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m


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history, architecture, and law, makes it one of the most exciting fields of study. Many tourism programmes are based in business schools at universities around the world. However, over the past decades it became clear that tourism is much more than just business, and programmes adapted to this view. Along with the general move to more sustainable practices, the tourism industry needs to adapt the triple-bottom-line as well, i.e. in addition to economic sustainability needs to also address the important issues of social/cultural and environmental sustainability. Many innovative tourism programmes include a wide array of course subjects, from cultural and heritage tourism, to ecotourism, coastal and marine tourism, dark tourism, golf tourism, to name but a few. The spectrum broadens, and often includes subjects, such as business travel, and the ever increasing events sector. In addition to regular coursework, students increasingly need to work on real life projects, either in groups or as individuals in form of a cooperative education. This means a move away from the traditional practicum, where many students had been abused as “cheap cleaning and coffee making staff”, and towards concrete projects in cooperation with an industry partner (business, NGOs, governmental agencies) that aim for real life usable outcomes.

July – August, 2011

Similarly, there is an increasing integration of research into the daily education at universities. Research centers and institutes often build the backbone of a department’s research activities, and provide students and faculty with invaluable experiences. For example, students are often employed as research assistants, and can gain valuable experience while at the same time earn some money to support their student life. Some institutes offer an array of different positions, such as internships, cooperative placements, research assistantships, etc. For postgraduate students, these jobs can also support the research activities for their own Masters and PhD theses. For faculty, the active work as researchers provides the unique advantage to stay up-to-date, and incorporate research findings and experience into the day-to-day teaching.

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B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Not only topics and research areas are experiencing a shift into more contemporary fields and niches, but also the delivery of the material. Many universities move away from the classical standard lecture, supported by PowerPoint slides. Innovation in the teaching and assessment methods is a large field of inquiry in its own right, and can include the employment of modern techniques and gadgets (such as online tools, text messaging, the use of smartphones, laptops and tablets). The teaching environment also changes drastically, from online components, to project work off-campus, to new classroom set-ups with round tables or even couches and bean bags, and field components to experience and investigate tourism phenomena first hand. I feel very lucky and privileged to be part of a worldwide team that is allowed to interact with a wide range of students and colleagues, from and in different countries. To me, tourism (including all its facets and sub-fields) is the most exciting field of study, and it is great fun working with colleagues and students to learn and understand more about the world’s largest industry! By Michael Lück, Ph.D. http://www.aut.ac.nz/study-at-aut/study-areas/hospitality-tourism http://www.nztri.org http://unwto.org


PROFESSIONAL

B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Swiss Hotel Schools Ranked Among World's Best Les Roches International School of Hotel Management and Glion Institute of Higher Education ranked among world's leading hospitality management schools for an international career The world's top hotel companies have again ranked several hospitality management schools of Switzerland as the best in the world. In a recent survey conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofres in the UK, 5-star hoteliers chose three Swiss schools among the top four hotel management schools worldwide: Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Glion Institute of Higher Education and Les Roches International School of Hotel Management. Also ranked among the top four was Cornell University (USA). These schools were ranked as the world's best for preparing students for an international career in hospitality management. The survey included a large sample of hiring managers from 5-star international hospitality companies around the world and was conducted by Taylor Nelson Sofres (TNS) Travel & Tourism (U.K.), the world's largest provider of custom research and analysis. The 2010 survey established the relative ‘ranking' of international hospitality management schools providing university-level degree programs from which employers are likely to recruit staff for international 5-star hotel companies. July – August, 2011

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PROFESSIONAL

B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Top 10 International Hospitality Management Schools in the World for an International Career Based on frequency of school selection by hospitality industry hiring managers from 5-star hotels (sample size = 181 respondents) Rank Institution Country 1 Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne Switzerland 2* Les Roches International School of Hotel Management, Bluche Switzerland 2* Glion Institute of Higher Education, Glion & Bulle Switzerland 2* Cornell University USA 5 Hotelschool The Hague Netherlands 6 Les Roches International School of Hotel Management, Marbella Spain 7 Hotel School Vatel France 8 Oxford Brookes University United Kingdom 9 César Ritz Colleges, Le Bouveret, Brig Switzerland 10 Ecole Hôtelière de Genève Switzerland * Les Roches International School of Hotel Management, Glion Institute of Higher Education and Cornell University are tied for second position.

Les Roches and Glion are members of the Laureate International Universities network. 'Switzerland continues to lead the world in providing the highest-quality international hospitality management education', said David Graves, CEO Laureate Hospitality Art & Design Education. ‘The results of this survey, like those of a similar survey in 2007, affirm that hiring managers at the very best hotels consider Swiss hospitality education to be the best in the world.' ‘The goal of top international hospitality management schools is to prepare managers to compete successfully in a rapidly changing world', said Arie van der Spek, Senior Vice PresJuly – August, 2011

ident of Laureate Hospitality Education worldwide. ‘This survey confirms that the hospitality industry understands and appreciates the unique nature of the Swiss education model, which combines practical instruction with serious academic studies.' ‘Our graduates deliver an outstanding level of performance after graduation and throughout their careers, as evidenced by the many Glion and Les Roches graduates occupying positions at the top of the world of hospitality ', continued Van der Spek. ‘Because we work closely with leaders in hospitality we understand their expectations for excellence and quality. In this way, we can prepare our graduates for a suc-

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cessful future in hospitality management, the world's fastest growing industry.' The survey was conducted in September and October 2010, and included invitations to more than 50,000 hoteliers in 70 countries. Laureate Hospitality Education, a division of Laureate Education Inc, commissioned TNS to conduct the survey utilizing "blind" objective techniques. The survey results are statistically reliable at a 95% confidence level. Similar results were obtained in a global industry survey conducted in 2007 by TNS. http://www.tnsglobal.com/


PROFESSIONAL

Tourism Education Trends and Challenges in 21st Century

July – August, 2011

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B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

People are clearly fundamental to the efficient operation and further development of the tourism industry. Many tourism products include people as a primary part of the proficiency offered, whether as performers or as members of the cultural environment. There is a growing realisation that labour should not be treated simply as variable costs, but as human capital. A high-quality skilled workforce will ensure greater competitiveness and innovation, improve job prospects and ease the process of adjustment in changing markets. There is the commonly acknowledged proposition that economic prosperity depends on an educated workforce. It is also agreed that the increasing recognition of the economic importance of tourism itself has lent further prominence to the necessity for an expansion of tourism education. The competitive advantage of countries in a global economy increasingly depends on the availability of skilled labour. This is also true for the tourism-related industries. Therefore, the structure of and focus on (public and private) educational and vocational provisions are important issues. A primary concern is that a lack of suitable staff will challenge the industry’s capacity to meet the expectations of service quality that tourism promotions have created. The demand for tourism services to meet international standards has led to an increasing trend to employ a highly skilled labour force and although human resources are the most valuable asset of these industries, paradoxically, the will to invest in education and training in some of the major sectors is comparatively low compared with other industries.


PROFESSIONAL

However, upgrading human resources and techniques, as well as improving management skills, are essential requirements for the further development of the industry. Too often, human resource planning is based on shortterm thinking, as opposed to regarding HR as a strategic asset. Generally dialogues by educators and developers of tourism curricula tend to centre on a balance between a vocational and an academic focus. The discussion is often merely about efficient and effective transferability of school curricula to daily operations, overlooking the value of learning as a function of professional development. It is clear that a focus on employability is in conflict with the goal of producing graduates capable of critical thinking. Taking the pragmatic stance, educators should be preparing students to be employable, while the theoretic perspective would require educators to equip students with higher order competencies, facilitate planning as well as self-reflection skills and more generally with the realisation that their management of knowledge will ultimately have an impact on the future of the tourism and hospitality industry. The unique nature of the Swiss education model offers a potential solution; it combines practical instruction and vocational orientation with high-quality academic studies. A survey conducted in 2010 by Taylor Nelson Sofres established the relative ‘ranking' of international hospitality management schools providing university-level degree programs from which employers are likely to recruit staff for international 5-star hotel companies. This July – August, 2011

global survey clearly demonstrated that Swiss schools were ranked as the best in the world. On this basis the curriculum could be delivered with this underpinning in mind so that there is improved synergy between the operational and pedagogical elements. The internationalization of the tourism student body and the unique characteristics of the this generation that has become known as generation Y creates new challenges for educators with regard to the management of and use of technology. The increasingly diverse student body and societal changes arguably create pressure for

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B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

educators to put in place new systems for academic and student support. Alpine Center experienced this trend as it successfully integrated over 40 different nationalities into its student body last academic year. With the growing recognition of the importance of responding to contemporary tourism and hospitality students’ needs there is a growing body of education-focused literature documenting the development and implementation of innovative pedagogical approaches for students studying in tourism and hospitality. Empirical research highlights the commitment of educators to develop sound, academically rigorous, innovative and perhaps even entertaining lectures, and case studies. Moreover, a key feature of the tourism industry is that of extent and pace of change. Patterns of consumption, technological change and supply innovation in tourism as elsewhere are in a constant state of change, which means education must evolve with industry changes by incorporating a life-long learning approach to tourism education. With tourism now established as one of the principal global industries the need for an effective and industry relevant tourism education framework that captures and utilizes latest pedagogical as well as business trends to underpin the industry’s development is of paramount importance. By Alan Furlong, BA, MBS Hotel School Director, Alpine Center, the Swiss Business School for Hotel & Tourism Management Education in Greece http://www.alpine.edu.gr


PROFESSIONAL

B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

Careers in the Global Economy – Education in Tourism and Hospitality Recent statistics issued by the World Travel and Tourism Council clearly show the importance and size of the tourism and hospitality industry. With over 235 million jobs, 650,000 alone at managerial levels, hospitality today definitely is one of the fastest growing industries in the world. With a GDP of just over 9% in 2009 and an annual growth of 4.4%, the tourism and hospitality industry contributes billions of dollars to the global economy. Looking beyond the current economic outlook, the industry is expected to resume its leading, dynamic role in global growth. Taking this growth into consideration the world’s leading tourism and hospitality companies are looking for skilled professionals to become tomorrow’s leaders. Education is considered by many as a vital determinant of success. Choosing what to study, and where, is one of the most important decisions a person will make as it will steer and ensure a successful career that will last many years. If someone is looking for a career that offers travel, varied challenges and they enjoy working with people then gaining a degree in tourism or hotel management field could be for them. Often students will look to countries overseas in which to gain a degree or further their education. With July – August, 2011

the industry being truly global, a recognised qualification from another country will provide many advantages to a future employer – the person will be multilingual, have the ability to communicate and understand different cultures and be adaptable to changes.

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Amongst many destinations, Australia is one of the most desirable tourist locations and over the years has discovered its place as being a popular destination for students to study hotel or tourism management. Even though the economic events of the past two years have


PROFESSIONAL

impacted tourism around the globe, Australia continued to perform well as a major destination with the UNWTO reporting that international visitor arrivals fell only 1% compared global arrivals falling between 6-8%. Student numbers too remain stable with Australia continuing to be regarded as a favourite destination in which international students can come and study. With tourism in Asia Pacific rapidly growing many of the leading hotel chains are building numerous new properties and the demand for skilled managers is on the increase. There are a small number of leading hotel schools located in Europe and the United States, but Australia is also home to specialised private institutions  – some of which are recognised as being the best in the region.

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One such school is the Blue Mountains International Hotel Management School which in a recent survey of international hotel hiring managers, was ranked number 1 among hospitality management schools in Australasia for an international career. (TNS Survey, September 2010). Blue Mountains is a universitylevel provider of hotel and event management education offering Bachelor of Business degrees. Blue Mountains is part of Laureate International Universities which includes other leading Swiss hospitality school such as Glion Institute of Higher Education and Les Roches International School of Hotel Management. The school opened its doors 20 years ago and has two campuses located in Leura (90 km west of Sydney), and the new downtown Sydney campus opening in January 2012. Blue Mountains has adopted the famous Swiss hotel school model of teaching and learning which balances theoretical knowledge, practical training and professional and personal development. As well as taking university level classes and tutorials, students gain daily practical training and learn discipline, teamwork and leadership skills at the residential campus in Leura. In the final year students move to the Sydney campus which will provide networking and career opportunities with leading hospitality and tourism organisations. It’s a win-win combination for both the industry and the graduates. Hotel chains and events companies are keen supporters of an educa-

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B a c k t o S c h ool : S t udy Tour i s m

tion that balances the theoretical with practical and professional development. Employers benefit as they have access to skilled individuals who will be able to join their organisations and quickly move into middle management and supervisory roles. Graduates find themselves in demand and often have a choice of employers when they start their careers, giving them confidence and the chance to excel in their chosen field. The right education enables future leaders to grow in this dynamic industry... industry which will continue to provide global opportunities for the right people. By Sales and Marketing Team BMIHMS For any inquiries please write to prateek.gujral@bluemountains.edu.au" http://www.bluemountains.edu.au


ETHICAL

Cultural Exchange: Live like a Local

Experience your destination in a different way. Learn how to milk a cow or plant rice – get connected with the locals and stay in their house. Discover cultural exchange projects in Thailand, Nepal, Ethiopia, and Kenya.


ETHICAL

Travel and Become Part of Thai Community

C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

Have you ever wondered how life would look like when living in an entirely different surrounding, in an entirely different culture with an entirely different way of living? Nowadays, developments in tourism can give you the possibility to realise this vision. In contrast to common forms of tourism, where big companies and multinationals are in control of a region and its economy, CBT (Community Based Tourism) aims on empowerment of, and fair benefits to the local community, with the development and preservation of the community as the main goal. In return, the tourist can experience the authentic way of living, in a unique natural and cultural setting. Instead of staying in an ordinary hotel, resort, bed & breakfast or guesthouse, one will experience the real family-life by staying in a so called homestay. In short, this type of accommodation differs itself from others by adding an extra dimension concerning interaction: the guest is part of the family, and is therefore closely related to, and more easily integrated into the community. As a result, guests are not only able to engage in normal tourist activities, but are regularly involved in activities with the locals. Mae La Na Community

One of the communities that have successfully executed CBT as a tool for development and preservation is Mae La Na. In the upper North of Thailand, nearby the Myanmar border, Mae La Na is situated in a valley in the Mae Hong Son district, surrounded by a stunning mountainous and relatively wild landscape, rich of natural resources of various kinds. July – August, 2011

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ETHICAL

The vast majority of the indigenous people, the ‘Shan’, maintain a Buddhist way of life and belief. The villagers believe in, and observe religious practices, and are very hospitable by nature. They attend food-offering to the monks every day, and make merits at the temple on every Buddhist holy day. Mae La Na is a relatively modern and well developed village, but tourists still have more than enough possibilities to experience the authentic way of living. The total population of Mae La Na counts 535 inhabitants, comprising 121 households. Thirteen households within the community also serve as a homestay to enable CBT. Local Activities

In Mae La Na and its surrounding area, several activities can be undertaken. Undoubtedly the most famous touristic activity in the region is a visit to South-East Asia’s longest cave: the Mae La Na cave. Accompanied with a local guide from the community, one can spend hours in the dark cave, admiring stalagmites, stalactites, waterfalls, bats, rare eyeless fish-species and more. Going through the whole cave is also a possibility, but because of its length, an overnight stay is required. Furthermore, the marvelous area is extremely suitable for spectacular trekking tours. After an exhausting day, one should definitely go to the local sauna. A traditional medicine-man fills a small barn with herbal smoke, creating an extremely relaxing atmosphere. Afterwards, one can enjoy a locally made cigarette, made July – August, 2011

of tobacco with additional herbs, held together by a special banana-leaf. Moreover, the community itself has numerous other activities on offer on a voluntarily base. One can think of working in the rice fields, educating the children at the local primary school, producing sesame oil in the traditional way, catching frogs at night, maintaining the villages’ irrigation systems and so forth. Experiences

During a ten days stay in May in this extraordinary setting, our group of six both German and Dutch students was assigned to three different homestays in the village. A rotation sys-

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tem was used every three days to spread the group equally over the homestays, in order to divide revenues accordingly and to get to know the community-members better. We were participating in the local life and spent time with our host families during some parts of the day, ate with them, and had conversations, as far as our basic Thai knowledge, their basic English knowledge and gestures allowed us to. The first three days were used to attend the regular tourist activities. The remainder we worked within the village on a research-project for CBT-I (www.cbt-i.org) and participated in several local (working) activities; an excellent way to discover the real community, its members and the daily life. It shows how different, relaxing, friendly and intriguing community-life in this village can be in comparison to the modern western society. Some general facts one can expect include a general 9 pm curfew, delicious food with rice as a main ingredient, the idyllic sound of cowbells ringing on the rice-fields (although depending on the season), an extremely refreshing shower in either the local stream or the shed where you can wash yourself by using a bowl of water, unimaginably friendly and open people, and a perfect climate combined with one of the best views on earth. If this appeals to you just as much as it did to us, do not hesitate for a second to pay the community of Mae La Na a visit to enjoy all this beauty, and at the same time support the community to develop and preserve its natural and cultural resources. By Kimberly van Velzen & Daniël van der Heijden http://www.cbt-i.org


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C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

Community Based Tourism: Rural Villages in Ethiopia More and more tourists are fascinated by experiencing not only interesting cities and landmarks but also real cultural exchange at their destination. Most tourism sites are packed with tourists which makes it quite difficult to experience real interaction with the locals. For cultural exchange it is necessary that the tourist number is low and that the interaction is natural meaning the hosting locals are unaffected or unpretentious in their approach. Among all the sub divisions of tourism activities, community based tourism is thought to be the best mechanism to address the intended goal with the minimum involvement of other beneficiary lines (tour operators, hotels) because it facilitates a direct contact with the local communities. In Ethiopia this kind of tourism is being practiced by a nine-year old project in the Northern part of the country by the name called TESFA Community based Tourism. TESFA is a local NGO (Ethiopian residents charity) working with rural farmers in two regions – North Wollo and East Tigray. The organization helps them earn additional income from tourism business along with their livelihood activities. In the next three years, TESFA plans to expand to other adminstravitve zones of these regions. July – August, 2011

Traditional Tigrian dancing “Telihit” at Shibrety community site

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ETHICAL

North Wollo (near Lalibela area) – view from Dufti Mariam lunch stop

Thanks to this initiative visitors have a unique opportunity to interact with the local farmers and see the wonderful landscape both scenic and cultural. At the same time the tourists help the villagers by being one of their clients. A visit to the rural villages gives a rare opportunity to experience genuine interaction with local people. On the other hand, the communities can also learn from the interaction which

July – August, 2011

leads to social and cultural changes in the hosting communities. TESFA is working as a facilitator by linking Ethiopian rural communities and tourists from different countries. Visitors trek from one village to another crossing rural countryside, enjoying the landscape, scenery, agricultural lands, flora and fauna. These give visitors an idea of the rural way of living in Ethiopia. So far the organization has developed eleven community sites near Lalibela (six in Meket Woreda). By keeping the traditional community structures, TESFA enables them to run tourism hosting facilities to improve their quality of life and environment. It contributes to a long term benefit to both the environment and local communities. The number of guests in a group visiting one village at a time is limited to six. This allows for smooth and modest interaction with local people in addition to preventing any damage in the natural environment. This is one of the principles of the organization – protecting the natural and cultural resources.

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C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

East Tigray – Trekking from Ghohagot to Shimbrety community site

The communication between the guests and hosts is facilitated by trained guides from Lalibela who are skilled mediators that avoid any control of the process. Thus the visitors can meet the people, learn about the village and discuss various issues in a natural way. By Hanna Girma http://www.community-tourism-ethiopia.com


ETHICAL

Nepal: Home Stays on Offer in Chitlang

Nepal is one of the richest countries in the world in terms of natural beauty due to its unique geographical position and latitudinal variation. The elevation of the country is 60 m to 8848 m, all within a distance of 150 km with July – August, 2011

climatic condition ranging from sub tropical to arctic. This wild variation provides an incredible variety of eco-system, the greatest mountain ranges on earth, tropical jungle teeming with a

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C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

wealth of wild life, thundering rivers, forested hills and frozen valleys. Tourism is the recent phenomenon of Nepal, which has more than 101 ethnic groups and 92 different spoken languages. The people inhabiting the rural parts of Nepal have its own particular and unique culture, which allure the international tourists and make them visit and stay with the rural community again and again. Chitlang is located to the south west of Kathmandu valley in mid-hills called Mahabharat range. This region reflects its heritage – it was an ancient Newar settlement. The main ethnic population are Newar, Tamang, Khas etc. Inscriptions dating back to Lichchavi era have been found in this place. According to 2001 census of Nepal, there were 1170 houses in Chitlang and 5830 people. In connection with the Nepal Tourism Year 2011, the ministry of tourism has come up with Home Stay Operating Procedure 2067 and already 7 households have registered as home stays from Chitlang at the tourism ministry division, Brikuti Mandap. More and more people are interested to provide their houses as home stays in Chitlang. The people living in the scenic Chitlang Valley in Nepal are very friendly to the travelers who come to explore local way of living. The villagers are very frank in nature, they are eager to share their knowledge with the guests and dine together. Entire families including children and women participate to show their guests around. There are various castes, tribes and ethnic groups, who live together in the same village


ETHICAL

within a short span of open land without any communal conflict. The mixed cultural society shares their cultural ceremonies as well and lives harmoniously and in peace with the neighboring villages. Villagers always heartily welcome the visitors and are known for their hospitality. Basically, rural tourism is the major income of the villagers. Travelers have the opportunity to experience the life styles of particular ethnic groups and to participate in their daily chores.

July – August, 2011

Culture is the main focus of Nepali tourism business. People’s hospitality, response and intimacy are the essence of the particular community, which is dependent upon tourism promotion. Photos: Bijaya Pradhan By Bijaya Pradhan http://www.dreamnepal.com.np http://www.discovernepal.org.np

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ETHICAL

C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

Nakuru, Kenya: Help the Villagers through Community Tourism Project Community Tourism’s objective is to provide a rich cultural experience coupled with development work to tourists in Kenya. Community Tourism is an initiative using tourism as tool to eradicate poverty within the community. The initiative was started in 2009 as way of helping the community showcase and market their heritage and products to the tourists community in a more responsible and sustainable way. The reasons as to why it was started are lack of school fees, scarcity of food, scarcity of water, lack of access to medical facilities, market opportunity and self employment. Community Tourism focuses on programs that generate income to the community and also provide rich fun filled experience to tourists. The programs are designed in such a way that they provide a win-win situation between the community and the tourists. Below are some of the program activities that we have embarked on: • Paper recycling to make shaanga for necklaces, bracelets and earrings • Making of hand warmers, scarves and Marvin’s through use of wool • Making mats using bottle tops • Helping those who are aged, sick and needed people within the community July – August, 2011

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C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l

• Selling of shares • Tree planting Community Tourism runs a couple of projects in a bid to promote community tourism in Kenya. These projects are in partnership with various Non Governmental Organizations, Community Based Organizations, Faith Based Organizations, Self Help Groups and private institutions: Rhino Camp Site

Rhino Camp Site is a campsite run by women that provides camping services to visitors in Nakuru. The camp site is maintained solely by women. They also use the campsite for cooking classes for guests who want to learn more about African cuisine. You can also book for lunch or dinner with community meal prepared by the women or prepared together with you. Spend a night in the camp, wake up early and go for a village walk whereby you will have firsthand experience with the women as they work. Afterwards go for horse safari whereby you will watch wild animals; a real and unique way of a game viewing. Our camp have hot shower and security is guaranteed plus an operation bar. 20% of the money goes directly to the community. Lake Nakuru Lodge

The lodge has supported the principles of responsible tourism since 2000 and has to implement responsible tourism policy plan. In 2009 it included them as a founding principle of its corporate social responsibility July – August, 2011

framework. It has adopted responsible tourism policy and action plan. This plan ensures that the lodge is well on its way towards being truly responsible destination. The lodge exercises its mandate for local tourism through creation of supportive policy environment and actions based on environment, economic and social-economic principles of responsible tourism. Having incorporated responsible tourism, the lodge has following characteristics of responsible Tourism:

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• minimizes negative economic, environmental and social impacts; • generates greater economic benefits for local people and enhances the wellbeing of host communities, improves working conditions and access to the industry; • involves local people in decisions that affect their lives and life changes; • makes positive contributions to the conservation of natural and cultural heritage, to the maintenance of the world’s diversity;


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• provides more enjoyable experiences for tourists through more meaningful connections with local people, and a greater understanding of local cultural, social and environmental issues; • is culturally sensitive, engenders respect between tourists and hosts, and builds local pride and confidence Mwariki Heart to Heart Women Group

Mwariki project is a community based group which uses tourism as tool to eradicate pov-

July – August, 2011

erty within the area. The above organisation was started in January 2009 by Lake Nakuru lodge as way of helping the community. Project has been involving the community address gaps and challenges by turning them into innovative, economic and conservation ventures. Waste recycling to come up with jewellery has been a great innovation. Community members have greatly contributed to the project design. Combines planting of trees that are both medicinal, and also improves on the environment. Empowers the community economically through groups and self employment ventures. Culture of saving and community cohesiveness enhanced. Enhances the capacity of the community members to fully take charge of their lives and fully address emerging challenges using available resources. The scarcity of water has led to famine in the past due to lack of project addressing water conservation in the source area. http://communitytourismkenya.org

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C ul t ur a l E x c h a nge : L i v e l i k e a L oc a l


SPA

Presenting Spas: Shows & Exhibitions

Spa and wellness is a dynamically growing industry all around the world. Get to know some of the most important shows and summits essential for any spa provider.


SPA

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

Wellness Summit: The Premiere Spa Event in Asia mation. The Wellness Summit is more than a conference; it is a platform where wellness meets—it is an experience. Since its inception in 2005, the Wellness Summit provides the platform and connection for progressive change and act as a conduit for the voice of conscience within the wellness industry to arise. It is constantly evolving to address the challenges of the future wellness, with the ambition to drive the fast-paced evolution of the philosophies, methodologies, technologies and academia within the wellness industry. From the informational to the inspirational as well as the practical to the philosophical, Wellness Summit features renowned speakers and industry experts that share their insights and spearhead discussions on an eclectic line-up of pertinent topics and key issues of concern to the present business environment and beyond. At the Wellness Summit, a myriad of business and professional-growth opportunities await high-caliber industry participants and stakeholders of the wellness industry. The 3-day Wellness Summit experience entails the following: • Fresh insights and perspectives from outstanding keynote speakers

Wellness Summit 2011, 12-13 October, Singapore

Though seemingly divergent in nature, the fields that are now converging and synergizing—medicine, health, beauty and spa— have similar aims governed by the same collective consciousness towards wellness for tomorrow. The evolution resulting through its integration needs to be managed and fostered to allow for their growth to be nurtured and to flourish together. Understanding the shifts and breaking traditional barriers and borders are what would transform wellness for the 21st century. Wellness Summit aims to provide a galvanizing platform that sought to chart a clear and unifying direction for the burgeoning industry here in Asia and the world-at-large. Seventh year in running, the Wellness Summit is unquestionably the leading and pivotal event for the Wellness and Spa Industry in Asia Pacific. Held annually, the Wellness Summit brings together the world’s leading innovative thinkers, expert minds, industry leaders and inspirational practitioners, and encourages thought-provoking interactive debate about some of today’s most relevant challenges. The aim is to translate new ideas and knowledge into practical change; to empower and lead the wellness movement together to create a momentum for sustainable transforJuly – August, 2011

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• U p to 40 unique sessions to meet a variety of interests and needs • Thought-provoking and direction-changing ideas from the “Ideas Worth Exploring” sessions • Highly interactive debates on key issues and concerns with leading experts integral to development and business sustainability • Innovations and ideas to help shape and form Wellness Tomorrow • Behind the scenes and updated knowledge on the authenticity and efficacy of products

July – August, 2011

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

• Fresh take-away skill-sets through the Continuing Wellness Education programme where Skills Development Sessions are conducted by experts in their respective disciplines • Potential association and alliance with global leaders that would put individuals/ businesses onto the wellness map • Industry Networking sessions where likeminded individuals meet http://wellnesssummit.com

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SPA

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

Host 2011: Hotel Industry and Spas in Italy of the vitality of a sector seeking new ideas: compared to the same period in 2009, the increase in the number of tourists and hotels registered actually shows a significant confirmation of a trend that seems to be set on the road to recovery for Italian accommodation enterprises. The figures show a 3.7% increase in bookings in October amongst Italians and foreigners (compared to October 2009), which brings the overall result from January to October (compared to January-October 2009) to a 0.5% increase in the annual rate of presences. Host 2011, the international exhibition of the hospitality industry (at fieramilano from 21 to 25 October 2011) offers itself as a tool at the service of the sector recovery, to give all business operators innovative solutions and new business ideas. At Hotel & Spa Emotion, one of the specialized events at Host, you can find versatile and eco-compatible products and techniques to install avant-garde technologies in every space, like the compact cabins for saunas, or the futuristic sensory showers, or exclusive ideas and services to pamper customers. Design, in particular Made in Italy style, will find the right spaces thanks to Hotel and Spa Design 2011; this show is organised by My Exhibition and is a reconstruction of an entire hotel inside the exhibition centre, so the hotel industry can have hands-on experience of the

Host 2011, 21-25 October, Milano, Italy

According to Eurostat, Italy is the European country with the most hotel rooms and beds and is second only to Spain in the number of bookings made, with 237.7 million in 2009 compared to Spain’s 251.1 million. Germany is in third place (215.6 million), followed by France (191.2 million) and by the United Kingdom (169.6 million). Germany’s third place is due to the great strength of its domestic market, amounting to a share of about 80%, while in Spain the international clientele prevails (56.4% of the total); the international hotel guests are also significant in Italy (43.0%). For some time now, one of the services that customers perceive as conferring plenty of status to hotel structures is wellness, so much so that hospitality and wellness are now practically inseparable sectors: the wellness and beauty dimension, always present in the daily routine of consumers, has also changed the habits of hotel clientele, who now expect offers to include the holistic relaxation of mind and body as part of the hotel and resort facilities. The recovery of the hotel industry, documented by recent Federalberghi data, is a proof July – August, 2011

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SPA

Host: 6 Events in One Host is a B2B hospitality show including six specialised events: Food Service Equipment Bread/Pizza/Pasta Ice cream/Confectionery Coffee Bar/Coffee Machines Hotel&Spa Emotion

most innovative technologies, interior design finishes, hotel, bathroom, spa centre, conference centre designs by prominent names in hotel architecture and design. Inspired and requested by the companies showing great interest in the event, this increasingly internationalised show extends its exhibition offer with exclusive dedicated layouts. Host launches two important new projects focusing on excellences in applied design for the hotel sector, for even more efficient synergy between the various sectors represented. The idea linking them is to provide unified visibility for those companies whose design content shows strong research and innovation, making it easier for buyers to find their way around the show.

July – August, 2011

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

In addition to creating interesting visit for buyers, grouping stands by carefully selected businesses is also an opportunity for these very exhibitors to create a sort of laboratory of new products and services, directly comparing ideas and cultures, moving ahead in continual, improved harmony with client needs. The Contract Excellence project is a space for companies showing top-of-the-range products thought up for comfortable unique settings, both inside and outside hotels and high-level hospitality structures. This area will be divided into real settings that highlight product features. The Table's Excellence project is based on the idea of “taste” as a dimension that starts with a beautifully laid table. This will bring together those products that offer innovation capable of “adding beautiful flavour” to restaurants and eating places and, in general, to food presentation. These two dimensions join that of Spa, the lively variegated world where avant-garde facilities and services can make all the difference for a hotel or resort. In addition to Hotel & Spa Emotion, at Host 2011 business operators can also get to know all the news in the many hospitality and restaurant sectors thanks to the six theme areas,

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which cover the three market segments of the HoReCa industry, with the aim of maximising the potential of related sectors: Food service equipment and Pane Pizza Pasta; Bar/Coffee machines; Ice-cream & Confectionery and Coffee. Furthermore, to ensure that these business opportunities are not restricted to the exhibition period alone, Host launches the brand new online service of Host Click, already accessible from the website www.host.fieramilano.it and designed to become a privileged entrance into the complex world of the Hospitality and Food Service industry–24/24 and 365/365. http://www.host.fieramilanoexpocts.it/en


SPA

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

Global Spa Summit: A Conference for the Top-Level Executives

(GSS) is held annually, beginning on the third Sunday in May. Today Global Spa Summit is an invitation-only event where thought leaders join together to help shape the future of the global spa and wellness industry. The goal of GSS is to provide the industry with an intimate, high-level gathering where CEOs and representatives from diverse sectors such as hospitality, finance, architecture and real estate, medicine, manufacturing, technology, consulting, and other related industries can network, learn, and share ideas to better the industry. Attracting top-level business executives from all over the world, GSS brings together industry movers and shakers, all with the common goal of moving the spa and wellness sector forward. The Summit has been responsible for some of the most important recent spa industry research, including the landmark “Global Spa Economy Report” and “Spas and the Global Wellness Market: Synergies and Opportunities” (both conducted by SRI International). The GSS was honored as the "Spa Event of the Year" for both 2009 and 2010 by AsiaSpa magazine’s awards program. A variety of interactive sessions are on the Summit agenda. They include panel-led dis-

Global Spa Summit 2011 Global Spa Summit 2012, 4-6 June, Aspen, Colorado

At the beginning of the 2000's, a group of industry leaders decided to create and fund a conference modeled in part after the sucJuly – August, 2011

cessful format of the not-for-profit World Economic Forum held each year in Davos, Switzerland, where leaders from all parts of the world gather to solve shared problems. Thus the Global Spa Summit was founded. The Summit

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The fifth-annual conference, in Bali, Indonesia from May 15-18, held for the first time in Asia, attracted a record number of executives (275) from 35 nations; 46% of attendees hailed from Asia, 30% from the Americas, and 19% from Europe.


SPA

cussions, general sessions, small group breakout sessions, and hosted dining conversations. Efforts are made to ensure that all attendees participate at whatever level they choose: observer, panelist, contributor, questioner, or table host. The aims: • Create community by fostering relationships among global industry leaders; facilitate friendly dialogue and the exchange of ideas; act as a catalyst for continued conversations beyond Summit meetings. • Establish a common language and understanding across regions and continents, while respecting individual identities and market realities.

July – August, 2011

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

• Create and endorse uniform measurement systems for performance tracking and benchmarking of spas worldwide. • Initiate, gather and trumpet quality industry research on a global basis • Provide accurate and reliable information for the investment community • Identify and assist in resolving issues affecting the spa and wellness industries • Function as a hub for global industry resources

http://globalspasummit.org

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SPA

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

Indonesia: Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo 2012, September, Indonesia

Held in March 2011 the Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo, Indonesia received 1,135 visitors which is an increase compared to the last events in 2007 & 2008. The trade fair is held in partnership with local well-established general spa & wellness trade fair. A total of more than 85 exhibitors presented their latest products covering all types of spa, beauty and wellness products, from Soap, Anti Aging, Spa product, medical spa, day spa, nail, organics, spa equipment, beauty equipment at the co-located fairs. 15 exhibitors representing 8 countries and regions were present at Spa & Wellness Expo alone. 32% of the exhibitors came from outside Indonesia, with representation from France, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Australia, Hong Kong, Spain and New Zealand. In 2011, the addition of Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo to the local trade fairs brought about a 50% increase in visitors to all fairs in Bali. The consecutive increase in visitors is testimony to its success with the local and international Spa & Wellness industry. Intensive discussions on the trade fair floor and networking and educational sessions in the seminar rooms built up a bustling business atmosphere. July – August, 2011

In his speech given at the opening ceremony, H.E. Dr Endang Rahayu Sedyaningsih, Mph. Dr.PH Minister of Health Republic Indonesia and organizer of BISWEXPO 2011, said: “The Health market is facing new challenges to attract the tourists to come to Indonesia.

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Medical industry needs to be in conjunction with the tourism sector to create successful medical tourism. However the medical & spa industry is strong and will prove its merits through this trade fair and will multiply the impact in the other sectors…The Visitors and Buyers which joined us for the first time will


SPA

enjoy the show; the event is perceived as a must-see trade fair in Indonesia!” The organizer of Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo, Mr. Felix Rusli, Director of PT. Felixindo Raya Pratama (Magnificent 9) is also confident of the trade fair’s success: “Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo was held only for the first time this year and as a niche trade fair for the spa, beauty & wellness industry, it has reaped success for both exhibitors and visitors. The trade fair profile complements the estab-

July – August, 2011

P r e s e nt i ng S pa s : S h ow s a nd E x h i bi t i ons

lished fairs of BISWEXPO 2011, expanding the types of products for buyers. With the target increase of 20% in exhibitors in its second year, we are set for more years of success.” A total of four group pavilions from Europe, France, Spain, Italy, and Germany showcased the best of their national products and were very well received by the visitors. “We exhibited within the Italy Beauty case pavilion and found it to be a really good platform to showcase our products. There are seven companies

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here but you will be surprised to find that there are altogether more than 10 brands of beauty & spa products presented here! We are happy with the feedback gathered and are definitely considering coming back next year,” said Mr. Andrea Pastori – Bio Company Mrs. Meritxell Salvador Llado, Spain from Germaine de Cappucini is a first time exhibitor at the expo and introduced a range of products to the Indonesia and Asia market. She said, “We feel that it is very important for us to target the beautician, spa company, spa operators and brand awareness and this is what we have at this show.” Mrs Amalia Wai Ching Lee, the Singapore representative of Earth Star, Singapore echoed similar views, saying, “It is our first time at this fair and we feel that Bali International Spa & Wellness Expo is better than the other beauty Indonesian trade fairs for their range of products, we will come back again next year.” A series of educational seminars on wine as well as food and beverage were held for the first time at the trade fair. The seminars were well-attended as visitors and exhibitors used these additional opportunities to network with the industry professionals. The majority of the visitors surveyed were satisfied or very satisfied with their visits as well, and most of them have accomplished their goals at the trade fair. Almost all are likely to participate again next year and they will recommend others to do so too.

http://www.biswexpo.com


Destination T u s c a n y : A n A r t i s t i c B e au t y

Tuscany is one of the most visited cities in Italy. Florence, Pisa, Siena – all these beautiful cities with marvelous architecture welcome crowds of tourists every year.


Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

Tuscany: Medieval Towns and Charming Countryside Tuscany is a beautiful region of Italy that is characterized by a very attractive and varied landscape. You can visit many beautiful places like the Tuscan Apennines, where you have the possibility of trekking and hiking, or the Casentino area, one of four main valleys of the province of Arezzo, where is the famous Natural Park. The National Park of the Casentino Forests is formed by centuries-old firs, beeches and chestnut trees. The holiday in Casentino gives you the opportunity to do many and different activities, including incredible mountain bike excursions. Tuscany also gives a wide choice for the tourists to visit beautiful cities such as Florence, Pisa, Siena, but also many small medieval villages, very distinctive and rich of history such as San Gimignano, located near Siena. San Gimignano is the world-famous medieval town, with its towers and its beauty right in the heart of the Tuscan countryside. You have the chance to visit a Cathedral, Museum of Sacred Art and beautiful Towers. In San Gimignano you have also the possibility of food-and winetasting and shopping among the stands of local traditional craftsmanship. Tuscany is also known as the land of the ancient Etruscan civilization. In the city of Cortona, near Arezzo you can find many historical July – August, 2011

relics related to the civilization of the Etruscans who lived and left their traces in Tuscany. The Melone II del Sodo is certainly the most charming and fascinating work that we can admire in the countryside around Cortona. It is also possible to visit the Etruscan Acad-

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emy Museum and MAEC: here you can admire meaningful and very important works of art, just remember the famous Etruscan bronze chandelier of the fourth century BC and various handicrafts that arrive from the Etruscan tombs discovered in the countryside of Cortona.


Destination

In Arezzo instead you can admire its most important monuments, such as the Tuscan gothic-style Cathedral, in which you can enjoy the important art works and paintings and the windows decorated with figures of Guglielmo de Marcillat. It's possible to discover the local handicrafts, to admire the frescoes on the "Leggenda della vera Croce" (Legend of the True Cross) by Piero della Francesca and the Houses of Giorgio Vasari and Francesco Petrarca. The most important historical event of the city is the "Giostra del Saracino", which has ancient origins. It begins with the exciting carousel with its 400 characters in medieval cloth-

July – August, 2011

ing. The city is divided into four areas, called "quartieri", driven by a fierce competition. At the district winner goes the coveted "golden spear", the trophy up for grabs each year. For all these sites rich with history and magic, Tuscany is perfect also for honeymoon: there is in fact a legendary place for weddings. For couples looking for the most charming places of Tuscany to get married, it is possible to organize weddings in the most fascinating structures as the ancient village of Lucignano. The curious legend of the Tree of Love characterizes this place, so “getting married” in Lucignano means to do it in the most important places of the ancient village as the Council Chamber of the ancient Municipal Palace. Inside the small Municipal Museum, the new couple will promise everlasting love in front of the magnificent Tree of Love, a masterpiece of Gothic jeweller's art. Here the typical Tuscan farmhouses will host the couples and their guests in a refined, genuine and very warm atmosphere. The newlyweds can taste the typical products ranging from the gorgeous Chianina steaks with olive oil to the Chianti wine and Brunello wine. Finally we cannot forget the beautiful places of the Tyrrhenian Sea where you can spend

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Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

an enjoyable holiday. The Tuscan Archipelago is also well known, made up of small islands and features. Here visitors have the opportunity of mini-cruises to visit Elba Isle and Isle of Giglio.

By Saracino Viaggi Incoming Tour Operator Saracino Viaggi Incoming Tour Operator organizes many tours for singles, couples or groups around Tuscany. It is important to remember that they are all tailor-made packages. http://www.saracinoviaggi.it http://www.ctsarezzo.it http://www.italiatourismonline.com


Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

Three Must-See Destinations for the Beginners Vineyards of Chianti

The Chianti area is one of the most beautiful places in the whole region, as well as the most well-known and appreciated by visitors from around the world. The borders of the Chianti region are not clearly defined but in general it extends over the provinces of Florence and Siena, covering all of the area between the two cities and extending to the east toward the Valdarno and to the west to the Val d'Elsa. The Chianti wine area extends further beyond the two cities, all around Florence and even toward Arezzo, Pistoia and Montepulciano. You'll often find references to the "Florentine Chianti" and the "Sienese Chianti" to define the areas closest to one or the other city, but these often refer to a wine's origin within the Chianti region. Chianti offers a unique landscape, with green, gentle hills covered with wide fields of vineyards and olive groves, small stone villages, characteristic parishes and countryside homes in stone. Florence – The Cradle of the Renaissance

Florence's museums, palaces, and churches house some of the greatest artistic treasures July – August, 2011

in the world. The most popular and important sites in Florence include the Cathedral, the Baptistery, the Uffizi, the Bargello, and the Accademia. The churches of Santa Maria Novella and Santa Croce are veritable art galleries, and the library of San Lorenzo is a magnificent exhibition of Michelangelo's architectural genius.

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Wander some of the oldest streets in the city until you reach the Arno River, cross the Ponte Vecchio, and experience the "newest" area of Florence, the Oltrarno. Be sure to set aside time to see the vast and varied art collection housed in the Pitti Palace. When you grow weary of museums and monuments, head out-


Destination

doors. Spend a day at the Boboli Gardens or climb the hill to the church of San Miniato al Monte to experience an enchanting view of Florence. Siena: Medieval Tuscany

Siena is probably Italy's loveliest medieval city, and a trip worth making even if you are in Florence and Tuscany for just a few days. Siena's heart is its central piazza known as Il Campo and world renowned for its famous Palio, a festival and horse race that takes place on the piazza itself two times each summer

July – August, 2011

(Movie audiences worldwide can see Siena and the Palio in the last James Bond movie, Quantum of Solace). Siena is said to have been founded by Senius, son of Remus, one of the two legendary founders of Rome thus Siena's emblem is the shewolf who nursed Remus and Romulus – you'll find many statues throughout the city. The city sits over three hills with its heart the huge piazza known as Il Campo, where the Roman forum used to be. Rebuilt during the rule of the Council of Nine, a quasi-democratic group from 1287 to 1355, the nine sections of the

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Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

fan-like brick pavement represent the council and symbolizes the Madonna's cloak which sheltered Siena. The Campo is dominated by the red Palazzo Pubblico and its tower, Torre del Mangia. Along with the Duomo, the Palazzo Pubblico was also built during the same period of rule by the Council of Nine. The civic palace, built between 1297 and 1310, still houses the city's municipal offices much like Palazzo Vecchio in Florence. Its internal courtyard has entrances to the Torre del Mangia and to the Civic Museum. If you feel energetic, a climb up the over 500 steps will reward you with a wonderful view of Siena and its surroundings. The Museum, on the other hand, offers some of the greatest of Sienese paintings. The Sala del Concistoro houses one of Domenico Beccafumi's best works, ceiling frescoes of allegories on the virtues of Siena's medieval government. But it is the Sala del Mappamondo and the Sale della Pace that hold the palace's highlights: Simone Martini's huge Maestà and Equestrian Portrait of Guidoriccio da Fogliano and Ambrogio Lorenzetti's Allegories of Good and Bad Government, once considered the most important cycle of secular paintings of the Middle Ages.

http://www.discovertuscany.com


Destination

Top Ten Places to Visit in Florence

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

amazing panoramic views of the city from on top of its hill. Giotto’s Campanile

The bell tower of the famous Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore, commonly referred to as the Duomo of Florence, is hard to miss in the city. Towering over the buildings with its multicolored facade, it is truly a site to see. For a small fee, you can climb the tower to get an amazing view of the city and the Duomo itself. The tower is named for the first architect of the Duomo, Giotto di Bondone, though the tower was not completed exactly to his original design. The tower can be quite a climb, but is definitely worth it! Piazza della Signoria

Florence has been one of those iconic cities that people have dreamed of visiting for hundreds of years. During the Renaissance it was a major center of thought, expression and art of all kinds. Many magnificent churches, opulent palaces and impressive monuments were constructed over the centuries, making it one of the most memorable cities in Italy! July – August, 2011

Piazzale Michelangelo

The Piazzale Michelangelo is a relatively modern addition to the ancient city. It was completed in 1869 and is a tribute to Michelangelo himself, with several replicas of his works in bronze throughout the plaza. The piazzale is a popular tourist destination because of the

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The Piazza della Signoria is one of the major piazzas in Florence and contains several different must-sees. The piazza is named after the Palazzo della Signoria, originally built to be offices for government officials that was later taken over by the Medicis, who moved the government offices to the Uffizi. The home of the Medicis was later moved to the Pitti Palace, renaming the Palazzo della Signoria the Palazzo Vecchio or the “Old Palace”. The Piazza itself has many statues, originals and replicas alike. David, the Fountain of Neptune, Hercules and Cacus, a bronze statue of Cosimo I and many others are scattered throughout the piazza as well as the open-air sculpture museum of the Loggia dei Lanzi.


Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

Also known as the Palazzo del Popolo, or Palace of the People, it was first used as barracks and office building for the Capitano del Popolo. Later it was also used as the office of the Podesta, the highest member of the Florentine city council. In the sixteenth century the office of Podesta was removed by the Medicis and the chief of police of Florence (or the Bargello) was moved to the building and it was used as a prison, giving the building its modern name. The building was still used in this manner until 1859 when it was turned into a national museum. Now it houses an impressive collection of Gothic and Renaissance sculptures that makes the Bargello a definite stop for any art lover. Santa Croce

San Lorenzo Street Market

The San Lorenzo Street Market is a great place to go shopping for souvenirs, gifts or clothes. You can find just about anything you would want to bring home from your trip to Tuscany. There are plenty of great deals on leather, wine, purses, wallets, cheese (vacuum packed available), dried meat, mushrooms, fresh olive oil, marinated olives, and just about anything July – August, 2011

else you could want. The market is located outside of the San Lorenzo church on three of the surrounding streets and is held each day from 9:00 to 19:30. Bargello

The Bargello was built in the thirteenth century and was originally a city official building, and is the oldest public building in Florence.

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The Basilica of Santa Croce is the largest Franciscan church in the world. Construction on the church started in 1294 and was finished and consecrated in 1442. Santa Croce has sixteen chapels and is the burial place of many great Italians including Michaelangelo, Galileo, Machiavelli, Guglielmo Marconi, Enrico Fermi, and many others. The housing that was at one time used for the Franciscan Friars is now used as a leather school and visitors can watch the artisans as they work their craft. Ponte Vecchio

The Ponte Vecchio is a medieval bridge that spans the Arno, connecting the two sides of Florence. It is the only bridge that survived the extensive bombing during World War II. Businesses line the bridge including jewelers, sou-


Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y The Uffizi

The Uffizi was built by Cosimo de Medici I to serve as offices for the city officials. Slowly, the Medici’s many acquisitions of art started to decorate the halls. Some sections became more of a place to display art than a workplace. The last heiress of the Medicis willed the Uffizi and its art to the people of Florence and ever since it has been one of the most visited museums in Italy. It is wise to purchase tickets in advance and to show up early in the day if you plan to visit the Uffizi, as lines are very long in the tourist seasons. Il Duomo (Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore)

venirs, art dealers, gelato, and leatherworkers. The bridge is also well known for the Vasari Corridor, a private hallway built for the Medicis that connects the Palazzo Vecchio to the Pitti Palace without having to walk the streets of Florence. Palazzo Pitti and the Boboli Gardens

The Palazzo Pitti was originally built by onetime rivals to the Medicis, but after their family lost much of their wealth the Medicis bought the Palazzo Pitti and made it their own. Since then it has passed hands many times, a base of power for Napoleon and at one time serving as July – August, 2011

the home of the King of Italy. Today the Palazzo Pitti is a museum and has many different collections, not just of art but a silver, porcelain, and carriage museum as well. The Boboli Gardens that are behind the Pitti Palace were built for the wife of Cosimo I de Medici, Eleonora di Toledo. The gardens set the style for sixteenth century formal Italian gardens. There was no natural water source for the massive gardens, so a conduit was built to divert some water from the nearby Arno to irrigate the area. Statues seem to be everywhere you look in the gardens, and the grottoes are a peaceful and serene place to relax after a day of sightseeing.

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Anyone that visits Florence can’t miss the Duomo. Plain and simple. A gorgeous example of renaissance that still holds the title of having the largest masonry dome in the world, and was the largest octagonal dome at the time with no wooden supports. The Duomo stands as a testament to the might and glory of Florence: a marvel of architecture, engineering and art. Next to the Duomo is of course Giotto’s bell tower and in front stands the baptistery with Ghiberti’s famous “Gates of Paradise” doors in front. The whole Piazza del Duomo is an impressive site; walking through the city with the narrow side streets and coming out into the piazza can be a shock for the first time just taking in the scale of the building. http://www.tuscany-villas.it


Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

Spa and Wellness – The Thermal Springs of Tuscany

Close your eyes and free your mind of work, traffic, pollution, and stress. This is the dream of many in a modern society, overcome by an ever increasing pace of life and evermore pressing needs. July – August, 2011

It is a dream that Tuscany can make come true! It is a well know fact that more than 2 million tourists each year choose this region to escape the anxieties and stress of everyday life and to spend a period of complete relaxation in one of the thermal spas present in our territory. A land of natural wonders, artistic treasures and gastronomic delicacies, Tuscany has always been renowned for its many natural thermal springs, rich in natural healing elements. Its waters, after having made their way through underground rocks, come to the surface, creating wonderful natural pools which you can dive into to regenerate and regain balance between the physical form and inner happiness. Spas are the tourism of the new millennium and Tuscany, in Italy, is one of the most sought out spa destinations, with the largest number of structures: 39 in total. In these new temples of health, from prestigious hotels to innovative and professional health centres, Tuscany can offer a wide range of treatments, purposefully thought out to satisfy an increasingly demanding clientele. These distinguishing traits have allowed Tuscan thermal baths to become, today, the cutting edge of Italian thermal tourism. From traditional cures to innovative treatments aimed at achieving a perfect psychophysical balance.

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Spas in Tuscany have always been considered some of the world's most famous for the prevention and treatment of many pathologies. Thermal mud is very useful for curing rheumatisms or for the treatment of pathologies resulting from traumas as well as for the prevention and treatment of liver diseases. Inhalation treatments can alleviate respiratory problems and are used to cure rhinogenous deafness. Thermal hydro-massages are used to treat and prevent peripheral vascular pathologies, while hydroponic treatments cure gastroenteric problems and purify the liver. But to choose Tuscany as your preferred 'wellness' destination also means spending time in luxury accommodations, situated close to world renowned cities of art (Florence, Pisa,


Destination

Siena), or fashionable seaside resorts (Forte dei Marmi and Versilia) or estates in the beautiful Tuscan countryside (such as Val d’Orcia, a UNESCO Heritage Site) which have, throughout the centuries, inspired the masterpieces of artists such as Michelangelo or Leonardo da Vinci. A holiday in Tuscany also means shopping in the most famous brand name shops (Prada, Ferragamo, Gucci and others) or relaxing on

July – August, 2011

one of the many golf courses in this region. It will also be possible to sit at a table and enjoy delicious dishes, accompanied by famous wines such as the Brunello di Montalcino, Chianti or the Nobile di Montepulciano. It is a unique holiday experience that allows you to enjoy Tuscany in total comfort and relax. http://www.turismo.intoscana.it

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Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y


Destination

Off the Beaten Path in Tuscany? Every year Tuscany is visited by crowds of travelers. Hundreds of millions of tourists have tromped through, but is Tuscany hopelessly over-touristed? Well, while no stone has been left unturned in Tuscany, it’s still possible to get off the beaten path. In an area so overwhelmingly dense with attractions, finding Tuscan tranquility often boils down to timing. Though it’s well-worn advice, it bears repeating: avoid Tuscany in June, July and August. It’s hot, crowded and pricey – prices rise the day after Easter through the end of September. Unless you’re aiming to attend one of the worthwhile summer festivals, plan for late March through early May or late September through early November, when even hotels in Florence are reasonably priced. Having said that, let’s talk some less-trodden Tuscan geography, ranging from low(er) profile cities and towns to straight up middle of nowhereness.

lopsided, architectural jumble of Piazza Grande is riveting, as is the renowned fresco cycle by Piero della Francesca in Chiesa di San Francesco, and the Romanesque epitome awaits at Pieve di Santa Maria. Cortona

It may be a stretch to describe tour-bus-bait Cortona as “off-the-beaten-path”, it being a standout hilltop town in a region known for hilltop towns, but thin public transport connections keep it less hectic than its all-star neighbors, particularly at night. Cortona’s beautifully messy layout is indicative of someone dumping a bucket of ‘Etruscan town’ down a hillside. Though there are a few fine museums, the steep, captivating streets, some twisting off at impossible angles, are the real attraction. These idyllic lanes have been frequently deemed film-worthy, most popularly in Under the Tuscan Sun. Montalcino

Anyone casually versed in Tuscan wine will know of retiring Montalcino. While it satisfies the hilltop town quota for sadistically steep ’streets’, the real attraction is the internationally coveted wine Brunello di Montalcino, known for its borderline outlandish exclusivity and price as much as for its extraordinary quality. Rosso di Montalcino, a slightly more modest red, is just as tempting. Both can be sampled here for a fraction of the price you’d find in your home country. Montalcino’s imposing 14th-century Fortezza, in addition to dominating the south end of town, has an enoteca

Arezzo

Arezzo is a real city, with the expected local bustle, but not on most Tuscany tour itineraries. It’s an easy day-trip from Florence, but with accommodations and eating value being superior, why not shift your bags for a couples nights? Furthermore, the city serves as an ideal staging area for a day-trip to Sansepolcro. The July – August, 2011

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

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Destination

Tus c a ny: A n A r t i s t i c B e a ut y

Tomb of the Infernal Chariot

In 2003, archaeologists excavating an intact 4th-century-BC tomb in the necropolis of Pianacce discovered the Tomb of the Infernal Chariot. Among the unique frescoes on the walls surrounding the alabaster sarcophagus  – their colors still as bright as the day they were applied – is a demonic figure with wild flowing hair driving a chariot pulled by a pair of lions and two griffins. The tomb entrance has a panoramic view over the Val di Chiana. Reserve tours through the Archaeological Civic Museum in nearby Sarteano. San Galgano Abbey

where you can enjoy a tasting after touring its fortified walls. Sansepolcro

An atypically flat, but captivating Tuscan walled town dating from AD 1000, Sansepolcro is best known as the probable birthplace of legendary painter Piero della Francesca. The historic center is tightly packed with stone structures abutting somewhat less historic structures, but it’s all a pleasant jumble. Step into any church with open doors, as they’re all lovely, but make a point of visiting the recently renovated cathedral, containing the Volto Santo (Holy Visage), a striking wooden cruciJuly – August, 2011

fix with a wide-eyed Christ dating to AD 950, and San Antonio church, which has a magnificent two-sided processional banner painted by Luca Signorelli. Montemerano

The walled, medieval, southern town of Montemerano only warrants an hour or so, but oh what an hour. Pick up a bottle of the excellent local Morellino di Scansano, drop into Chiesa di San Giorgio, decorated with 15th-century frescoes of the Sienese school, and finally stroll up to the unspeakably harmonious, oh-so-photogenic Piazza del Castello.

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One of the country’s finest Gothic buildings in its day and now an atmospheric ruin. The mammoth, roofless, stone and brick shell stands in an empty field, which is often enshrouded in a spooky fog on spring mornings. On the hill overlooking the abbey is the tiny Monte Siepi Chapel, which houses a real-life “sword in the stone”. Ghiaccio Forte abitato Etrusco

You’ll need a car and, ideally, GPS to find this nugget, located at the end of a couple, poorlysigned dirt roads south of Scansano. The ruins of this Etruscan fort are admittedly meager, and information boards severely weathered, but the top-of-the-world panoramic views are unbeatable. There are serviceable tables for lazy picnics. http://blog.hotelclub.com


Fairs & Exhibitions T ra v e l / T o u ris m i n J UL Y - A U G U S T 2 0 1 1 b y regi o n s


Fairs & Exhibitions

Western Europe

J ul y- A ugus t , 2011

 The Tourism Society Annual Conference 2011  Location

United Kingdom / Beaulieu

Start / End

04 July 2011 / 05 July 2011

Provider

The Tourism Society

Contact

gregory@tourismsociety.org

 Outdoor: European Outdoor Trade Fair  Location

Germany / Friedrichshafen

Start / End

14 July 2011 / 17 July 2011

Provider

Messe Friedrichshafen

Contact

presse@messe-fn.de

 RDA Workshop   Location

Germany / Cologne

Start / End

26 July 2011 / 28 July 2011

Provider

RDA-Workshop Touristik-Service GmbH

Contact

service@rda-workshop.de

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Fairs & Exhibitions

WTA_GrandTour_290x225mm_ad_Layout 1 09/05/2011 13:03 Page 1

J ul y- A ugus t , 2011

North America “ T H E O S C A R S O F T H E T R AV E L I N D U S T R Y ” WA L L S T R E E T J O U R N A L

G R AN D TOU R 2011   Hawaii Lodging, Hospitality,     & Foodservice Expo  Location

USA / Blaisdell Center, Hawaii

Start / End

13 July 2011 / 14 July 2011

Provider

Douglas Trade Shows

Contact

dtsm@hawaii.rr.com

 Destination Marketing Association

Dubai • Antalya • Sharm el Sheikh • Bangkok • Montego Bay

Global Reach • Global Recognition • Global Rewards

    International (DMAI) Annual Convention  Location

USA / New Orleans, Louisiana

Start / End

20 July 2011 / 22 July 2011

Provider

Destination Marketing Association International

Contact

kwhite@destinationmarketing.org

awards@worldtravelawards.com

worldtravelawards.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Fairs & Exhibitions

Asia & Pacific

J ul y- A ugus t , 2011

 New Choice Mongolia Rally 2011  Location

Mongolia / Ulaanbaatar

Start / End

14 July 2011 / 28 July 2011

Provider

New Choice

Contact

info@volunteer.org.mn

 Mumbai International Tourism Expo (MITE)  Location

India / Mumbai

Start / End

15 July 2011 / 15 July 2011

Provider

CEMS Pte Ltd.

Contact

bernice@cems.com.sg

 Travel & Tourism Fair - Calcutta  Location

India / Calcutta

Start / End

16 July 2011 / 18 July 2011

Provider

Fairfest Media Limited

Contact

ttfotm@fairfest.com

  Hosfair  Location

China / Guangzhou

Start / End

30 June 2011 / 02 July 2011

Provider

Guangzhou Huazhan Exhibition Company Limited, Canton Universal Fair Group Limited

Contact

hosfair@hosfair.com

 Travel & Tourism Fair - Hyderabad  Location

India / Hyderabad

Start / End

08 July 2011 / 10 July 2011

Provider

Fairfest Media Limited

Contact

ttfotm@fairfest.com

 Foodpro 2011  Location

Australia / Sydney

Start / End

10 July 2011 / 13 July 2011

Provider

dmg world media

Contact

foodproexpo@divexhibitions.com.au

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Tourism Review Online Magazine - 07/2011