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Dear readers, The May issue is finally here! If you feel like visiting an exotic yet modern country open the Destination supplement and immerse in the Malaysian world of rain forests, traditional architecture as well as delicious food. While waiting at the airport try to focus on the design and artistic experience you get. Art becomes an important part of today’s airports. Open the Transport part to learn more. Almost any town and city in the world boasts about their wonderful museums. However let us present a group of remarkable institutions dedicated solely to the outstanding figures of music, poetry as well as politics. Read the Heritage supplement. If you are in the spa industry you are well aware of the growing number of hotel spas. Are they more successful than resort spas? What are the latest trends? Open the Spa part. First of all however discover the world of global geoparks and visit Spain, Portugal or even Romania. Read the Professional supplement. Enjoy the spring! Milada Sovadinova Editor


CONTENTS

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H E R I TAG E MuseuMs: stars CoMing alive

TRANSPORT

CONTENTS

Artistic Airports? Uplifting & inspiring DestinAtion The artistic design of airports helps to form the overall experience of travelers forced to spend long hours waiting for their connection. Get acquainted with the unique design of Vancouver’s and Denver’s airport, the new terminal at Changi and in the Carrasco Airport in Montevideo.

Mozart, Chopin, Wagner, but also Churchill and Whitman – they all were remarkable figures whose legacy is present even in today’s world. Learn more about them in the museums dedicated solely to their life and achievements – museums of outstanding personalities.

HERITAGE: Museums: Stars Coming Alive.........4

TRANSPORT: Artistic Airports? Uplifting & Inspiring Destination...................33

Lucerne: Unique Tribute to Richard Wagner. ...........................................................5 Long Island: The Birthplace of America’s Greatest Poet..........................................7 Warsaw: New Museum of Fryderyk Chopin. .................................................................9 Mozarthaus Vienna: At Home with Mozart..............................................................11 Churchill Museum: In the Footsteps of the Prime Minister...............................13

Vancouver’s Artistic Airport.......................................................................................34 Changi Airport Terminal 3 – Clear and Natural..........................................................36 Denver International Airport Art: Part of the Cultural Capital..................38 Carrasco Airport in Montevideo: A Great Project Come True..........................40

Professional

De st i nat ion M a l ay s i a : T r u ly a s i a

In the Footsteps oF Global Geoparks

Geoparks! What are they? What to expect? What can you see there? Let us introduce the concept of global geoparks embraced mainly by UNESCO but other organizations as well. Get familiar with the parks in Spain, Portugal, Sicily but also China or France.

Malaysia – a multicultural country of friendly people, beautiful nature reserves, long history as well as modern high-tech cities. Get familiar with this “truly Asian” world.

Professional: In the Footsteps of Global Geoparks......................................................14

Discover the Fascinating World of Geoparks. .......................................................15 Arouca Geopark: The Gem in Northern Portugal..................................................18 Examine the Dinosaur Fossils in the Maestrazgo Geopark................................20 The Madonie National Park: Discover the Sicilian Heritage.............................22

MEDICAL

Destination: Malaysia: Truly Asia............................42 Malaysia: Standing out among the Crowd..............................................................43 Travel and Tourism in Malaysia...................................................................................45 Kuala Lumpur: The New Gateway to South-East Asia. ...........................................47 Penang: Old-world Charm and Beach Retreat.......................................................49 Taman Negara: The Oldest Rainforest in the World............................................51

Fairs & Exhibitions

SPA HOTELS MORE & MORE POPULAR

T r av e l / T o u r i s m

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r e g i o n s

Hotel spas represent an important market within the spa industry. How much were they affected by the recession? What is the outlook? And what about the latest trends in the field? Check out the views of the experts.

Medical: SPA HOTELS MORE & MORE POPULAR........................................................24

Fairs & Exhibitions: Travel/Tourism in MAY 2010 by regions..................................................52

The Performance of Hotel Spas....................................................................................25 Trends That Will Help Keep Hotel Spas Attracting Customers.........................27 Europe’s Top 10 Luxury Hotel Spas................................................................................29 Hotel Spas Recession Overload. ...................................................................................31

Western Europe..................................................................................................................53 CENTRAL Europe..................................................................................................................54 Africa/MIDDLE EAST.......................................................................................................55 North America. ..................................................................................................................57 Asia & Pacific. ......................................................................................................................58


H E R I TAG E Museums: Stars Coming Alive

Mozart, Chopin, Wagner, but also Churchill and Whitman – they all were remarkable figures whose legacy is present even in today’s world. Learn more about them in the museums dedicated solely to their life and achievements – museums of outstanding personalities.


H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

Lucerne: Unique Tribute to Richard Wagner discovered the slightly neglected, but magnificent mansion-house then owned by the patrician Am Rhyn family. Soon afterwards, he was able to move into the completely furnished house. When Richard Wagner signed the tenancy agreement with Lieutenant Colonel Walter Am Rhyn in April 1866, he planned to spend only one year at the Tribschen mansion-house. However, he and his family finally lived at the shore of Lake Lucerne for six years. Wagner's years in Lucerne are said to be his happiest. On August 25th 1870, he married Cosima. The ceremony took place at St. Matthew's Church in Lucerne. It was here that his son Siegfried, born on Tribschen, was baptized. In honor of these two events he composed the 'Siegfried Idyll' which was first performed on the stairs of the mansion-house.

Siegfried-Idyll's World Premiere

Richard Wagner had already established more than a passing acquaintanceship with Lucerne and its surroundings before he took up residence in the Tribschen villa, having visited the town on four occasions previously. Wagner’s fifth and final stay in Lucerne lasted from 5th April 1866 to 22nd April 1872. During a boat trip on the Lake of Lucerne with Cosima von Bülow, the daughter of Franz Liszt, he May, 2 0 1 0

In December 1870 Wagner had secretly composed a serenade for Cosima's birthday. This "Tribschen-Idyll" as he first named it became known throughout the world later as the "Siegfried-Idyll". The preparations for its performance and the rehearsal were of course also kept strictly secret from Cosima. After the general rehearsal in the Lucerne Hotel du Lac, conducted by Wagner, the musicians came to Tribschen very early in the morning of the 25th December 1870, tuned their instruments in the spacious kitchen and took up their positions on the staircase: for the first time the beautiful melodies of the "Siegfried-Idyll" sounded throughout the house.

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Opening Concert for the Lucerne Festival It is worth mentioning that the incomparable "Siegfried Idyll" was again heard 1938 in the place where it had been created, although not this time on the staircase within, but outside in the park in the version scored for large orchestra and under the baton of the Italian maestro Arturo Toscanini, who with this open air concert had laid the foundation stone, as it were, of the International Music Festival, nowadays called Lucerne Festival.

Wagner and His Guests From 1866 to 1872 Wagner welcomed various famous friends and relatives to his mansion-house in Tribschen. His greatest patron and admirer was Ludwig II of Bavaria. In order to be as close to the venerated maestro as possible, His Majesty even spent the nights in a little room next to Richard Wagner’s bedroom. Other guests were Friedrich Nietzsche who visited the Wagner family 23 times in Tribschen. At any time Nietzsche was welcomed as a guest and almost as a member of the family. Other admirers of music and composers visited Wagner during his years in Tribschen: Franz Liszt– Cosima's father, Peter Cornelius, pianist Josef Rubinstein, musicologist Edouard Schuré, architect Gottfried Semper, authors Judith Gautier and Catulle Mendès as well as Villiers de l'Isle-Adam and many others.


H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

Special Exhibition 2010 In the early 1850s Richard Wagner lived in Switzerland not only as a political refugee but also as a tourist and an adventurous hiker. Especially Brunnen and Lucerne were visited by Wagner several times. From here he started his long hiking tours in Central Switzerland. This year the Richard Wagner Museum opens an exhibition "Myth of the Alps in the 19th Century: Richard Wagner’s hiking tours in Switzerland". The exhibition shows how dangerous such mountain

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tours of several days in the pioneer period of Swiss alpinism were. They often took place with insufficient equipment, mostly on foot or on horseback on unmarked paths. Musical inspirations which resulted from the close relationship of Wagner to the great landscape of the mountains are also reported concretely. The exhibition is enriched by original documents from the Richard Wagner National Archive Bayreuth. http://www.richard-wagner-museum.ch

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H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

Long Island: The Birthplace of America’s Greatest Poet

The

Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site and Interpretive Center is the native home of the famous poet Walt Whitman, widely recognized as America’s Greatest Poet. Whitman was born here in 1819 in a farmhouse built by his father circa 1810. In Whitman’s time, the Birthplace homestead was approximately a 20-acre farm, but despite Whitman’s national prominence, the property was sold off until only approximately two acres were left by 1940. The site in West Hills faced the continual threat of suburban encroachment. So in 1949, a group of poets, business people and concerned citizens founded the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association (WWBA) to help raise awareness and funds to preserve this historic treasure. Long Island’s primary newspaper, Newsday, launched a fund-raising campaign that inspired

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students across Long Island to collect pennies for the cause. After three months of widespread community support, WWBA was able to purchase and protect the property. In 1957, the Birthplace was designated a New York State Historic Site and since 1985 the property has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The US Millennium Council named it an “American Treasure” in 1999. The Birthplace was restored in 2001 and the restoration was filmed for the TV series, “This Old House.” A modern Interpretive/Visitors Center was built in 1997. In 2004, the old barn was replaced by a new structure, The Gathering House, which retained the original barn beams as flooring. The Birthplace farmhouse is an excellent example of native Long Island craftsmanship – simple in line with pleasing proportion. The Birthplace was constructed with hand-hewn beams that are held together by wooden pegs and laid on whole tree trunks supported by a foundation of small boulders. It is notable for several unusual architectural features, such as its corbelled chimney and storage closets in fireplace walls. Much of the hardware in the home is original. Though Whitman’s family moved to Brooklyn when he was four years old, Whitman always felt a closeness to his ancestral Birthplace and returned to the region often. He referred to Long Island as his beloved “Paumanok”, which is the Native American name for “fish-shaped” Long Island. Celebrated for capturing the nation’s spirit during the nineteenth

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century, Whitman’s writings examined some of the era’s most significant events, including the nation’s Westward Expansion, immigration, slavery and the Civil War. Whitman’s career spanned over 40 years and thousands of works. Not only does WWBA remain committed to preserving the actual Birthplace as a Museum, it also remains dedicated to promoting the voice of Walt Whitman by celebrating the poet’s vision of democracy, diversity, and creativity through its programs and events. WWBA offers site tours and over 16,000 people visit annually. WWBA also sponsors a wide array of literary events, cultural programs, and family activities. Their extensive educational programs attract over 7,000 regional students per year. Along with the Birthplace Museum, the Interpretive Center contains a series of engaging exhibits whereby visitors can delve deeply into Whitman’s life and times. The exhibit incorporates artifacts, original manuscripts, letters and over 130 portraits of Walt Whitman. Poster panels trace Walt’s development from his boyhood to his international prominence. An interactive children’s table holds toys and games from the era. Visitors can listen to Whitman reading his poem “America” which was recorded on an Edison cylinder. Among the museum’s most important pieces is a first edition of Whitman’s epic book of poetry Leaves of Grass and his autobiographical Specimen Days. A short stroll across the grand lawn brings visitors to the Gathering House which offers rotating art exhibits.


H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

Thanks to the continued commitment and support of New York State Senator Carl L. Marcellino and Assemblyman Steven Englebright, the preservation of the Birthplace State Historic Site is helping visitors, writers, scholars and children better understand and appreciate the life and times of Walt Whitman. The Birthplace State Historic Site is open daily from June 15 to Labor Day, and on Wednesday to Sunday from Labor Day to June 14. Guided tours are offered during opening hours and private group tours can be arranged. A museum gift shop is avail-

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able. Picnic tables and park benches are situated on the grand lawn. The facility is fully-handicapped accessible. Facilities are available for rental. Major events include monthly poetry readings, a student poetry-writing contest, a Whitman Family Reunion, a May Birthday Celebration with a famous Poetin-Residence, and an annual Benefit Gala Dinner Dance at Oheka Castle. By Cynthia Shor http://www.waltwhitman.org

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Warsaw: New Museum of Fryderyk Chopin

C

elebrating the Chopin Year 2010 is a time of many important cultural events. One of the key investments is the opening of a new museum exhibition of Fryderyk Chopin. Works on rebuilding the old premises of the museum have been carried out since 2005. The institution is dedicated to collecting memorabilia of Fry-

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H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

deryk Chopin, for many years located in the historic Ostrogski Palace at 1, Okólnik Street in Warsaw. Its redevelopment has completely changed the nature of the previous Museum. As a result of this metamorphosis particular care has been taken to preserve the relation with a long tradition of the institution. At the same time the Mu-

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seum has gained a new identity as an institution to meet the needs of viewers, depending on their individual needs based on the various collections of artifacts, the results of the latest scientific research and artistic activity. The biggest world collection of items related to Fryderyk Chopin, includes musical manuscripts, printed scores, Chopin correspondence, personal items (cufflinks, diaries etc.), iconography, as well as biographical works about him and critical commentaries on his compositions and his reception as a composer. The architectural reconstruction project was prepared by the Grzegory & Partnerzy Architekci Studio. New concept of functional museum was designed after the technical expertise and gathering the necessary documentation. The project aimed at increasing the working space of the museum (managed to increase by 90%) and the construction of a new concert hall. The project presented by the firm Migliore+Servetto Architetti Associati, belonging to two Italian architects Ico Migliore and Mara Servetto turned out to be the best. Their company deals with the architectural designs of buildings and interiors as well as implementing the concept of interactive exhibition for Museums and Institutions. The investment is financed by the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage, Operational Program Infrastructure and Environment. The Fryderyk Chopin Institute cares about the content of the Chopin Museum. The Chopin Museum is the focal point of the Chopin Year celebrations in 2010 and also the most important national institution of the memory of a great Composer. “It is a difficult task that we wish to accomplish, due to the complexity and specificity of the theme itself,” said Alicja Knast, the Chopin Muzeum curator. “We are dealing with matter and the elusive intan-


H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

gibles that everyone receives in their own unique way: with music. Fryderyk Chopin and his work is, of course, in the center of our interest. The main question we set for us was how to show that wealth in an accurate, but also attractive way. Therefore, we do not limit ourselves to one medium; we will not only offer visitors with headphones. Also, there will be the sound installation with live concerts. We want the museum to be a universal, inspiring and thoughtful site, corresponding at the same time with the individual needs of the visitors.” The innovation of the museum is mainly based on an individual approach to the viewer. Each guest receives a ticket made with the use of the RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) technology. InforMay, 2 0 1 0

mation about viewer’s preferences will be digitally encoded in the ticket. Depending on the person’s decision and needs the right profile tour will be chosen. The use of RFID technology allows customization of the audio-visual content, taking into account four levels of narrative: basic, advanced, for children and for the visually impaired. Each level will be presented in eight languages. An omnipresent ‘sounds cape’ which is based on its own scenario will go silent in the room documenting the composer’s death. With the use of the light and sound the elements of particular interest to the viewer will be exposed. Visitors will be able to choose one of eight languages, and one of the four tour profiles. The exhibition is developed on the four stories of the palace, ranging from the basement. Each floor’s exhibition will be devoted to life and work of the composer from a different perspective. We'll see works by Chopin, his inspiration, the women in his life as well as the circumstances of the birth and death of the Composer. The Museum focuses on individual reception. Its construction at the same time implies a kind of universality. The various components of exposure have been designed in such a way that everyone in the museum finds something for themselves: the school tours, artists as well as students seeking indepth knowledge of manners and people of Chopin's era. All these features allow the institution to break the stereotypical image of a “museum” as a dull, ‘dead’ exhibition. Interactivity, self-selection and an extremely wide range of information from different fields will allow the new Chopin Museum to be both the central to the Chopin’s Year celebrations and the National Memorial of Fryderyk Chopin. By Link PR http://linkpr.pl http://biuro.chopin2010.pl

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Mozarthaus Vienna: At Home with Mozart

H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

“I assure you that this is a magnificent place – and the best place in the world for my profession,” wrote Mozart to his father about his house in Vienna, and the comment proved to be correct. In the ten years he lived here he composed many of his most important works and matured to become the artist whom we know and appreciate today. He also earned a lot of money and was able to enjoy an extravagant lifestyle – as is impressively demonstrated by the only surviving apartment at Domgasse 5 close to St. Stephan’s Cathedral. Mozart lived here in the impressive bel-étage from September 1784 to April 1787, during which time he composed his famous opera The Marriage of Figaro. After being left untended for many years, the Figaro-Haus, as it was called, was finally refurbished and Mozart’s apartment integrated in the new four-storey Mozarthaus Vienna, where music lovers can now find out all about Mozart’s Vienna years. Following Mozart’s famous quotation from a letter to his father Leopold, the tour starts on the third floor of the building, where visitors are offered audiovisual information about the various places in which Mozart lived and his personal and social situation in the baroque eighteenth-century Vienna. Another area deals with the people of importance to him: the emperor, clients, patrons, friends, theatre officials and other contemporaries. Mozart’s relationship with the freemasons and his sometimes unorthodox behavior are also investigated. The presentation on the second floor deals with Mozart’s operas, with particular emphasis on the May, 2 0 1 0

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da Ponte operas The Marriage of Figaro and Don Giovanni. It looks at the musical context, fellow composers and rivals and also his last great work, the Requiem. The Magic Flute area features a multimedia installation and shows that Mozart does not belong to a single country or city but to the whole world. The tour continues in the historical surroundings in which Mozart actually lived with his wife Constanze, their children, three servants, the dog Gaukerl and the bird Starl. Mozart and his wife arrived here with their nine-day-old baby Karl Thomas. A second child was born here but died a few weeks later. Visitors can see where the billiard table stood, where Mozart worked, where the servants slept, and where Mozart’s multilingual library was installed. As the original furniture no longer exists, it is replaced by multimedia installations and some


H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

outstanding historical objects like the rare late eighteenth-century flute clock. A further highlight is the Camesina room, used by Mozart as a bedroom, which contains a sample of the famous Viennese stucco artist’s work. On the ground floor is Café Figaro, and the museum shop is on the first floor, technically in the neighboring house, Domgasse 3. Concerts, readings and symposiums take place in the delightful vaulted lower basement. The programme for the year 2010 features The Marriage of Figaro, which was composed by Mozart at Domgasse 5. An exhibition entitled “What we are not allowed to say we’ll have to sing” until

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6 June looks at the musical context surrounding Figaro and its reception. From 26 June the second special exhibition of the year, “You will see how merry we can be – Mozart and women”, will look at Mozart’s relationship with women such as Aloysia Weber and Nancy Storace. Three concert cycles with renowned performers round off the programme. Photos: Mozarthaus Vienna/David Peters By Alfred Stalzer http://www.mozarthausvienna.at

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Churchill Museum: In the Footsteps of the Prime Minister The

H eritage : Mu s e um s : Star s C oming Aliv e

Cabinet War Rooms, the place of today’s Churchill Museum, were established in their subterranean location in 1938-39, initially to house military planners and their support staff but then, after several changes of mind, to house the War Cabinet. Housed in a roughly converted storage basement at the back of Whitehall, underneath one of the major edifices that grace the area – and would seem to be an easy target for aerial bombing! – they provided sheltered working and living accommodation for hundreds of civilians, civil servants and members of the armed forces, at all levels from just before war broke out in 1939 to the day after it finished in August 1945. Their humble appearance, their shallow draft (they are only one floor below ground) and their poor facilities (no WCs, no bathing facilities, a problem for a Prime Minister like Winston Churchill with a bathing obsession) come as a shock, as do their very preservation and ready access to all comers. The site, which once was so secret that few outside the site’s complement were even aware of it, is now kept, in large part, just as it looked when last used in 1945. The Cabinet Room, with its chairs, table coverings, lights and maps all positioned were they have always been, lacks only the fug of cigar and cigarette smoke and perhaps the stentorian Churchillian tones that would once have boomed out at the

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Chiefs of Staff ranged precariously in front of him. The Map Room is cluttered and crowded with all the impedimenta of the busy, round-the-clock operational monitoring scene it once had been: the wall maps, densely covered in pin holes marking the movements of shipping across the enemy submarine-infested oceans, the coloured direct-line telephones, the high tech apparatus that now looks so dated, all abandoned on the declaration of peace, all still sitting as if ready for use again. When the site was opened to the public just over 25 years ago it was only one third of what it had grown into by 1941, but, in more recent times and to accommodate its ever growing audience (it now regularly welcomes over 300,000 visitors a year) it took over more space underground and, in 2005, opened the award-winning Churchill Museum. From the perfectly preserved historic scene, the visitor moves into a world of interactive technology and iconic objects, in this most engaging of modern museum displays. The feeling that one is walking the corridors in the footsteps of Churchill and the immersion in his life that the Churchill Museum provides is one of the most emotional and involving museum visits imaginable. It’s a secret that should be shared. By Nicola Osmond-Evans http://www.iwm.org.uk/churchill


P rofessio n a l In the Footsteps of Global Geoparks

Geoparks! What are they? What to expect? What can you see there? Let us introduce the concept of global geoparks embraced mainly by UNESCO but other organizations as well. Get familiar with the parks in Spain, Portugal, Sicily but also China or France.


P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s

Discover the Fascinating World of Geoparks

The

brilliant idea of “geo-park” is perspicuous to any nature lover and travel freak. Nonetheless it became concrete only late and under unusual circumstances, when two geoscientists from Europe (French Guy Martini and Greek Nicolas Zouros) had met in China in 1997 during a meeting on geological heritage. Many a good idea has been conceived in China, where foreigners sometimes more easily discover diamonds in the haystack. In this case the valuable findings were unique natural sceneries in one single huge country, where wantonly negligent destruction of mankind’s living space most amazingly contrasts with preserved nature reserves and tourism highlights. In Europe geoparks were then firstly established by applying for funds at Brussels with some work at a regional level, as seen for the Réserve Géologique de Haute Provence (France), and finding partners in the European Union to share three common goals: (1) to preserve geological heritage, (2) to enhance the public to understand earth science, and (3) to promote sustainable economic development on a regional level. Comparable regions, joining the Alpine Provence, were Lesvos Island (Greece), Maestrazgo / Terruel (Spain), and Vulkaneifel (Germany). Just one year later, in 1998, a UNESCO Geopark programme was established. The framework of International Network of Geoparks (INoG) required (1) management plans for supporting sustainable socio-economic development (with agritourism and geotourism as most potential actors), (2) methods

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P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s for conserving and enhancing geological heritage, means for teaching geoscientific disciplines and environmental issues, and (3) joint-proposals from public authorities, local communities and private actors willing to integrate Earth Heritage Conservation into sustainable development.

European Geopark Network Established By 2000, a convention on Lesvos Island followed to create a European Geopark Network substantiating the original three goals. Firstly, to exchange ideas and cooperate with all actors of different geoparks. Secondly, to use the different geological histories and national mentalities of each nation state, and to work towards the sustainable development of landscape resources for future generations. And thirdly, to use the European Geopark Network as an instrument for the building of a sustainable European Community of Regions – a program strongly supported by the EU-program Interreg IIIC South for sharing experience and best practices in geological monuments management and developing geotourism in Europe. Ten years later, in 2010, more people have become aware, how beautiful landscapes and sceneries might look like, no matter if these are awe inspiring mountains, spellbound lakes or queer rock formations. Thereby one has not to travel around the globe or dive into the Grand Canyon, since European countries and regions also hide many a unique geological heritage. But not all of them have reached the world platform, or at least have been attached as marginal national geopark into a larger world-class geopark unit. One example is the 14 million year old Ries basin. The world’s best researched meteorite crater, with its focus of the fully preserved walled town of medieval Noerdlingen, is now an exclusive part of the Swabian Alb Geopark. May, 2 0 1 0

Landscapes are anything else than “boring” or “dead”. They speak thousands of languages telling us their history written in stone. As demonstrated on the following examples, a geopark becomes a challenging target, where time-honored monuments of long earth history are greeting and consolidating Europe’s multi-various and multi-cultural regions.

North West Highlands Geopark The North West Highlands of Scotland (UK) may beat the Grand Canyon as a window of Earth’s history. They are the key area of earth sciences calling geoscientists from all over the world. In 19th cen-

200 Geoparks in China China’s most fascinating landscapes count almost 200 national geoparks. Only 22 of them so far are members of the international platform of World Geoparks by 2010, although most of them present with similar top qualifications such as Guilin’s pa­ leotropical tower karst: 2 in the heart of the country (in Sichuan: Xingwen Geopark, Zigong Geopark) 11 in northern China – north to south (in Heilongji­ ang: Wudalianchi Volcanoes Geopark and Jingpohu Geopark; Inner Mongolia: Hexingten Geopark and Alxa Geopark; in Hebei: Fangshan Geopark; in Henan: Yuntaishan Geopark; Songshan Geopark, Funiushan Geopark and Wangwushan Geopark; in Shaanxi: Qinling Geopark; and in Shandong: Tais­ han Geopark) 9 in southern China – north to south and east to west (in Anhui: Huangshan Geopark; in Jiangxi: Lushan Geopark and Longhushan Geopark; in Zhe­ jiang: Yandangshan Geopark; in Fujian: Taining Geopark; in Hunan: Zhangjiajie Sandstone Peak Forest Geopark; in Guangdong: Danxiashan Geo­ park; on Hainan island: Leiqiong Geopark; and in Yunnan: Shilin Karst Forest Geopark)

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tury, the highly complex Moine Thrust Zone with its enigmatic rocks in the wild, boggy Scottish country was recognized as one of the most important structures of the 400 million year old Caledonian Mountain belt. The once high mountains were the first in Europe to be formed by early Paleozoic sea deposits (ca. 600 ~ 390 million years ago) at the beginning of evolution. The mineral-rich mountains once had stretched all over Ireland, Wales and western Scandinavia, being flattened to the present highlands and finally polished by the ice of the last ice age (ca.–700.000 ~ 12.000 years). What fascinates is not only the attachment of this mysterious mountain belt onto Europe at times, when the ancient continent was still isolated from the ancient Asian continent, while connected with ancient northern America. It is furthermore the 3000 million year old Lewisian Gneiss Complex containing some of the oldest rocks and embedding the Caledonian mountains. This gneiss belt appears now in the typical rugged 'cnoc-and-lochan' (“hill and lake”) landscape. If visitors won’t see “Nessie” in the world’s most famous loch, they might probably recognize instead some 'insel-bergs' shaped in the red Torridonian sandstone on top of the Lewisian Gneiss, dating back to the so far oldest known ice age (pre-Cambrian: ca 1000 million years ago).

Haute-Provence (France) and Swabian Alb Want to find a Nessie elsewhere? Then just move from the world’s oldest preserved geo-heritage to the Alpine Provence in southeastern France, where 300 million years of history are demonstrated in Europe's largest geological open-air museum (2000 km2) with fascinating rock formations and fossil sites. Near Digne a huge rock shelf is covered with more than 1550 ammonites on a 320 m2 large


P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s Skeletal remains, next to fishes and mammals, are found in fossil fluvial and lake deposits, amongst them dinosaur eggs and hatchlings. Another highlight is the huge pterosaur “Hatzegopteryx”, which once was one of the largest flying animals ever existing. Dracula, the flying dragon with a wing span of 12 m? For all these giants their end might have come with volcano eruptions, which have remarkably shaped the landscape with rocks-tuffs, lavas and volcanic bombs.

The Petrified Forest on Lesvos Island

limestone wall. The 21 km long spectacular Verdon gorge opens with awe inspiring views on the calcareous highlands, where Ichthyosaurs are telling about the times of the early Jurassic Sea (some -150 million yrs). These 18 m long gigantic “fishlizards” were a combination of fish and reptiles, viviparous predators that paralleled the dinosaurs on land and pterosaurs in the air. They equally constitute the main paleontological treasure in southwest Germany’s Swabian Alb Geopark (Holzmaden), a carstic landscape with caves, volcanic fillings and historic Celtic settlement sites where Europe’s earliest iron-brass smeltering took place.

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Hateg Country Dinosaur Geopark (Romania) More about the enchanted giant reptiles, which were extinct some 65 million years ago at the end of Mesozoic times, Hateg Country Dinosaur Geopark may offer. Located in a fertile basin of central Romania and framed by 2000 m high Carpathian Mountains, glacial lakes, gorges, caves and alpine forests, this ancient center of Roman settlement is now a 1000 km2 large geopark around Hateg town. Its remarkable heritage offers "dwarf dinosaurs" from the end of Cretaceous period (-65 million years).

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Lesvos (Lesbos) island has been better known for its number of famous people since ancient times, including Sappho, the unduly referred 7th/6th cent. BC poetess to “Lesbian women”. More substance is given by the unique Petrified Forest (national monument since 1985) that had existed some 15–20 million years ago. When intense volcanism had shattered the Aegean region during the Miocene period, volcanic products (andesites, tuffs, ashes etc) buried the dense vegetation and made it fossilize. Today outcrops of tree fossils of rare scientific value are seen as silicified remnants of that subtropical forest. Roots and branches, once alive, are standing upright or lying on the ground in a multitude of colors, providing considerable information about Europe’s late Tertiary paleoflora and epic climate. By Dr. Engelbert Altenburger I-Shou University, ass. prof. at the Faculty of International Business, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, amadeus@isu.edu.tw http://www.isu.edu.tw


P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s

Arouca Geopark: The Gem in Northern Portugal L

ocated just at one hour drive from Oporto city, the Arouca Geopark is one of the best well kept secrets of Northern Portugal. A place where Geology, Nature, Architecture, Culture and Gastronomy transform this region in a “must stop” destiny. A member of the European and Global Geoparks Networks under the auspices of UNESCO, since 2009, Arouca Geopark hosts a valuable and unique geological heritage, with more than 500 million years. Across its 327 km2 area, the visitor can find 41 places with geological relevance (geosites) that are identified and classified. The Ordovician giant trilobite fossils of Canelas – the biggest in the world  – the “Rocks Delivering Stones” (or rather “stones that give birth”) of Castanheira, and the Mizarela Waterfall in Freita Mountain are among the most important and well known geosites of Arouca Geopark.

Nature & Culture The mountains of Freita, Arada and Montemuro, as well as the unspoiled Paiva River are classified areas of the “Natura 2000” Network, which integrate an exceptional biodiversity and are the main attractions reflecting the beauty of the landscape. Along with this outstanding natural and geological heritage, Arouca Geopark has also a very strong legacy in terms of architectural heritage, such as the Arouca’s Monastery, the biggest Portuguese monument built in granite, dating the beginning of the building from the 10th century. Here is housed May, 2 0 1 0

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P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s ita Mountain are options to bear in mind. There are many tour agents and several locals that offer these experiences of sport and adventure. Arouca Geopark also offers educational programs and Tourist Routes for those who are looking for a familial or scholar program. The units of local accommodation and travel agents offer tourist programs that provide unique sensations and emotions.

For Your Taste Buds

one of the most important Portuguese private collections of sacred art. The abandoned tungsten mines of Rio de Frades and Regoufe, exploited by Germans and British respectively, are an important mining heritage that keeps some interesting histories related to the World War II and the Portuguese neutrality.

Walking, Rafting, Biking One of the best ways to discover this territory is by trekking. Visitors can choose one of the thirteen walking trails and discover traditional villages, see the land being worked and make friends with the local people. If adrenalin is what you’re looking for, rafting and kayaking at Paiva River, with the best rafting tracks in Portugal, or mountain bikes at Fre-

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One of the best ways to finish the visit to Arouca Geopark is without any doubt tasting the local delicacies. For the main course you can choose “posta arouquesa” or the roasted veal. The meat comes from the local cattle bred "arouquesa", being raised free in the surrounding mountains. Don´t miss the possibility to taste the exquisite sweets such as “castanhas doces” or “barrigas the freira” which were prepared in the old times by the nuns at the monastery and whose recipes are carefully kept by local producers. “Pão-de-ló”, "melindres" and “pedras parideiras” are also regional sweets not to be missed as well. In the Arouca Geopark territory you have a set of diversified places for accommodation: a three stars hotel, located right at the centre of Arouca town; a rural hotel, just 10 minutes away by car; several traditional houses, located some of them in traditional villages; and the camping park in the Freita Mountain, with bungalows, and space for tents and caravans.

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Folk Festivals During the year a diversified set of events animates the Arouca Geopark territory, namely the International Festival of wild waters, in the Paiva river during the winter time; the European Week of Geoparks, at the end of May; the International Folk Festival in August; and the “Feira das Colheitas”, the biggest local festivity which celebrates the local legacy related to the land and to the local ethnography. These are just a few of the several suggestions to complement your next visit to the Arouca Geopark. By Arouca Geopark Association (AGA) http://www.geoparquearouca.com


P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s

Examine the Dinosaur Fossils in the Maestrazgo Geopark

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The

Maestrazgo Cultural Park is one of the pioneering geoparks in Europe as well as an exceptional laboratory for exploring the geological evolution of the Iberian Plate during Mesozoic and Tertiary periods. Splendid geological formations and structures, modeled into impressive landforms, are highly valued for scientific and educational activities. They are very interesting also to tourists, who get acquainted with the local nature and geology thanks to the intense research carried out here by geologists and paleontologists in the last decades. Scientific research, educational activities, and geotourism products should not be dissociated from each other within the overall management plans of the Geoparks. It is important that researchers consider the cultural and social results as an important purpose of their studies. It is also necessary that the contents of geotourism products are closely linked with the current interpretations of researchers. The Maestrazgo Cultural Park also has an important paleontological heritage, that is studied and excavated by the Fundación Conjunto Paleontológico de Teruel. A big museum in Teruel city and a network of small exhibition centers all around the Teruel province made up the Dinopolis project, linked to the F.C.P.T. and promoted by the regional government of Aragón. Two of these centers are located within Maestrazgo: Galve, a small village with an important ensemble of dinosaur fossils and footprints, and Castellote, showing an interesting site of Cretaceous petrified trunks. On the one hand, this Geopark can discover three areas declared Natural Monument in 2009: Crystal Caves in Molinos, Órganos de Montoro and the Source River Pitarque. On the other hand there can be also found the Geological Park Aliaga. This Park includes eleven points of special interest showing explanatory diagrams and panels, all of them located at distances up to 7 km from Aliaga where you


P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s

can join a tour and the guide will explain you how to read history in the rock layers, to reconstruct the millenary flows and ebbs of the sea in this region, today situated far away from the coastline, to imagine the different species of animals and plants living in the past, and to interpret the forces that built and modeled the landscape. Some of them offer panoramic views of the geological formations, tectonic structures and landforms. Other outcrops show details of continental and marine sediments, minerals and fossils, as well as spectacular folds and tectonic faults. The ensemble of points constitutes an itinerary representative of the regional geology. Some of its splendid geological formations and structures, modeled into the impressive landforms are highly valued for scientific and educational activities. These mainly deal with the Geological Park of Aliaga, at the western Maestrazgo: field-work stages by students from the universities of Utrecht, Plymouth and Cardiff, Practical Course on Geology of the Summer University of Teruel, and field-trips

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developed within the framework of different scientific congresses and symposia. The Geopark was promoted by the municipality of Aliaga (Teruel province) and the Department of Geology of the Zaragoza University, and it has got financial support by the regional government of Aragon, Leader program of the European Union, Plan Miner of the Spanish Government, and local council of Comarca Cuencas Mineras. On the other hand, this project makes a part of the Maestrazgo Cultural Park, which provides legal support and protection for the natural and historical heritage of the region. The Mestrazgo Cultural Park is one of the founding members of the European Geoparks Network. The Maestrazgo Geopark is placed within a very interesting natural landscape and constitutes an exceptional viewpoint. By Julia Escorihuela & Silvia López http://www.parquegeologicoaliaga.com http://www.maestrazgo.org

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P rof e s siona l : In the Fo ot ste p s of Gl ob al G e op ar k s

The Madonie National Park: Discover the Sicilian Heritage

The

most important actions carried out by the Madonie Park body in the last few years have concerned territorial animation through activities of enjoyment, information, training and environmental education devoted to the Geopark. These are activities that all Geoparks in the European network constantly valorize and celebrate every year, between the last ten days of May and the first ten of June, during the “Geoparks Week”, the European Week of Geoparks, that should stimulate and promote use and enjoyment of the geological heritage for the benefit of the resident population. The fundamental merit of this activity lies in the wise con-

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nection between the geological, natural and cultural heritage that allows people to enjoy the “genius loci” or “spirit of the place” of every context or site offered for visit. All information and suggestions for open-air exploration of the Park can be found in the Madonie Geological Museum established in collaboration with the commune of Petralia Sottana and connected to the A. Collisani Archaeological Museum. The Madonie Geopark Museum safeguards the memory of our land and tells the story of migrating continents, seas that advance and dry up, and rocks that still creak and crumble in

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the sun, reminding us that everything moves and changes. Since October 2004, together with the first geological path of the Madonie Park and the Sicily of the “Battaglietta-Portella Colla Pothole” inaugurated during the 5th European Congress of Geoparks, the museum has constantly been visited by school groups, university students, associations, visitors and tourists of all ages that have appreciated its teaching model and interactive innovation. Encouraged by the increasing geo-tourism flows, the Madonie Geopark Museum was subsequently implemented to focus on the genesis of rock-salt, which is exceptionally concentrated in the active Petralia Soprana mine and in the nearby abandoned mines along the upper River Salso. The latter, not yet open to the public, but already projected for the evaluation of the geological heritage of the territory, await initiatives and shared policies aiming at geo-tourism enjoyment that so many people call for. For the first time and in harmony with the principles laid down by the EGN Statute, the “Stones and water pathway”, a set of three paths, brings together the cultural and archaeological elements closely connected to the geological vicissitudes. This is the case of the Castellana Sicula archaeological area, inside which the building to be used as a museum has already been restructured and completed. Here, as in so many other archaeological sites in the Madonie, the close relationship between archaeology and geology shines through


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what has also emerged in recent excavations of other extremely interesting sites. Other recently developed activities typical of a European geopark include school programmes, permanent and itinerant exhibitions and guided tours, also in the surrounding towns and villages. For instance, going along the Urban Geological Path at Petralia Sottana or at Sclafani Bagni it is possible to discover and read, among pages and

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pages of geo-diversity of rocks used by man, the biodiversity of the past and events in the territory that fascinate not only geologists. The “Water Museum” Permanent Education Centre at Scillato reminds us that water is an irreplaceable source of life, a heritage of humanity and an inalienable and universal right. The path along the Tiberio Gorges at San Mauro Castelverde reminds us of what all waters on Earth should be like and not only those in protected areas. The geological section of the Caltavuturo Civic Museum, another information and training point in the Madonie Geopark, has various panels illustrating the geological paths and the geo-sites in the Park, a model reproducing the village and the rock that looms over it, and a permanent exhibition of the most representative rocks. Together with the “Rocca di Sciara” path, it enriches the geo-tourist offer. From everything that has been enacted and animated to assess the geological, natural and cultural heritage for the purposes of environmental education and sustainable local development, the commune of Isnello too is a protagonist of animation of elevated scientific contents to promote initiatives serving for knowledge and popularization of the astronomic sciences that proceed starting from its own geological substratum, “Towards the Astronomic Park of the Madonie.” This is a true Astronomic Park financed by CIPE, to be created atop Monte Mufara distant from light pollution and connected to the teaching and popularization structure already identified in the urban context of the village. Through the fascination of geological culture connected to projects for education to sustainability,

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convinced auto-involvement of the local administrations and bodies responsible for the development of the territory, we have taken under our aegis resources and potentialities of our identity and our places founded on rocks that emanate culture. By Dr. Pasquale Li Puma (Parco delle Madonie, uob5@parcodellemadonie.it) http://www.parcodellemadonie.it http://www.europeangeoparks.org


MEDICAL

SPA HOTELS MORE & MORE POPULAR Hotel spas represent an important market within the spa industry. How much were they affected by the recession? What is the outlook? And what about the latest trends in the field? Check out the views of the experts.


The Performance of Hotel Spas

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any types of spas are being developed in hotels and resorts, from luxurious facilities with extensive public water facilities to creativelydesigned treatment rooms and relaxation areas. However are hotels introducing spas as profit centres or are they simply a competitive draw card to increase guest numbers? Intelligent Spas’ Global Spa Benchmark Program collects a wide range of information about spa facilities which enables detailed examination of the key differentiators between hotel and resort spas versus day spas. Some important research findings on the global spa industry are summarized below:

Spa Design • Hotel and resort spas are significantly larger than day spas with the largest hotel spas being developed in the Americas and Middle East/Africa regions. May, 2 0 1 0

M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar

many other commitments and activities both business and leisure guests already have, and will, schedule during their stay. Unless the spa is open to hotel guests only, it is quite typical for a reasonable mix of spa visits to be non-hotel guests. Also, hotel guests often visit local day spas or other hotel spas if their hotel spa is not effectively promoted. The latest global research on hotel spa guest mix is • Just under half of the indoor space in hotel spas presented below: is allocated to treatment rooms, which is less than • Globally, 64% of hotel spa guests are from people day spas. Hotel spas in the Asia Pacific region alstaying in at the accommodation property. low the highest proportion of space for treatment • Compared to other regions, hotel spas in the rooms. Americas region receive the highest proportion of • There are slightly more treatment rooms on avertotal spa visits from guests staying at the accomage in hotel spas compared to day spas. Hotel modation property, with almost three quarters of spas in the Americas region contain the highest spa visits coming people staying at the hotel. number of treatment rooms. • Almost half the visits to spas in the Middle East/ • Hotel spas are more likely to offer support faciliAfrica and Europe regions are from people not ties such as relaxation areas, change rooms, saustaying in the adjoining hotel/resort. nas and steam rooms in comparison to day spas. Asia Pacific ME/Africa Americas These research findingsEurope highlight the importance • Day spas are more likely to offer water treatHotel guests 64% 53% 72% 53% of spas also catering to their local markets in terms ments such as large hydrotherapy baths, private 36% 47% 28% 47% Non-hotel gue of operational policies and procedures and incorpoJacuzzis and Vichy showers. rating local day spas in competitor analysis activities. Hotels Guests Visiting Spas

‘Build it and they will come’ is a dangerous philosophy when it comes to spa developments as a variety of marketing campaigns are necessary to generate visits to the spa and maximise the spa’s revenue potential. It is easy to assume that many hotel guests will notice the spa and book an appointment, however this is often not the case. Many guests need prompting to visit the spa as that spa time competes with

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Hotel/Resort Guests Versus Non-Hotel/Resort Guests Europe Americas ME/Africa Asia Pacific 0%

25%

50%

Hotel guests

Non-hotel guests

75%

Source: Intelligent Spas, Global Spa Benchmark Report, May 2009

100%


M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar

Key Performance Benchmarks • Day spas receive more visits per year on average compared to hotel spas. • Hotel spas receive more annual revenue than day spas. • Annual revenue per treatment room is higher in hotel spas. • Hotel spas generate more revenue per employee on average compared to day spas. Revenue per visit ratio is higher at hotel spas. This research clearly identifies there is more potential for hotels to cash in on spa goers. With more thoughtful and targeted marketing to existing hotel guests, as well as local residents, hotel spas may generate more revenue, compete more effectively against local day spas and prove a more viable and profitable department within the hotel. By Julie Garrow Managing Director of Intelligent Spas, Julie Garrow is a global expert on the spa industry having conducted research in over 80 countries to date. Her statistical publications are used by spas, hotels, consultants, government and other organisations that need to better understand the spa industry. http://www.IntelligentSpas.com

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M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar

Trends That Will Help Keep Hotel Spas Attracting Customers

The

spa industry has become a cornerstone of the wider hospitality and tourism sectors, and new data from Smith Travel Research (STR) helps explain why. The research firm recently revealed that luxury hotel spas proved significantly more resilient than their ‘room’ equivalents in a tough 2009: while the Average Daily Rate for rooms fell 16% and occupancy declined 9%–the average spa treatment rate dipped a more modest 4%, and Treatment Room Utilization actually grew 3.5%. Smith Travel argues that luxury hotel spas’ ongoing, comparative strength may mean increased attention from management going forward. After all, as Jan Freitag, STR’s vice president, put it, “a hotel room can only be sold once per night, while a spa treatment room can be sold multiple times a day.” (And note: some hotel room rates today are lower than the rate for an hourly treatment in their spa!)

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A host of forces are keeping the hotel spa a draw. For one, they’re increasingly marketing and catering to local clientele to augment revenue – and, according to SpaFinder, this trend will only grow as hotel spas increasingly roll out membership programs for local/traveling clientele to regularly use their fitness facilities, attend classes and hit their spa for weekly/monthly facials and massage. In addition, the industry has made other smart moves, including re-positioning themselves away from ‘mere pampering’ toward wellness and health  – knowing full well that people pay more to satisfy a ‘need’ than a ‘want.’ But perhaps the key force that has ensured hotel spas keep attracting customers is their constant innovation…with many new approaches and offerings underway in 2010…

A Look at Ten Hot Hotel Spa Trends:

1) Celebrating Celebration In a recent SpaFinder survey, travel agents reported the #1 spa travel trend was people increasingly hitting hotel/resort spas for special occasions like the big ’0s’, anniversaries, weddings, etc. And after the severe downturn in hotels’ corporate/meetings business, this is a welcome new market. The group ‘staycation’ or ‘spacation’ – families and friends celebrating together at a spa hotel – is a growing reality. 2) Year of the Hammam With spa-goers increasingly seeking authenticity, tradition, and that magical spa experience that

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also delivers results, the Middle Eastern hammam represents one of the hottest trends for 2010, albeit with a distinctly modern expression. This year people who have never heard the term will learn the meaning, and those familiar with it will discover new places, including resort hotels, to experience it. 3) Not “Going to,” But “Belonging to” a Spa Hotel spas are being creatively re-imagined as places of “belonging” – not only through the big rise in membership programs, but also in the diverse ways spas are being recast as social/communal hubs. After all, the hotel spa can trump the local day spa in terms of amenities (think steam, sauna, pools, fitness, food service), and are becoming very attractive places for local well-heeled clientele to frequent regularly.

Health & Wellness Tourism (Retail Value RSP, US$ bn )

World Asia Pacific Australasia Eastern Europe Latin America Middle East and Africa North America Western Europe

2009 64.0 29.3 1.7 2.8 3.1 4.5 5.1 17.6

Forecast 2010 2012 2014 65.9 70.2 76.7 30.1 32.3 35.9 1.9 2.0 2.2 2.7 2.9 3.2 3.2 3.3 3.5 4.7 5.1 5.7 5.0 5.5 6.1 18.2 19.1 20.1

©2010 Euromonitor International


M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar ing more spa, hospitals are incorporating spa elements, and spas are bringing in more medical specialists. The era of the integrated hotel-resortspa-fitness-wellness-beauty center is on the serious upswing. More reasons for hotel guests to venture out of their room to try this hybrid spa, and for local clientele to visit.

4) The Price Is (Still) Right Hotels as well as spas responded to the global recession with discounts, value-adds, and a nearuniversal focus on deals, deals, and more deals. That will continue across 2010, but with a less intense focus on straight discounts, and a growth in more unique incentives. Increasingly, the spa itself will be the hotel incentive, with complimentary spa services with room bookings. And look for very new loyalty programs to keep the local clientele fully engaged as well. 5) Wellness Tourism We’re very familiar with people seeking spas for wellness. And medical tourism – crossing borders for medical procedures (often plastic surgery, dentistry, knee replacements, etc.) – is on the rise. Well, make room for “wellness tourism,” a new term describing travel across borders for preventive services, diagnostics, and spa and well-being vacations at global hotels. 6) The Hybrid Spa In general, spas worldwide are incorporating far more fitness, fitness centers are incorporat-

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7) The New “P” Word With a healthcare crisis besetting many nations, prevention is poised to be the new “it” word of the global spa industry. But rather than replacing established industry concepts like ‘wellness’ and the old ‘P’ word, pampering, it’s a sharp (and smart) refocusing of the conversation. Pampering, after all, speaks to the stress-reduction, relaxation goal of most spa-goers – and that is itself ‘prevention’. 8) The Online Hotel Spa 2010 will prove a watershed year for the spa industry’s virtual presence. Consumers are online in droves searching for spas, checking online reviews, booking treatments, printing out instant gift certificates, and embracing social networking sites. They can even check their iPhone to pinpoint day/hotel spas nearby thanks to a new SpaFinder App  – or game while they exercise in the resort’s fitness center. Get ready for spas to use yield management software that, much like the airlines or hotels themselves, enables price variation, so they can offer a less expensive massage on weekday mornings, compared to Saturday afternoons. 9) Stillness The modern human experience involves an unprecedented amount of sensory overload, noise, and media stimulation: we’re wired to the gills, bombarded in front of TV/computer screens, texting, tweeting, clattering away – now even on airplanes.

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But the spa is one of the last, remaining sanctuaries of silence and serenity – so look for hotel spas to put a new emphasis on experiences that focus on stillness, slowness, and silence. 10) Evidence, Science, and Standards With our worldwide recession, consumers are increasingly insisting on no-gimmick treatments with real, measurable benefits. This is quickening a rising trend: the demand at the hotel spa for evidencebased therapies and greater transparency to help spa-goers separate the wheat from the chaff. Facts, evidence, and science behind spa offerings are moving front and center, at the cost of a few diamond facials…

By Susie Ellis Susie Ellis is the President of SpaFinder Inc., the world’s largest spa media, marketing and gifting company http://www.spafinder.com


M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar

Europe's Top 10 Luxury Hotel Spas

resort spreads high style across the coastline, with multiple pools and modern architecture spreading over its grounds. And the Six Senses Spa, which features Turkish hammam in addition to European treatments, is a dream come true.

Porto Elounda De Luxe Hotel, Crete Another place to find a Six Senses Spa is in Crete at the Porto Elounda De Luxe Hotel. This seaside paradise will overwhelm the senses with its beauty and unbelievable luxury. With a golf course, shopping center, pools, and, of course, the spa, it has everything a luxury seeker could want in a vacation destination.

Beau-Rivage Palace, Switzerland Switzerland is home to another of Europe's best hotel spas with its Beau-Rivage Palace in Lausanne. The hotel itself is outstanding, but its spa, Cinq Mondes, is what really sets the property apart. Filled with different kinds of steam baths and pools from around the world, Cinq Mondes is unquestionably the place to unwind in town.

Four Seasons Hotel George V, France As would be expected, one of the Europe's most fabulous hotel spas is located in Paris, the center of fashion and high style. The Four Seasons Hotel George V is just steps from the famed Champs-Elysees, and it offers unparalleled access to the city. An added bonus: the spa is classically perfect.

C

ombining beautiful landscapes, a first-rate hotel, and a posh spa is a recipe for excellence. And that formula is what makes Europe's Top 10 Luxury Hotel Spas so superb. Each of the following hotel spas boasts the allure of a European location and entices guests with the luxury of a high-end re-

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sort. Visit one of these premier destinations for a relaxing vacation unlike any other.

Kempinski Hotel Barbaros Bay, Turkey The Kempinski Hotel Barbaros Bay sits on the shores of the Aegean Sea in Bodrum, Turkey. This

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Anassa, Cyprus Cyprus is home to Anassa, an ultra-luxurious resort that takes its name from the ancient Greek word for "queen". The resort's recently upgraded Thalassa Spa takes a holistic approach to well being, with spa cuisine, treatments, health consulta-


M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar rounded by peacock blue waters; the property is home to a championship golf course, first-rate gourmet restaurants, and plenty of leisure activities. And then there's the Retreat Spa, a sophisticated haven for relaxation in paradise.

Choupana Hills Resort, Madeira

tions, and even week-long programs designed to get guests in tune with their goals.

Park Hotel Kenmare, Ireland Travelers to Ireland will also encounter a posh hotel spa if they trek to Kerry, where the Park Hotel Kenmare steals the show. This gorgeous stone building towers over the lush countryside near Kenmare Bay. Inside, the SAMAS spa pampers visitors with classic spa treatments infused with local botanicals.

Intercontinental Aphrodite Hills, Cyprus Look back to Cyprus for another extraordinary resort. The Intercontinental Aphrodite Hills is sur-

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Madeira, Portugal is an island teeming with luxury. One particularly luxurious destination of the isle is the Choupana Hills Resort, a luxury destination set on a hill overlooking the bustling city of Funchal. The spa, which is inspired by the clouds, indulges guests with airy treatments and extravagant amenities.

Le Sirenuse, Italy Positano, Italy is home to Le Sirenuse, one of the world's leading small hotels. This charming abode houses the Aveda Concept Salon, a modern spa facility that soothes guests with multiple posh treatment options. There's also a quaint boutique on site, which sells one of the leading fragrances in Italy, a house-developed unisex scent.

La Residencia, Mallorca Finally, Mallorca is an island overflowing with luxury. And one of the most posh establishments on the island is La Residencia, a hilltop escape

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that bursts with gardens. The Spa at La Residencia is fabulous in its own right; using only the finest products and employing the best estheticians, the spa is a sanctuary of tranquility, luxury style. Europe's Top 10 Luxury Hotel Spas all pack in the posh little extras. These facilities flaunt world-class golf courses, gourmet restaurants, stunning guest rooms, and refined spas. They're the perfect destinations for luxury seekers searching for the best in Europe. Photos: Kempinski, Four Seasons, La Residencia http://spahub.com


Hotel Spas Recession Overload

M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar regarding where expenses can be cut, what treatments stand the test of time, and what areas might be overlooked. The 2009 Trends® in the Hotel Spa Industry report analyzes the 2008 financial performance data of 128 spas operated by hotels located throughout the United States, and includes comparisons made to the 2007 performance of the same hotel spas. In aggregate, the 128 hotels that voluntarily submitted their data for the survey averaged 384 guest rooms in size and in 2008 achieved an average occupancy of 66.1 percent and an average daily room rate of $259.44. Both urban and resort hotel spas were included in the research, while day spas, medical spas, destination spas, and hotel spas that independently lease space were excluded.

Revenues

As

we enter 2010, words like, “economic downturn” and “recession” are still lingering in everyone’s minds. The service industry among others was significantly impacted by the events commencing in the fall of 2008 and unfortunately, hotel spas were not immune. Hotel spa operators reported that they began to feel the impacts of the economic events early on in 2008, especially those within the luxury hotel segment. May, 2 0 1 0

To examine how the economic recession has impacted hotel spas, we analyzed the 2008 operating results presented in the 2009 edition of Trends® in the Hotel Spa Industry produced by PKF Consulting and PKF Hospitality Research. The pre-recession financial data presented in the PKF Trends® report offers an early indication of various recession-influenced revenue and expense movements, which in turn provides hotel spa operators with guidance

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For the hotels that participated in the Spa Trends® survey, spa department sales represented 4.3 percent of total hotel revenue in 2008. As expected, the spa sales to total hotel revenue ratio was higher for resort hotels (4.8 percent) versus urban hotels (2.9 percent). These relative ratios have been consistent year over year given the core differences between resort and urban hotels, such as size of facilities, rate structure, amenity base, and guest mix. Total department revenue for the spas in the survey declined 6.6 percent from 2007 to 2008, which is reasonable given the overall performance of the hotel industry during the same time period. Given the negative perception of luxury hotels and decreases in group travel, resort hotel spas were impacted more than urban hotel spas at 7.4 percent and 2.4 percent declines, respectively. Urban hotel spas may have been sheltered given the participation and support of the local community. At 55.6 percent of total revenue, massage continued to be the greatest source of revenue for hotel


M E DI C A L : Sp a h otel s m ore & m ore p opu l ar

spas. Skin care and body work (19.3 percent) and salon services (9.8 percent) also contributed significantly to spa sales. Retail sales, at 9.3 percent of total spa department revenue, still represent a significant portion of revenue; however in 2008 this line item declined by 8.6 percent. In recent past spa retail sales have enjoyed the greatest growth, yet the United States retail industry has deteriorated during this downturn and spa retail was no exception. For those hotels that reported membership fees, this revenue source made up 8.7 percent of total revenue in 2008 and increased 1.7 percent from 2007. This is another indicator of hotel spas reaching out to the local community in order to offset the loss of revenue attributable to lower guest counts. Items such as fitness and personal training and health and wellness fell to a great extent in urban hotel spas at 19.9 percent and 47.0 percent, respectively. Yet in resort hotel spas these fields dropped by 4.7 percent and grew by 24.8 percent, respectively. While people are still visiting spas, they are re-prioritizing and avoiding what they may consider to be frivolous expenditures. However, as the economy returns to normal operations, it should be these areas that see the greatest improvement. Wellness is a clear trend for the long-term and as May, 2 0 1 0

consumer confidence rises, people will begin reinvesting in their lifestyle.

levels, were able to manage expenses more effectively allowing them to post positive results.

Expenses

Looking forward

Like all departments within a hotel, labor related costs are the biggest operating expense for spas, representing 58.1 percent of department revenue in 2008. Included in this amount are the costs associated with leased or contracted personnel. In 2008, both urban and resort hotel spas were effective in lowering salaries, wages and bonuses by a combined 3.9 percent. The economic downturn forced operators to eliminate staff and reduce hours. It is interesting to note that while jobs are being cut, the amount spent on employee benefits still increased a slight 0.5 percent. Outside of growing labor costs, spa managers were effective in containing department operating expenses. Non-labor related costs actually declined 6.7 percent from 2007 to 2008 with the greatest savings achieved by controlling operating supplies (16.5 percent).

Although the final results have yet to be tabulated, it can reasonably be assumed that hotel spa revenue 2009 will be down compared to 2008. Historically, the most successful hotel spas tend to exist within luxury hotels. Unfortunately, this was the segment which suffered the most in 2009 due to cuts in discretionary spending and poor perception. The current challenging operating environment should encourage operators to spend more time reviewing key items, such as managing inventory, service levels, and overall appearance. While the year 2008 served as a preview for the depressing performance that took place in 2009, the outlook for 2010 looks a little brighter and with any luck words like recession and downtown will start to fade away.

The Bottom Line – Profit The average departmental profit margin for the spas in the survey sample was 25.1 percent in 2008 with more operating efficiency exhibited by resort spas (26.2) compared to urban spas (19.8 percent). It is important to note that hotel departmental profit margins are calculated before deductions for administrative and general, marketing, maintenance, and utility expenses. From 2007 to 2008, the average hotel’s spa department profits fell by 13.9 percent. However, we did note a difference in performance by type of hotel. Urban hotel spas enjoy a 3.7 percent growth in department profits, while resort hotel spas suffered a 16.1 percent decline. Urban spas, with local contribution, smaller spaces, and more stable demand

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By Gabrielle Lerner http://www.pkfc.com


TRANSPORT

Artistic Airports? Uplifting & Inspiring Destination The artistic design of airports helps to form the overall experience of travelers forced to spend long hours waiting for their connection. Get acquainted with the unique design of Vancouver’s and Denver’s airport, the new terminal at Changi and in the Carrasco Airport in Montevideo.


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

Vancouver's Artistic Airport O

ver the past 16 years, I have many times passed through YVR – Vancouver International Airport on Canada's west coast. Whether on a domestic or international flight, the ever-growing collection of art and architectural showpieces in every terminal and connecting link has something new to offer, something to surprise and delight, or something to greet with the familiarity of an old friend. In all my world travels, I have encountered no other airport that even begins to replicate this thoughtful, inspiring space – effectively an enormous art gallery through which more than 16 million people pass each year. A full-time curator, whose position was first created by the Vancouver Airport Authority in 1994, takes her mandate very seriously to create originality and inspiration "on the fly", working in tandem with architectural and interior design experts equally dedicated to making YVR both distinctive and award-winning rather than a predictable shopping and eating environment. The Authority, with its community-based Board of Directors, is a not-forprofit organization that reinvests all earnings into airport development and improvements. Refreshingly, investing in the artistic side of YVR is a consistently high priority. Anyone who has visited British Columbia appreciates the strength of its spectacular natural beauty, natural resources and distinctive aboriginal cultures. Those are the elements and unique sense of place deliberately showcased in this artistic airport, although there are also some wonMay, 2 0 1 0

derfully whimsical selections on display to do nothing more than bring a smile to the face of the harried traveler. Most visibly, the spectacular contemporary aboriginal art has driven the artistic vision for an airport set against a dramatic backdrop of ocean and mountains. YVR houses the largest collection of Northwest Coast native art in the world. Arriving at the International Terminal, visitors heading into the Customs area are overwhelmed by towering 5.5 meter red cedar "Welcome Figures", colorful 5-meter-high aboriginal weavings hung as banners, and an enormous 6-meter diameter cedar Spindle Whorl carved by a Vancouver native artist to depict the theme and spirit of flight. At the heart of the International Terminal, the bronze cast, six-ton Jade Canoe is the focal point

Recent YVR Awards • Rated second favorite airport in the world by Condé Nast Traveler magazine, 2008 Readers choice awards. • Airports Council International’s 2009 global air­ port survey of international passengers: YVR rated #5 in the world (15 to 25 million passen­ gers category). • UK-based Skytrax: 2010 award rated YVR the #1 airport in North America in a survey of interna­ tional passengers.

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The world’s largest Coast Salish Spindle Whorl, “Flight”, was carved in red cedar by Susan A. Point. © Alison Gardner

of YVR's art collection. Created by Canada's most acclaimed aboriginal artist, Bill Reid, it has been hailed by art critics around the world as one of the most significant sculptures of the 20th century. Placing this imposing Haida Gwaii art work, fully accessible to all, at the center of an airport instead of in a museum is a bold statement in itself, with visitor photo ops numbering in the thousands each day. More recently unveiled, The Pacific Passage awaits passengers arriving in Vancouver from U.S. destinations. Travelers enter through a traditionally-


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

The International Terminal’s Pacific Passage features many aboriginal elements for visitors traveling between Canada and the U.S.

YVR’s International Terminal hosts a “Pacific Coast” relaxation area with a plant-lined creek, glass salmon, artwork and a large west coast sea-life aquarium.

© Alison Gardner

© Alison Gardner

constructed post and beam longhouse doorway, emerging into a Northwest Coast world, complete with the sights and sounds of a sandy beach and lapping water, a 12-metre carved and decorated whaling canoe, and a spectacular thunderbird sculpture soaring overhead. "Am I really in an airport?" is a thought that immediately comes to mind! Some design elements throughout the airport are more subtle such as ceiling lights and huge sweeps of custom-designed carpet each representing logs that commonly jam together at odd angles in the rivers and coastal inlets around BC's forestry communities. Don't forget to look up and down as you hurry to or from your gate! Drawing inspiration from the natural beauty of the province, YVR’s International Terminal also features an indoor creek with running water, plants, logs and intriguing glass-sculpted salmon sprinkled through the stream-bed. The area is surrounded by cafés, a full restaurant, shops, comfortable (non-airport) seating and original artwork. A large, 114,000-litre

aquarium showcasing some 850 indigenous sea animals serves as its Pacific West Coast centerpiece. This is my favorite relax-and-decompress zone, another place to completely forget you are in an airport. As Canada's second busiest airport, YVR (YVR. ca) welcomed 16.2 million passengers in 2009, representing 67 airlines serving 119 destinations. On the technical side, it is among the most modern and efficient in the world. Yet, it is the heart-side of the airport that defines its character and makes it a pleasure to visit and re-visit often.

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By Alison Gardner Editor/journalist, Alison Gardner, is a global expert on nature-based vacations and cultural/educational travel. Her Travel with a Challenge web magazine, is a recognized source of new and established operators, accommodations and richly-illustrated feature articles covering all types of senior-friendly alternative travel. http://www.travelwithachallenge.com

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T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

Changi Airport Terminal 3 – Clear and Natural

airport’s total handling capacity to about 70 million passenger movements annually. Terminal 3 is a showcase of inspirational architecture featuring the thoughtful integration of nature’s wonders with state-of-the-art technology to create a relaxing and refined ambience of embracing comfort, topped with a myriad of enjoyable, enlivening and entertaining facilities to charm and revitalize travellers.

Design Concept The roof design of Terminal 3 is an innovation in itself, making use of natural lighting to create a unique ambience distinguishing it from any other airport terminal in the world.

Natural Lighting

S

ingapore opened its new Terminal 3 on 9 January 2008, 17 years after its Terminal 2 opened and 27 years after Changi Airport started operations with its first terminal in 1981. Poised to propel Changi further ahead as a premier global air hub and the world’s best airport, Terminal 3 is set to deliver unsurpassed qualities May, 2 0 1 0

of service, efficiency and safety, and promises a brand new experience for all air travelers who pass through its gates. The 380,000 square metres Terminal 3 is the fulfillment of the airport masterplan envisioned in the 1970s. A seven-storey building with three basements and four above ground levels, Terminal 3 costs S$1.75 billion and brings the

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The unique roof architecture allows soft natural light into the building while keeping the tropical heat out. The first-of-its-kind roof design has 919 intelligent computer-controlled skylights with specially designed butterfly-shaped reflectors which automatically adjusts themselves according to the outdoor sunlight intensity. Each skylight comprises a roof opening sealed with a pure crystal-type glass that admits the full spectrum of colours from natural daylight into the terminal building. An intelligent control system adjusts a set of butterfly-shaped reflector panels installed above each skylight in response to the position of the sun and cloud cover conditions so that


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

Clarity Changi Airport planners recognise that a key stress point for many travellers is wayfinding. Terminal 3 was hence designed to allow travellers to find their passage through the terminal with ease. This is possible as Terminal 3 adopts a see-through layout concept, making it easier for travellers to orientate themselves. Signages are upsized and multi-lingual to enhance wayfinding. In current times, where air terminals tend to be mega structures with high ceilings, it is important to ensure that font sizes of signages are not perceived to be small relative to the huge expanse of space. an optimal amount of natural daylight is directed through the crystal-type glass into the building interiors. Parabolic aluminium reflectors “louvers”, spanning below the roof across the entire ceiling, shape the streams of daylight into uniform, glarefree, diffused lighting to present a refreshing natural light environment, enlivening the sense of space and comfort in the terminal. At night, the skylights glow with artificial lighting delicately concealed below the reflector panels. The overall effect is a soothing ambience at all times of the day. The introduction of abundance of natural light into the building in turn helped achieved two objectives. Firstly, for about five hours a day, there is no need for artificial lighting. Together with an air-conditioning system that throws cold air via binnacles rising from the ground, the result was a substantial reduction in energy consumption and savings in energy bills. Secondly, lush landscaping could be introduced into the building.

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External Views With full glass facades, passengers have extensive visual access to the external landscapes that surround them. This gives a sense of expansive space and openness, besides giving travellers views of take-offs and landings of airplanes.

Going Back to Nature Airport designs have evolved over the years, with newer airports and terminals developed with striking architecture and each trying to carve out their own identities. For Changi Airport, Terminal 3 is a reflection of Singapore’s Garden City image. Coming into Terminal 3, one will be awed by the fivestorey high vertical garden, called the “Green Wall”. Spanning 300 metres across the main building, it can be admired from both the Departure and Arrival Halls. The “Green Wall” is a tapestry of climbing plants, interspersed with four cascading water-

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falls and a hand-carved sandstone art wall display. At the transit mall, travellers can relax amongst fig trees, koi ponds or visit the World’s First Butterfly Garden in an airport.

Single Shopping Street On the commercial front, more than 25,000 square metres of floor space has been set aside for more than 100 retail shops, over 30 food & beverage outlets and over 20 service concessions. To complement the see-through layout concept of Terminal 3, the Departure/Transit Mall is designed to provide a compact single shopping street layout that enhances the visibility of the retail outlets. The extensive use of glass in the terminal will allow passengers a vantage view of both the airside and landside shopping and dining zones.

http://www.changiairport.com


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

Denver International Airport Art: Part of the Cultural Capital D

enver International Airport (DEN) is not only the gateway to Colorado and the Rocky Mountains, but is also a grand public space of the American West. Visitors and passengers are in for a unique experience when they travel through Denver. With one of the largest public art collections of almost any airport in the world, DEN’s public art program features around 30 site-specific works created by 39 artists and includes sculptures, murals and installations. Works run the gamut from a high-tech archway of neon color and light that reflects Colorado’s Native American storytelling heritage to a rotating collection of temporary exhibits that feature new and wellknown Colorado and regional artists. While Denver International Airport is the newest major airport in the United States with an innovative design that is still cutting edge 15 years after the airport opened in 1995, it draws on a long tradition of public architecture and public art. The planners who created DEN took their inspiration from the plazas, town squares and markets of Europe and Asia, which for centuries have melded form and function by making beauty as critical to the use of the space as practicality. Support for the arts has a strong tradition in Denver, and the airport is one of the many public spaces that has benefitted from a 1991 ordinance created by then-Mayor, Wellington E. Webb. The ordinance ensures continued funding and implementation of art for public spaces, and a city that was once known more for its infamous Wild West

May, 2 0 1 0

Photograph courtesy of Denver International Airport. Artwork copyright 2009 Estate of Luis A. Jimenez, Jr. and Artists Rights Society ARS New York

past has become a vibrant cultural center of the New West. Planning the public art program started years before Denver International Airport opened in 1995. The public art program at DEN was the largest fully integrated art project of its kind in the world back in the early 1990s, with 15 artists commissioned to

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create works of art for the new airport at the very beginning of the design process. These artists were encouraged to integrate artworks into the actual structure and systems of the building. Airport planners worked together with these artists to conceptualize a public art program at Denver International Airport that resulted in a collection including close


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

to 40 permanent works of completely unique, sitespecific art. Murals punctuate open spaces throughout Jeppesen Terminal; 5,280 tiny propellers – one propeller for each foot of altitude that gives the “Mile-High City” its name – populate a wall in the train tunnels connecting the terminal and concourses, activated by the movement of the trains to cast a shimmering wall of light down the tracks; a rearing blue stallion, Mustang by Luis Jiménez, expresses the energy and momentum of the West with red eyes unapologetically looking to the future. It is this fusion of art and architecture that makes Denver International Airport unique among the nation’s airports and the public art program unique among the nation’s public art programs. The culture of the Rocky Mountain region is a highlight of traveling through DEN within the six temporary exhibit venues. Artist shows, collaborations with the region’s museums and cultural groups, and displays of Colorado history are all to be found scattered through the terminal and gate areas. Our main gallery, the Ansbacher Hall, is a

May, 2 0 1 0

welcome respite of culture near the A gates security checkpoint. This fever pitch of cultural activity is intended to be a distraction for the travel-weary passenger, but also a growing, uplifting experience. Recent exhibitions have included collaboration between the airport and the Loveland Museum/Gallery and the Loveland Chamber of Commerce featuring Victorian-era Valentine’s Day cards, memorabilia, and free exhibition postcards that travelers and visitors alike could send to their loved ones for Valentine’s Day, courtesy of the airport. Denver International Airport also cooperates with local colleges and universities to feature new artists emerging on the scene to the airport audience in the “Shows Talent” exhibition series. Denver International Airport’s art program is heading into a second phase of development, with new commissions for temporary and permanent works of art, and exciting new opportunities in DEN’s expansion plans. The activity of DEN’s cultural programming mirrors the trajectory of cultural tourism in Denver. According to studies

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by the Colorado Council on the Arts and Colorado Business Committee for the Arts performed in 2008 the cultural industry, as a sector of the economy, is the 5th largest industry in Colorado (by employment). Cultural tourism amassed $331 million in economic impact that year, while indirect economic spending generated $965 million. The past few years have seen the construction of the new Museum of Contemporary Art, the Clifford Still Museum, and the opening of the Vance Kirkland Museum, as well as an expansion of the Denver Art Museum and upcoming expansions of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, Denver Zoo, and Denver Performing Arts Center. The public art programs in the metro-Denver area are equally robust with new installations regularly popping up in the neighborhoods and downtown. DEN’s art program is a healthy part of that vital cultural capital. The art is the work of the famous and the international, as well as of the local and vernacular. In this way, art at the airport is an everchanging yet permanent contribution of our shared culture in the grand plaza of the West: under the tents. Resources: The State of Colorado’s Creative Economy, a December 2008 report commissioned by the Colorado Council on the Arts. 2008 Economic Activity Study of Metro Denver Culture commissioned by the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts. Photos: "Photographs provided courtesy of Denver International Airport."

By Matt Chasansky (Director of Denver International Airport’s Arts Program) http://www.flydenver.com


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

Carrasco Airport in Montevideo: A Great Project Come True

In the architectural design the main objective was to generate great transparencies and a feeling of amplitude in all the public areas. To achieve this concept, the upper part of the building has an extensive and surrounding leaning glazing of almost 8,000 square meters that allows the optimization of the use of natural light and offers great open visuals of the platform and the whole airport space. The new Airport building is located in a parallel line to the main runway (06-24) which was extended to 3,200 meters of length to allow Intercontinental Flights operation. Altogether with the New Terminal a new platform was also built to allow the embarkment and disembarkment of passengers by means of four telescopic bridges connected directly to the building, these bridges are able to service any aircraft from a small plane as the CRJ-900 to an Airbus 380.

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ith an investment of 165 million dollars, a successful process that now represents the New Airport Terminal of Uruguay has been accomplished: a project designed by the renowned Uruguayan architect Rafael Viñoly. The inauguration of the new Airport (December 2009) not only symbolizes a milestone for the country in terms of investment, architecture, high quality of services, vanguard and technological innovation, it also constitutes an emblematic bid that makes us proud and honors the gateway to Uruguay. May, 2 0 1 0

The project, today a reality, has become a landmark that represents Uruguay both from the spatial point of view as well as a symbol. A big roof of double curvature extends for almost 400 meters all along the length of the building, overhanging the limits of the building itself to rest on the ground. This roof has a maximum width of more than 130 meters and shelters the Departure Lounge, Check-in Hall and the Belvedere Terrace. The roof has a total surface of about 4 hectares (4,000 square meters).

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Best New Terminal Travel+Leisure recently rated the Carrasco Inter­ national Airport as the one with the Best New Terminal: “Inspired by the region’s characteristic cuchillas, or low hills, this terminal from New Yorkbased, Uruguay-born architect Rafael Viñoly has a gently curving 1,000-foot-long roof reminiscent of the futuristic hubs built when air travel was young and a sunlit terrace in the departures hall. Travelandleisure.com


T R A NSP ORT: Ar ti sti c Air p or t s ? Uplif t ing & In spir ing D e st inat i on

The New Terminal evolves into two main levels with separated and different accesses to service the flow of passengers at Departures and at Arrivals respectively. Ample sidewalks provide space for the passengers’ access from or into private cars, taxis and buses. This layout with separated, independent levels allows the creation of exclusive and separated areas for departures and arrivals, thus avoiding passengers and visitors crossovers. Likewise, the Belvedere Terrace was created with the objective of creating an area where the passengers and visitors could relax in a peaceful environment. The building occupies a surface of more than 45,000 square meters and has 8 boarding gates, 4 of which have connecting telescopic air bridges. A special baggage handling system is provided for Departures consisting of automatic conveyor belts that take the baggage from the check-in area to the departures platform. This system of conveyor belts takes the baggage first to the technical area where a series of different controls and supervisions are carried out for security reasons through automatic X-ray machines. Regarding the baggage

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handling system at Arrivals, the New Terminal has 3 baggage claim carrousels. One of them is a double carrousel to serve long haul flights. The New Airport is accessed from National Route 101. The whole Airport complex is divided in three distinctive clearly separated sectors. The central sector comprises the public vehicle parking space with an approximate capacity for 1,200 vehicles which almost triplicates the capacity of the old terminal. The New Terminal is able to handle up to three times more the volume of passengers, compared to the old terminal, which amounts to 4 million and a half users per year. In this way, one of the most important projects of the country is completed, respecting the concept that, from the start of the concession it has fulfilled all of the expected requirements, as the extension and reconstruction of the runways, completing an optimal building structure that places us strategically as the HUB del MERCOSUR. http://www.aic.com.uy

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D esti n atio n M a l ay s i a : T r u ly A s i a

Malaysia – a multicultural country of friendly people, beautiful nature reserves, long history as well as modern high-tech cities. Get familiar with this “truly Asian” world.


Malaysia: Standing out among the Crowd

De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

One from Many The country Malaysia is a young entity, coming into existence less than half a century ago. Made up of former British colonies in the Malay Peninsula and part of Borneo, the fledgling nation was more concerned with internal development and modernization in its early years. Promotion of tourism, although important, was not aggressively pursued. It can be argued that it was during this period of rapid development, spurred in part by youthful nationalistic spirit, that the rich and colourful colonial heritage was stripped away and replaced with the dull humdrum of modern life. High rise buildings replaced quaint colonial structures, names of places and roads were changed to honour local personalities while many other important landmarks fell into disrepair.

To Know Malaysia Is to Love Malaysia The year was 1990 when Malaysia geared up for its first serious attempt at promoting tourism with the launch of its “Visit Malaysia Year” campaign. This marked a departure from previous attempts to market Malaysia as a tropical paradise destination, which did not achieve great success as tourists were more interested in visiting better-known destinations such as Phuket and Bali in neighbouring Thailand and Indonesia. Tourists often deemed those destinations more “fun” as regulations were looser compared to Malaysia's stricter laws, especially regarding prostitution and drugs. Malaysia's attempts at marketing itself as a family-oriented destination prior to 1990 went largely unnoticed.

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esterners have always been enthralled by the exoticism of Asia, and fantastic tales and adventures involving Asia have been told by many, some growing to legendary proportions. Asian countries know this, and have used it to their advantage to attract tourists to their countries. May, 2 0 1 0

Countries with a strong identifiable image like Egypt, China, and Japan, have no problems attracting visitors, nor do world class destinations like the Himalayas, Angkor Wat, or Bali. The sheer diversity of attractions that Asia offers can result in less famous countries in being relegated into obscurity. One country eager to avoid that fate is Malaysia.

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Biar mati anak, jangan mati adat (The child may die, but never our tradition) Malay proverb


De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

Bila sesat, balik ke pangkal jalan (When lost, return to the starting point) Malay proverb

This repackaging along with several mega-projects, most notably the Petronas Twin Towers, have managed to reverse Malaysia's slide into obscurity and helped it establish some global recognition. In recent years, there has been an emphasis on the development of world class events, including the Sepang Formula One Grand Prix, the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exhibition, as well as the bicycling world's Tour de Langkawi, to further burnish Malaysia's image as an international tourist destination. The first campaign in 1990 showcased an array of attractions, and focused on Malaysia's natural beauty. Eco-tourism and adventure tours highlighting the country's national parks and natural attractions like the Niah Caves and the Orang Utan rose to prominence. It was a rousing success for Malaysia as the country registered over seven million visitors that year alone.

potential visitors and the country lost ground to well-designed and focused tourism campaigns organised by other neighbouring countries. One particular campaign that affected Malaysia greatly was the Amazing Thailand! campaign as it not only pulled in visitors from faraway but also revitalized Thailand as a tourist destination for local Malaysians.

Jack of All Trades

Malaysia Truly Asia

Following the initial success in 1990, Malaysia grew ambitious and began to diversify, targeting various niche markets in an effort to reduce dependence of a narrow range of tourist attractions. Shopping, culture, beaches, conventions – you name it, Malaysia had it! Needless to say, the diversification came at a cost, as the different and often conflicting images projected by Malaysia caused confusion among May, 2 0 1 0

Facing mounting competition from neighbouring South East Asian countries, Malaysia re-packaged its image, weaving the different images into a seamless tapestry that mirrored the multi ethnicity of its people. Comparing the large number of races in the country with the diversity of the Asian continent, Malaysia trumpeted that it truly is a microcosmic representation of Asia. This is reflected in its current tagline of Malaysia Truly Asia.

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So What Lies ahead for Malaysia? Although the tourism industry is booming and is taken seriously by the government, the country will always have to stay on its toes to ensure that it is not eclipsed by competing campaigns. The country is now quicker to respond to new trends, as seen by its organised approach towards the fledgling medical and sports tourism sectors. Malaysia is also more open to leaning on some of its famous citizens, like the world renowned shoe designer Jimmy Choo, and designing regional events around them. Malaysia has a long road ahead, but the journey promises to be an interesting adventure. By Mike Tan Malaysia.com – Malaysia’s premier travel and tourism guide http://www.malaysia.com


Travel and Tourism in Malaysia

De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

T

ravel and tourism remains a highly important part of the Malaysian economy, with an ever increasing number of companies competing for a share of rising tourist expenditure. The tourism accommodation and air transportation sectors have seen the lion’s share of growth. For example, Air Asia, the country’s premium low cost carrier, has expanded its operations and now offers many more routes within and outside the country and is regarded as a significant regional player. The hotel segment has been growing particularly rapidly, with the popularity of top-end boutique hotels continuing to increase. In addition, the budget accommodation segment is also performing well, with new entrant Tune Hotels expected to become the country’s largest chain of budget hotels.

Visit Malaysia Year 2007 Campaign Helped to Boost Tourist Arrivals The visit Malaysia Year 2007 campaign helped to increase awareness of Malaysia as a tourist destination throughout the world and to sharply increase the number of tourists visiting the country. Tourist

Malaysia among Top 10 Tourist Destinations for Europeans Malaysia is among the top 10 most affordable destinations in the world where Europeans can go a long way with their Euros for a memorable holiday, according to the German-language Ya­ hoo! Travel Magazine. It listed Malaysia along with Thailand, India, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Croatia, Bul­ garia, Turkey, Egypt and Hungary. Malaysia’s Lang­ kawi island was praised for its long, white sandy beaches, palm trees and fascinating coral reefs. Nature lovers too get “full worth” for their money with the abundance of flora and fauna. TheStar.com.my

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De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

Robust Performance by Tourism Sector A total of 23.65 mn tourists visited Malaysia in 2009, according to data released by the Immigra­ tion Department, an increase of 7.2% year-onyear. The robust performance came in stark con­ trast to the dire prognosis of a fall of 9%, forecast by the government at the start of the year and shows that Malaysia did well to withstand the lack of consumer demand for global tourism dur­ ing a difficult period. Speaking at the release of these figures, Tourism Minister Dato Sri Ng Yen Yen praised the tourism industry for its efforts in pro­ moting Malaysia over the year against a backdrop of challenges such as the global economic crisis and the outbreak of H1N1 virus. The minister also added that, for the first time, arrivals from China passed the 1 mn mark, at 1.01 mn. Companiesandmarkets.com

arrivals have increased across all sectors, whether business or leisure. The 9th Malaysia Plan, a 5 year economic plan developed by the Malaysian government, projected a 9% annual increase in tourism inbound figures from 2006 to 2010 – a target which is likely to be met as a result of the success of the marketing campaign.

Internet Sales Limited but Growing Rapidly In 2009, the majority of travel and accommodation reservations were either performed via the telephone or face-to-face, with internet retailing remaining very much a niche channel. However, the number of internet bookings continues to increase

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rapidly as retailers increase their technological capabilities. The leader of the internet sales model is Air Asia, which follows an almost exclusive online booking strategy in order to minimize operating costs. Not surprisingly, internet bookings are most popular in the airline sector and are increasing in the hotel segment, with internet sales in other categories such as travel retail, car rentals, and tourist attractions lagging behind.

Slower Growth Forecasted due to Economic Slowdown According to Euromonitor International, the global economic downturn is expected to have a severe impact on Malaysia’s travel and tour-

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ism industry, with many tourists worldwide likely to reduce expenditure as a result of declining confidence. As a result, tourism arrival figures are expected to decline over the early part of the next five years period. However, incoming tourism numbers are expected to recover towards the end of the next five years period, partly as a result of the government’s fiscal stimulus package. (Extract from Euromonitor International’s report “Travel and Tourism in Malaysia”) Photos: Tourism.gov.my http://www.euromonitor.com


De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

Kuala Lumpur: The New Gateway to South-East Asia

to exquisite made-in-Malaysia items, the highly competitive environment that exists among traders is a blessing in disguise to shoppers. While department stores practice a fixed price policy, bargain hunters can test their skills at smaller retail establishments or at any one of Kuala Lumpur's famous night markets. KL will enthral you. It will capture your heart and mind in a way no other city will.

Places of Interest in Kuala Lumpur

Kuala Lumpur, also known as the Garden City of Lights, is the Capital City of Malaysia. From its centralized position which spans 243.6 sq. kilometres, this ultra-modern nerve centre of Malaysia expands outwards to embrace the world. Discovering Kuala Lumpur is like travelling through a time tunnel. Here, vivid traces of history continue May, 2 0 1 0

to influence and inspire a country set on becoming a fully industrialized nation by the year 2020. You will see ultra-modern skyscrapers standing magnificently next to rows and rows of quaint old shop houses. Haute cuisine beside hawker stalls. To an avid shopper, Kuala Lumpur is a paradise. From world-renowned designer labels and brands

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Petronas Twin Towers The famous twin towers – the world’s tallest – are situated in KL. Set in an enormous and artistically designed tropical garden, they house an exciting discovery centre, a stunningly beautiful concert hall and an unusual art gallery, all of which are connected to a shopping gallery and food court. Since it was opened in 1997, the towers have become one of the city's main symbols, looming into the heavens and often lost in cloud when the afternoon thunderstorms rumble in. Standing 452 m (1483 ft) high, the building (designed by Cesar Pelli) consists of two similarly shaped towers joined by a 58 m (192 ft) sky bridge at the 41st and 42nd floors. Local ex-pats like to see the Petronas Twin Towers as a metaphor for Malaysia's economy. Sultan Abdul Samad Building The Sultan Abdul Samad building was constructed at the end of the last century and the site was chosen because of its central position. A.C. Norman, a British architect who worked for the Public Works Department in Kuala Lumpur, in designing


De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

the existing building took into consideration some of the features of buildings in several Islamic countries. The building includes shiny copper domes and a 130-metre clock tower. The predominantly Moorish appearance of the building suitably reflects the cultural background of Malaysia. Istana Negara The official residence of the Yang Di-Pertuan Agong (The King), located on a hillock at Jalan Istana. The palace is surrounded by green lawns, ponds and trees. On ceremonial occasions, the palace and its grounds are gaily lit-up. Parliament House The Parliament House placed on elevated ground commands a panoramic view of the Lake Gardens is the modern Parliament House with its distinctive oval-shaped windows. It is situated in one of the greenest and most beautiful areas in KL and is superbly lit at night. The main building and its adjoining tower block accommodate the two houses of Parliament, a banquet hall, library, various offices and committee rooms. Sri Mahamariaman Temple Built in 1873, this is one of the most ornate and elaborate Hindu temples in the country. The detailed May, 2 0 1 0

decorative scheme for the temple incorporates intricate carvings, gold embellishments, hand-painted motifs and exquisite tiles from Italy and Spain. It also houses a giant chariot that is used to transport a deity annually during the Hindu festival of Thaipusam Gardens in Kuala Lumpur Lake Gardens Located off Jalan Parlimen, is the greenbelt of Kuala Lumpur. Developed in the 1880s, these undulating and beautifully landscaped gardens cover 170 acres of rolling lawns with huge trees, colourful beds of flowers and two lakes. There is a children's playground, jogging tracks, exercise stations, and rowing boats. The popular gardens offer plenty of recreational opportunities and attractions. The Orchid Garden showcases thousands of international varieties of the most beautiful flower in the world. The garden contains over 800 species from Malaysia alone. The Hibiscus Garden is a small terraced garden, which provides a strikingly colourful panorama of countless varieties of hibiscus. Photos: Tourism.gov.my http://malaysia.tourism-asia.net

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De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

Penang: Old-world Charm and Beach Retreat

Penang Island, often referred to as the Pearl of the Orient, is one of the most picturesque and romantic regions in all of Asia. This tropical island lies in the Indian Ocean, just off the north-west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Penang received its name from the Pinang, or Betel Nut tree, once commonly found on the island. Founded in 1786 by Captain Francis Light of the British East India Company is a cultural melting pot and the oldest British Straits Settlement. Its historic heart of Georgetown was where ships refuelled and May, 2 0 1 0

served as a centre for the spice trade as well as tea and cotton from China and India. The island’s alluring beaches and old-world charm has made Penang a popular tourist destination. Locals swear Penang has Malaysia’s best food and will delight in taking visitors to the multitude of open-air stalls along Gurney Drive. Nyonya food (a Chinese and Malay culinary blend) is also best sampled in Penang and Melaka. On Penang Island sits the capital, Georgetown, a city steeped in history and tradition yet sparkling

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with progress and modern development. Certain sections of the city present a quaint picture from the past where narrow side streets, trishaws, temples and traders plying their goods, seem to belong to a forgotten era. Penang is a shopper's paradise for goods old and new, at bargain prices. Walking through Georgetown with its eclectic blend of colonial, Moorish, Indian, and Chinese architecture is a sensory journey of fascinating sights, sounds and aromas. Relax and take a trishaw to discover Georgetown’s heart and soul. See the


De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a clan houses or kongsi established by Chinese settlers the most famous being Khoo Kongsi with its elaborate decorations. Ride past Kapitan Keling Mosque established by Penang’s Indian Muslims. Nearby is the Kuan Yin Teng or Goddess of Mercy Temple, the oldest Chinese temple in Penang. In the Pulau Tikus suburb is a Thai temple, Wat Chayamangkalaram with its reclining Buddha; reputed to be one of the world’s longest. Many Penangites are Buddhists and Wesak Day is a major festival. Thaipusam is a colourful Hindu festival observed in Penang and a few places worldwide. The famous Eastern and Oriental Hotel is the place to unwind and be reminded of an era when it was a popular venue for the city’s elite. Visitors can stay in the renovated 19th century Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion, one of the most well-preserved mansions outside China. To enjoy cool mountain air and a panoramic view of the city, take the unique funicular train up Penang Hill. Batu Ferringhi on the northern coastline is a favourite playground for visitors from near and far. Its casuarina-lined beaches from Tanjung Bungah to Teluk Bahang boasts several international deluxe resorts as well as attractions such as the Toy Museum, the first of its kind in Asia and the largest in the World. The Penang Bridge, one of Asia’s longest at 13.5 km, links mainland Peninsular Malaysia to the island. Penang is also accessible by ferry from Butterworth, where the state’s main rail and bus terminal are located. The Penang International Airport has direct flights from Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Thailand. http://www.tourism.gov.my

May, 2 0 1 0

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De s ti nati on : Mal ay si a : Tr u ly Asi a

Taman Negara: The Oldest Rainforest in the World

Taman Negara National Park straddles the borders of three states – Kelantan, Terengganu and Pahang – in Peninsular Malaysia. A totally protected area of 4,343 sq km, Taman Negara is one of the world's oldest tropical rain forests. The diversity of its fauna and flora is a result of undisturbed evolution over 130 million years. The park was established in Malaysia in 1938/1939 as the King George V National Park. It was renamed to Taman Negara after independence, which literally means "national park" in Malay.

May, 2 0 1 0

The park has developed into a famous ecotourism destination in Malaysia. It is a particularly favourable destination for trekking, as the park's remarkable biodiversity is matched by a good network of jungle trails and the availability of expert guides. The park is also noted for fishing, especially along the upper reaches of the Tahan or Kenyam rivers, and for rafting the rapids of Sungai Tembeling. Malaysia is one of the 12th mega biodiversity areas in the world and Taman Negara's tropical rainforest indeed is one of the world's most complex and rich ecosystems. The park is home to about 14,000 species of plants and trees more than any other forest in the world. There are more than 2,400 species of flowering plant, 200 species of mammals, 350 species of birds, 67 species of snakes, 55 species of frogs, 80 species of bat, 30 species of rats and 109 species freshwater fishes (15 species endemic to Taman Negara). Peninsular Malaysia's highest mountain, Gunung Tahan (2,187 m), is located in Taman Negara, and climbing the mountain is an unforgettable experience. Due to the scarcity of water along the route, the journey must be done in two stages, and an experienced guide is compulsory. At least three days are required for the journey to the summit and back.

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On the southern edge is Kuala Tahan, the park's headquarters, linked to the outside world by river. A three-hour river trip is the only overland route; an alternative is to take a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Taman Negara. Photos: Tourism.gov.my, TR archive http://www.geographia.com http://www.tamannegara.org


Fairs & Exhibitions T r av e l / T o u r i s m

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MA Y

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r e g i o n s


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0

Western Europe

  The Advantage Conference  Location

Lucerne / Switzerland

Start / End

21 May 2010 / 23 May 2010

Provider

Advantage Travel

Contact

nickya@advantagetravelcentres.com

 IMEX 2010  Location

Messe Frankfurt / Germany

Start / End

25 May 2010 / 27 May 2010

Provider

Regent Exhibitions

Contact

info@imex-frankfurt.com

  European Medical Travel Conference 2010  Location

Venice / Italy

Start / End

05 May 2010 / 07 May 2010

Provider

Health Care Strategy Int., Sogedin S.p.A

Contact

info@emtc2010.com

  EXPOVACACIONES - Expo of Tourism & Leisure Time  Location

Bilbao / Spain

Start / End

06 May 2010 / 09 May 2010

Provider

Bilbao Exhibition Centre

Contact

bec@bec.eu

  ANTOR MICE Event 2010  Location

Putten / Netherlands

Start / End

18 May 2010 / 18 May 2010

Provider

ANTOR/PRESS HERE

Contact

WWW.MICENEDERLAND.NL   info@micenederland.nl

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Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0

CENTR AL Europe

 Central and Eastern Europe Medical Tourism    

and Healthcare Summit 

Location

Zagreb / Croatia

Start / End

17 May 2010 / 18 May 2010

Provider

Global Engage

Contact

steve@globalengage.co.uk

 Hotel 2010  Location

Banska Bystrica / Slovakia

Start / End

04 May 2010 / 07 May 2010

Provider

BB EXPO s.r.o.

Contact

veltrhy@bbexpo.sk

  MITF Moscow International Travel Fair  Location

Moscow / Russia

Start / End

13 May 2010 / 16 May 2010

Provider

RTE Moscow

Contact

mitf@mitf.ru

 Global Spa Summit  Location

Istanbul / Turkey

Start / End

16 May 2010 / 19 May 2010

Provider

Global Spa Summit

Contact

betsy@rbicom.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 54 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0

Africa/MIDDLE EAST

 INDABA Travel & Tourism Trade Show  Location

Durban / South Africa

Start / End

08 May 2010 / 11 May 2010

Provider

Kagiso Exhibitions (Pty) Ltd.

Contact

indaba@kagisoexpo.co.za

 Food & Hotel Arabia  Location

Jeddah / Saudi Arabia

Start / End

16 May 2010 / 19 May 2010

Provider

Al Harithy Company for Exhibitions Limited

Contact

international@acexpos.com

 Oman Travel Market 

 Arabian Hotel Investment Conference 

Location

Muscat / Oman

Start / End

17 May 2010 / 19 May 2010

Provider

OITE

Contact

bushra@oite.com

35th Annual Africa Travel Association Congress 

Location

Dubai / United Arab Emirates

Location

Banjul, The Gambia / All-Africa

Start / End

01 May 2010 / 03 May 2010

Start / End

17 May 2010 / 20 May 2010

Provider

Bench Events / MEED

Provider

Africa Travel Association

Contact

ahic@meed-dubai.com

Contact

info@AfricaTravelAssociation.org

  World Travel Awards - Middle East Gala Ceremony 

  The Hotel Show Dubai 

Location

Dubai / United Arab Emirates

Location

Dubai / United Arab Emirates

Start / End

03 May 2010 / 03 May 2010

Start / End

18 May 2010 / 20 May 2010

Provider

World Travel Awards

Provider

dmg world media

Contact

awards@worldtravelawards.com

Contact

SabahMustafa@dmgworldmedia.com

 Arabian Travel Market 

  Travel World Expo (TWE)  

Location

Dubai / United Arab Emirates

Location

Kuwait City / Kuwait

Start / End

04 May 2010 / 07 May 2010

Start / End

19 May 2010 / 20 May 2010

Provider

Reed Travel Exhibitions

Provider

Kuwait International Fair Company

Contact

chris.chackal@reedexpo.co.uk

Contact

info@kif.net

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Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0  Iran Food & Hospitality  Location

Tehran / Iran

Start / End

30 May 2010 / 02 June 2010

Provider

Fairtrade Messe und Ausstellungs GmbH

Contact

info@fairtrade-messe.de

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 56 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0

North America

 Pan-American Congress on Aesthetic and Anti-Aging    

Medicine 

Location

Montreal / Canada

Start / End

20 May 2010 / 22 May 2010

Provider

EuroMediCom

Contact

emaa@euromedicom.com

Annual Aruba Caribbean Tourism Security Conference  Location

Aruba, NWI / Other

Start / End

31 May 2010 / 02 June 2010

Provider Contact

allamanda@setarnet.aw

  International Las Vegas Tourism Security Conference  Location

Las Vegas, NV / United States of America

Start / End

09 May 2010 / 11 May 2010

Provider

Southern Nevada Tourist Safety Association

Contact

swatson@lvcva.com

  International Pow Wow  Location

Orlando, FL / United States of America

Start / End

15 May 2010 / 19 May 2010

Provider

Travel Industry Association

Contact

meetings@tia.org

 Hospitality Design Expo & Conference  Location

Las Vegas, NV / United States of America

Start / End

19 May 2010 / 21 May 2010

Provider

Nielsen Business Media

Contact

jeff.brown@nielsen.com

  More events related to Travel/Tourism can be found here   If you are an event provider you may consider to place your event in the above category, please click here   If your event already is in the list you may consider using the enhanced listing. For replacement just click here

— 57 —


Fair s & E x hi b ition s : M AY, 2 0 1 0

Asia & Pacific

  The Global Travel & Tourism Summit  Location

Beijing / China

Start / End

25 May 2010 / 27 May 2010

Provider

World Travel & Tourism Council

Contact

enquiries@wttc.travel

 World Travel Fair  Location

Shanghai / China

Start / End

27 May 2010 / 29 May 2010

Provider

VNU Exhibitions, Asia SICMO

Contact

Stephanie.xu@vnuexhibitions.com.cn

 World Travel Fair 2010  Location

Shanghai / China

Start / End

27 May 2010 / 29 May 2010

Provider

VNU Exhibitions Asia

Contact

victoria@vnuexhibitions.com.cn

 Hofex 2011  Location

Hong Kong / China

Start / End

11 May 2010 / 14 May 2010

Provider

Hong Kong Exhibition Services Ltd

Contact

hofex@oesallworld.com

 China Hotel Investment Conference   Location

Shanghai / China

Start / End

12 May 2010 / 14 May 2010

Provider

HVS

Contact

aphua@hvs.com

 Beautyworld Japan  Location

Tokyo / Japan

Start / End

17 May 2010 / 19 May 2010

Provider

Messe Frankfurt

Contact

info@mesago-messefrankfurt.com

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— 58 —


iŃ ons

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Figures Economy

Security

New service

Problems

Transport

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Ecology

People

Events

Special

TR Partner

Media Partner

Alarm

Advice

Polls Awards

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Tourism Review Online Magazine - 05/2010  

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