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June, 2009


Dear readers, Hurray! The summer is coming. This is the perfect time to think about your next holiday destination. Let us inspire you! For example, beautiful, European-like QuĂŠbec with its fabulous landscape, thrilling history as well as intriguing modern attractions awaits you. Read more in the Destination part. Perhaps you and your family are fans of theme parks so get updated on the latest trends in the industry and see where the parks are heading in the Active supplement. If you had enough of everything and seek some time on your own or only with your friends, read the Professional part this time focusing on womenand men-only holidays and services. You think this field has no future? You better read on. The trends of the spa & wellness industry are the topic of the Spa part. Get the latest numbers and find out what the customers want. First of all, however, take your Dickens or Hemingway and set out for a literary journey around the world. Literary tourism is in and is here. Go for the Heritage supplement. Milada Sovadinova Editor


CONTENTS

CONTENTS

M A Y, 2 0 0 9 Medical / SPa

H E R I TAG E

SPA TrendS ShAking The PlAneT

Get Literary on a Literary tour Books, books, books – can you travel without them? Take your favorite literary treasure for this journey to London, Oxford or even South Africa. No, books are not dead, and won’t be. Check out the famous literary festivals in the U.S., visit the birth house of Agatha Christie, Jane Austen as well as Alan Paton. Also, don’t forget to visit the little Pinocchio – naturally in Italy.

Constantly growing in popularity spas are praised in many parts of the world. The industry however is undergoing dynamic development. See the latest numbers from the Global Spa Benchmark Report, read about the superbrands joining forces to lure the clients, visit Hawaii or South Africa to get a unique treatment. Get updated on the latest spa trends.

HERITAGE: Get Literary on a Literary Tour................................................................. 4

MEDICAL/SPA: SPA Trends Shaking the Planet................................................ 36

Oxford Writers: From Shelley to Tolkien................................................................ 5

Super-Brands Changing the Global Spa Market................................................... 37

Feasting on Literature: No “Death of Books”............................................................. 7

Global Spa Benchmark Report: Spa Industry Trends. .............................................. 39

THave Book, Will Travel! Literary Tourism in KwaZulu-Natal. ........................ 9

The Growing & Diverse Spa Market of South Africa........................................... 41

London: The Literature-Lover’s Dream. .................................................................. 11

The Evolution of the Spa Experience….................................................................... 43

Walking Through a Fairytale – Pinocchio’s Land............................................... 13

Hawaii: Aloha Spa Trends............................................................................................... 45

Professional

De st i nat ion

(Wo)men only Vacation

Quebec The second largest Canadian province, the only one with French as the official language – Québec is undoubtedly a unique member of the Canadian family. Outgrowing the concept of New France Québec today entices with its long and colorful history, aboriginal heritage, beautiful wilderness as well as modern cities. Bienvenue au Québec.

Single woman? Bored? Go for girlfriend getaways and enjoy your time. Single man? Stressed out? Choose the tour package of your life designed specifically for you. Wo(men)-only holidays are the trend even in the current global downturn. Be inspired.

Professional: (Wo)men Only Vacation................... 14

Destination: Quebec......................................................... 47

Women Travelers Go It Alone...................................................................................... 15

Québec: Je Me Souviens.................................................................................................... 48

The Male Get-Away: Only for Him................................................................................ 17

Sustainable Development: Québec’s Tourism Sector in 2009. ............................ 51

Girlfriend Getaways Continue to Thrive............................................................... 19

Spectacular Québec City: A Whole New Experience............................................. 53

Women Only Hotels – All around the World. ....................................................... 21

Go Back in History: The Plains of Abraham............................................................ 56

Stag Weekends: Home or Away?. ................................................................................... 23

Canada’s French Connection: Montreal’s History of Multiculturalism... 57

Active/Adventure

Fairs & Exhibitions

Shout for Joy! theme ParkS & Water ParkS Roller-coasters, thrill rides, water slides – kids as well as grown-ups simply love them. What are the latest trends in the industry though? Is the harsh economic situation affecting the popularity of amusement parks? Do they have any future? Hey, have you heard about the new kid on the block? Visit Dig This!

T r av e l / To u r i s m

i n

J u n e

2 0 0 9

b y

r e g i o n s

Active/Adventure: Shout for Joy! Theme Parks & Water Parks........... 25

Fairs & Exhibitions: Travel/Tourism in JUNE 2009 by regions................................................. 59

10 Trends Point the Way to Future Resort Development.................................. 26

Western Europe. ............................................................................................................... 60

Dig This, North America’s First Heavy Equipment Theme Park......................... 30

Africa/MIDDLE EAST.......................................................................................................... 61

World Theme Parks Market to Reach $28.7 Billion by 2012................................. 32

North America.................................................................................................................. 62

Drayton Manor Theme Park: Views & Trends.......................................................... 34

Asia & Pacific................................................................................................................... 63


H E R I TAG E Get Literary on a Literary Tour Books, books, books – can you travel without them? Take your favorite literary treasure for this journey to London, Oxford or even South Africa. No, books are not dead, and won’t be. Check out the famous literary festivals in the U.S., visit the birth house of Agatha Christie, Jane Austen as well as Alan Paton. Also, don’t forget to visit the little Pinocchio – naturally in Italy.


H e ritag e : G e t Lite rar y on a Lite rar y Tour

Oxford Writers: From Shelley to Tolkien

to Lewis Carroll, the pen name of the mathematics don who composed stories of ‘Alice in Wonderland’, writers have lived in almost every corner of this beautiful city. Still other writers have simply been inspired by Oxford’s hidden treasures. Hogwarts Hall is said to have been based on Christ Church’s Tudor Great Hall and the Pitt Rivers museum with its meticulously labelled treasures tucked neatly into drawers and cupboards, to have been the model for shops in Daigon Alley. Some colleges have particular literary associations. J.R.R. Tolkien, author of ‘Lord of the Rings’ and ‘The Hobbit’ was an undergraduate at Exeter College . So was Philip Pullman who used Exeter College (under the name ‘Jordan College’) as the starting point for his trilogy ‘His Dark Materials’. Martin Amis and Alan Bennett (whose ‘History Boys’ is currently showing in the West End ), are contemporary writers educated there. The first female Head of a former all-male college in Oxford, Marilyn Butler, was herself an expert on the English novel. You can find her name carved on the outside of Exeter college … if you know how and where to look...

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Who

would not be inspired to write amid Oxford’s famous ‘dreaming spires’, tranquil water meadows and timbered halls? Even the college architecture is structured to allow contemplation and thought: from the secluded gardens hidden behind high college walls to the cloisters,

Jun e, 2009

designed to allow light for study even in inclement weather. Oxford has been a fertile ground for many creative writers. From John Wycliffe, early translator of the Bible, and Geoffrey of Monmouth, recorder of traditional tales of King Arthur and his Knights, …

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Agatha C hristi e’ s h om e op e n s to th e p u b lic

The southwest county of Devon has a new tourist attraction this year in the shape of Agatha Christie’s much-loved holiday home, Greenway, which the best-selling author described as ‘the loveliest place in the world’. After a €5 million restoration funded by the National Trust and private donations, visitors will be able to visit the crime-writer’s house and 12-hectare garden which slopes down to the River Dart. The house was bought in 1939, and stayed in the family until the death of her daughter and sonin-law in 2004 and 2005. ITB B er lin E ng lish D a i ly


H e ritag e : G e t Lite rar y on a Lite rar y Tour

Children and adults who love C.S. Lewis’ books are drawn to Magdalen College, where carvings reminiscent of Mr. Tumnuss and other characters in ‘The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe’ overlook quadrangles and cloisters. C.S. Lewis was a Fellow of this college where he lived during the week, only making the journey to his own house, the Kilns, at weekends. The Kilns in Headington, just outside the ring road, can be visited by arrangement. Also associated with Magdalen College is the celebrated wit and aesthete, Oscar Wilde whose play ‘The Importance of Being Ernest’ and morality tale ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ are his best-known writings. Scandal has dogged the heels of other writers educated at Oxford – Percy Bysshe Shelley was sent down (i.e. sent away from) University College for publishing ‘The Necessity of Atheism’ in 1811 while the poems of John Wilmot, Lord Rochester,

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who studied at Wadham College, range from the risqué to the frankly obscene. Oxford has produced many women writers: Wendy Cope, whose clever and whimsical verse appeals to a wide audience, read history at St Hilda’s. Other writers who studied at this formerly all-female college (one of only five compared to around 30 for men) include Barbara Pym whose newly-fashionable novels are set in a world genteel poverty and Church of England Christianity. D.K. Broster, who wrote novels of the Jacobite Highlanders and Val McDermid, the best-selling crime writer, both studied of St Hilda’s. Undoubtedly the most famous Oxford crime writer must be Colin Dexter, whose tales of Inspector Morse, the curmudgeonly but analytical Chief Inspector of police, are set amid Oxford’s colleges, halls, pubs and waterways. This article mentions but a few of Oxford’s famous authors; there are too many to list. Oxford University Press (OUP), the University’s own publishing house, has played a major role in making publications available to the general public. Fascinating tours of the OUP museum can be arranged. All the places mentioned in this article are open to the public, the majority free of charge. You can find opening hours and days on the official Oxford Tourism website www.visitoxford.org and download a ‘What To See and Do' free of charge. The best way to explore Oxford’s literary links is on foot with one of the qualified Blue/Green badge guides. Tours are offered, both for individuals and for groups, at the Tourist Information Centre on

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Broad Street, right in the heart of the city. You can book on line. All Blue/Green Badge guides have a thorough knowledge of Oxford’s literary figures so you can take any of the walking tours (offered every day at 11.00am and 2.00pm) and tell the guide you are interested in Oxford writers. There is also a special programme of Themed Tours, some of which focus on literary figures such as CS Lewis and JRR Tolkien, William Morris and Victorian Oxford while others give over-views such as Oxford’s Children’s Stories or a Literary Tour. Several excellent guidebooks which feature Oxford writers such as ‘Oxford’s Famous Faces’ and ‘Oxford Rogues’ can be purchased online via the Tourist Information Centre’s E-shop. By Heather Armitage http://www.visitoxford.org


H e ritag e : G e t Lite rar y on a Lite rar y Tour

Feasting on Literature: No “Death of Books” information. Thanks to their faith in the power and pull of the printed word, literary lovers will find many events this year to satiate their lust for great books and the authors who pen them.

Unlikely city print-fests

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isten to some naysayers, and they say the printed word is dead. And advertisers in droves are fleeing newspapers for the Net. Their exodus would seem to be driving the final nails in its coffin. Apparently there are still quite a lot of event planners who are either contrarians or privy to insider

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Cities that you might not immediately equate with literary attractions are magnets for literary cognoscenti because they have become synonymous with literary traditions. Creative partnerships between authors and the hospitality sector are also putting their stamp in this niche. Consider Miami….fun, sun, vibrant nightclub scene…but literary destination? That’s right. In fact, thousands of book lovers this November will converge at Miami’s International Book Fair, one of the U.S.’s largest outdoor book fairs. They’ll schmooze with best-selling as well as emerging authors from all over the globe. With almost 200 exhibitors on hand, wannabe authors can also network with a wide variety of publishers. And Montgomery, Alabama? F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald aficionados will be celebrating Scott’s birthday this September at his annual birthday bash at the Fitzgerald Museum.

Savvy partnerships Those traditional print stewards, municipal libraries, are benefiting from enterprising library foundations that design compelling literary events. Fort Lauderdale (FL)’s Public Library

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Foundation sponsors a Literary Feast that brings authors and book lovers together for two days of book signings, cocktail receptions and an outreach program where authors discuss their works with local high school students. In San Antonio (TX), inventive mash-ups of culinary arts and great literary works are creating some fascinating venues. The San Antonio Public Library Foundation’s Literary Feast dinners, held February through March around the city, included

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F or m or e i n f ormati on :

Miami International Book Fair: November 8th-15th, 2009 Fitzgerald-Museum: September 19th, 2009 Fort Lauderdale’s Literary Feast: March San Antonio Public Library Foundation Literary Feast, February through April Poe Revealed, the Edgar Allen Poe Bicentennial, throughout 2009


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such concepts as a dinner where a stellar group of chefs and authors based their theme dinner around Dr. Kolleen Guy’s book, When Champagne Became French: Wine and the Making of a National Identity. For sheer scale and length of events, Richmond, Virginia’s Poe (as in Edgar Allen Poe) Bicentennial is in its own league. A network of Virginia-based historic sites, museums, libraries and performing arts organizations are collaborating throughout 2009, hosting performances, exhibits, and books signings that celebrate Poe’s works and life. The

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hotel chain Hampton Hotels’ Save a Landmark program even restored the Poe Museum’s eighty year-old garden where plants related to Poe’s books still grow. By Patricia Kutza Patricia Kutza is a U.S. travel, business and technology journalist based in the San Francisco Bay region. She crafts features for such outlets as Bay Area Kids Magazine, Excell, Acura, Journeys, Executive Traveler, and San Joaquin Magazines. She invites readers to visit her new blog at http://www.examiner.com/x-2336-Vallejo-CommunityExaminer.

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H e ritag e : G e t Lite rar y on a Lite rar y Tour

Have Book, Will Travel! Literary Tourism in KwaZulu-Natal

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iterary tourism is a new field in South Africa. Whilst in England, the interested traveller can buy books on Hardy’s Wessex, Dickens’s London and Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon; and even go on guided walks through famous ‘literary’ places like Wordsworth’s Lake District; there is very little of the same for the South African literary fan. KwaZulu-Natal, a province on the east coast of South Africa, is particularly rich culturally speaking, offering

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a wide range of writers both black and white, male and female, writing in English and Zulu predominantly – Alan Paton, Roy Campbell, Lewis Nkosi, Sita Gandhi, Daphne Rooke, Credo Mutwa for instance – who are linked in some way to this place. Some years ago, I started to think about the possibilities for literary tourism in this region. Whilst KwaZulu-Natal is not known for specifically ‘regional writing’ characterized by common threads, settings,

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or even ideological sameness nevertheless it struck me as a place ripe for literary tourism given its varied cultural mix of African, Indian and European influences. By exploring both its literary heritage and contemporary scene, I thought it might be possible to encourage an interest, in both visitors and locals, for more than the ‘sun, sea, Zulu dancing and game reserves’ that are the usual drawcards featured in tourist brochures. Could literary tourism be a possibility here in the same way that it has been established in England and Europe? The scale might be smaller but the driving energy would be the same: readers of South African literature might like, for example, to follow Alan Paton in Ixopo, see where Bessie Head was born in Pietermaritzburg, recreate old Zululand through Credo Mutwa’s traditional folk tales, walk through the Casbah where Aziz Hassim’s family saga is set. Literary tourism is all about visiting places where writers spent their time and places about which they wrote. For example, who, after reading the lyrical opening sentences of Paton’s famous book Cry, the Beloved Country (1948) has not wanted to see this place in reality? “There is a lovely road that runs from Ixopo into the hills. These hills are grass-covered and rolling, and they are lovely beyond any singing of it. The road climbs seven miles into them, to Carisbrooke; and from there, if there is no mist, you look down on one of the fairest valleys of Africa. About you there is grass and bracken and you may hear the forlorn crying of the tithoya, one of the birds of the veld. Below you is the valley of the Umzimkulu, on its journey from the Drakensberg to the sea; and beyond and behind the river, great hill after great hill; and beyond and behind them, the mountains of Ingeli and East Griqualand.”


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For the tourist interested in literature, a novel as tied to place as this one cries out to have the setting visited to understand something of Paton’s intense identification with the land and its linked social problems. With this idea in mind, the KZN Literary Tourism project started developing literary trails where literary fans could see places through the eyes of the writers. Four such literary trails that have been constructed thus far – one on Rider Haggard, one on Alan Paton, another on Grey Street

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Indian writers and finally one on writers linked to sites in a Durban black township called Cato Manor. Why choose Paton and Haggard? The reason for choosing trails on Haggard and Paton is primarily the tourist potential of these two writers and their close links with particular KZN places. Paton is one of South Africa’s best known writers following his success with Cry, the Beloved Country, while Rider Haggard’s popularity in his day as a bestselling writer of exotic African romances has continued into the pres-

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ent – King Solomon’s Mines (1885) has never been out of print. His links to the Anglo-Zulu battlefields of Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift – which feature in his novels The Witch’s Head; Black Heart and White Heart; and Finished – both already important sites for heritage tourism in KZN, allow for ‘spillover’ tourism. A few, disconnected efforts by tour operators to capitalise on both ‘Paton’ and ‘Haggard links’ also means there are already some existing sites which could be authentically linked together. From stand alone writers the focus then shifted to trails in community areas where a cluster of less well known writers could be featured. The Grey Street Writers trail was the first of these with writers like Dr Goonam (Coolie Doctor), Phyllis Naidoo (Footprints in Grey Street), Aziz Hassim (The Lotus People), and Imraan Coovadia (The Wedding) finding a voice. The Grey Street area, home to Indian traders and their families, already has a tourist presence in terms of various cultural tours which visit its markets and mosque. Both literary fans and cultural tourists have embraced this new trail with enthusiasm. Most recently developed in 2008 is the Cato Manor writers’ trail which takes visitors to Hindu temples, market gardens, shebeens, and informal traders all of which make up this urban settlement deeply divided by race riots in the 50s and 60s. Tourists are now welcomed by locals who are also learning about their writers such as Lewis Nkosi (Mating Birds) and Ronnie Govender (At the Edge). Furthermore, by training local community guides very real steps have been taken towards the goal of responsible tourism which benefits the community. By Lindy Stiebel http://www.literarytourism.co.za


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London: The Literature-Lover’s Dream of all this into just a couple of days in London? Here are some suggestions to help you try.

Hotels

For

centuries, London has inspired authors, poets and playwrights. Arguably, the capital has had the greatest global influence on the English language of all the English-speaking places in the world. But how can you pack even a small part Jun e, 2009

E. M. Forster apparently lodged in the Kingsley Hotel (now known as the Thistle Bloomsbury) from 1902 to 1904 – probably for its proximity to his Bloomsbury comrades. Today, it makes a great central lodging for the discerning literary disciple. Romantic poets Keats, Shelley, Byron and Coleridge, along with writers Robert Louis Stevenson, D. H. Lawrence and J. B. Priestley all lived in Hampstead. A favourite hotel in this area is the well-priced Hampstead Britannia Hotel. If you want to push the boat out, try Hazlitt's in Soho Square, named after the 19th-century writer William Hazlitt. This is a hip hotel with rooms named after its former guests. You could stay in the Jonathan Swift room or the Lady Francis Hewitt suite. We've heard on the grapevine that J.K. Rowling is rather fond of this swish hotel – hang out in the lobby with a copy of a Harry Potter, and she might even sign it for you! Brown's Hotel is the perfect place for little bookworms to stay as it's where Rudyard Kipling wrote The Jungle Book. You'll find plenty of family-friendly facilities including cots, a children's menu, and interconnecting rooms. Brown's also have a special family package which includes toys, sweets, and themed children's bed linen.

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Day Time Activities If you can, get an early start with a guided Dickens Walk. London is Dickens' domain and some of the city's most evocative areas are Southwark and Borough. Saturday is market day at Borough – which is a real bonus. There are lots of amazing places to stop for lunch, but if the weather's good, why not grab a picnic, linger a while and enjoy the surroundings. Dickens lived and breathed London, apparently walking the city from morning to night – so after lunch why not cross the river and walk up Chancery Lane to Staples Corner and Lincolns Inn Hall. Then onto 48 Doughty Street, Dickens' only surviving home and now a museum devoted to him.

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B o ok s vot e d m o st e sse n tial trav e l it e m

In a poll hosted on the Skyscanner’s site, “a good book” received 24% of the vote as the most essential travel item, followed by an MP3 player with 22%, perfume or deodorant with 14% and a laptop or PDA with 10%. Other items voted in were magazines, earplugs, a mobile phone, camera, insect repellent and even hair straighteners. In the era of the iPod, the result may come as a surprise, but despite the rise in popularity of new electronic gadgetry, it seems that one of the oldest forms of entertainment remains the best. Tr av elD a i lyNe ws .c om


H e ritag e : G e t Lite rar y on a Lite rar y Tour Martin Amis's ambiguously titled novel isn't actually set in the London Fields Park in Hackney – but this trendy, gritty part of east London is home to many of the city's intellectuals. Hampstead hangs onto to its literary and artistic traditions and is packed with bookshops and art galleries – a lovely spot to spend a lazy half a day. A little like Bloomsbury and Dickens-land, Hampstead is best enjoyed on foot. Hampstead also holds fascination for those interested in the poet, John Keats. A moment's walk from Hampstead Heath is the house where Keats lived from 1818 to 1820; the setting which inspired some of Keats's most memorable poetry. Here, Keats wrote “Ode to a Nightingale”, and fell in love with Fanny Brawne, the girl next door. It was from this house that he travelled to Rome, where he died of tuberculosis aged just 25.

Evening Activities

Doughty Street is in Bloomsbury, once the literary heart of London. The shops, the transport, the fashion and locals may have changed, but the architecture and atmosphere of the place that George Bernard Shaw and Virginia Woolf once called home still hold good. Two real treats for bookworms in the area are the British Library and the Reading Room at the British Museum. Take a little quiet time out in either (or both) at the end of the afternoon.

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When Hemingway stayed in London, he stayed at The Dorchester. And we presume when he stayed there, he drank at the Dorchester Bar, so begin your evening here. For dinner, head over to The French House in Soho. The fabulous French House has counted scores of writers and actors as patrons. Charles De Gaulle even wrote his declaration of defiance against the Nazis here, and it's the place where Dylan Thomas famously got drunk and accidentally left his manuscript for Under Milkwood.

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Or head for Hoxton Square. The area is filled with some seriously hip bars and pubs, we suggest The Bricklayer's Arms in Charlotte Road and the Barley Mow on Curtain Road. For dinner, try either Hoxton Apprentice or The Real Greek. Photos: visitlondonimages/ britainonview http://www.visitlondon.com


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Walking Through a Fairytale – Pinocchio’s Land

The

irresistible appeal of fairy tales is one of the most crucial things in a child’s life. Of course, each one of us has a favorite one. For many, Pinocchio is the most attractive character that they sympathize with. The ‘birthplace’ of Pinocchio and his tale, or of his father, Carlo Lorenzini, to be more precise, is in a little village in Tuscany. The

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little village of Collodi, Italy has long been attracting Pinocchio’s fans as an impressive park. Commemorating this charismatic character the park has been recently restructured and redeveloped. The Pinocchio Park presents the old story by means of impressive sculptures, pieces of great architecture, and various examples of great art and it possesses an overall character of fascinating creative energy. Walking through this amusement park seems like walking through the fairytale itself. The Park is not the only attraction drawing the tourists to Collodi. Local infamous Villa Garzoni is another great tourist magnet. The 17th century villa with its impressive cascade of exotic botanical gardens truly leaves one breathless. Furthermore, butterfly admirers will be surprised by local collection of the most beautiful tropical butterflies from South America, Africa and Australia. Both, the Pinocchio Park and the Villa Garzoni have recently been redeveloped, thanks to the ‘Fondazione Nazionale – Carlo Collodi’. Several architects participated on the project; great names such as Emilio Faroldi, Maruzio De Vita, or Francesco and Federico Guerrieri. A science museum has been added to the complex as well as an open-air museum and multi-media exhibit that contribute to an already overwhelming image of Collodi. http://www.tourism-review.com http://www.pinocchio.it

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Professional (Wo)men Only Vacation Single woman? Bored? Go for girlfriend getaways and enjoy your time. Single man? Stressed out? Choose the tour package of your life designed specifically for you. Wo(men)-only holidays are the trend even in the current global downturn. Be inspired.


P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

Women Travelers Go It Alone

“Where are the men?” This was clearly the unspoken thought of many who watched the five of us toss the ropes and maneuver our Barge through the locks on the Canal du Midi in Southern France. We were the only crew of women on the canal and when on the last day we steered our way through the famous seven locks at Beziers, the crowds that come to watch this spectacle gave us a round of applause for our efforts. Jun e, 2009

The Canal Du Midi was idyllic, a popular trip on the calendar of Australian company Bushwise Women. The five of us from New Zealand and Australia floated gently along the Canal stopping at villages to buy fresh produce, taste the wine, and visit ancient sites along the way. It was simply – France, in all its glory. It was to be a sabbatical of sorts – I had come to the end of one chapter in my life and it felt like

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time to dream new dreams – it was time to travel. I had scoffed at Liz Gilbert’s book Eat Pray Love: “we don’t need to go on some grand expensive tour to find ourselves, we can find ourselves anywhere.” But I did go on the grand tour, and Liz’s book Eat Pray Love became my constant companion and guide on the four month trip, as did the women I traveled with and met along the way. In New Zealand we have several tour operators who cater especially for women travelers and as I am not a confident traveler, especially on my own, joining a small group of women seemed a great place to start. The Tour Calendar on the Women Travel NZ website showed a few tours that fitted my timetable and plans. I was soon booked in to Bike and Barge the Canal du Midi with Bushwise Women along with a two week Morocco Odyssey with Venus Adventures. Morocco was something else – this trip took me right out of my comfort zone and it was worth it. In a country like this a great guide is a must – especially for women traveling alone. Julie Paterson our guide from Venus Adventures for Women made it safe for us to dive in and explore this ancient country. We entered into another world and we were given the tour of a lifetime – from shopping for carpets to riding a camel into the Sahara to sleep under the stars. Our handsome local guide Adil proudly escorted our group of eight women. Other men asked him where the men were, and they looked at him enviously when he said “there is just me!” Guide Julie had warned us the shopping is irresistible, I said maybe a carpet... but of course no woman could resist. The bargaining began and


P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

by the end of the trip our bags were bulging, large packages had been posted home and we had contributed greatly to the local economies of every place we visited. These two fabulous tours were the framework around which I built my travels. I wove in side trips with friends to Prague and Rome, stayed in the fabulous Women’s B&B near the Duomo in Florence, rented an apartment in Lucca through Rosanna Capatinin of Eliotropica Travels for Women and spent a week in the south of Spain in Diva Espana retreat for women. All over the world women are not only traveling, but women are offering accommodation and tours Jun e, 2009

especially for women travelers. As a born networker I could not resist building a new website which connects these and so Women Travel the World was born. Now I have even more excuses to travel. Whoopee! By Rosemary Neave Links: Women Travel the World http://www.womentravel.info Women Travel Blog http://www.womentravelblog.com Women Travel New Zealand http://www.womentravel.co.nz Venus Adventures http://www.venusadventures.travel Bushwise Women http://www.bushwise.co.nz

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The Male Get-Away: Only for Him

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In

the last 30 years male stress has become increasingly common, especially in the UK. Statistics have shown that men are much more prone to occupational stress than women. According to the UK’s Counselling Directory the number of stress related mental illness in men is on the rise and men are much more prone to substance abuse and even have a higher suicide rate than women, but it doesn’t need to be all doom and gloom. All the evidence suggests that men need to start taking care of their health and wellbeing more; thankfully, this is where specialist travel companies come in. One of them is the recently established BeautifulBreak, a travel company dedicated to providing spa and wellbeing holidays for all modern professionals who need to escape the pressures of city living. The new niche that they and along with other travel services are embracing is the male get-away. The For Men Only portion of their services combines spa and leisure activities to create packages designed for the stressed man in mind. The Managing Director of BeautifulBreak Ilona Wesle explained: “It’s important for men to get quality time for themselves too. More often they are consumed with work deadlines and what little free time they do have is reserved solely for their families. It’s important, however, to manage those stress levels and take some quality time out for themselves so they are in a better mental and physical state to be productive at work and be with their families.” There are a variety of short break packages available for men out there, everything from spa treatments for men and squash or mountain climbing retreats, each combining relaxation and the leisure activities that men crave. We all know that the only way a man can sit still through a male exfoliation scrub is the thought of the golf course in the afternoon.


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The packages offered by the company include a golfing break complimented with male facial vitality treatments in Austria and even an Italian biker’s special holiday complete with guided bike tours and a daily scented Jacuzzi.

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“Us women tend to assume that men would not enjoy a holiday dedicated to pampering and relaxation but the truth is, they occasionally need their quality time alone to regroup unless of course we all want our men prematurely bald,” quips Ilona, “that is why our service is committed to not neglecting the needs of men.” As today’s men’s health magazines show, the modern man is now one who can admit to stress and wrinkle-paranoia but while men’s care products are flying off the shelves the idea of the male equivalent of a ‘girly break’ is yet to be as popular. It’s time that men realize that a weekend trip to Austria is for more than indulgent bachelor parties and embraced their new-found freedom to have a massage and a facial after a manly game of squash.

By BeautifulBreak http://www.beautifulbreak.com

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P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

Girlfriend Getaways Continue to Thrive

W

ith unemployment rates reaching record highs and morale at an all-time low, consumers are feeling the pressure to put off all nonessential expenditures for more solvent times. The travel industry is among those hit hardest by the Jun e, 2009

current economic crisis, with airline, hotel, and vacation bookings declining in a seemingly endless spiral. One sector, however, seems to be weathering the storm better than most: the “girlfriend getaway.” Vir-

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tually unheard of just a decade ago, women-only holidays have enjoyed a meteoric rise in recent years, with new programs and providers popping up all over the map. And today, even as family vacations and boys’ weekends are being put off, women around the world are continuing to invest in themselves. It may seem surprising that women – often the guardians of family finances – are indulging their wanderlust even now. But research suggests that this may be an act of self-preservation rather than selfishness. In a recent study, University of California Los Angeles psychologist Shelly Taylor found that women respond to stress not with the “fight-orflight” response observed in men, but with its polar opposite: “tend-and-befriend” behavior. Says Taylor, “We think it’s cute when women call up their sisters when they’re under stress. But no one has realized that this is a contemporaneous manifestation of one of the oldest biological systems.” And it’s still in evidence today. As one of the country’s foremost pioneers of the girlfriend getaway, Bev Sanders has seen this behavior firsthand, time and again. “I think women are in tune with their needs,” Sanders says. “It’s like on an airplane, when they


P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

tell you to put on your oxygen mask first, then take care of your family – women really get that. They understand on a deep level that if they are feeling lost, they can’t bring value to their relationships.” Sanders is founder of Manifesta Safaris for Women. Its consistent success (regardless of the economic climate) seems to support Taylor’s “tendand-befriend” theory. “That’s one of the reasons we love our girlfriends: they are the compass that always gets us back on

Jun e, 2009

course,” says Sanders. “It’s also of the reasons I believe in what I do, especially now.” Manifesta Safaris offers sunny week-long surf vacations for women of all ages, sizes, and abilities, as well as creative art retreats in Carmel-bythe-Sea, California. Sanders is also the founder of Jennifer’s Journey, a contemporary on-line travel resource for women. http://www.manifestasafaris.com http://singlemindedwomen.com

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P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

Women Only Hotels – All around the World

vated in 2001. It is located in the center of the town, very close to an underground station. The women haven is on the 3rd, 4th and 5th floor of an old, modernized Berlin building, reached easily by elevator. They offer comfortable rooms and a beautiful sun deck. The changing display of paintings by women artists contribute to the unique atmosphere of the hotel. If you come to Berlin, for business or pleasure, this womanly atmosphere will make your stay a memorable experience. The daily buffet breakfast has a variety of items to please everyone, and is available from early to noon. In summer you can enjoy your breakfast on our large sun deck. There you may relax and enjoy the view over Berlin.

London, UK

B

eing EX in the City often means traveling to other places round the world alone. While most working women today are comfortable mixing and mingling with men while traveling wouldn't it be nice sometimes to have a hotel where just women were allowed? Sometimes it is a little creepy when you order room service and a man delivers it. Here Jun e, 2009

are a few women only hotels we have found – can't vouch for them but they are worth checking out

Berlin, Germany

Artemisia at Brandenburgische St. 18, Berlin 10707, Germany – is the first hotel exclusively for women in Berlin. It was opened in 1989 and reno-

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In the 300-room Grange City hotel, which mainly serves executives visiting the City, room service staff are women, creating privacy and security for guests who are able to walk along corridors without encountering businessmen. 68 rooms incorporate femalefriendly features such as extralarge illuminated wardrobes and a “movie star” backlit make-up mirror in the bathroom, an extrapowerful hairdryer with long cord, and, for security, a spy-hole and chain lock. The room service staff is female so women can order breakfast and stay in their pajamas


P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on The upholstery, the toiletries, the bedspreads with floral prints, the folding ironing board and iron in the closet, the plasma screen TV, the choice of soft drinks and miniatures in the mini bar... all have visible feminine touches about them. "Lady guests prefer these rooms particularly for their safety. So, we have video phones in each room to check from inside who's at the door. We screen all her calls if she wants it. We pick and drop her at the airport. And importantly, we bar men from entering this floor including the hotel staff. The lifts don't stop at the Eva floor unless you have the room key with you and you swipe it on the lift board," explains Ms. Vasan. For those willing to take a swig after a long day at work, the floor also has an option of a women-only lounge. The Taj group's business hotel here, The Ambassador Hotel also has similar facilities for unescorted women travellers. The Oberoi, The Imperial, Hyatt Regency, The Grand, Marriot Welcomgroup... all now keep in mind such guests and offer them similar facilities providing a security net for a single woman traveller in an unsafe city like Delhi.

Florence, Italy Zurich, Switzerland A group of businesswomen in Zurich have opened the first hotel in the city exclusively for women – Lady's First Hotel. Designed by a well-known female architect, “Lady’s First” is an oasis of calm in the midst of the hectic city. As a well-travelled businesswoman, Schneider knows what women want from a medium-priced hotel. Housed in a late 19th century building in a trendy district of the city, Lady’s First boldly combines new and old, offers a spacious sauna and relaxation area, and adds simple touches

Jun e, 2009

that are often overlooked, but make the difference between a pleasant and unpleasant stay.

New Delhi, India Delhi now claims to be the first Indian city to have a women-only hotel floor at ITC Maurya Sheraton. A five-star option for the well heeled, but a welcome move nevertheless. Named so femininely Eva, the floor has women butlers, a woman chef, safety equipments fitted in the rooms and on the floor. For the lady guests' safety and comfort.

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In Florence there is a small bed and breakfast just for women. B&B is an exclusive bed and breakfast for women only located at the top floor (no lift – 68 steps) of a historical palace in the center of Florence, Italy. With a stunning view of Brunelleschi's cupola of the Duomo, it overlooks a quiet inner garden and is only minutes away from the Uffizi, Ponte Vecchio, Santa Croce, the Accademia, the main train station and air terminal. http://www.exinthecity.com


P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

In

Stag Weekends: Home or Away?

Jun e, 2009

this day and age of stag extravagance, the biggest question is not whether the stag do should involve girls, but should the big event take place in Bristol or Barcelona. A number of important factors should be considered when deciding a stag weekend destination; the budget, the stag’s preference, the weather etc, etc. So would it be better to enjoy the bright lights of London or escape to the raucous clubs of Ibiza? An increasing number of stags are heading to European cities and this is because the stag night has become the stag weekend and occasionally the stag week. However, many people are adamant that the UK is home to some of the world’s greatest cities and is simply a fantastic stag weekend location. With cities such as London, Manchester, Edinburgh and Brighton, the UK is a playground of activity and entertainment; perfect for an outstanding stag weekend. However, a flight to a European city can cost less than a train ticket across the UK, which is why so many stag weekends are heading to foreign lands. The most popular of the European destinations are Amsterdam, Barcelona and Dublin, all of which are extremely affordable to travel to. Another reason the stag weekend has become such an epic occasion, is the best man trying to top the previous stag event. The stag weekend experience is becoming a competition amongst best men. Whoever creates the most outrageous, debauched and extravagant stag weekend is certain to go down in history as a best man legend. This competitive streak has seen stag nights and stag weekends become indulgent week long holidays in exotic countries, halfway across the world. The UK still holds onto a large percentage of stag parties and is often considered the best party

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P rof e ssional : (Wo ) me n O nly Vacati on

atmosphere in the world. The vibrant pub culture has always brought stag parties streaming to the UK. Taking a stag party abroad is becoming a cheap and simple experience, with many groups enjoying the stag weekend of a life time, for very little money. Although the European stag weekend is growing,

Jun e, 2009

the UK is still one of the most popular destinations. It may be expensive but the vibrant atmosphere in cities such as London, Manchester, Leeds and Brighton are hard to match. By Leigh Stringer http://www.eclipseleisure.co.uk

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Active/Adventure

Shout for Joy! Theme Parks & Water Parks Roller-coasters, thrill rides, water slides  – kids as well as grown-ups simply love them. What are the latest trends in the industry though? Is the harsh economic situation affecting the popularity of amusement parks? Do they have any future? Hey, have you heard about the new kid on the block? Visit Dig This!


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

10 Trends Point the Way to Future Resort Development In more rural settings, hotels and indoor-outdoor waterparks are being combined with golf courses, ski hills, conference centers, medical centers, casinos and residential projects as well as second home, vacation home and resort retirement communities. For example: • Kalahari Resort in Wisconsin Dells WI broke ground in May 2008 a $15 million indoor enter-

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ver since waterparks came indoors, under cover, and attached themselves to hotels, the hotel waterpark resort industry has continued to grow at an accelerating pace – from 24% to 32% annually. And the average size of these waterpark resorts is getting bigger. In 2004, only one indoor waterpark over 50,000 sf opened. In 2005, three opened. But eight (8) indoor waterparks over 50,000 sf opened in 2006, and another eight (8) opened in 2007. Jun e, 2009

What’s the future of resort development? 1. Lodging, Recreation & Entertainment Concepts Are Merging In urban areas, we now see hotels, recreation, entertainment, sporting activities, shopping, convention centers and large-scale attractions being combined in mixed-use resort destination developments.

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T h e m e / Wat e r Par k s i n 2 0 0 8

• 122.7 million: Total visits to the top 20 parks in North America, level with the performance in 2007. Between 2005 and 2008 the top 20 North American parks grew by a total of 3.9 percent. • 57.4 million: Attendance for the top 20 European parks, representing a growth rate of 1.1 percent. Attendance growth of 7.6 percent from 2005-2008 for top European parks. • 12.2 million: Visits to top 10 parks in Mexico and Latin America • 66.9 million: Total attendance to top 10 Asian/Pacific Rim parks • 186 million: The total theme park attendance for top 25 worldwide parks in 2008, down 0.4% from 2007 • 12.5 million: Combined visitation to the top 15 US waterparks, a growth of 1.8 percent from 2007 • 19.9 million: Total attendance to top 20 worldwide waterparks, up 1.4 percent from 2007. TEA/ERA Attraction Attendance Report 2008


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s tainment facility that includes a 24-lane bowling alley, 65-foot Ferris wheel, ropes course, a zip line and over 200 arcade games. Kalahari already has a 125,000 square foot indoor waterpark, 65,000 square foot outdoor waterpark, 125,000 square foot convention center and over 800 hotel rooms and condominiums. • At Silver Mountain Resort in Kellogg ID, you can stay and ride a surf simulator in the new indoor waterpark and ride a gondola up to the top of the mountain for snow skiing in winter and mountain biking in summer. You can also buy a timeshare, condo or vacation home in the center of the action. 2. Long Weekends Are Replacing Long Vacations A recent USA Today article reported that the two week vacation is fast disappearing. Instead, employees are using their vacation days to extend weekends and take shorter breaks from the office. Rising gas prices are partly to blame as well as mounting pressure for workers to be available to clients around the clock. And more dual income couples are finding it difficult to coordinate vacation schedules due to work demands. About 55% of vacationers will take several shorter weekend getaways instead of the traditional long summer retreat, according to a WNBC survey. This trend certainly explains the popularity of drive-to regional resorts and the rapid growth of indoor waterparks as part of hotels and resorts. High gas prices, dissatisfaction with the airlines and shorter getaways all contribute to the relative success of regional drive-to resorts compared to the national fly-to resorts. 3. Multi-Generational Family Gatherings Are More Popular Unlike the typical vacation of the past that involved just Mom, Dad and the kids, older and younger Jun e, 2009

generations are traveling together more. In a nation in which families often live in separate states, sharing a vacation is a way for grandparents, parents and children to book some quality time and make memories. Several waterpark resorts with large villas (sleeping 12 to 20 people) reported that these popular units sell out first. As a result of togethering, as it is called, indoor waterparks are being designed for all ages and resorts are responding with packages to please all ages. 4. Projects Are Moving Toward Mixed-Use Resort Destinations Mixed-use has come of age and is growing rapidly. It is one of the hottest product types in real

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estate. Almost every new hotel project includes a variety of components that create a destination for meeting, shopping, recreation and entertainment. Why is mixed-use so popular among developers and lenders? Because all the components have a positive impact on each other and help to stabilize the entire project. Not all these impacts are fully understood by developers because mixed-use real estate projects are complex and require expertise in many different areas. However, almost everyone agrees that hotel owners are no longer content to have lodging generators nearby. They are designing and integrating these demand generators into destination projects that act as a strong magnet in the region.


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s 5. Hotel Waterpark Resort Growth Is Accelerating Hotels and resorts with indoor waterparks are a small but rapidly-growing segment of the lodging, recreation and entertainment business. Hotel waterparks are popular with families and hotel owners because they fill empty rooms at higher room rates than hotels without indoor waterparks. The waterpark sector of the resort industry has experienced annual growth ranging from 22% to over 30% in each of the last seven years. Clearly, hotel waterpark resorts are not a fad but here to stay. Every year the construction pipeline gets bigger. And hotel waterpark projects keep getting bigger in size. Many are part of mixed-use resort destination developments that include conference centers, recreation, entertainment, retail shopping, offices and residential units. A hotel waterpark resort is just a hotel with a very expensive attraction, similar to having a golf course or conference center. While they can be expensive to build, the costs are small compared to their positive impact on hotel occupancy, room rates, room revenues and total guest spending. 6. Indoor Waterpark Projects Are Getting Bigger The average size of a hotel indoor waterpark has been steadily getting bigger each year. More and more hotel waterparks are adding meeting space to attract different types of customers during certain low periods throughout the year. And more hotel waterparks are part of larger mixed-use resort projects. When deciding how big to build an indoor waterpark, conventional wisdom might tell a developer to build it slightly smaller than necessary. But in the hotel waterpark resort industry, just the opposite is true. “Bigger is better,” a philosophy adopted by nuJun e, 2009

merous developers goes to the heart of the matter – entertainment value. To encourage families with young children to drive up to 200 miles and spend more than $200 a night for a family suite, you have to offer high entertainment value. The smarter developers understand this. 7. Adventure Sports Are Going Mainstream Activities include surfing, skiing, boarding, paddling, rafting, kayaking, rock-climbing, rope-walking and skydiving. The challenge is to master the media, things like snow, water, waves, rapids, rocks, ropes and skydiving. Almost all of these activities that pit man against nature are seasonal, such as kayaking in spring, ocean surfing in summer and snow skiing in winter. With more and more man-made facilities, conveniently located close to home and work, where novices and enthusiasts alike can practice their skills more frequently, adventure sports are going mainstream and becoming part of mixed-use resort developments. 8. Trend from Natural to Man-Made Facilities Many of today’s sporting enthusiasts want the real thing. Of course, it is better to play golf on a real outdoor golf course, but when it rains during your vacation time, it is nice to find a golf simulator at the resort. AboutGolf of Maumee OH is a 19-year old company that has become the world leader in indoor golf simulator technology by providing a new level of realism. The company has over 500 golf simulators installed around the USA and worldwide with another 300 to be installed in the next year or so. Another example is rock climbing. The artificial rock wall became popular when Recreational Equipment Inc (REI) installed man-made rock climbing walls in their 96 retail stores. While the expert rock climber wants the real thing, the novice rock climber can easily learn how to climb us-

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ing the artificial climbing walls that are conveniently located close to home or the hotel. Even the expert climbers enjoy the climbing wall when the weather is adverse. The US National Whitewater Center (USNWC) in Charlotte NC boasts the largest artificial river in the world – a multi-channel waterway for kayakers and rafters that is at the heart of the 307-acre facility that includes a ropes challenge course, 11 miles of mountain biking & hiking, the largest manmade outdoor rock climbing wall in the country, a 20,000 sf conference facility, restaurant and retail shop. 9. Every Outdoor Sport Will Have an Indoor Version Many sporting activities – golfing, rock-climbing, skiing, boarding, kayaking, rafting and surfing – were part of natural settings that included mountains, rivers and oceans. Traditionally, many of these activities have been outdoor adventure sports. But sporting enthusiasts say it is hard to get away from work at the right time. So, now resort and attraction developers are bringing the adventure closer to the market. It seems that every natural setting has a made-man artificial version. And every outdoor sport has an indoor version located closer to home. 10. New Structures & Enclosures Cover Large Spaces Affordably In the city of Brand, not far from where the Berlin Wall once stood, a former airship hangar houses Tropical Islands, a 700,000 sf indoor waterpark resort with sandy beach, lagoon, spa, fine dining and hotel. The huge resort is open 24/7, regardless of the weather outside, because it is covered. Ocean Dome in Miyazaki, Japan is known as the world’s largest indoor waterpark, the size of three football fields or 322,700 sf, due to its fully-retract-


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

Possibility Thinking Results in Innovation

able roof, which is kept open when warm weather permits. Covering large spaces now makes it possible for outdoor venues to expand their peak season from 100 days to 365 days a year. And the new hightech structures are less costly than traditional materials. Using a transparent roofing system, the resort developer can create an economical indoor island paradise that is open to the sky all year long – a big attraction for people that live in areas where it’s too cold, too hot or too rainy.

Jun e, 2009

It’s not hard to predict the future of adventure sports resorts. Just imagine the impossible – like snow skiing in summer or surfing in the middle of the desert. Think about how to make artificial snow, or just imagine how to create a wave. Invent new equipment (skateboards, snowboards and wakeboards) that makes the old equipment (snow skis and water skis) seem dull. Think about how to convert a winter resort into a year round resort. How about indoor skydiving? It is this type of possibility thinking that results in new business opportunities. Each innovation creates a new sporting activity, a demand for new indooroutdoor facilities and an opportunity to capture revenues all year long – thus eliminating the risk of seasonality and climate in a resort investment. And if you cluster all these demand generators into a mixed-use regional destination project – with lodging, recreation, entertainment, conference center, restaurants, nightclubs, retail shopping, offices and residential components – you have a winning combination. By Jeff Coy Jeff Coy, ISHC, is president of JLC Hospitality Consulting of Phoenix-Cave Creek AZ and certified by the International Society of Hospitality Consultants. For more information regarding adventure sports and resort feasibility, contact him at 480-488-3382 or email jeffcoy@jeffcoy.com. Or go to www.jeffcoy.com.

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Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

Dig This, North America’s First Heavy Equipment Theme Park outside the construction industry. After all the fun he had, it was no surprise to him to find others who said they would pay for the experience. As if the first year numbers, and a heavy load of media attention, were not enough to prove its success, Mumm said this summer’s bookings have exceeded their expectations. In fact, there is enough demand to expand. Dig This will open a second location in Las Vegas later this summer and they are looking into more locations across the country. Just what is it about these everyday work machines that make them a genuine tourist attraction?

Digging Is Therapeutic Get a Load of This! After renting a bulldozer and excavator to build his home in Colorado, New Zealand entrepreneur Ed Mumm thought there might be a business in giving people the chance to operate a 20-ton vehicle. He was right. Ever since he unearthed the idea in December 2007, Dig This has been attracting hundreds of experience-seeking vacationers to its 10acre “sandbox” in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. “Today’s traveler is looking for new experiences,” Mumm said. “This was a niche that hadn’t been filled yet.” Mumm spent months researching this new brand of theme park by talking to people both inside and Jun e, 2009

Vacations are supposed to relieve stress and take one’s mind off the anxiety of everyday life. With today’s worrisome economy, there could not be a better time for this truly unique vacation experience to come into play. “It’s an awesome stress reliever,” Mumm said. “When they finish and look at what they’ve done, it’s a huge release and they have a really big smile.” Mumm said if anything the economy is having a positive effect on business. “People are seeking memories, they want a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” he said.

Digging Is Hands-on The day begins with a safety talk followed by a visual orientation where participants learn what they

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will be doing with toys in a sandbox. Afterward the newly oriented diggers try the real thing. Equipped with radios, participants climb into the cab of their assigned vehicle. They learn how to maneuver while receiving guidance from Dig This’ instructors. Once they get a hang of the machine, usually a 20-minute learning curve, they set out to complete several digging activities. “I want people to feel what it’s like to experience a big piece of machinery,” Mumm said. “It’s a rush!” It does not take long for the fun factor to kick in. Dig This offers half-day and full day adventures as well as “First Tracks,” a two-hour condensed program to get feet dirty. Full day adventures offer four to six hours of operating the equipment while the half-day allows for two hours at the controls.

Digging Is a Unique Gift For someone who has everything, Dig This is a rare gem. Mumm said he has hosted people who received the experience as a wedding, anniversary or birthday gift. “People want this for different reasons,” Mumm said. “And a lot of guys are booking this for their wives.” Digging is a battle of the sexes? “Couples can have some really good fun,” Mumm said. “It’s friendly competition.” So far, Dig This’ clientele has been split right down the middle, and both the men and the women really dig it. According to Mumm, women often pick it up faster than men because they are better listeners. “Women are fun to have out there, they’re always screaming and laughing,” he said.


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s Mumm said he would like to see more women sign-up. So much so, Dig This launched “Excavate and Exfoliate,” a lodging and spa package with the Steamboat Grand Resort Hotel. Mumm also hopes families are part of his future business. Kids must be at least 14 to participate, and Mumm believes the experience would be educational and confidence building. Whatever the reason people come to Dig This, the concept points toward a new trend in theme parks and new level of fun, 20-tons of fun in their case. Amusement parks provide thrills, this one can guarantee euphoria, or as Mumm describes it, “They come in not knowing what to expect, they leave totally ecstatic.” By Riley Polumbus Christina “Riley” Polumbus is a freelance writer based in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. She can be reached at polumbus@gmail.com. http://www.digthis.info

Jun e, 2009

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Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

World Theme Parks Market to Reach $28.7 Billion by 2012 capita spending on theme parks in countries such as Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, India and China. Growth in attendance is also expected to stem from entertainment-related technology development and sophistication, which help offer visitors cutting-edge amusement, and fun. Future growth will stand enthused by the numerous advancements made in entertainment technologies such as real life simulations, virtual reality, and high quality visual imagery, among others. Examples of innovative simulations include intergalactic space races, runaway sports cars in the Italian Alps, river rafting in New Zealand, and aquariums with acrylic tunnel concepts involving underwater rides with a scuba diver's view. While the United States dominates the world theme parks market, Asia-Pacific is expected to drive future growth, followed by Eastern Europe, and Middle East.

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the market recovers poise in the upcoming years, growing popularity of mass entertainment, and the tendency of families to spend a large portion of their discretionary free time on outdoor fun will continue to drive growth. With governments in developing countries focusing on promoting tourism and entertainment, the upcoming years are expected to witness growth in attendance and per Jun e, 2009

Top 5 Worldwide A m u se m e n t / T h e m e Par k s i n 2 0 0 8

1. Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, USA (17.063.000 visitors) 2. Disneyland,Anaheim, California, USA (14.721.000 visitors) 3. Tokyo Disneyland, Tokyo, Japan (14.293.000 visitors) 4. Disneyland Park at Disneyland Paris, Marne-LaVallee, France (12.688.000 visitors) 5. Tokyo Disney Sea, Tokyo, Japan (12.498.000) TEA/ERA Attraction Attendance Report 2008

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Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

Rationale for growth in the developing countries is the anticipated rise in tourism, and a parallel rise in the number of foreign tourists visiting these destinations. Other factors expected to impact the market include spike in aging population, persistent park modernization and continuous improvements in facilities, and services provided. Player-knit strategies, which are designed to magnetize visitors, and increase repeat visitations, include providing clear and green parks, and easy online ticketing, among others. The concept of indoor theme parks combined with retail shopping centers is expected to help the market score huge gains in the upcoming years. Examples of this type of theme parks include Mall of America located in Minneapolis USA, Lotte World in South Korea, and West Edmonton Mall in Canada. As stated by the recent report published by Global Industry Analysts, Inc., world theme parks market is dominated by the United States with a share of over 50% estimated in the year 2008. Emerging markets of Asia-Pacific, and Middle East/AfJun e, 2009

rica are expected to offer the highest potential for growth. Theme parks market in Latin America is expected to rise by US$53.2 million between 2008 and 2012. In Europe, Germany, France and United Kingdom, together, collar close to 62% of the market. Revenues in the Russian theme parks market are projected to reach US$154.4 million by the year 2015. Leading theme parks worldwide include The Adventuredome, Blackpool Pleasure Beach, Busch Gardens Europe, Cedar Fair L.P., Disneyland, Disneyland Paris, Disney-MGM Studios Theme Park, Disney's Animal Kingdom, Samsung Everland Inc, Islands of Adventure, Lotte World, Magic Kingdom, Six Flags Inc, Tokyo Disneyland, Tokyo Disneysea, Universal Studios, Universal Studios Hollywood, and Yokohama Hakkeijima Sea Paradise, among others. (text shortened) http://www.StrategyR.com/

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Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

Drayton Manor Theme Park: Views & Trends

D

rayton Manor Theme Park was first opened to the public in 1950 by co-founders, husband and wife, George and Vera Bryan. Almost 60 years later, Drayton Manor has been transformed into an award-winning attraction located in approximately 280 acres of beautiful countryside on what was

Jun e, 2009

formerly the estate of the Peel family, including Sir Robert Peel, who served as Great Britain’s Prime Minister twice between 1834 and 1846. In an interview, Colin Bryan, managing director, looks back at 2008 and comments the coming trends in the theme park industry.

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How was the year 2008 for the Drayton Manor Theme Park? Did you see any impact of the global recession? Drayton Manor Park had a record year last year with a staggering 1.25 million visitors coming through the gates. We had a 41 per cent increase on 2007 season and 30 per cent of visitors were new to the park and came from all over the UK, Ireland and Europe. Due to the economic climate we see more people choosing to stay in the UK and opting for days out with the family as opposed to traveling abroad. Situated in the centre of the UK, near to motorway’s and close to Birmingham International Airport, Drayton Manor is a lot closer to people than they may think, which is one reason why we are seeing more visitors come to the park. Last year, we launched Europe’s first Thomas Land based on one of the world’s top children’s toy brands, Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends. The attraction is aimed at younger children who can go on the themed rides with their family and has been a roaring success in its first year, opening Drayton Manor Park up to an even wider family audience. What do you think the theme parks can do to fight the economic crisis? Put simply, offering a great product is why we see so many people come to Drayton Manor Theme Park – the wide range of different rides suitable for the whole family to ride together, like Apocalypse and G-force, unique attractions such as Thomas Land and Shockwave – Europe’s only stand up


Activ e / A dv e n t u r e : S hout for Joy! T he me Par k s & Wate r Par k s

rollercoaster and a great choice of food and drinks outlets. Service is a priority, ensuring staff are fully trained and are visibly on hand to help customers with any queries. This goes a long way to ensuring people keep coming back to the park again and again. Also, it is imperative we offer discounts online – this crucially ensures customers get even more value for money and also encourages more traffic to our website, therefore keeping users informed of our latest events and news. We have maintained our online booking price for the third year running. For the “pay once“ entry price, all visitors can enjoy the theme park, Thomas Land and our zoo which has over 100 species of animal, proving that there is something for everyone to enjoy at Drayton Manor. Can you distinguish any trends in the theme parks industry? Regarding the travel & tourism industry as a whole, we anticipate more families taking shorter breaks and again, staying in the UK meaning that theme parks should be a top request for families this year. Jun e, 2009

The theme parks that will perform strongest are those that offer the widest variety of attractions – there must be an even mix of white knuckle rides, younger children and family orientated rides and a program of entertaining events and shows. Drayton Manor’s banqueting facilities and future 150 bedroom hotel due to open in March 2011, shows that we can offer much more than entertaining and thrilling rides. More people are using the internet for research and offers of best prices for their days out and for where they choose to go, so there will inevitably be a marked increase in online and social media marketing to reach out to customers. You have recently opened a new 4D cinema. Do you plan any other additions for 2009? The 4D cinema, which is a traditional 3D film with the added excitement of moving and vibrating seats, smells and wet spray, has been a great success so far, offering yet another attraction included in the entry price. To celebrate the first birthday of Thomas Land, we introduced a new engine, Rosie who has already been a hit with the younger visitors showing that the engines cannot all be male and she’s very easily seen as she is pink! She came to keep the boys in order, taking her role as second engine to Thomas and Percy easily. We now have newly rebuilt “Chicken Diner” serving our own chicken meals and also a new coffee stop fitted out like a 50’s American Diner with Wurlitzer music, all centered along our new Art Deco Street. Plus a major refit of our big beef-burger restaurant has been added to our extensive catering facilities, giving visitors a greater choice of food and refreshments. What was the biggest success of the Park last year? Thomas Land and its merchandise shop was an exceptional success which we fully intend

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to build upon this year. Our record 1.25 million visitors speak volumes, we now relish the challenge to maintain that success for years to come. Our Christmas with Thomas & Friends in Thomas Land was highly successful and will be repeated this year too. Also, we are in the process of acquiring planning permission for our much needed Hotel, featuring a Thomas Land Play room, themed Thomas and Friends rooms, Brasserie, a restaurant and a function suite, situated within the grounds of the park right next to the Theme Park gates which is sure to be a great success. And failure? Not being able to control the weather! What is your vision for the Park? We aspire to offer something for everyone – from the very young to the not so young, we provide “total family entertainment”.

http://www.draytonmanor.co.uk


Medical / SPA SPA Trends Shaking the Planet Constantly growing in popularity spas are praised in many parts of the world. The industry however is undergoing dynamic development. See the latest numbers from the Global Spa Benchmark Report, read about the superbrands joining forces to lure the clients, visit Hawaii or South Africa to get a unique treatment. Get updated on the latest spa trends.


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

Super-Brands Changing the Global Spa Market have significant brand recognition – such as Canyon Ranch in the US, Chiva-Som in Thailand and global supplier/operator ESPA – are the exceptions that prove the rule. However, as the industry becomes ever more competitive – especially in light of the economic downturn – an increasing number of players are starting to recognize the power of a strong brand identity in facilitating market penetration, expansion and consolidation. Among those leveraging its brand to diversify and grow is UK company Champneys, the operator of four top health resorts, which a few years ago launched a mass-market skincare line into British supermarket chain Sainsbury’s. Building on this

commercial success, the group is now rolling out a chain of town-centre day spas/stores in the UK, with plans for up to 50 sites, and has also launched the skincare range into Russian retail chain 36.6. Elsewhere, it’s created a range of ready-meals for Sainsbury’s and is developing a residential spa community in Marbella, Spain. Also maximizing its brand’s potential is the Pritikin Longevity Center and Spa in Miami, Florida. Famed for the Pritikin Program, a diet-and-exercise regime scientifically proven to combat health problems from diabetes to heart disease, the 31-yearold company recently confirmed an agreement with property developer Boymelgreen to create a ‘Pritikin Living’ community in Houston, Texas. It also

Dove Spa

D

espite experiencing a dramatic boom in the last decade, the worldwide spa market is still highly fragmented. Although there are an estimated 72,000 spas worldwide, the vast majority are independent, single-site or small, regional businesses, whose names have little currency beyond their immediate environs. The few companies that can truly claim to

Jun e, 2009

Mandarin Oriental

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M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

Mandarin Oriental

has a licensing deal with Indian operator VLCC to roll out 15 Pritikin day centres in India, and further deals in the UAE and Singapore are under discussion. In addition, the US government has passed legislation allowing the Pritikin Program to be covered by its public health insurance scheme, Medicare, increasing the potential for a domestic rollout. Other interests include a book-publishing arm and a branded food line. And it’s not only spa and wellness companies that are using the power of branding to win market share. French group George V Restauration, which created the restaurant and hotel chain buddha-bar, has entered the sector with two brands – buddha-bar spa (in its Evian-Les-Bains and Prague hotels) and buddha attitude (in Doha) – as well as a branded skincare range, spa cafés, music CDs and a nail-bar concept. Jun e, 2009

Another significant newcomer is Dove Spa – a spin-off of Dove, the leading toiletries brand of global conglomerate Unilever. This accessible day-spa concept has grown to 24 sites in the UK since being launched in 2006, and is now set for roll-out in Canada, following the opening of two sites in Toronto last year. Dove Spa’s parent company, Spa and Salon International, also has 17 sites in Spain and two in Mexico, operating under the name Pond’s Institute; another Unilever retail brand, Pond’s is well known in Spain and parts of Latin America. In the current climate, the Dove Spa/Pond’s Institute business model – combining value-for-money products and treatments with a recognised brand name – is proving resilient, with Spa and Salon International reporting strong sales through to the end of last year. Another mass-market retail brand tapping into this market is Nivea, whose German

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owners Beiersdorf AG have opened three ‘Nivea Haus’ facilities in Hamburg, Berlin and Dubai in as many years. At the high end, luxury beauty supplier Clarins is also marking its territory in the industry, opening flagship ‘Clarins Skin Spas’ across the world and working to increase its portfolio of hotel spas from 20 to 100. Other luxury brands moving into the sector include Versace, with its Salus Per Aquum spa at Palazzo Versace Gold Coast in Australia, and a second property set to open in Dubai next year; Bulgari, with spas at its hotels in Milan and Bali; Prada, through a partnership with Ritz-Carlton in the US, and Dior, which saw the first Christian Dior Spa open at condominium development The Cliff at Cupecoy, in St Maarten, last November. The five-star hotel market is also investing heavily in spa brands, as hoteliers finally acknowledge the importance of the spa both as a marketing tool and a revenue generator. Shangri-La is one of several global hotel operators to have created a unique identity for its spas – with its China/Himalayas-inspired CHI brand – while Mandarin Oriental takes its eponymous spa offering so seriously that it’s invested “a considerable figure” to develop a unique range of Mandarin Oriental-branded products and treatments in association with skincare experts Aromatherapy Associates. Of course, branding alone won’t keep cashstrapped consumers coming back, and savvy operators know they must pay more attention than ever to the quality and value of their offering to survive this recession. But they also know the power of a trusted brand can’t be underestimated, and could serve as a powerful differentiator in these difficult times. Photos: Mandarin Oriental, Dove Spa By Rhianon Howells Consulting editor of Spa Business magazine www.spabusiness.com/digital


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

Global Spa Benchmark Report: Spa Industry Trends

The

global financial crisis (GFC) has reduced global spa visits for 2008 by 13% based on survey data collected via Intelligent Spas’ ongoing Global Spa Benchmark Program. Employment has also been hit with

Jun e, 2009

spa operators recognizing a fall of 8.1% on the number of staff they predicted to employ in 2008, compared to actual people employed. Revenue results for 2008 was a surprising 8.5% up on forecasts, however spa operators predict a fall of 9.4% during 2009. Asia Pacific’s spa industry has been least affected by the GFC to date, with spas in this region recording a 7.4% growth in treatment room occupancy, a 12.2% growth in therapist productivity and 13.9% growth in average treatment rate between 2007 and 2008. In comparison, spas in the Americas region have experienced declines in all three key performance indicators (KPIs) over the same period and Middle East/Africa has seen declines in the first two stated. The spa industry across the Asia Pacific region is also the most optimistic regarding the medium term, forecasting growth in a number of KPIs between 2009 and 2010 including a 16.3.% increase in average revenue per visit and a 6.1% increase in visits per spa. During the same period, the Middle East/Africa region and Americas regions are predicting single-digit decreases in average revenue per visit of 1.3% and 8.9% respectively, and spas in Europe suggest visits per spa could decline by over 40%. The latest research also tracked qualitative trends and asked spa managers and owners what trends they were directly experiencing in their local markets. In addition to economic pressures, spa operators are also being forced to increase their

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standards as more knowledgeable clients visit with higher expectations relating to: 1. Service levels – spa clients’ now expect great service, customized treatments and a relaxing environment. This should not be a problem if spas have the right policies, procedures and design elements in place. If not, then their return visitation rate will suffer. 2. Product ingredients – clients are becoming very fussy about what they put on their skin. They typically want products to be as natural as possible, organic if possible, whilst also providing the anti-aging results they expect. Therefore, product selection is becoming much more important decision for spa operators. Increased group visits are another trend noticed by spa managers and operators. They can range from family visits, corporate visits and special occasions such as a baby shower or pre-wedding,


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t • What maximum number can the spa cater for based on the number of rooms, beds and therapists available? • Is there budget to allocate to the cost of promoting group visits and does the treatment menu has to be adjusted? • What is the spas alcohol policy as often these groups are celebrating then a little champagne would be expected. A number of other general trends were found to be consistent across the global spa industry, including: • Retail spending is down on previous years. • More value for money is expected. • Memberships and loyalty programs are becoming more available. • The proportion of male visitors continues to rise. • Relaxation is still a significant part of the spa experience. • Environmental policies are becoming more important to clients.

hens day out. To adapt to this trend, spa operators need to review their facilities and consider the necessary logistics to identify if the current spa infrastructure allows for group bookings. For example: • Can the reception hold multiple people as they wait for all the group members to arrive? str. 39-40 • Is there a separate relaxation room for group Global Spa Benchmark Report: Spa Industry By Julie Garrow bookings to gather and relax in so their chatter Trends http://www.IntelligentSpas.com does not affect other clients? (vložka) Key spa industry benchmarks include: Key spa industry benchmarks include:

Regional Benchmarks

Global Benchmark

Asia Pacific

Middle East/Africa

Americas

Europe

Treatment Room Occupancy

34%

37%

27%

32%

31%

Therapist Productivity Rate

43%

42%

33%

49%

43%

Average Treatment Rate (USD)

$90

$77

$87

$109

$111

Revenue per Available Minute (USD)

.41

.32

.29

.59

.54

62%

64%

53%

72%

53%

2008 Spa Industry Benchmarks

Capture Rate of Hotel Guests

Source: Intelligent Spas, Global Spa Benchmark Program, May 2009

Jun e, 2009

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M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

The Growing & Diverse Spa Market of South Africa

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hat sells South African Tourism is by far the diversity of this country. It offers a true first world experience in an African Country with unique experiences such as having a massage while overlooking the bushveld where the Big Five roams free…

Jun e, 2009

With the amazing climate and wonderful scenery, there are so many perfect settings for real rejuvenation and ‘decompression’. In South Africa, you will find an abundance of excellent spas and wellness centres scattered all around the country from mountain hideaways, sleek city spas, beach

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retreats, spas in the winelands spas at game lodges and wellness centres located on a golf courses. Even though South Africa is not necessarily seen as a spa destination, it offers guests unique experiences in many ways. Some South African Spas have embraced the best of the international influences such as Thai Massages from the East, Roman Baths & Vichy Treatments from Europe and even some Moroccan influences in both rituals as well as architecture; however the true African influences have been captivated in most of the spas in architecture, interior design, rituals, treatments and products. The spas have introduced signature treatments which have been inspired by African cultures and the use of natural resources. This might even include doing a body exfoliation with maize meal or using a knopkierie (an African walking stick) in some massage treatments. Local natural products such as marula oil & Rooibos extract have also been recognised as having healing ingredients. A spa in Kwazulu Natal, Fordoun, even offers the African cultural experience of having a session with the local Sangoma (traditional healing doctor) who will give advice on natural remedies for daily aches & pains. It is therefore a necessity to include a South African Spa experience in any traveler’s itinerary. When at a game lodge there is nothing more relaxing than a soothing massage after a bumpy game drive or after a round of golf cleansing the body &


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

mind with some pamper therapy at the spa. Even a revitalizing day at the spa to get rid of jet lag is becoming more and more popular with international tourists. It is however interesting to note that the Spa industry is probably one of the newest & fastest growing markets in the South African hospitality & tourism arena. The spa industry in South Africa had small cautious beginnings in the nineties but soon became a flourishing market in present day with more than 600 top spas on offer throughout the country. What was once known as a treat for the rich and famous has become something of a lifestyle necessity. And what was once mainly a female environment has now become something which can be enjoyed by couples and singles, groups of friends and even corporate incentive groups. Jun e, 2009

The industry has only recently introduced a governing body in the form of the South African Spa Association and giving accolades to the best spas in the country is something still new & refreshing. One must however take note of the fact that even though South Africa is a new player in the international spa industry, some of the South African spas have already received international accolades such as Pezula Spa (Garden Route) which was voted as being one of the Top 100 Spas in the World (Conde Nast Magazine). Other spas with international accolades include the Western Cape Hotel & Spa, Fancourt and many more. The spa industry locally have also become aware of their social responsibilities such as Mangwanani Spa Group who offers disadvantaged women, ongoing training & employment enabling them to be

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sustainable and enrich their lives to better their standards of living. Spas have also realized that in the spirit of advertising wellness there must be an awareness of looking after natural resources with spas such as Vygenhoek Spa which was named one of the first truly organic spas in South Africa. It is therefore clear that the ever-growing spa industry of South Africa has something on offer to both the serious spa-goer as well as for someone looking for a bit of relaxation while taking in the awe-inspiring experiences this diverse country has to offer. Let the pampering begin…… By Marnel Edwards (on behalf of the South African Spa Association) http://www.saspaassociation.co.za


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

The Evolution of the Spa Experience… services ranged from body massages and facial treatments to pedicures and manicures. More advanced in their applications, these same treatments still exist today. What has changed dramatically is the consumer mindset and expectation of the spa experience. Savvy, wiser, and armed with internet knowledge, the spa goer has become the wellness consumer. Their new mantra is “Give me something more!            

Relax Me   Inspire Me     Heal Me       Revitalize Me         Restore Me           Soothe Me

And oh yeah…please educate me too, because I want to take this experience home with me.”

The New Dawning of Wellness Culture…

For

the last twenty years the main mantra for the spa consumer has been "make me beautiful”. Spas were places to be spoiled, pampered and indulged. Beauty treatments dominated the spa experience and women became “Queen for the day”. Spa Jun e, 2009

Restore, refuel and refresh. Functioning at optimum levels for longevity is the new dawning of wellness culture. The key drivers of wellness culture are everlasting beauty & longevity, energy & stress management and preventative health, & wellness. Just go to your local book store and observe the plethora of book titles on:        

Anti-Aging     Anti-Stress         Anti-Obesity             Anti-Disease

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Where will the savvy wellness consumer go to learn how to maintain a healthy lifestyle? The smart wellness enterprise will answer the call and offer an integrated approach to the wellness experience by catering to the “individual” in an innovative and customized fashion. The “individual” takes center stage as the health sciences reveal no one treatment modality fits all. The new wellness consumer will seek to enhance and improve their personal wellness lifestyle through blending a variety of wellness applications and healing modalities such as: • Yoga • Tai Chi • Detoxifying Body Scrubs • Cooking lessons and Nutritional Counseling • Stress Management and Reduction Therapies • Aromatherapy • Reflexology • Life Coaching “Don’t forget I want to be pampered too with the most unique, authentic, exotic, natural, organic and eco conscious personal care products available. That’s right…Give me something more!”


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

The Cultural Cocktail – Integrating & Blending

century and are embracing healthy lifestyle and preventive personal care through integrated wellness modalities. Creating your own individualized health map is the next wave of wellness culture. The holistic approach to beauty, health and wellness respects the whole person and acknowledges the trinity of mind, body and spirit. The spa and wellness purveyors of today are now facilitators of healthy lifestyle and well being. As more research fuels the integrative approach to health and wellness and we learn more about bioindividuality and personal gene therapy, we will enter the age of World Wise Wellness. A world where spas outnumber hospitals and wellness trumps disease. This may be too much to expect just yet, but not too much to ask. Give us something more! The Day Spa Association (DSA) is a professional membership-based trade organization founded in 1991. The focus is to serve as the primary business resource for day spa professionals through educational seminars and workshops, research studies, publications and Internet informational exchanges.

How do you create wellness culture? Wellness culture in today’s experience economy is reflected through our “global community” which is becoming more blended every day. The traditional Swedish massage is just one of the many types of massages one can enjoy in the 21st century spa. Today you can enjoy a cornucopia of “indigenous treatments” highlighting unique local ingredients and therapeutic traditions. Take a trip to the Southwest of the U.S. and check into the Arizona Biltmore Hotel to experience a “Cactus Flower Wrap” using prickly pear cactus extract to soften your skin or a Sedona Mud Wrap using local mud to detoxify your body and nourish your skin. What is your fancy? Shall it be a Finnish Sauna, a Greek Herbal Bath or a Japanese Salt Steam Bath? How about Thalassotherapy (a Greek word for the sea and refers to variety of treatments that use seawater and seaweed, each designed to tone and revitalize the body and in many cases improving circulation)? You can travel to experience these creative therapies or just head over to your local Day Spa. Wellness Culture crosses all socio-economic borders. Hot Stone Therapy, Ayurveda, and Thai Massage are now commonly offered on the Day Spa menu and all have been inspired by ancient cultures across the globe.

For more information, please contact the DSA at 201-8652065 (USA), e-mail DaySpaAssn@aol.com or visit www.dayspaassociation.com By Laura Connolly Trendscapes Media, Conceptual Storytelling..., Serving Wellness Lifestyle & Culture, P: 609-613-4642, E: info@trendscapesmedia.com, www.trendscapesmedia.com

Bio-Individuality With advances in health science, consumers now reject the “sickness model” dominating the last

Jun e, 2009

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M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

Hawaii: Aloha Spa Trends

Jun e, 2009

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D

iscovering this magical and surreal mystical beauty in this particular spa environment makes it an ideal healing destination for both island visitors and the island ‘ohana alike. The aloha spa trends for the treatments/services at the Spa without Walls located at the Fairmont Orchid, Hawaii integrate the Big Island of Hawaii’s natural therapeutic environment with the ancient healing arts, and traditional Hawaiian or island enrichment body treatments using locally blended or indigenous products. Guests are offered an exotic blend of the essence of aloha with the relaxed and tropical spirit in Hawaii. The term kahuna (plural, kahuna), derives from kahu (caretaker) and means the custodians of esoteric knowledge kept secret in order to preserve its mana. Mana means life force, equivalent to Ki (as in Aikido), Chi (as in Tai Chi) or Shakti in the Sanskrit language. Taken together the word Ho’omana means empowerment or to empower. The Big Island of Hawaii resonates with the natural beauty of nature and the resort and spa blend elegance, comfort, and Hawaiian style that capture the (mana) power of the island. Guests can invigorate their own inner mana as they seek balance and calm with the unique massages. You can choose to have a massage at the waterfall hales and listen to the trickling of the waterfalls or experience the oceanside cabana and surrender to the sounds of the gentle surf, feel the gentle breezes and experience the delightful aromatic fragrances. The ancient master healers of Hawaii practiced massage regularly and created the ancient art of lomilomi which means massage. It is intertwined with the laws of Huna, most specifically the law that everything seeks harmony and everything seeks love. Huna is the healing empowerment and spiritual Shamanism of ancient Hawaii. The therapists


M e dical / Spa : SPA Tre nd s S haking the P l ane t

that do the treatments are all trained in the Hawaiian healing arts. The lomilomi massage originated in the Islands to restore the mana (power) within. Long, gliding rhythmic movements with the fore arms and hands

Jun e, 2009

offers relief to sore muscles, increases circulation and is beneficial for the physical, mental and spiritual aspects of the individual. Imagine a Hawaiian lomilomi massage and a foot wrap which is followed by a compress of specially blended Hawaiian herbs. La‘au Hamo- La‘au (medicinal herbs) Hamo (to rub or massage), blends lomilomi with the use of Hawaiian medicinal and flower extracts which promotes healing, rejuvenates, calms, and soothes the mind and awakens the senses. The highly trained staff embodies the collective wisdom of their Kupuna (Native Elders) which allows them to emanate the Aloha (healing intention) which translates directly to a spa experience like none other for their guests. Coffee has long been noted for its antioxidant qualities to combat the signs of aging skin as the caffeine promotes circulation to help diminish the appearance of cellulite. The famous Kona Coffee, indigenous to the Big Island is a natural ingredient for a body exfoliation and a luscious vanilla orange cream and spritz tops off the aromatic renewing experience. Some products that are manufactured here use only ingredients found in Hawaii and they make their own hydrosols (soul of the plant) infusing locally grown and wild crafted botanicals in ancient copper distilling processes. The products that they

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create produce a resonance and a vibration that are palpable which makes the products feel alive and fresh. The blends of the Hawaiian body products embody the mana, beauty, and mystique of the Hawaiian Islands. Because of the reverence to the indigenous people who evolved in harmony with nature-they capture ancient knowledge and combine tranquil healing elements to optimize and balance the whole person. Under the palm trees, beside the ocean, amid white coral and black lava the exotic fruits and plants such as coconut oil, Lehua honey, Hawaiian sugar cane, papaya enzymes, warmed lava stones and balancing aromatherapy oils, and seaweed are just a few of the natural ingredients that are used in the products and then utilized in the treatments and services. Eco-friendly, with much Aloha the spa trends are creating a sustainable environment for everyone involved and the body, mind, heart, and spirit are renewed using authentic healing methods and products of the earth. Photos: Fairmont Orchid By Sandra Alexcae Moren Spa Consultant, Author and Educator, www.kyron.ca http://www.fairmont.com/orchid


De st i nat ion Quebec The second largest Canadian province, the only one with French as the official language – Québec is undoubtedly a unique member of the Canadian family. Outgrowing the concept of New France Québec today entices with its long and colorful history, aboriginal heritage, beautiful wilderness as well as modern cities. Bienvenue au Québec.


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Québec: Je Me Souviens

L

ocated at the north-eastern tip of the North American continent, Québec covers an immense territory. Its 1,667,926 km2 (643,990 sq. mi.) surface is equivalent to three times the size of France, five times the size of Japan, twice the size of Texas and seven times the size of the United Kingdom, making it Canada’s largest province. Québec’s majestic St. Lawrence River is bordered by the Canadian Shield to the north and the Appalachian mountains to the south. Its vast forests shelter more than a million lakes and rivers. Further north, the deciduous for-

Jun e, 2009

i

Tourism Industry

Tourism is the fifth-largest industry in Quebec. In total, 29,000 companies are involved in the industry, generating 130,000 direct and 48,000 indirect jobs. In 2006, Quebec welcomed 28,551,000 tourists, most of them from the United States, France, the U.K., Germany, Mexico and Japan. Wi k ip e di a.org

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est makes way for the coniferous forest of the taiga, followed by the shrubs and lichens of the tundra.

Aboriginal & French Roots About 10,000 years ago, the first people arrived on the territory that is now Québec. Later, these Aboriginals welcomed the first French colonists. They traded furs with them and helped them adapt to the tough climate of the New World. 1534 Jacques Cartier lands in Gaspé and finds a territory occupied by Aboriginals.


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c 1976 The Summer Olympic Games are held in Montréal. 1992 Montréal celebrates its 350th anniversary. 2008 Québec City, the province’s capital, celebrates its 400th anniversary.

European Charm & Modernity Québec City, the province’s capital, is perched atop Cap Diamant, from where it overlooks the St. Lawrence. The cradle of French civilization in North America and the only fortified city north of Mexico, Québec City has been on UNESCO’s prestigious World Heritage List since 1985. The province’s metropolis, Montréal, is the second-biggest French-speaking city in the world and boasts the largest inland port on the planet. Its architecture combines North American modernity with European charm. Extremely cosmopolitan, it has its own Little Italy, Latin Quarter, Chinatown and Gay Village.

St. Lawrence River

1608 Samuel de Champlain founds the city of “Kebec,” an Amerindian word that means “where the river narrows.” 1642 Paul de Chomedey de Maisonneuve founds Ville-Marie, a small evangelistic mission that will later become Montréal. 1701 The Great Peace of Montréal is signed with 39 Amerindian nations; this treaty that brings an end to the hostilities between the Aboriginal nations and the French colony. 1759 The battle of the Plains of Abraham ends with the defeat of the French troops under Joseph de Montcalm at the hand of the English army led by General James Wolfe. Jun e, 2009

1763 Louis XV cedes New France to the British Crown with the signing of the Treaty of Paris. 1867 The British North America Act is passed, creating a confederation of four provinces: Québec, Ontario, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. 1960 The Quiet Revolution marks the beginning of major social changes and the modernization of Québec. 1967 Montréal hosts the World Exposition, Man and His World. 1974 The National Assembly declares that French is the official language of Québec.

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The St. Lawrence is one of the longest rivers on the planet. It is distinguished not only by its size, but by its rich ecosystems, diverse wildlife and countless unique islands. Its estuary is one of the richest in the world. Various species of marine mammals, birds and fish live, stop over, nest, reproduce or feed here, particularly during the seasonal migrations. The St. Lawrence is also one of the world’s longest navigable waterways, giving access to the Great Lakes and, consequently, the interior of the continent. Its history is shadowed by numerous shipwrecks as a result of shoals that make navigating the river treacherous. Even today, the captains of cargo and passenger ships have to be guided by experienced pilots who are well acquainted with the St. Lawrence’s reef and currents.


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Quebecers In 2006, Québec had 7.6 million inhabitants, which is nearly a quarter of the Canadian population. Its population density was 4.7 inhabitants per square kilometer (11.5 habitants per sq. mi.). With almost 80% of its population living along the St. Lawrence River, Québec has many large uninhabited stretches and wide, open spaces. Aboriginal peoples account for about 1% of Québec's population. In total, the 10 Amerindian nations and the Inuit nation represent nearly 78,000 people. Québec is primarily a French society thanks to its language and its culture. In 1974, the National Assembly (Québec’s parliament) proclaimed French to be the official language of Québec. The population is 80.9% francophone, while 7.8% of Quebecers speak English at home and the remainder speaks another language, such as Italian, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Greek, Vietnamese or Portuguese. Photos: © MTOQ /J. F.Bergeron http://www.bonjourquebec.com

Jun e, 2009

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De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Sustainable Development: Québec’s Tourism Sector in 2009 Collaborative Initiatives

The

need to develop tourism based on sustainability principles is a part of a general tourism policy framework since 2005 in Québec and most tourism sub-sectors also have set broad objectives based on this basis, including the Skidoo Federation. Although sustainability is well accepted across Québec’s tourism sector, in practice it is not a central part of it, even though many businesses and organizations have implemented numerous measures to improve their performance. In this context the action of a few appears ad-hoc.

Jun e, 2009

To date none of the 21 tourism regions had produced a comprehensive regional scale sustainable development strategy with a clearly articulated vision, set of achievable short and long-term objectives and progress measure indicators. Yet, tourism is an important economic activity in Québec and in 12 regions it directly generates at least 3% of all income. Tourism has much more potential to be sustainable, since most regions have rich natural and cultural resource bases and diversified economies. Although natural resource exploitation forms the foundation of many regions across Québec, there is much untapped potential to expand tourism in these areas, thereby achieving greater economic integration. Untapped potentials also remain between biodiversity conservation and tourism development on private and public lands besides the protected area networks managed by the Provincial Parks Authority, la Sépaq and Parks Canada. In some regions such as the Laurentians, concrete initiatives have been undertaken towards strategically integrating tourism into the regional economy through the Provincial Government’s Accord Program. In other regions a shift towards increased collaboration between stakeholders is occurring by the establishment of various cooperatives. Examples include the Lac Saint Pierre Biosphere Reserve, l’Échappé Bleue, Le Parc Aventures Cap Jaseux and V.E.R.T.E. cooperatives. There are probably numerous other locally driven

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projects, but to nobody has examined their socioeconomic value or general importance. There are also 23 territorial areas across Québec with Local Agenda 21 (LA21) strategies and one of the best examples with a strong tourism orientation includes the municipality of Baie-Saint-Paul. There, an LA21 process and willingness and leadership by certain stakeholders continue to enable greater community interaction as part of the redevelopment planning of Le Massif Resort.

Operational Changes to Improve Performance Some tourism operations have a longer history of functioning according to sustainability ideals such as the Le Baluchon rural resort and the zoos in Granby and Saint-Félicien. However, very few businesses have a transparent Corporate Social Responsibility strategy, such as those published by the Granby Zoo and Transat AT. Many tourism operations have reduced their energy and water use and waste output via different mechanisms, but their overall impact is not evaluated. Hotels in Québec seem to be making visible progress, especially since the Québec Hotel Association has its own Reser-Vert certification program, and Québec’s Tourism Industry Corporation of Québec also recently modified its rating system to include environmental considerations and carries out checks on behalf of the Canadian Hotels Associations of Green Key rated establishments. Since recent years, numerous events including conferences and festivals are


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c increasingly organized as ecologically and socially responsible, such as Montreal’s International Jazz Festival. Many other tourism operations also have supply chain management policies and source various products locally and or produced responsibly. Abitibi-Témiscamingue is the first ‘green’ Tourism Region awarded by Recyc-Québec for achieving more than 80% waste recuperation for its office operations. Besides environmental efforts, some tourism businesses are also making contributions to improving north-south relations. For example, L’Auberge l’Autre Jardin has been directly providing financial benefits to developing countries via its support of Carrefour Tiers Monde. Similar actions can be observed by Parc Safari that sells fair-trade products from developing nations. Sustainability news about small and medium enterprises (SME) in Québec is not well documented, which suggests limited progress. Since SMEs comprise about the majority of the tourism industry, it might be worthwhile to examine their progress, and issues so that appropriate tools could help them implement change towards sustainability. Québec’s tourism includes a variety of products to help reduce its greenhouse gas emissions such as a vast bike network developed by Vélo-Québec, the Bixi bike in Montreal and the bio buses in Old Québec and Montreal. Some businesses and events are also carbon neutral, but their profiles and numbers have not been documented. For example, Karavaniers du monde is the first tour operator in Québec to include the cost of carbon offsets in its pricing. Climate change does not seem to be a preoccupation of the Québec tourism sector, despite the vulnerability status of some products notably ski, snowmobile and various other outdoor activities. Some sub sectors in Québec have a long history of encouraging businesses and visitors alike to reduce their environmental impact, notably Québec’s Jun e, 2009

Adventure and Ecotourism Association. How many visitors to and from Québec travel environmentally consciously is not known. Undoubtedly Québecois travelers are increasingly ethically minded. Since 88% of tourists in Québec are of domestic origin, consumers locally need more indication about industry’s progress so they can choose responsibly.

Where to Next? Various operational changes to improve environmental and social performance of the tourism sector are occurring at all scales, but nobody knows the real progress in the absence of benchmark

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indicators. Québec is not ahead nor behind other Canadian Provinces but there has not been a national study to compare progress at this scale. Québec’s tourism sector is in the beginning phase of operationalizing sustainable tourism and the above examples highlight the need for a Provincial scale action plan combined with a set of feasible progress indicators. The support tools and knowledge network to put sustainable tourism principles into action is growing across Québec, and numerous institutions offer special training to improve human resource capacity, in responsible environmental managers that is directly applicable to tourism. There is also a growing amount of effective tools and mechanisms reported from outside Québec to help implement change rapidly and help sustain a viable and responsible industry sector. However, local leadership remains an important key driver to implementing any action plan. There needs to be more leadership from government and industry to move the fragmented sub-sectors forward and to provide a coordinated approach to the entire process in Québec. The tools are wide ranging, and many remain unexplored potentials in Québec, including financial incentives and voluntary measures. Photos: TR archive, TourismeMontTremblant.com By Dr Julianna Priskin Senior Researcher and Analyst, Québec Tourism Intelligence Network, Transat Chair in Tourism, Montreal's School of Management, Université du Québec à Montréal http://tourismintelligence.ca This article was reprinted from its original version published in the 14 May 2009 Edition of the Globe-Veilleur. For a full list of references please refer to: http://tourismintelligence.ca/2009/05/14/a-portrait-ofquebec%E2%80%99s-tourism-sector-in-2009-in-itspath-towards-sustainable-development/


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Spectacular Québec City: A Whole New Experience S

ome travel destinations just seize the imagination. Their beauty is breathtaking. They evoke wonder and excitement. They're vibrant and alive. They're warm and welcoming. But few do it all as effortlessly and as naturally as Québec, the unique walled city on the St. Lawrence River. No other destination in the world offers Québec's compelling mix of features and attractions.

Location Nature has been a generous contributor to Québec City's appeal. The very heart of the Québec City region is the St. Lawrence River, which arrives in a flourish from Montréal, squeezes through the Québec-Lévis narrows under the cliffs of Upper Town, then rushes on to the Atlantic in a widening expanse of water and nature. This unique combination of geography adds to the region's scenic appeal. Located in the St. Lawrence River Valley, the city is divided into two distinct parts – one perched high on the promontory overlooking the river, the other down by the shoreline where the first settlement was built.

Old Québec The city itself also abounds in attractions. Historic Old Québec is the best known of all. This lively walled part of the city, with its winding streets and quaint town squares, traces its roots nearly 400 years back to the founding of the city in 1608, and is the cradle of French civilization in America. Today, Old Québec is renowned for its European Jun e, 2009

— 53 —

charm and unique architectural beauty. Boutiques and cafés line the streets, horse-drawn calèches clip-clopping past stately heritage homes, musicians serenade passers-by, and strollers stop for a view of the river from the cliffside boardwalk. This pedestrian-friendly and thoroughly enjoyable district is like a living history book, with a story to tell at every turn. In 1985, UNESCO recognized its immense historical value by declaring it a "World Heritage Treasure."

Popular Destination Québec City attracts over five million tourists a year, including over one million from outside Canada. Americans are the largest group of foreign visitors, followed by Europeans and Asians. Whatever their origins, all comment favorably on the affordable accommodations, restaurants, and attractions offering visitors great value for their travel dollar  – even those from other parts of Canada who do not enjoy the added benefit of favourable exchange rates.

Four Periods of History In total, four great periods have marked Québec City's development. The first period precedes the arrival of European settlers, when the Québec City region was peopled by proud and independent native nations. Still today, a Huron reservation exists right within the city limits, drawing visitors for a taste of Amerindian cuisine and the opportunity to learn about native culture.


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Restaurants & Shopping However, visitors flock to Québec for more than a glimpse of its remarkable past. This is a city where every activity seems designed to enhance travel enjoyment, and visitors take full advantage of the fact. Québec is particularly noted as a gourmet destination. No other city its size boasts such a selection of fine restaurants and bistros. Whether visitors prefer fine French cuisine, a simple “steak frites” on a sun-drenched patio, the flavorful and innovative offerings of Québec's new generation of gourmet chefs, or the hearty stews and meat pies of Québec country cooking, the choice is so appetizing they may be tempted to extend their stay an extra day or two. Québec City also features a very generous selection of ethnic restaurants to suit every taste. And after a lingering meal, nothing beats browsing through Québec's countless shops and boutiques!

The second period began with the arrival of settlers from France in 1608, at about the same time that British pilgrims were making their way to Virginia. Here they carved a new colony out of the surrounding wilderness, learning from the natives, clearing woodland for farms, and raising families in their bountiful new homeland. Québec was the capital of New France and the administrative center of an empire stretching all the way to Louisiana. In 1759, the British laid siege to Québec, eventually capturing the town with a surprise attack via the Plains of Abraham—today a magnificent urban park. Eager to secure the support of their new French-speaking subjects against the rebellious colonies to the south, the British, rather than assimilating the habitants, decided to guarantee Jun e, 2009

their right to the Catholic religion, the French civil code of law, and the French language. It was under British rule that the Québec fortifications were built, to protect the city against attack by the Americans. Today it is the only walled city in North America. The fourth and most recent chapter of Québec history began with Canadian Confederation in 1867. Québec City became the provincial capital and was gradually to grow into the confident, outward-looking, modern center of trade and culture crossroads it has become today. Each of these four periods has left its own legacy in the city—and each is recounted in fascinating and easy-to-follow detail in the city's many museums and interpretation centers.

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i

Québec City Tourism 2008

For the tourist industry, 2008 was a tremendous success with Québec City’s 400th anniversary activities: +10.1% in hotel occupancy (target: 6.5%) +73.6% in person-nights (target: 54%) -7.9% in outdoor attractions attendance (target: 5%, bad weather and 400th anniversary shows) +7% in indoor attractions attendance (target: 4%) +14.7% in businesses and boutiques (target: 5%) +2.6% in restaurants (target: 7%, residents traveling downtown) +35% in requests for information in tourist information centers +35.8% in conventions and conferences Q u eb e cRe g i on.c om


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

i

Ice Canoe Racing in Quebec City

Ice canoeing started as a grueling, dangerous, necessary means of transportation to cross the frozen Saint Lawrence River during the winter. The legend is that the racing began as a competition between families for the contract to deliver the mail. Now there’s an association (the Association de Canot a Glace de Quebec–ACCGQ) and several regular annual races, including at Quebec City’s Carnaval de Quebec, the biggest Winter Carnival in the World. More than 40 teams compete, struggling with the powerful current, great chunks of ice and numbing water. C a n a d aC o ol.c om

Rue Petit-Champlain, tucked quaintly at the foot of the cliff beneath the city's landmark Château Frontenac, is North America's oldest shopping street. It's great for unearthing Amerindian crafts, local designer fashions, jewellery, decorative objects and much more. Nearby rue Saint-Paul is

Jun e, 2009

brimming with antique shops – the ideal place for whiling the day away. Visitors can also stop by one of the city's many art galleries to pick out a work by an up-and-coming Québec artist or a stunning piece of Inuit sculpture. And for those colder winter nights, perhaps a warm leather or fur coat from a local boutique would be just the thing! Visitors should also be sure to venture outside the city's walls for more discoveries. Rue Saint-Jean in picturesque Faubourg Saint-Jean-Baptiste offers a tempting selection of gift items and fine foods. Rue Cartier in Québec City's chic Montcalm district is another must on any shopping circuit. The trendy rue Saint- Joseph in Saint-Roch district attracts many shoppers in this section of Lower Town because of the unique shops, restaurants and boutiques that

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recently opened. And for truly astounding selection, travel to Laurier Québec, Place Sainte-Foy, Place de la Cité or Galeries de la Capitale, four suburban malls featuring hundreds of stores, many of them unique to Québec City.

Festivals & Events Another great thing about visiting Québec City is the never-ending succession of events and activities the region offers throughout the year. The premier summer event is without question the Québec City Summer Festival, an incredible musical happening that turns Old Québec into a crazy quilt of people, places, and performances. For 11 days, world beat and French song take to the streets as the city becomes one giant outdoor stage. Also on the bill is a fine sampling of other musical styles along with children's theatre and a diverse roster of street and circus entertainers. A host of other events add to the summer enjoyment in Québec, including Les Grands Feux LotoQuébec, a musical fireworks competition in the natural amphitheatre of the Montmorency Falls; the SAQ New France Festival, an annual tribute to the city's French heritage; the International Festival of Military Bands; and the Québec/Saint-Malo Transat, an international sailing race held every four years. Photos: © MTOQ / J. Bourdeau, R. Gilles, L. Turgeon, www.bonjourquebec.com http://www.quebecregion.com


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Go Back in History: The Plains of Abraham The Battle “The Plains of Abraham” is the name commonly used to designate the Battlefields Park. Located on a natural promontory along the North Shore of the St. Lawrence River, the site has been the focus of the development of Quebec City since its founding by Samuel de Champlain in 1608. On 13 September 1759, the land was the scene of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in the French and Indian War (part of the Seven Years' War) in which the British army, under General James Wolfe, climbed the steep cliff under the city in darkness, surprising and defeating the French. Both Wolfe and the French commander Montcalm died of their wounds but the battle left control of Quebec City to the British, which would allow them to take control

i

The

site of many clashes for supremacy between the French and British Empires, the Battlefields Park with the 108-acre Plains of Abraham is the scene of the 1759 Conquest, which changed the fate of North America.

Jun e, 2009

Battle Commemorations

The battle of the Plains of Abraham (September 13, 1759) and the battle of Sainte-Foy (April 28, 1760) took place 250 years ago. To make sure we don’t forget these milestone historical facts, activities marking the 250th anniversary of the battles will be held throughout the year: thematic days, an exhibition on the Seven Years’ War, symposiums with the participation of historians, memorials in memory of the combatants, books recalling the writings of the military and civilians who lived through these events, and historic reminders in the Greater Québec City area. C cbn-nb c .g c .c a

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of Canada the following year with the surrender of Montreal despite the victory of the Chevalier de Levis over General James Murray on 28 April 1760. With the Treaty of Paris in 1763, France consequently renounced possession of Canada, Acadia, and most of Louisiana which went to Spain although France retained control over New Orleans and the surrounding area. In 1800, following Spain's military demise at the hands of Napoleon, Louisiana was returned to France according to the terms of the Treaty of San Ildefonso. This cleared the way for the Louisiana Purchase by the United States in 1803, effectively ending French rule in mainland North America.

Lungs of the City On March 17, 1908, the law creating the National Battlefields Commission (NBC) was sanctioned to highlight and preserve this site, unique in the world by its sheer size, its geographic location, its historical role and its beauty. The Battlefields Park, which groups together the Plains of Abraham and the Des Braves Park, was developed to honour the memory of both French and British combatants Apart from its historical past, the park is to Québec what Central Park and Hyde Park are to New York and London: a city park of outstanding value, the lungs of the city. One hundred and eight hectares of meadow and grassy knolls, decked with flowers or covered with snow, are there for residents and visitors to enjoy. The parks are used by 4 million visitors and tourists annually for sports, relaxation, outdoor concerts, and festivals, especially during Fête nationale du Québec celebrations, the Quebec Winter Carnival, and the Quebec City Summer Festival. Photo: Flickr.com http://www.ccbn-nbc.gc.ca http://en.wikipedia.org


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

Canada's French Connection: Montreal's History of Multiculturalism

W

hen the French first arrived in North America with designs on creating a 'New France', they observed the native tribes of the Algonquian, Iroquoian and Inuit, and built their first colonies based on the fur-trading tradition of these indigenous peoples. This was the beginning of Canada's own grand tradition of integration, of the acceptance of different cultures; a tradition that – like the language

Jun e, 2009

spoken by those colonizers – is still very much alive in Quebec today. What Canada's province of Quebec represents, then, as its French mother-tongue proudly proclaims, is an area of North America that, rather than striving for identity, has instead gained identity through an amalgamation of other identities and

— 57 —


De sti nati on : Q u eb e c

cultures – a province that gains uniqueness by mingling great aspects from many different cultures; a province that stands singular in its multiculturalism. A great example of Quebec's multiculturalism can be found in its largest city, Montreal, that can be seen as a city made from cities; a place grafted from lots of different cultures, from its original foundation as part of 'New France', right through its British rule and development alongside the United States, to

Jun e, 2009

the Montreal we see today – a city with enough influences and culture for three cities. As well as its language, Montreal still shows the influence of the original European settlers in the part of the city known as Vieux-Montreal, or Old Montreal. Some of the buildings in this part of the city date right back to the seventeenth century, like the colonial mansion Chateau Ramezay, and the Notre-Dame-de-Bon-Secours Chapel – the colonial history of which runs so deep that its under-

— 58 —

ground crypt is the site of an archeological excavation! Another building of historical and architectural interest is the vast Basilique Notre-Dame de Montreal, designed by Irish-American architect James O'Donnel, whose Gothic Revivalist style again highlights the coming together of older European themes in a more modern, North American setting. It is said that O'Donnel, a Protestant, was so distraught at the idea of not being entombed in this beautiful basilica that he converted to Catholicism on his deathbed! Today, the city's more modern take on Quebec's tradition of multiculturalism is in evidence wherever you look, and expresses itself frequently through artistic performances and festivals, from the elegant pirouettes of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens to the acrobatic barrel jumps of the avant-garde La La La Human Steps; from the world's largest gay-benefit dance festival Black and Blue, to the blue notes of the Montreal International Jazz Festival. Other more modern sights include the Olympic Stadium built for the 1976 games – which boasts the tallest slanted tower in the world – and the Underground City, the largest underground complex in the world, which is home to many of the shopping malls, museums and hotels in Montreal although surface dwellers are well catered for in this department too! This majestic city, then, can boast a level of multiculturalism most cities cannot, for Montreal has not only adapted to new cultures, but its entire history, its charm, and its success have all relied on cultural acceptance. Photos: © MTOQ / R.Baronet, R. Gilles, L. Turgeon, www. bonjourquebec.com By Paul Mcindoe http://EzineArticles.com


Fairs & Exhibitions T ravel / T ourism

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regions


Fairs & E x hi b ition s : J U N E , 2009

Western Europe

City Break : The European Cities Business to Business Travel Event Location

Gothenburg / Sweden

Start / End

15 June 2009 / 16 June 2009

Provider

Reed Exhibitions

Contact

sonia.wilson@citybreakexpo.com

Game Fair 2009 Location

Chambord / France

Start / End

19 June 2009 / 21 June 2009

Provider

Lariviere Organisation

Contact

organisation@editions-lariviere.fr

Coach Tourism Show Location

Balloch, Scotland / UK

Start / End

03 June 2009 / 03 June 2009

Provider

Scottish Tourism Forum

Contact

ruth.greig@stforum.co.uk

EUROAL: Latin American and European Fair of Tourism, Art and Culture Location

Torremolinos (Málaga) / Spain

Start / End

04 June 2009 / 06 June 2009

Provider

Palacio de Congresos y Exposiciones Torremolinos

Contact

euroal@palacio-congresos.com

International Trieste Tradefair Location

Trieste / Italy

Start / End

06 June 2009 / 14 June 2009

Provider

Fiera Trieste

Contact

info@fiera.trieste.it

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Fairs & E x hi b ition s : J U N E , 2009

Africa/MIDDLE EAST

Global Airport Expansion Congress Location

Doha / Qatar

Start / End

15 June 2009 / 16 June 2009

Provider

Naseba Communications

Contact

robint@naseba.com

Riyadh Travel 2009 Location

Riyadh / Saudi Arabia

Start / End

02 June 2009 / 04 June 2009

Provider

Asas Exhibitions & Conferences Organizing Company

Contact

az@asas.biz

Karibu Travel & Tourism Fair Location

Arusha / Tanzania

Start / End

05 June 2009 / 07 June 2009

Provider

KARIBU TRADE FAIR LIMITED

Contact

info@karibufair.com

Travel Distribution Middle East Location

Dubai / United Arab Emirates

Start / End

09 June 2009 / 10 June 2009

Provider

EyeforTravel

Contact

nick@eyefortravel.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Fairs & E x hi b ition s : J U N E , 2009

North America

Caribbean Veggie Fest: Health Tourism & Spa Conference Location

Kingston / Jamaica

Start / End

13 June 2009 / 14 June 2009

Provider

Positive Tourism Productions

Contact

info@caribbeanveggiewellness.com

Destinations Showcase Chicago Location

Chicago, IL / United States of America

Start / End

24 June 2009 / 24 June 2009

Provider

Destination Marketing Association International

Contact

info@destinationmarketing.org

Tourism Week Location

Ottawa / Canada

Start / End

01 June 2009 / 07 June 2009

Provider

Tourism Industry Association of Canada

Contact

kdesjardins@tiac.travel

Online Marketing in Strategies in Travel USA Location

Miami, FL / United States of America

Start / End

03 June 2009 / 04 June 2009

Provider

EyeforTravel

Contact

helen@eyefortravel.com

HSMAI’s Affordable Meetings West Conference and Exhibition Location

San Jose, CA / United States of America

Start / End

10 June 2009 / 11 June 2009

Provider

HSMAI

Contact

info@hsmai.org

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

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Fairs & E x hi b ition s : J U N E , 2009

Asia & Pacific

Medical Tourism Asia 2009 Location

Rasa Sentosa Resort / Singapore

Start / End

09 June 2009 / 11 June 2009

Provider

Medical Tourism Asia

Contact

rita.parasurum@ibcasia.com.sg

International Travel Expo Hong Kong Location

Hong Kong / China

Start / End

11 June 2009 / 14 June 2009

Provider

TKS Exhibition Services Ltd

Contact

info@tkshk.com

MICE, Business & Incentive Travel Expo

Thailand Travel Mart Plus Location

Bangkok / Thailand

Start / End

03 June 2009 / 07 June 2009

Provider

Tourism Authority of Thailand

Contact

info@thailandtravelmartplus.com

KOTFA: Korea World Travel Fair Location

Seoul / Korea

Start / End

04 June 2009 / 07 June 2009

Provider

Korea Tourism Association

Contact

kotfa@kotfa.co.kr

FHC Beijing 2009

Location

Hong Kong / China

Start / End

11 June 2009 / 13 June 2009

Provider

TKS Exhibition Services Ltd

Contact

info@tkshk.com

ITE - 23rd International Travel Expo Hong Kong Location

Hong Kong / Hong Kong

Start / End

11 June 2009 / 14 June 2009

Provider

TKS Exhibition Services Ltd

Contact

travel@tkshk.com

ITE MICE – 4th Business & Incentive Travel Expo Location

Hong Kong / Hong Kong

Start / End

11 June 2009 / 13 June 2009

Provider

TKS Exhibition Services Ltd

Contact

travel@tkshk.com

Asia Luxury Travel Market

Location

Beijing / China

Location

Shanghai / China

Start / End

09 June 2009 / 11 June 2009

Start / End

15 June 2009 / 18 June 2009

Provider

CIE - China International Exhibitions

Provider

Reed Exhibitions

Contact

fhc@chinaallworld.com

Contact

debbie.jackson@iltm.net

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Fairs & E x hi b ition s : J U N E , 2009 BEST EN Think Tank: The Importance of Values in Sustainable Tourism Location

Singapore / Singapore

Start / End

15 June 2009 / 18 June 2009

Provider

BEST EN

Contact

liburd@sitkom.sdu.dk

Beijing International Tourism Expo Location

Beijing / China

Start / End

18 June 2009 / 20 June 2009

Provider

CEMS

Contact

ruth@cems.com.sg

Interbath China Location

Shanghai / China

Start / End

28 June 2009 / 01 July 2009

Provider

Landesmesse Stuttgart GmbH

Contact

frank.roeder@messe-stuttgart.de

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Tourism Review Online Magazine - 06/2009  

June, 2009 Milada Sovadinova Editor Hurray! The summer is coming. This is the perfect time to think about your next holiday destination. Let...