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INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY - SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE VICTORIA TAYLOR


CONTENTS HEALING PAVILION

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PORTABLE PICNIC

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MODULAR FURNITECTURE

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BOTLEY SCHOOL CANTEEN

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FINAL PROJECT, YEAR 3

HEALING PAVILION Maggie’s Centres are drop-in centres for those affected by cancer. This project was aimed at allowing the Oxford Maggie’s Centre users to access a space they can use independently, offering freedom that contrasts the clinical environment of a hospital. Based in Lye Valley, Oxford, the Healing Pavilion highlighted the importance of nature within a holistic habitat. The Healing Pavilion combines visual imagery with physical touch, creating a tactile environment to psychologically heal the users and release feelings. Emotion and touch go hand in hand – whether a hug from a loved one, or the feel of a comforting material; the Healing Pavilion encourages users to feel at ease within a space they can feel in control of.

RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

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PLAN - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP


LYE VALLEY COLLAGE - EAST TO WEST

AT ONE WITH NATURE The Healing Pavilion was designed to fit within the Lye Valley surroundings. Lye Valley is a nature reserve in Headington, Oxford; and is situated between a residential area, and the Churchill Hospital. The valley is a serene environment; with users including dog walkers, students walking between residential area and hospital, and families. The specific site for the Healing Pavilion resides in the west area of the Lye Valley, backing onto the Churchill Hospital car parks. The form of the pavilion follows the natural formation of the surrounding trees, ensuring the pavilion showcases precise views of the valley.

SITE COLLAGE - PHOTOSHOP

VIEW FROM LYE VALLEY PATH - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP 7


KITCHEN - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

ENTRANCE AND COURTYARD - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP


CONNECTING SPACES The Healing Pavilion has a central space with a courtyard that connects each room. The central space has a ‘chimney’ roof with a large roof light, allowing fallen leaves and views of the sky to be seen from the space. Corners of the pavilion have been activated by framing specific views, creating a spatial field that directs users to become aware of ‘unused’ areas of a building. Colour psychology has been used to create a calming space, that allows vulnerable sufferers to gain confidence with warming oranges – used for comfortable items such as seating and soft furnishings. The colour purple allows users to have a spiritual connection with the pavilion and provide them with a calm atmosphere. The kitchen allows users to feel at home, whereas the living space gives options for users to relax and practise yoga.

LIVING SPACE - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

ROOF LIGHT - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

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1:1 PROTOTYPE - WOOL

CONTEMPLATION POD - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

CONTEMPLATION POD - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP


MEMORABLE MATERIALITY An important aspect of the Healing Pavilion was to provide somewhere secluded where the user could go when feeling emotional. A Contemplation Pod has been designed to allow users to free their emotions in a soft environment. A recognisable material, wool, has been designed to appear in a form that represents the growth of a tree, yet also comfort the user by conforming to their seating position. The piece contains a mix of convex and concave forms, in shades of orange and brown, to represent warmth and vitality.

ELEVATION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

ROOF PLAN - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

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A TACTILE SPACE Upon entering the pavilion, users will see the central space. The central space has a courtyard with furnitectural seating, allowing the user to lean back and touch the gravel. Two lemon trees grow within the courtyard, applying visual, touch and smell, activating the senses within the pavilion. There are large panels of glass that do not restrict the user into feeling stuck within the space. The Healing Pavilion aims at being a tactile space for sufferers of cancer; a continuous colour palette combined with differing textures allows the user to feel independent during a vulnerable time, but still comforted by a recognisable environment.

VIEW FROM ENTRY - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

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ELEVATION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

SECTION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

ELEVATION AND SECTION OF ALTERED STRUCTURE


PROJECT 1, YEAR 2

PORTABLE PICNIC Portable Picnic was an introductory project looking at converting a movie scene into an architecturally inspired piece. The iconic opening scene of Breakfast at Tiffany’s was transformed into a structural skirt that could hold the picnic items. The skirt represented symbols including how Holly Golightly is trapped within the city, maintaining a high social class in order to appear lavish. This project sparked inspirations of materiality, sociology and psychology.

PORTABLE PICNIC

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PROJECT 3, YEAR 2

MODULAR FURNITECTURE An environment within the interior was created for the Modular Furnitecture project, allowing users to depict the way they use the design. Aims of the project were to create a piece that could be adapted by the users, depending on their needs. The Modular Furnitecture was intended to be used by a range of ages, from young children at an afterschool club, to students who need some time to relax during studying. The materiality of the modular furnitecture combined hard and soft materials – including a steel structure with steel rope details, and a tensile mesh that could be used as flexible seating. The colour purple was used to psychologically radiate spirituality and mindfulness. The Modular Furnitecture has themes of gender, which are distorted by combining qualities together to blur stereotypical traits.

ELEVATION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

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MODULAR BOXES - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

PLAN - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP


BLURRING ‘GENDERED’ THEMES

SECTION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

A combination of textures and forms were used to create a furnitectural, merging feminine and masculine themes. A steel structure was used to shape the piece, representing masculinity through strength. Tensile mesh covers the steel structure, formed with 3D printed fabric, representing soft and flexible feminine themes. To partition the form, modular timber boxes are used to ground the gendered themes, and blur gender stereotypes. The modular furniture can partition the space as the users please, and act as a combination of storage, seating and partitioning forms. This allows the furnitectural pod to become something that can be used by a range of people, serving a range of purposes and emotions. The Modular Furnitecture allows users to become social by joining in with a yoga group and allow the user to feel independent by letting the user use the space alone.

COLLAGED MODEL WITH AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

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FINAL PROJECT, YEAR 2

BOTLEY SCHOOL CANTEEN Botley Primary School is located in West Oxford, within a growing area, populated by a varied range of people that differ in culture, social class and age. This project followed on from Modular Furnitecture and was aimed at showing Botley School how the canteen could be transformed from an overcrowded and problematic cafeteria, to creating an area that was systematic but spacious. The transformed canteen aimed at saving some of the original 1940s canteen, so the new canteen was recognisable to the pupils and staff.

ELEVATION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

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STRUCTURE AXO - AUTOCAD

COOKING DEMONSTRATION - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

PLAN - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOS


CANTEEN TRANSFORMATION The canteen was transformed by adding in a system in place that directed lunch types to different areas. The flow of pupils entering was dispersed by directing pupils to an area that was based on their lunch type – school dinners or packed lunch. The canteen was also altered to become more open – by allowing children to see the preparation of their meals and allow them to take part in preparing healthy meals through cooking lessons. Gendered themes were carried through the Modular Furniture project into the Botley School Canteen by displaying a combination of materiality that would blur gender boundaries. The skeleton of the new structure was constructed out of steel, covered by a double sided 3D printed mesh.

CANTEEN - RHINO AND PHOTOSHOP

SHOP

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EAT WHERE YOU LEARN The Botley School Canteen would transform the school itself by providing a space that would incorporate a Japanese learning methodology – eat where you learn. The canteen would not only be used as a dining area at midday, but also could be used for lessons, after school clubs, and during school fetes. The double-sided 3D printed fabric meant that lights could be added, so children could learn about projection and shadow. The Botley School Canteen not only transforms the user experience during lunch time, it transforms the mindset of the users to understand a connection between living, eating and learning.

SECTION - AUTOCAD AND PHOTOSHOP

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VICTORIA TAYLOR INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO  
VICTORIA TAYLOR INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO  
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