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Our Notes:

In this Issue DEPARTMENTS Notes from the Publishers................................................2 TACC Board of Directors & Staff........................................4 Chairman’s Message......................................................... 5 Chamber Exec’s Message..................................................6

FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY South Bay Innovation Going Green...................................8 How the City of Torrance Makes Use of Technology........10 Community Hydrogen Action Plan (CHAP).......................11 Why Drive a Hybrid?........................................................12 Managing the Maze of Technology..................................14 Social Media 101: Four Steps to Get Started Today .........17 Recycling is a ball with Ball.............................................19 Pros and Cons of Outsourcing Information Technology.......20 Tackling Climate Risks with Technology..........................21 What’s the Point of Sale?................................................22 Technology Trends and the Hospitality Industry.............23

U.S. CENSUS 2010 Be Counted in 2010.........................................................24

CHAMBER PAC Lawmaker Goes Far Beyond Making Laws ......................25

CHAMBER HIGHLIGHTS TACC Foundation Launches Second Mentor Program..... 26

RIBBON CUTTINGS Torrance Businesses Celebrate.......................................27

CHAMBER EVENTS Congresswoman Jane Harman Addresses the State of the Region.................................28 TACC 2009 Business Expo...............................................29 LTAA’s Leader Symposium...............................................30 Annual Japan Business Reception...................................30

UPCOMING EVENTS At the Chamber ...............................................................31

NEWS BRIEFS Providence LCMH Power of Pink .....................................32 Federal Per Diem Rates Are Hurting Weary Hotel Industry.........................................33 A BioMed Founder to be Honored...................................33 19th Annual Sunday by the Sea......................................34

CHAMBER BENEFITS Chamber Groups and Core Benefits................................35 Torrance Magazine: It’s All About Business ....................36

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I am a mere business owner determined to be efficient and of superb service to my clients. I have a love/hate relationship with technology: love, because I feel power in my Blackberry and having information at my fingertips; hate comes when I get the sudden realization of dependence on something with an anticipated failure rate. For Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, those who have considered Green Ink Marketing hiding in a cave as a sign of rebellion, it will not work. As we started putting together this issue, we were slapped with the fact that technology has the power to save humanity and the planet, help us work more efficiently, help us communicate with “friends” and contacts, and drive us crazy... In this issue we have included information on government’s involvement in green technology and the efforts by Torrance companies to be at the helm of inception and innovation. We see small businesses supplying specialized needs to others in a cohesive and integrated way, and service suppliers ensuring that we take advantage of safe technologies allowing for less conflict between the various tools. How rich our business community is, and how fortunate we are to have a Chamber of Commerce as a gathering place for service and innovation! Hungry for more? Board member Dan Thomas is encouraging businesses in the technology fields to join in for networking and discussions in a new group that is forming (TechPros). Pat and I also want to take this opportunity to thank all of you, readers, contributors and advertisers, for supporting Torrance Magazine in 2009. This magazine is about you and your business and we feel privileged to be able to provide a communication and publicity forum. The advertisers’ financial support make it possible for us to continue to bring forth this local and exclusive material. Thank You! May we all start this new year invigorated and with new plans to implement the right strategies to thrive. Happy 2010! Sue Moylan UPCOMING DEADLINES for the April 2010 Issue on Health: Article Deadline: February 19, 2010 Advertising Deadline: February 19, 2010 Distribution Date: March 31, 2010

CONTACT US: Advertising: See www.torrance-magazine.com or Contact AdSales@Torrance Magazine.com or 310.317.0841 Articles: Amy Herrschaft and/or Pat Sandt, at Submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or 310.373.2880 General Information/Marketing Services: Sue Moylan, at info@GreenInkMarketing.com or 310.539.2235 TACC Contact: Amy Herrschaft, at Amy@TorranceChamber.com or 310.543.3113 The Torrance Magazine focuses on business stories, events, and who’s who profiles that are of interest to Torrance Chamber of Commerce members and others doing business in the South Bay area. The editorial is positive, informationpacked, exclusive news: a diverse mix of feature stories on Torrance and South Bay movers and shakers, businesses, events, local industries, government and business economic development strategies and outlooks.


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TACC Board of Directors and Staff 2009-2010 Executive Board of Directors

Scott Easterday Outback Steakhouse

Chairman of the Board Dan Keeton Torrance Community Church of the Nazarene

Judy Gibson Strategic Technology Sources

Chairman Elect Mark Waronek Ek & Ek President and CEO Donna Duperron Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Immediate Past Chair Toni Bock Virco Inc.

Craig Leach Torrance Memorial Medical Center

Julia Nagano Port of Los Angeles Steven Napolitano Field Deputy, Supervisor Don Knabe

Vice Chair Membership Outreach Sue Moylan Crest Marketing, Inc.

Max Ocansey Exxon Mobil Corporation

Vice Chair Membership Programs Michael Goguen Edward Jones Investments

Jeffrey Rogers Western Federal Credit Union

Vice Chair Government Affairs Charles Gale Jr. Metropolitan Water District of So. Cal. Vice Chair Economic Development Jerry Say LandPoint Corporation

Pat Sandt Green Ink Marketing Liz Seong Re/Max Realty Bob Shafer Torrance-South Bay YMCA

Vice Chair Premier Investor Relations Aaron Aalcides Malaga Bank

Mark Story Ball Corporation Dan Thomas TelePacific Communications / PhonBiz.com

Vice Chair Education Foundation Tara O’Brien Kaiser Permanente General Counsel Karl Schmidt Parker, Milliken, Clark, O’Hara & Samuelian

B. Elaine Thompson B. Elaine Thompson, Law Office Richard Tsao New Century Properties & Investments Tracy Underwood Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc.

2009-2010 Board of Directors Candace Allen Field Deputy Assemblymember Ted Lieu Linda Amato Doubletree Torrance South Bay Hotel Vanessa Aramayo Field Deputy Congresswoman Jane Harman Karin Baker American Honda Motor Company, Inc. Tony Bazurto Compex Legal Services, Inc.

Sharon Weissman Field Deputy, Senator Jenny Oropeza

TACC Staff Donna Duperron President and CEO Helen Duran Finance Administrator Abbie Enriquez Administrative Assistant Amy Herrschaft Communications and Events Manager

Philip de Souza Aurora Enterprises

Kelly McLeod Membership Manager

Raj Dias Phoenix International

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Michael Hunn Providence Little Company of Mary

Dr. George Mannon TUSD Superintendent of Schools

Vice Chair Finances Carlos Seraphim Citibank FSB

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Mary Giordano Assistant City Manager, City of Torrance

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About Torrance Magazine Torrance (ISSN #0194-5491) Published by the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce with Green Ink Marketing. Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Ste 100, Torrance, CA 90503. (310) 540-5858; Green Ink Marketing, Sue Moylan and Pat Sandt, 2785 Pacific Coast Hwy, Ste. 312 Torrance, CA 90505 310.539.2235. Subscription rates: $20.00 per year. E-mail: Info@GreenInkMarketing.com Send address changes to: Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce c/o Torrance Magazine 3400 Torrance Blvd, Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503 Tel: 310.540.5858 All rights reserved. Trademark. ARTICLES: Torrance Magazine is published quarterly and mailed to TACC members and distributed to selected businesses in the community. The publishers welcome written queries regarding articles for possible publications. Articles are subject to editing and are included on an “as space permits basis” at the discretion of the Publisher, Editors and Editorial Board. ITEMS: Material and photos for inclusion must be received 30 days in advance of the quarterly publication date. Reproduction, in whole or in part without written permission, is prohibited. Photos and articles not returned. DISCLAIMER: All reasonable efforts have been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in Torrance Magazine. The publisher accepts no responsibility for damage arising directly or as a consequence of the use or publication of inaccurate or missing information. The opinions expressed by contributors are their own, and are not necessarily shared by Torrance Magazine, its staff, TACC, Board of Directors, management or advertisers. Editorial content is intended as general information, and not as specific legal or financial advice; for such, readers are advised to consult professionals in the appropriate field. The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and Green Ink Marketing assume no liability resulting from the advertising contained in the publication. Printed on FSC Certified Paper with Soy-Based Inks.


CHAIRMAN’S

MESSAGE

Let’s Get Back to Business! It is amazing how vast the Torrance Chamber membership is in the South Bay as it is represented in this issue highlighting Technology. You will hear on the large scale from Congresswoman Jane Harman and her address at the State of the Region event about government's energy conservation efforts. At that same level, you will learn about how U.S. Hybrid is adapting vehicles for clean air. On the local scale, you will hear from colleagues who can help you work though email forwarding and file back-ups. Jason Mills reminds us that the social networking sites are not a fad or going away anytime soon. He talks in his article about relationship building, which brings me to a larger point. In my years in business and volunteer work I have come to learn that people want to interact with people they know and like. With all the technological advances, nothing replaces relationships and earned trust. This became evident in the past few weeks when the Board of Directors decided to hire Donna Duperron to help lead this great organization as President and C.E.O. Donna spent 8 years at the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce, with her last position being Chief Operations Officer in September 2008. During those years, Donna built an extensive network of friends, colleagues, and associates in every corner of the city. She enjoyed great trust from these relationships, which placed her in positions of leadership at all levels. Her most recent experience is as C.E.O. of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, a Torrance non-profit organization. Donna has been able to successfully navigate all groups, including government, philanthropic, and business organizations. Her true asset as a leader is based on being a relationship-builder that is able to connect the dots and the players. And, at the end of the day, that's what getting business done comes down to.

DAN KEETON Chairman of the Board Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce

As a Chamber, we relate to our membership. This was a challenging year for everyone as we all realign business strategies. Yet most of us find that the success of our organizations still lie on the instinctive and natural value of connecting with people to make our efforts relevant and the Chamber is great for that. Don't miss some upcoming events such as the Dragon Circle Chinese New Year Celebration, the Green Torrance meetings, the Green Expo and so many of the ongoing groups and events that meet your needs. Come on by, shake hands, and “Let's get back to Business!”

I have come to learn that people want to interact with people they know and like. With all the technological advances, nothing replaces relationships and earned trust. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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CHAMBER EXEC’S MESSAGE

Thank you for welcoming me as the new President and CEO of the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce. I am excited about coming “back home” after serving as CEO for Retired Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP) in Torrance. Having worked for the Chamber for more than eight years, I have experienced successful events, leadership, and management practices, but as always I know that working as a team, more can be done. I look forward to getting reacquainted with many of you, ensuring the value of your membership and developing new events and business opportunities. I seek to increase community participation while expanding and growing Chamber membership and will concentrate on growing the organization’s relevance, partnering with existing members, growing the membership base, and securing the organization’s financial stability. It is nice to be back and to once again work closely with all of you. I am thrilled by the quality of the staff we have in place and know we will be able to serve our members well. I will be in contact with many of you very soon and trust that all of you will feel comfortable in contacting me at any time. It is your Chamber. I am honored to be back and to work with staff and members to make this great organization even better.

Donna’s professional experience includes eight years with TACC, and with other Torrance organizations including RSVP, Pediatric Therapy Network (PTN), and American Honda Motor Co, Inc. She is Past President of Kiwanis Club of Torrance and in 2007 the Western Association of Chamber Executives named her Staff Person of the Year. Earlier this year while working for RSVP, DONNA DUPERRON she organized the Torrance Block President and CEO Party. Currently Donna serves on Torrance Area the City of Torrance Centennial Chamber of Commerce Celebration committee, on the PTN Advisory Board, on the Teen Employment Network, Youth in Government, and as a member the Torrance Police Neighborhood Watch Program. Donna Duperron, President and CEO 310-540-5858 Donna@TorranceChamber.com

Attention Chamber Members Technology Professionals (TechPros) We are forming a new group for Torrance Chamber Tech Professionals. Be part of the first meeting on Wednesday, February 24th, from 12pm-1pm @ the Chamber. In an effort to gauge interest in this group, please make an effort to attend. RSVP required; please call the Chamber at 310-540-5858. Organized by Board Member Dan Thomas, the TechPros group will be bringing together companies and professionals in the DAN THOMAS technology fields (Hardware, Software and Services). Members will TelePacific Communications/ grow and benefit through networking, support, education, community presentations, service opportunities and leadership. We want to hear PhoneBiz.com from you and your technology company as we chart the course for this new group and navigate the future of technologies in our business and personal lives.

Save the Date, February 24th!

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South Bay Innovation Going Green By Jane Harman

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he economic downturn that has afflicted the rest of the country—and the world—has hurt the South Bay as well.

In the 36th Congressional District, 83,000 people – 12% of the District’s population – have no health insurance. The value of trade passing through the Ports of LA and Long Beach dropped to an estimated $282 billion this year from $356 billion in 2007. And more than 20,000 longshore workers, truckers and warehouse workers have been idled. State-wide, unemployment rose from 11.9% in July to 12.2% in August, and construction employment fell by a third to 633,000 in July from its high of 949,000 in early 2006. California was hit first and hardest by the collapsing housing market, and foreclosures are still surging. In July, one in 10 California homes was in default. If it weren’t for the cushion provided by the area’s aerospace industry we’d all be feeling a lot more hurt. Almost half of the nation’s satellites and space programs are produced within 25 miles of the LA Air Force Base in El Segundo. The base’s Space & Missile Systems Center and the Jet Propulsion Lab are two of the country’s largest recipients of government space funding. Combined, they support almost 24,000 jobs and spend about $3.7 billion annually in LA County. Boeing’s recent $400 million deal with Intelsat for four commercial satellites is evidence of the promise that the commercial telecommunications sector holds for the satellite industry and for our region. When man first landed on the moon, the world watched it through Intelsat. With telecommunications so drastically altering the way we live and interact it’s reasonable to expect the most revolutionary advances are still ahead. Though the aerospace industry is a ray of light in an otherwise dark economy, employment numbers are fragile. To quote a local aerospace executive: “they’re trading jobs for PhDs for jobs with shovels.” South Bay leaders are all too aware of the “gray wave” washing over the aerospace industry – and of the competitive

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Jane Harman represents California’s 36th Congressional District

Recognized by her colleagues and the national media as an authoritative voice on counterterrorism, homeland security and intelligence matters, Jane Harman has represented California’s 36th Congressional District in Los Angeles’ South Bay since 1993. As a member of the House Intelligence Committee for eight years – the final four as Ranking Member – Harman helped shape Congress’ policy response to the 9/11 attacks and played a lead role in the creation and passage of the Intelligence Reform Act of 2004. Now in her eighth term, Harman continues that policy focus as Chair of the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Intelligence & Terrorism Risk Assessment. She is also a member of the Energy and Commerce Committee, where she sits on the Health and Energy & Environment Subcommittees. Her role as an environmental leader was cemented with the passage of the 2007 Energy Act, which included her landmark lighting efficiency provisions to phase-out the wasteful 100-watt incandescent bulb by 2012, and require all light bulbs to be at least three times more efficient than today’s by 2020. Her life-long commitment to progressive issues is reflected in her record on a woman’s right to choose, on issues of interest to the gay and lesbian community, seniors and veterans, and has earned her top ratings from advocacy groups including Planned Parenthood, the Human Rights Campaign, and the California League of Conservation Voters. A product of Los Angeles public schools, Harman is a graduate of Smith College and Harvard Law School. Prior to serving in Congress, she was a top aide in the United States Senate, Deputy Cabinet Secretary to President Jimmy Carter, Special Counsel to the Department of Defense, and in private law practice. Married for almost three decades to Sidney Harman, founder and Chairman Emeritus of Harman International Industries, she has four adult children and three grandchildren. Visit www.house.gov/harman/

It’s this remarkable synergy between area businesses, local governments and world-class academic institutions that gives our region a “green leg up” on other parts of the country. 8

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1. Solar panels in the parking lot of BT’s El Segundo headquarters fulfill up to 20 percent of the facility’s electricity needs. 2. Rep. Harman speaks with Hermosa residents Robert and Monica Fortunato, who are turning their home into a “net zero” energy dwelling, meaning it produces as much energy as it consumes. Also pictured are Hermosa officials Kit Bobko and Mike Keegan. appeal of high tech titans like Google and Microsoft to the next generation of scientists and engineers. Michael Crichton once wrote that if you told a physicist in 1899 that within the next century mankind would “travel to the moon, and then lose interest,” the physicist would “pronounce you mad.” But it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that failure to attract the best and brightest minds could have a profound effect on America’s long-term security interests. This issue was the subject of a September 2008 El Segundo event hosted by SMC—featuring then-NASA Administrator Mike Griffin—which put the problem in proper local and national perspective. And as Co-Chair of the Congressional Space Power Caucus, I’m exploring ways to use that forum to put a new luster on the industry and promote interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. You can help too. There’s no substitute for the scientists and engineers among us who are willing to become ambassadors for their craft. I’ve been around long enough to remember how our region first reeled, and then adapted, to previous challenges. I’m confident we’ll rise to meet the current ones. One area where the South Bay is, hands down, best poised to grow and lead is in green jobs. In some ways, we already are: In Harbor City, Balqon is producing all-electric, heavy-duty trucks capable of hauling 30-ton shipping containers in and around the port complex. Clean trucks now move nearly 60% of cargo at the Port of LA, reducing emissions by 70%. Torrance’s Enova Systems, a leader in the field of alternative vehicles, is now the supplier to Navistar for the US Department of Energy Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology Acceleration and Deployment Activity program. Windstream, a Manhattan Beach company, produces small urban wind turbines, and will soon help power Hermosa Beach and Manhattan Beach municipal buildings.

At its El Segundo office, the telecommunications company BT installed one of the largest rooftop solar systems in Southern California. It produces 15%-20% of the office and data center’s electricity needs and will reduce carbon emissions by 700,000 pounds annually. Toyota’s headquarters in Torrance is the largest corporate construction project ever awarded a gold rating by the US Green Building Council. Falcon Waterfree Technologies in West Los Angeles is a leading waterless urinal system provider. Since its first installation in 2001, the company has placed 150,000 urinals everywhere from the Staples Center to the Taj Mahal, saving roughly 17 billion gallons of water in the process. California has been the national environmental leader for generations. We were talking about green technologies before it was cool. Our business leaders can’t take all the credit; in many cases it’s private citizens who lead the charge. One Hermosa Beach family is particularly inspirational— they’re retrofitting their home to be a net-zero energy dwelling, meaning that it produces as much energy as it uses. It’s one of first net-zero retrofits in California, especially in an urban area. Experts from Southern California Edison are participating in the design as well as tracking the project from its inception to help inform future best practices that can be shared with customers. All of the scientific data that’s accumulated will be made publicly available so others can benefit from the work. It’s this remarkable synergy between area businesses, local governments and world-class academic institutions that gives our region a “green leg up” on other parts of the country. The Chambers of Commerce in the South Bay—including Torrance—are nationally recognized. Organizations like the South Bay Council of Governments and South Bay Energy Savings Center spur creativity and collaboration among governments and private business. You are part of a cohesive community of movers and shakers who will drive innovation in the South Bay for years to come. Keep it up!

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How the City of Torrance Makes Use of Technology Similar to most businesses, the City of Torrance offers its “customers” (residents and visitors) a variety of vital services, educational programs, enriching activities and fun events. In this way, as a full service “business”, the City of Torrance makes use of technology to effectively provide key information and services to the community. Through the City’s website, www.TorranceCA.Gov, each department provides information, communication tools, and an opportunity for the public to engage the city. The public may provide information, submit any inquiries and sign up for classes and programs as well as complete certain forms online. On the City’s website, residents and businesses may access the “CityGram” email feature, which enables anyone to email the City with any inquiry or concern. Each inquiry is the then fielded to the appropriate department for response. All City Council meetings are streamed live on the City’s website through a system called Granicus. This system has enabled more people to participate in the civic process as residents view the City Council meetings, along with agendas and staff reports, online. With the prevalence of social media tools as a means of communication, the City of Torrance has also begun exploring the uses and effectiveness of tools such as Twitter and Facebook. In April 2009, the City began using Twitter@ TorranceCA to promote activities, events, and services. Twitter is an alternative method of broadcasting information to persons specifically interested in the City. Currently, TorranceCA’s list of followers is growing, and “tweets” are generally sent daily to these users to keep them informed of the latest happenings. The Community Services Department’s Library Division has also been testing the effectiveness and elements of Facebook that the City may take advantage of. Through its pilot Facebook account, City staff keep library patrons abreast of progress with the refurbishments of the branch libraries that have been underway. The Torrance Police Department has also been utilizing Twitter and Facebook to test these avenues as a means of communicating with the public, especially to help keep Torrance a safe and secure community. The use of technology is also enhancing the work of the City’s Community Development Department, specifically with the Interactive Voice Response System (IVR). IVR is a telephone system which allows the public to schedule inspections and obtain results of inspections 24 hours a day,

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7 days a week. Additionally, every building inspector assigned to field inspections has been equipped with a laptop computer unit that is connected live to the City’s permit issuance program. As the field inspector performs an inspection, results of the inspection are entered into the laptop which connects live to the City’s permit issuance program; this allows for immediate posting of inspection results. This up-to-the-minute information that is available for public viewing allows the contractors and/or homeowner to streamline their construction schedule. The Community Development Department also makes use of a Geographic Information System (GIS) and Computer Aided Design (CAD) to provide specific detailed information about locations in the city. The results produced by the GIS are often utilized by other city departments on numerous projects. A program of note that will soon be made available is a Traffic Management Center (TMC) which will allow the City’s Public Works Department to program, analyze, adjust, and control the operation of its traffic signals from a centralized location. The TMC will incorporate a computer work station and video cameras at specific traffic signals to monitor traffic circulation. Torrance’s Transit Department also continues to monitor the life of its buses and new technology that impacts their production and maintenance. This has lead to the continuous updates of its fleet of buses for better service and better fuel efficiency. These projects are simply a few of the numerous ways that the City of Torrance makes use of technology to better serve its community. Through the continuous assessment of, and learning about new technology, the City is able to make use of the best and most appropriate products of technological advancement to create efficiencies in the way Torrance serves the public. There are many ways that the City of Torrance makes use of technology in providing services, programs and activities and enhancing its operations. Any city department would be happy to share further information on the tools that they use and how those tools benefit the community or even how you may consider implementing something similar in order to increase your business’ efficiency! Please contact Fran Fulton in the Office of Economic Development for more information at 310-618-5807 or via email at EconomicDevelopment@TorranceCA.Go


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Community Hydrogen Action Plan (CHAP)—

A Grassroots Plan for Developing Torrance’s Hydrogen Community

Communities across the United States are increasingly being tasked with establishing energy independence and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Whether this comes from mandates or regulatory actions, the result is that communities need implementation strategies that provide new jobs, cleaner air and stable energy costs. Hydrogen fuel cells are one promising strategy for communities of all sizes. Fuel cells can efficiently utilize local resources to provide power for stationary use, transportation and materials handling. Local support for early hydrogen and fuel cell projects is a key to successful implementation.

For each of these areas, practical commercial or near-commercial products already exist. For example, a number of manufacturers are currently selling stationary fuel cells that can generate electricity from hundreds of kilowatts to several megawatts. Others have developed efficient, durable forklifts and lift trucks that are becoming cost competitive with conventional equipment. Several California transit agencies have successful fuel cell bus programs, while most automakers, including Torrance’s Toyota and Honda, are fast developing production fuel cell vehicles. Both automakers have deployed fuel cell vehicles to paying customers since 2003, with Honda currently leasing its FCX Clarity through several southern California dealerships.

The Community Hydrogen Action Plan is a systematic template for successfully jumpstarting local hydrogen and fuel cell Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles lined up Torrance has several hydrogen station projects. Developed by the California Fuel projects that will provide fuel for fuel cell Cell Partnership, in collaboration with the National Fuel Cell vehicles. In addition to existing private stations at Honda and Research Center, CHAP focuses on supporting local leaderToyota, both Shell Hydrogen and an independent Chevron ship and activities to streamline project acceptance and planstation are building new retail hydrogen stations in the ning. Implementing CHAP ensures a community’s position as Torrance area. a leader in sustainable energy, and creates a foundation for Each of these projects represents jobs in the Torrance area. long-term economic and social benefits. These include engineers and project managers who site, In Torrance, fuel cell technology can provide benefits in permit and build facilities; construction workers who build four specific areas: the projects; and sales and service people to support forklifts • Distributed power generation using waste streams, and vehicles. Many hydrogen and fuel cell projects also such as sewage or landfill gas represent new opportunities for small businesses and • Residential power and heat in a process that is more entrepreneurs. efficient and smaller in size than solar panels CHAP has been designed to support local leadership • Backup power as an alternative to current battery and activities that achieve a community’s economic, environor diesel technologies in industries such as telecom mental and social benefits through use of hydrogen fuel cell • For transportation in cars, trucks, transit buses technologies. Communities that are early adopters will be and forklifts. who others look to as these technologies advance and become more prevalent: Torrance has already begun the process, establishing themselves as a model community for a sustainable future!

The Community Hydrogen Action Plan is a systematic template for successfully jumpstarting local hydrogen and fuel cell projects.

For more information, contact: Jordan McRobie, California Fuel Cell Partnership 21845 E. Copley Dr., Suite 1137 Diamond Bar, CA 91765 (909) 396-3388 http://www.cafcp.org TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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Why Drive a Hybrid? With so many hybrid vehicles on the road today we may wonder, why hybrid? You may know that hybrid vehicles use more than one source of power, usually an internal combustion gasoline engine in combination with an electric motor, and in some cases hydrogen fuel cells or even hydraulic systems. There are many variations of hybrid vehicles. Hybrids are simply efficient because, 1) they use smaller engines for cruising speeds with an electric motor providing acceleration power, 2) the engine’s idling time and transients in traffic is reduced or eliminated and, 3) they recover energy with electric motor during braking. Hybrid vehicle systems also reduce pollution and fuel consumption, especially in stop-and-go traffic. The conventional engine has been evolving for over a century, and is generally efficient when operated at “full power.” But when driving conditions change, we seldom use full engine power and our vehicles operate indifferently. Hybrid

vehicle systems allow us to use a smaller internal combustion (IC) engine to improve the cruising power, while using the electric motor to both accelerate/decelerate and recover energy during braking, thus saving fuel costs, reducing emission and brake wear. Hybrid vehicles are really about energy management; as sensible as the most advanced energy management and battery technology used in our cell phones and laptops. Efficient and user-friendly, hybrid vehicles enhance our vehicles’ performance while saving energy and reducing emissions. Global warming, caused by increased gases such as Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Carbon Monoxide, Hydrocarbons and Nitrogen Oxides, has become an important concern for the world. Hydrocarbons are the gases from internal combustion engines that burn fuel to power vehicles. And while we may have various after-treatments to reduce Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and Hydrocarbon emissions to reclaim clean air, true CO2 and other harmful emissions reduction can be achieved by improving energy efficiency and cleaner combustion. Hybrid Vehicle Systems are a sensible alternative, and pave the way to the future for all forms of transportation, regardless of vehicle type or class. Transit Buses are excellent candidates for hybrid technology whether we use Diesel (not allowed in California), Gasoline, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), or even Liquid Natural Gas (LNG). Vehicles used in Ports are benefitting from our hybrid technologies. These vehicles are inefficient and polluting, as they sustain lengthy idle time while waiting to be loaded or unloaded. Heavy construction vehicles can also be refitted and the industries that support them can benefit through the use of hybrid. Hybrid use can

Hybrids reduce fuel consumption, costs and emissions, and by turning toward hybrid solutions, we can help ourselves today and for generations to come. 12

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offer a reduction of air pollutants and toxic wastes by as much as 50%, less dependency on imported oil and less damage to our precious resources. Hybrid vehicle systems are the only real, feasible alternative to engine-only vehicles. Hybrids efficiently transfer power between engine and the electric motor. They reduce fuel consumption, costs and emissions, and by turning toward hybrid solutions, we can help ourselves today and for generations to come. It should be recognized that the City of Torrance hosts one of the highest concentrations of talent in Electric and Hybrid technologies in the world, including Toyota, Honda, GM ATC, Honeywell, Aisin, Panasonic, NAVCom, L3, Enova and US hybrid. Dr. Abas Goodarzi received his Masters and Ph.D. in Power Electronics from University of Missouri - Columbia, is a Registered Professional Engineer since 1985, and has been involved in design and development of Electric

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and Hybrid vehicles system since 1982. Dr. Goodarzi was the Senior Scientist at Hughes Aircraft Company and Technical Director for General Motors EV1 Electric Vehicle program in 1994. He is the founder and CEO of US Hybrid since 1999 focusing on design, development and manufacturing of electric and hybrid systems for commercial, medium and heavy duty on/off-road specialty vehicles.

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Managing the Maze of Technology In today’s times of down-sizing, reassignment, outsourcing, reduction, cost-cutting, or whatever else you call it, office managers have been required to take on new tasks and responsibilities to keep offices running smoothly and efficiently; but who has the expertise or time to accomplish all that is required to run a typical office? Imagine this scenario: 7:00 AM – Receive urgent Email from sales agent that can’t access quote system. 8:00 AM – Discuss new website development with marketing, sales, and Bob (the website guy) while communicating about what the new promotion will be so he can make changes later. 9:00 AM – Fix the copier once again since there never seems to be a budget for a new one. 10:30 AM – Call the phone company and sit on hold with them for 45 minutes.

12:00 PM – Change the backup tapes in the server while grabbing a quick bite. 1:00 PM – Go over the phone bill with accounting to try to explain why you have to pay so much. 1:30 PM – Reset the VPN so the branch office can access the server yet again. 2:00 PM – Riffle through the file cabinets looking for the last bill for toner since your copier is so old you can’t find it from anyone else. 2:30 PM – Attempt to setup the new phone for the temp that will be gone in a week. 4:00 PM – Help the boss find his lost file in his My Documents that he has lost again (he believes). 5:00 PM – Get ready to apply patches to the server and hope that it finishes and comes back up before midnight. 9:00 PM – Back home, ready to read up on how to get Email on cell phones since that is so important to your boss who can’t even use Email. Sound familiar? Many office managers seem to be the go-to person for anything from copiers to server maintenance and all the technologies in between. It is unrealistic to assume that anyone can keep up with all that is going on in a busy office and has the expertise to deal with every situation that pops up during the day, derailing the current task to react to the crisis of the moment. Turn-over among office and IT management is the fastest in most offices and this lack of continuity of personnel creates even more burden and chaos for the next associate destined to become the next answer-person for an office full of machines, documents, and people. These overworked individuals have little to fall back on and almost no understanding or support as they attempt to resolve issues beyond their training, only to cause greater inefficiencies. But hiring a team of individuals to address the various Continued on page 16

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Consider a collective of technology specialists structured to be a one-stop expert shop for high-tech needs. Managing the Maze of Technology Continued from page 14 concerns is out of the question. Learning more about these ever-changing technologies is not viable. Is outsourcing a Tech Support team more practical? Probably, especially if the team consists of various skill sets to address the variety of needs an office encounters; and even better if the team members are used to working together where they may address most issues while minimizing the client’s direct involvement. Consider a collective of technology specialists structured to be a one-stop expert shop for high-tech needs. If the day’s scheduled outlined above sounds like something your office may relate to, consider instead that the same number of hours in the day could have included getting an email from a vendor informing that updates relating to the website are automatically updating for new products, an analysis on the copier, informing that the back-ups are done, that the file shortcuts are set up, a review of telephone service providers, etc., etc.

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Outsourcing professionals like chamber members “EnterpriseTechGroup.com” manage days like this for their clients as they offer reliability and solutions, giving the overburdened office manager a resource for all technologies in the office environment. From website creation, to copiers, to phones, to voice/data connections, to document management, to off-site hosting and everything in between, there are consultant groups out there ready to step in, take charge, and relieve the yoke of responsibility for the skills that office managers of today are not prepared for. In searching for help, however, consider a team approach of technologists who work together in all the necessary tech aspects, including data, business workflow, telecommunications, and office equipment needs. Robert Wakefield-Carl QoS Telesys, EnterpriseTechGroup.com www.enterprisetechgroup.com


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Social Media 101: Four Steps to Get Started Today By now, most people have heard of LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and all the other types of new buzz words that seem to be on every news channel. Why the interest? Because just like the invention of the automobile or the telephone, this new technology allows you to create ways of connecting with new prospects and partners like never before; and your competition knows this too. With the right strategy, social media allows you to connect with the right people anywhere in the world, at any time at all times removing the traditional barriers that have limited personal interactions. We know the opportunity is out there but how do you get started? Here is a quick four step plan to get you going: 1. Back to the basics: Define who you are, what you do and what you offer your clients. Often it is this basic question that causes people the most trouble. Before jumping into the many social media tools, take a moment to reflect on what makes you unique and valuable to the marketplace. Odds are there are one or two (or hundreds) of people who do what you do and who on the surface are as equally talented, experienced or qualified. How often do you attend a networking event and have trouble standing out from the pack? How often do you meet a new face and have trouble sharing the specific benefits of the services that you uniquely provide. To be effective in any business development effort, ask your best clients why they chose you and what unique factors helped them make the wise decision to choose you. 2. Find and Connect with People. Once you are clear on what specific benefits you can provide, it is time to find and connect with potential clients and partners. The challenge can be that the opportunities are endless and overwhelming with-

out a plan. The easiest way to get started quickly is to a. Connect with the clients and partners you already have b. Join relevant groups in both LinkedIn and Facebook. Hint: what groups are your clients and partners associated with? c. While at events, make sure to connect with the contacts you are making. Be the one to initiate the connection requests d. Add your connection information to your email signature. Make sure to avoid the common mistake of just joining groups with people that do what you do. Instead, connect with the groups your clients connect with. Remember, people who choose to be online are there to make valuable

connections too. Just like you, they are looking to connect with people that share their interests and can be potential partners or clients. 3. Add Value to the Conversation. Networking 101: No one likes a pushy salesperson but everyone likes a helpful contact. a. Use your status updates to share your individual assets in a non-pushy way. What expertise can you share? What valuable articles are you reading? What events are you attending that may be relevant to your network? b. Be active in the groups you have joined and add value to the discussions taking place. Remember, the goal is to connect with people in the groups. Give sincere feedback on Continued on page 18

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Social Media 101 Continued from page 17 relevant topics. Send invite requests to people who are posting; they are working hard to connect with others as much as you are. c. When connecting with people you don’t know, add a sentence or two of how you are connected and what you are looking to offer. Everyone appreciates a warm introduction. d. Connect your connections with other connections. Your partners and clients are looking for partners and clients too. Be the type of referral partner you wished your connections were to you 4. Rome was not built in a day (or two‌) Remind yourself that great relationships take time; and social media relationships are no different. Just like face to face networking, the key to your successful social media strategy is to review and repeat steps one though three over and over again. Social media enhances the personal and professional

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networking you are used to engaging in. It does not replace it. Out-think and outwork your competition. Spend 30-60 minutes a week thinking how you may add value to these current and future connections. Quick Tips to Get Started 1. Find a networking partner who understands the tools and buy them lunch. It will be the cheapest education you ever get. 2. Create a LinkedIn and Facebook account www.facebook.com and www.linkedin.com. Make sure you complete your profile. An incomplete profile reflects your lack of interest. 3. Find the profiles of excellent peers and imitate what they do. 4. Read articles and blogs to help you build a foundation and learn what successful people are doing. I would recommend starting with www.mashable.com, www.hubspot.com, and http://socialnomics.net

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5. Have a follow up strategy or Customer Relationship Management system to manage all the new relationships you are building. 6. Hint: I eat lunch. Jason Mills is the Marketing Manager at Integrated Information Systems, a Microsoft Gold partner and Microsoft Dynamics GP/CRM partner focused on helping clients execute their business strategy by leveraging technology though best business practices.Jason has over 12 years of experience educating companies on how to leverage technology with measurable results. He hosts monthly webinars on business topics and is a speaker at Microsoft and other technology vendor events.

Jason can be reached at (424) 757-4201 Jason.mills@issusa.com http://www.linkedin.com/in/ jasontmills


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Recycling is a ball with Ball From Labor Day to November 15 – America Recycles Day (ARD) – businesses, schools, families and organizations across the country increase their recycling efforts through the Aluminum Can Council’s ARD Cans for Cash School Challenge. Ball Corporation’s Torrance, California, metal beverage packaging plant has since 2007 coordinated a “Cans for Cash” challenge at two local schools. Ball’s Torrance facility has manufactured aluminum cans since the early 1960’s and at full capacity produces 6.4 million cans a day.

A recycled can requires 95 percent less energy, generates 95 percent less emissions and creates 97 percent less water pollution than generating new metal.

Students and faculty at Madrona Middle School in Torrance and First Lutheran School in Torrance work with Ball to collect aluminum cans. The schools hold a competition by grade level to see which grade has collected the most cans by November 15th and Ball matches the dollar amount the students raise by selling the cans to recyclers. Madrona Middle School is Ball Torrance’s Adopt-A-School partner through the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce program. In 2008 the Chamber awarded Ball & Madrona “Partnership of the Year.”

America Recycles Day they donate their cans to the Cans for Cash school fundraisers and encourage the community to do so as well. The rest of the year one of the plant’s long-time employees, Hans Bolthausen, cashes in aluminum cans and plastic bottles from the employee cafeteria and uses the money to purchase toys and school supplies. These items are donated each December to Cheer for Children, a local nonprofit, all volunteer organization, who delivers them via Santa to acutely ill children and their families at Harbor UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California.

“This year, the two schools collected 3,186 pounds of recycled aluminum cans - Madrona’s 750 students brought in an average of 2.31 pounds per student and First Lutheran’s 493 students brought in an average of 2.95 pounds per student. As a result, Madrona raised over $5,700 and First Lutheran raised over $4,700,” said Mark Story, Plant Manager. As for the grade level competition, the 7th graders at Madrona won with 2.3 pounds per student and the 4th graders at First Lutheran won with 5.3 pounds per student. “This is the easiest fundraiser a school can have; just bring in your trash for cash! No wrapping paper or cookie dough to buy,” said Rachel Tobin, Human Resources Manager and can drive coordinator.

“Torrance should be proud, as are we, of the Madrona Middle School’s and First Lutheran School’s stellar recycling and fundraising accomplishments with Ball Corporation. We are pleased to help their efforts each year with posters, curriculum, prizes, and this year Infinitely Recyclable bracelets for the students,” according to Jenny Day, Director of Recycling at the Can Manufacturers Institute. Through Ball Torrance, both schools are entered in the Aluminum Can Council’s national competition recognizing the top three per capita recycling schools with prize money and trophies to be awarded shortly. A recycled can requires 95 percent less energy, generates 95 percent less emissions and creates 97 percent less water pollution than generating new metal.

Over the last three years, Madrona & First Lutheran students, faculty and staff and Ball Corporation’s Torrance employees have collected a total of 7,000 pounds of aluminum cans for recycling. Ball’s employees collect their used aluminum cans all year long, but from Labor Day till

To learn more about America Recycles Day, http://www.americarecyclesday.org/americarecycles.aspx, and the ACC’s ARD Cans for Cash Challenge, www.cancentral.com. For more about Ball Corporation’s sustainability initiatives, visit www.ball.com/sustainability.

1. 73 lbs. of recycled aluminum cans

2. Left: Ron Richardson, Principal, Madrona Middle School Right: TACC Board member Mark Story, Plant Manager , Ball Corporation, Torrance Can Plant

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Pros and Cons of Outsourcing Information Technology In today’s hi-tech world, businesses are faced with many challenges that were not even considered just a few short years ago. Internal computer networks, e-mail servers, Internet connections, firewalls and system security are now essential aspects of running most businesses. While advances in technology associated with the core competency of a business can accelerate productivity and growth, managing the explosion of extemporaneous technology can be increasingly time-consuming and counterproductive. Understanding where to focus internal IT resources and when to call on outside expertise can give companies an edge over the competition. There are many different levels of IT outsourcing and the decision or tosecure help should be approached in a methodological manner. Outsourcing can range from merely hosting an e-mail server to colocation or even onsite managed desktop, network and application support. A colocation center hosts servers owned by multiple customers and ensures scheduled maintenance and back-ups, a guaranteed power supply and secure network operations to keep all systems running constantly. In a simplistic sense, colo providers charge rent to house machines and keep the lights on. A closer look reveals the high level of infrastructure, sophistication and training that is required to keep those lights on. IT outsourcing can focus on either hardware or software applications – or both. The level of outsourcing that is right for a business depends on many factors: The number of employees, desktop machines and servers will influence the decision. With a small number of machines and servers to support, a full-time network administrator can be cost prohibitive. With a large number of servers and desktop machines, the fluctuations of the organization and its required resources can often be better served through an outsource provider. Organizations with a complex IT network can benefit from an outside consultant with experience in a broad range of environments who can bring in new ideas to simplify the system and lower development and support costs. Another factor to consider is a company’s dependency on IT to produce its goods and/or services. Hi-tech organizations do not necessarily require hi-tech IT environments. For example, an optical disk replicator employs sophisticated equipment in the manufacture of its products, but does not require an over-

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ly complex IT infrastructure. Companies that rely heavily on technology to run their day-to-day operations must have competent and reliable IT resources and advice. For many companies, IT was never planned; it just evolved. As the early networks began to develop, specialized training was required to configure the machines to communicate with each other. As these technologies improved and the cost of entry dropped, specialists were no longer required. Unfortunately, this paved the way for rapid growth of IT systems that lack the benefit of logical and strategic planning. As the cost of hardware continues to drop, the use of job-specific servers is becoming the norm. The number of dedicated servers (e.g. e-mail, file, print, fax and database) has increased exponentially over the years. Many organizations now use a dozen smaller machines to take the place of what once was a single mainframe, minicomputer or phone system. Companies are best served by focusing on their core competencies and may be more efficient by outsourcing non-business-related tasks such as payroll, legal services, software application development and IT support. Understanding the level of IT service required to provide optimum resources to an organization is key to answering the question of IT outsourcing. By defining a service level requirement between a company’s core business and its IT organization, and then evaluating its IT support options between internal resource utilization and external outsource resources, a company can determine if IT outsourcing makes sense. Ultimately, information technology is nothing more than a tool that is used by business today. It is interesting to note that, as a tool, IT is much like the mail we send and receive on a daily basis. Yet, unlike mail, which we hand over to experts without even considering delivering it ourselves, many of us continue to employ and train our own full-time IT resources without giving outsourcing a thought. By R. Boyd Zack, President, R. B. Zack & Associates, Inc. RBZ&A has been handling IT outsourcing needs for 28 years, specializing in custom business application design and development, conversions, systems integration and support. For further information, contact Boyd.zack@rbza.com or 310 303 3320, or visit www.rbza.com


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What’s the Point of Sale? Before answering that question, I want to explain why I am passionate about Point of Sale technology. When I was a kid working in my mother’s art gallery at the end of each day, my mother would sit at an old oversized oak desk tucked back beyond customers reach. She would slave over receipts, a handwritten customer list and green ledger paper, tracking what was sold and who it was sold to, tediously reconciling the day and later the bank. And then, there was…I N V E N T O R Y! Ugh! Inventory; we would count and recount each tube of paint, every brush, book, canvas and drawing pad. Never once; always twice. We would then re-count every item looking for the missing tube of Burnt Umber, a 5x7 drawing pad, graphite pencils and, heaven forbid, any missing Royal Sable brushes.

I realize now how much time, money and maybe even customers were lost that could have been saved...”If she’d only had the technology then that we have now.” My older siblings would rightfully argue whether I “worked” in my mother’s gallery at all. I did love being there but hated how long and hard my mother worked. It’s the way it was but it’s not how it has to be. Okay, now you know why I am passionate about Point of Sale technology, so what’s the Point of Sale? If you ask Wikipedia, “Point of Sales (POS) or “checkout” is both a checkout counter in a shop, and the location where a transaction occurs. Colloquially, a “checkout” refers to a POS terminal or more generally to the hardware and software used for checkouts, the equivalent of an electronic cash register. A POS terminal manages the selling process by a salesperson accessible interface. The same system allows the creation and printing of the voucher.” Blah, Blah, Blah did you get through the whole paragraph? I’m not impressed either, my mother had that 36 years ago. If you ask me, Point of Sale is the vehicle that captures the sales, including customers’ information, products, pricing, and your purchases, vendors information, costs and inventory. Capturing the details enables business owners to evaluate their best and worst products or customers, by date range, location, salesperson, and even marketing efforts in an automated and fully integrated manner. There are many options available to retail business owners; so many that making a decision can be daunting. Finding the right consultant that will listen to your pains, assess your needs, understand your goals, objectives and budget can help you make and implement the best solutions. Properly implemented Point of Sale technology allows business owners to “do what they went into business to do”.... That’s the Point of Sale! Shea O’Neal the founder of Accounting Therapy was individually selected by Intuit® to be a member of its Solution Provider Program. For more information she can be reached at 310.791.1230 x111 or Shea@AccountingTherapy.com

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Technology Trends and the Hospitality Industry We’re speeding, not just moving quickly. As we aim to process details in light speed in most aspects of our lives, the use of technological devices and conveniences while traveling are essential and hotels are making a point of being equipped for travelers in a hurry. Technology is vividly seen upon arriving at the Doubletree Hotel Torrance/SouthBay, where guests with an advance reservation confirmation number or a credit card or Hilton HHonors member card can head to the Kiosk located in the Front Lobby for an Express Check-In. The Kiosk will assign guestroom number and issue room keys. Their friendly and complimentary hi-speed internet access is available in each guestroom and in all public areas of the hotel. Upon departure, Express Check-Out is available at the Kiosk from 6am-1pm using a reservation confirmation number again or either a credit card or Hilton HHonors member card. Then, guests can print out their Boarding Pass for domestic or international flights. The process requires simply touching the screen for Airline Web Check-In and selection of airline from a choice of twenty major airlines. This technology allows for simply typing in the departure city, Mileage Plus number and pressing “Print”, allowing guests to arrive at the airport holding their Boarding Pass. The Business Center features a computer system that will also allow guests to print Boarding Passes and much-much more. Additionally, the Business Center offers an “On Site Concierge” to find local activities and services that include Food & Dining, Nightlife, Transportation, Sports & Recreation, Travel Deals and Shipping information. Beginning at the point of making reservations, Doubletree allows for online booking of rooms, even for groups of 5-25 guests at www.torrancesouthbay.doubletree.com/E-Events offering special rates. For individual bookings, guests can call 1-800-222-TREE to make reservations and ask for the “Social Rate” or SRP Code “SR9” to receive a special discount.

1. The Kiosk assists guests to an Express Check-In and Express Check-Out as well as printing Boarding Passes 2. On Site Concierge assists guests in finding local activities and services

The Doubletree Hotel Torrance/South Bay was voted “Favorite Hotel in the South Bay” in the 2009 Daily Breeze Readers Poll.

The use of technological devices and conveniences while traveling are essential and hotels are making a point of being equipped for travelers in a hurry.

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Lawmaker Goes Far Beyond Making Laws By Jenny Oropeza Senator, 28th District As your public servant for the 28th Senate District, I am committed to providing you excellent service and doing everything I can to improve the quality of life, the economic vitality and the safety of our community. Fulfilling a primary part of my job is responding to your questions and concerns, helping you solve your problems and putting the public’s interest—your interest—first. Whenever you give me a call, staff will respond promptly, whether it’s assistance with a state agency, information on legislation or advocating on your behalf. Unfortunately, the most frequent request these days is with unemployment problems and related economic issues. I also receive many calls concerning the Department of Motor Vehicles, Caltrans, utilities and consumer affairs issues. Case work sometimes centers on residents or businesses having problems with organizations that are not state agencies. We also help businesses, cities and non-profit groups that seek grants or may be having problems with a state agency like the Air Quality Management District, the State Resources Water Control Board or the Public Utilities Commission. Legislation, of course, is important. Let me share with you some of my priorities: Transportation, health care, education, the environment, cancer prevention and fair and trustworthy elections. We can help you with information on legislation, support for grants or applications and community services. It is a great honor to represent you in our community and in Sacramento. Together, we will work to better our neighborhoods, schools and businesses. Constituent Services We can assist you in many areas that may be troublesome. These include personal or business concerns. If your business is having problems with Caltrans, a utility or the DMV, we can help. If you or someone you know needs assistance

with auto insurance, consumer complaints, child support, child care, disability insurance, workers’ compensation, or the Franchise Tax Board, let me know. Legislative Services Your views about issues that I may vote on are invaluable, so don’t hesitate to let me hear from you. If you need information about existing or proposed state laws, contact my District Office. We can provide you copies of legislation, laws, the status of legislation, bill summaries, analysis of bills, committee rosters and information on the legislative process. Community Services We can mediate between you and government agencies or offices. We can arrange for state experts to visit your community for technical assistance or advice. And we would gladly visit your business, neighborhood or group to discuss state legislation or programs. Just let us know. For more, visit my Web site below or contact my District Office at 2512 Artesia Blvd., Suite 200, Redondo Beach, CA 90278, or call (310) 318-6994. My Sacramento Office is in the State Capitol, Room 5114, Sacramento, CA 95814, or call (916) 651-4028. I look forward to hearing from you. Elected to the Assembly in 2000 and the Senate in 2006, Jenny Oropeza is the highest-ranking Latina in the Senate and chairs the Senate Majority Caucus. For more, visit www.senate.ca.gov/oropeza The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Political Action Committee (TACC-PAC) is an affiliate of the Torrance Chamber to support the election of officials and promote laws at all levels of government that advance and support business issues and the free market, private enterprise system. For more information, please contact info@taccpac.org or the Chamber at 310-540-5858.

Fulfilling a primary part of my job is responding to your questions and concerns, helping you solve your problems and putting the public’s interest—your interest—first. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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TACC Foundation Launches Second Mentor Program Services and North Torrance High School, this program helps students navigate the transition from the high school environment to the college, adult, and working worlds.

Torrance Chamber business leaders and North Torrance High School students recently kicked off a new three-year Mentor Program. A partnership between the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation, Toyota Financial

The students and mentors meet approximately once a month during the students’ sophomore year. Each session is designed to foster a bond between the mentors and students. Structured student-mentor activities at each session help students learn about communication styles, goal-setting, strengths and passions. The relationship will continue throughout the students’ junior and senior years in an effort to help these young people identify goals and develop action plans to achieve them.

As business leaders, we have a wealth of experience to share with students who are at a critical point in their lives. These students are starting to make decisions about life after high school, and mentors can provide muchneeded guidance and encouragement.

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“As business leaders, we have a wealth of experience to share with students who are at a critical point in their lives,” says Tara O’Brien, vice chair of the TACC Foundation. “These students are starting to make decisions about life after high school, and mentors can provide much-needed guidance and encouragement.” The Mentor Program also brings great satisfaction to the mentors, many of whom are returning after our first Mentor Program ended in 2008. For more information on becoming a mentor for future programs, please call Amy Herrschaft, Torrance Chamber vents and communications manager, at 310-543-3113.


RIBBON

CUT TINGS

Barrister Executive Suites 21250 Hawthorne Blvd. #500, Torrance CA 90503 Phone:(310)792-7000 Fax:(310)792-7045 http://www.barrister-suites.com leasing@barrister-suites.com Contact the business for space availability

Cash America 3957 Artesia Blvd., Torrance CA 90504 Phone: (310)793-2500 Fax: (310)793-2577 http://www.cashamerica.com Store Hours: Mon: 9:30am-7:30pm, T-F: 9:30am- 6pm Sat: 9:30am-3pm, Sun: Closed

Howards Appliances, Inc. 25415 Crenshaw Blvd., Torrance CA 90505 Phone: (310)539-2993 http://www.Howards.com Torrance@Howards.com Mon-Fri: 10am-9pm, Sat: 10am-7pm Sun: 10am-7pm

Tikkun Holistic Medicine 24241 Hawthorne Blvd., Torrance CA 90505 Phone: (310)628-7848 Fax (310)375-0222 http://www.TikkunMedical.com Contact the business for additional information

For details and to schedule a ribbon cutting, grand opening or ground breaking ceremony, please contact Kelly McLeod at 310-792-3808 at the Chamber no later than one month prior to the event and provide two preferred dates.

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EVENTS

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Congresswoman Jane Harman Addresses the State of the Region On Wednesday, October 13, the Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and the South Bay Association of Chambers of Commerce welcomed Congresswoman Jane Harman, for the seventh year, as she addressed the South Bay regional business community at the State of the Region Address. For every business in the South Bay region, it was important to hear from the Congresswoman. Her perspective was relevant and vital as she serves as the Chair of the Homeland Security Subcommittee on Intelligence Information Sharing and Terrorism Risk Assessment and as the veteran and ranking democrat on the House Intelligence Committee.

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This luncheon presentation at the Torrance Marriott brought the Congresswoman back to her district to report the status of national concerns for all business and civic leaders from her district. Guests heard her perspective on the economy, health care, and the current national political scene in addition to her inside knowledge of the challenges businesses are facing in this unusual time. A special thank you to all the sponsors of the event including Champion Sponsor, Northrop Grumman; Patriot Sponsors: Chevron Products Company, Daily Breeze, Exxon Mobil, Kaiser Permanente and Los Angeles World Airports. Homeland Sponsors included ConocoPhillips, Continental Development Corporation, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Southern California Edison Co., Torrance Memorial Medical Center, and Toyota Motor Sales U.S.A., Inc.


CHAMBER

EVENTS

The Torrance Chamber Promotes a Local Economy with the

2009 Business Expo The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 2009 Business Expo was a great success at Torrance Marriott ballroom on Thursday, October 30th. With Malaga Bank as the high-lighting sponsor, both businesses and non-profit organizations took advantage of this marketing opportunity to feature their products and services. The Expo brought in between 400 and 500 business members and area visitors and was an optimal venue for members to meet other Chamber members. Halloween balloon art by Me to You Balloons brought a festive atmosphere to the event while Celebrations Mobile DJ Service provided a soundtrack of festive Halloween tunes.

Businesses and attendees exchanged business cards and took advantage of the networking opportunity. Exhibitors provided items from their businesses for the prize-drawing opportunity. Although costumes were not mandatory, members came dressed up in their favorite costumes and participating businesses brought out their Halloween dÊcor. Community members also visited the Expo and learned about the various Torrance businesses and non-profit organizations and what they have to offer the South Bay. For information on next year’s event, please call the Torrance Chamber at 310-540-5858 or visit www.torrancechamber.com

Both businesses and non-profit organizations took advantage of this marketing opportunity to feature their products and services.

Chairman Dan Keeton with Sponsors – Aaron Aalcides with Malaga Bank, (L to R) Matthew Beaumont with Celebrations Mobile DJ Service, Peggy Rodriguez with Me To You Balloons, Maribel Denner with Torrance Marriott, and Carlos Sidney with the Daily Breeze. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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CHAMBER

EVENTS

Leadership Torrance Alumni Association’s Leadership Symposium Provided Members with Access to South Bay Leaders The Leadership Torrance Alumni Association’s Leadership Symposium was a new Torrance Chamber event that provided entrepreneurs, business owners, executives and mid-level managers in the South Bay area with an opportunity to interact with their peers. Business members learned how other businesses and organizations could utilize leadership skills to help grow their businesses in challenging economic times. The information-packed event included a panel discussion on “Business Leadership During Challenging Economic Times.” The panel speakers included City of

Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto who is also the President of Scotto Towing, Aaron Aalcides, Senior Vice President of Malaga Bank and Tom Shortridge, Senor Vice President of Svorinich Companies. In addition to the panel, guests chose from three breakout sessions about growing business. The session speakers and topics included “How to grow your business in Torrance and Utilizing City and Chamber Resources” with Fran Fulton, Economic Development City of Torrance and Sue Moylan, Green Ink Marketing. Doug Quackenbush, President of Business Compass presented on

“Being a Price Leader Instead of a Price Discounter in a Down Economy.” The third session was about “How to fund and expand your business in any economy” with Jon C. Walls, Co-Founder of Principle Management Consulting. Closing the symposium with information on “How to Succeed in Battle and in Business!” was the Keynote speaker, Jim Cragg, Keynote Speaker: Jim Cragg, President, Special Operations President S.O. Tech/Special Operations Technologies Inc. Technology. Presenting sponsors of the Symposium were Malaga Bank and Torrance Marriott. Event sponsors included S.O. Tech, Inc., GreenInk Marketing, and Vistage. Program sponsors: Aurora Enterprises and Courtney Self

Torrance Chamber 12th Annual Japan Business Reception Honored Four Women in the Torrance Japan Business Community The Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce and the Japan Business Association celebrated the years of dedication and contributions from Japanese Businesses to the City of Torrance at the 12th Annual Japan Business Reception. At the Doubletree Hotel Penthouse, TACC Divisional Chairman for Cultural Affairs, Judy Gibson, honored four Japanese women who have significantly influenced the Torrance community.

the U.S. Naginata Federation and the Southern California Naginata Federation.

The honorees of the reception included Rica Ruriko Hirota, retired Deputy Executive Director of the JAB South Bay Regional Committee Office, Mikko (Arimoto) Haggott-Henson, founder of the Torrance Sister City Association, Rumi Iwanaga, Director of the Japanese Educational Resource Center, and Helen Michiyo Nakano, Co-Founder and Charter Member of

Additional honored speakers were Frank Scotto Mayor of Torrance and Consul General of Japan Junichi Ihara. Corporate sponsors included Providence Little Company of Mary Hospital, Doubletree Hotel, Enagic USA, Inc., Torrance Memorial Medical Center, Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc., and Virco Inc.

“In the Chamber’s ongoing effort to honor the diversity that we are fortunate to have in the city of Torrance, our goal is to bring about harmony and understanding from a business and friendship perspective to each and every one of us,” said Judy Gibson.

Left: TACC Cultural Diversity Chair, Judy Gibson addresses the guests; Center: Chairman of the Board, Dan Keeton, Consul General of Japan Consul General of Japan, Junichi Ihara and Torrance Mayor Frank Scotto at the Japan Business Reception. Right: Guests perform the Sake Keg ceremony

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UPCOMING

EVENTS

Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 2010 CALENDAR OF UPCOMING EVENTS J A N UA RY 13th – Green Torrance Meeting – A committee collaboration between the City and the Chamber 3:30 p.m. at the Torrance Chamber offices. Committee meets every 2nd Wednesday of the month

22nd – Nonprofit Coalition 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Located at the Torrance Chamber offices. Bring a brown bag lunch. RSVP to the Torrance Chamber.

28th – Dragon Circle Chinese New Year Celebration 5:30 p.m. Located at the Doubletree Hotel. For more information or to RSVP contact the Torrance Chamber.

For more information visit us on the web www.torrancechamber.com 3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503

MARCH 24th – Green Torrance Expo at the Torrance Marriott.

ONGOING 1st, 3rd, 5th Friday of every month – Young Professional Group Morning Buzz 8:00 a.m. Located at Panera Bread 2733 Pacific Coast Highway #A Torrance 1st Tuesday of every month Human Resources Professionals of Torrance 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Located at the Torrance Chamber offices. RSVP to the Torrance Chamber. 2nd Monday of every month – Government Affairs Policy Group 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. Located at the Torrance Chamber offices. Last Thursday of every month – Professional Roundtable of Financial Services 3:30 p.m. located at Marie Callender’s RSVP to the Torrance Chamber. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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NEWS

BRIEFS

Providence LCMH Power of Pink Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation 9th Women’s Wellness Conference – The Power of Pink Benefits Big for Breast Cancer Programs Providence Little Company of Mary Foundation’s 9th Women’s Wellness Conference – The Power of Pink generated a record $135,000 to benefit Providence Little Company of Mary’s breast cancer programs. Over 525 guests supported the fight against breast cancer at the full-day conference which promoted the health and well-being of a woman’s body, mind and spirit at the Torrance Marriott on October 2, 2009. Guests were inspired by morning speaker Carol Lin and keynote speaker Meredith Baxter who both shared stories about their personal experiences with breast cancer. Baxter emphasized the necessity for early detection and urged the crowd to support breast cancer programs in their own community. Leading in community support was presenting sponsor

American Honda Motor Co., Inc. Platinum sponsors included the Crimi-Roser Foundation, the Jacqueline Glass Family and the Jankovich Company, with the Centofante Family as gold sponsor. The 2009 Sister Nancy Boyle Award for Excellence was presented to Nancy Carlson, Chief Executive of Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center San Pedro. This award honors an individual who embodies the legacy and life of Sister Nancy, with qualities of an innovative spirit, gentle strength and grace, respect for all, and love and compassion. For information about supporting Providence Little Company of Mary please contact the Foundation at 310.303.5340 and visit www.lcmweb.org.

The Power of Pink generated a record $135,000 to benefit Providence Little Company of Mary’s breast cancer programs.

Left: Conference Co-Chair Shelley Joyce R.N.; Presenting Sponsor Honda’s Kacey Takashima; Morning Speaker Carol Lin; Keynote Speaker Meredith Baxter; Platinum Sponsor Jacqueline Glass; Co-Chairs Cathy Alessandra and Linda Wenglikowski; Center: The 2009 Sister Nancy Boyle Award for Excellence winner and Providence LCM Medical Center San Pedro Chief Executive Nancy Carlson with Providence LCM Foundation President Joseph Zanetta; Right: Keynote Speaker Meredith Baxter and Presenting Sponsor Honda’s Kacey Takashima.

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NEWS

BRIEFS

Federal Per Diem Rates Are Hurting Weary Hotel Industry By Jane Harman In lean economic times, the hotel industry has one vital lifeline: the steady flow of business travelers – who pay for lodging based on federal per diem rates. But those rates for LA County – set by the General Services Administration (GSA) – are lower than rates elsewhere in California and do not reflect large variances in lodging costs within the County. The current rate of $135 is $12 less than San Diego County; $31 less than San Francisco County and an astounding $74 dollars less than the City of Santa Monica – which is located within Los Angeles County. Officials from the Cities of Torrance and Redondo Beach and members of their Chambers of Commerce brought this unfair equation to my attention. I’m glad they did.

The root problem lies in GSA’s methodology, which treats LA County as a monolith. To address this unfairness, I enlisted fellow LA County Reps. Dana Rohrabacher, Linda Sanchez, and Laura Richardson to join me in writing GSA Administrator Paul Prouty to request that the annual per diem review sample a smaller geographic region of mid-priced, upper and upper-upscale properties in Los Angeles County – similar to those available in Santa Monica. Limiting the geographic region to properties that are near or within the city limits of Los Angeles should ensure that hotels throughout the County receive more equitable and competitive per diem rates. This would be a logical correction, and I’m hopeful that GSA will agree. Stay tuned.

Jane Harman has represented California’s 36th Congressional District since 1993.

LA BioMed Founder to be Honored American College of Physicians to Recognize Melvin R. Kaplan, MD, FACP Melvin R. Kaplan, MD, FACP, a former Board Chair and one of the founders of the research institute that became Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed), will be honored by the American College of Physicians (ACP) for his lifetime devotion to the care of patients. ACP will present its Ralph O. Claypoole Sr. Memorial Award for Devotion of a Career in Internal Medicine to the Care of Patients to Dr. Kaplan in April. “The competition for this award was extremely stiff, but your contributions were the most outstanding,” said Faith T. Fitzgerald, MD, MACP, ACP chair, in a letter to Dr. Kaplan. Dr. Kaplan has been affiliated with Harbor-UCLA Medical Center since 1950, including serving five years as chief of medicine. LA BioMed honored him in 2004 as one of its “Legends,” and he’s received numerous awards over his career.

“Dr. Kaplan was among the visionaries who saw the potential for creating a research institute on the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center campus,” said LA BioMed President and CEO David I. Meyer, PhD. “Because of their vision, LA BioMed is thriving today and leading the way in taking discoveries from the bench side to the bedside.” LA BioMed is one of the nation’s largest research institutes of its kind, translating scientific discoveries and transforming lives.

Dr. Kaplan was among the visionaries who saw the potential for creating a research institute on the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center campus. TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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NEWS

BRIEFS

SUNDAY BY THE SEA GOURMET FOOD AND WINE TASTING GALA

Raises Funds for Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation

Photo By: Dave Gregerson, Gregerson Photography

Over 700 guests enjoyed Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation’s 19th Annual Sunday by the Sea. The annual food and wine tasting gala was held this past September 27, 2009 from 2-5pm at the lovely seaside home of Carolyn and Julian Elliott. Over 60 premiere restaurants and wineries from around the South Bay and Southern California tempted guests with delicious morsels and libations.

Sr. Terrence Landini, LCM; Barbara Roberts, Executive Director, Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation; Jacqueline Glass, Chair, Providence TrinityCare Hospice Foundation Board of Trustees and Terri Warren, Chief Executive, Providence TrinityCare Hospice

Nearly $200,000 was raised to benefit the programs and services of Providence TrinityCare Hospice. Highlights of the event were the beautiful atmosphere, the wonderful fare, the band – The Stephanie James & Mark Fitchett Jazz Ensemble and the live auction, where chef Michael Schaffer donated two dinners at private homes to raise over $8,000 for TrinityCare Hospice Foundation. Providence TrinityCare Hospice is one of the oldest and largest not for profit hospices in Southern California, providing comfort and care to adults and children with life-limiting illnesses. Proceeds from this event directly benefit the programs of Providence TrinityCare Hospice such as: Patient Care Assistance, TrinityKids Care – the only dedicated pediatric program for infants and children in the region, Necessities of Life, Palliative Care and The Gathering Place – a community bereavement center. For more information, please call: 310.257.3535 or visit www.trinitycarehospice.org

Nearly $200,000 was raised to benefit the programs and services of Providence TrinityCare Hospice. 34

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CHAMBER

BENEFITS

See How the Chamber Supports its 5 Core Membership Benefits

C

ommitted to being a valuable resource to its members, the Torrance Chamber offers a variety of programs that support its mission, including networking opportunities, industry and business-focused events, and community involvement. The Chamber also maintains a strong legislative advocacy program, voicing the needs of its membership and helping to establish a favorable business climate at local, state, and federal levels.

Creating a Strong Local Economy

Promoting the Community

Business Expo Networking @ Noon New Member Reception Ribbon Cuttings and Grand Openings South Bay Industry Executive Forum

Gourmet Food and Wine Festival Cultural Involvement: • Japan Business Reception • Chinese New Year Celebration • Black History Celebration Leadership Torrance Leadership Torrance Alumni Association • Leadership Symposium • Junior Leadership Program Ribbon Cuttings and Grand Openings TACC Foundation: • Adopt-a-School partnership program • Mentor Program • State of Education Torrance Area Green Summit and Expo

Providing Networking Opportunities: Providing access to influential business leaders Ambassador Program Business at Breakfast Green Torrance Committee Holiday Open House Human Resource Professionals of Torrance Leadership Torrance Leadership Torrance Alumni Association Networking @ Noon New Member Reception Non Profit Coalition Professional Roundtable of Financial Services (PROFS) South Bay Industry Executive Forum TechPros Young Professionals Group (YPG)

Supporting the Business Interests Before Government Candidate Forums Lunch with our Leaders South Bay Association of Chambers of Commerce State of the City State of the Region

Talking Political Action

Advertising Opportunities: Business Directory and Resource Guide Daily Breeze Advertising Program Email Blasts Torrance Business Monthly Torrance Magazine

High Exposure: Event Sponsorships Premier Investor Program

Services: Employee Savings Program Daily Breeze Advertising Program Member 2 Member Discounts SCORE Counseling from Experienced Executives

Access D.C. GAP – Government Affairs Policy PAC – Political Action Committee

Not a member of the Chamber? Need information on events or groups? Visit www.TorranceChamber.com or reach our staff at 310.540.5858

Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100, Torrance CA 90503 Office 310.540.5858 • Fax 310.540.7662 TO R R A N C E M A G A Z I N E

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fighting Stroke Dr. Bernard Ullman

Lynda Stoodley, R.N.

Dr. Gerald Reich

Dr. Franklin D. Pratt

Dr. George So

Medical Director Stroke Program

Stroke Program Manager

Medical Co-Director Emergency Department

Medical Co-Director Emergency Department

Interventional & Neuro Radiologist

Every minute counts. At Torrance Memorial’s Primary Certified Stroke Center, our dedicated team of physicians, nurses and staff provides fast, effective treatment within that first crucial hour in our care. And once the emergency is over, our medical team and rehabilitation therapists continue working to ensure the best recovery possible.

Learn about the four signs of stroke and what you can do. Visit www.TorranceMemorial.org/stroke or call 310-517-4711.

and the reason is you.


Torrance Area Chamber of Commerce 3400 Torrance Blvd., Suite 100 Torrance, CA 90503

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Here’s our January 2010 issue. For comments and submittals, contact submittals@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.373.2880 For advertising opportunities, contact AdSales@Torrance-Magazine.com or call 310.317.0841 TACC Communications and Events Manager Amy Herrschaft, (310) 543 3113 or Amy@TorranceChamber.com

Our April 2010 theme is:

Health Services

Torrance Magazine ~ January, 2010  

Torrance chamber of commerce addresses Technology in the South Bay

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