Page 1

REGIONAL LOOKBOOK

PAINTER/ILLUSTRATOR/MURALIST TRISHA ABE

07

CITY BUILDERS

TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


WE DON’T THINK SO EITHER. Waterloo Region’s identity shouldn’t be a modification of another brand. Since when is second best good enough? If we want to continually improve our quality of life, we’re going to need a confident and inclusive identity that stands out. Our region’s hard-working creative collaboration has, and continues to, generate big ideas, talent and tangible outcomes that extend far beyond our corner of the world. That kind of creativity is powerful and the result of all of us...even those who don’t think they’re creative. Let’s celebrate who we really are. Join the movement at: creativecapitalofcanada.ca

HIP is a proud supporter of the Creative Capital of Canada movement


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07.

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R e le ase d A P R . 2019

magazine TM

The journey begins here.

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St. John’s-Kilmarnock School (SJK) is the leading co-educational independent school in the Waterloo and surrounding region. Since 1972, SJK has been providing an enriched educational program for students in JK – Grade 12.

CHRIS TIESSEN, partner writin g & phot ography

At SJK, every child is our world. Individualized learning paths

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supported by our qualified and dedicated faculty help our students realize the dreams they dare to dream. As the only accredited IB World Continuum School in Southwestern Ontario, our students find their excellence within, love to learn, and

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‘CITIES HAVE THE CAPABILITY OF PROVIDING SOMETHING FOR EVERYBODY ONLY BECAUSE, AND ONLY WHEN, THEY ARE CREATED BY EVERYBODY.’

– JANE JACOBS

IT’S PRETTY AMAZING, ACTUALLY. CELEBRATING TWO YEARS IN BUSINESS. SEVEN ISSUES. ONE THOUSAND AND TWELVE PAGES OF CONTENT. WELL OVER A HUNDRED EDITORIAL PIECES ABOUT OUR REGION’S MOST INTRIGUING BUSINESSES, INSPIRING COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND BEGUILING VISIONARIES. AND THE TWO OF US. CAI AND CHRIS. BEST FRIENDS. SCHEMERS. PARTNERS IN ENTERPRISE. CREATORS OF THIS THING WE CALL TOQUE. DOING IT ALL. DOING IT ALL? OSTENSIBLY, PERHAPS. IN REALITY, THOUGH, IT’S A WHOLE DIFFERENT STORY AS WE EFFECTIVELY LEVERAGE THE CREATIVE CAPITAL ALL AROUND US TO PRODUCE THESE (SOME WOULD SAY) ANACHRONISTIC ARTEFACTS – PRINT MAGAZINES. WRITERS AND EDITORS. ADVERTISERS. COLLABORATORS AND ADVOCATES. UNITING LIKE VOLTRON TO CONTRIBUTE TO WHAT WE’RE ENVISIONING AND ACHIEVING AT TOQUE. JOINING TOGETHER TO CHAMPION THE SUCCESS AND PROSPERITY OF THIS REGION. FROM BROOKLYN TO BERLIN. IT’S NEVER A SIMPLE THING, THIS. PUBLISHING. AND YET, WITH SO MANY STRONG BUSINESSES AND STRONG-WILLED VISIONARIES HELPING US BUILD THIS BRAND, IT NEVER SEEMS THAT DIFFICULT EITHER. IT TAKES A VILLAGE, THEY SAY, TO DO ANY NUMBER OF THINGS. IN OUR CASE, IT TAKES A REGION. OF ARCHITECTS, ARTISTS AND BUILDERS. OF

CREATIVES,

DESIGNERS

AND

ENTREPRENEURS.

OF

INNOVATORS. INVENTORS. ORACLES. PIONEERS. PRODUCERS. TRAILBLAZERS. MAKERS OF ALL KINDS. MAKERS OF MAGAZINES. AND OF CITIES TOO. LET’S MEET A HANDFUL OF THEM NOW. WELCOME TO THE ‘CITY BUILDERS’ ISSUE.

.ca


CONTENTS 9. EDITOR’S LETTER: THE CITY BUILDERS ISSUE 14. T  HE WALPER HOTEL: SEATED FIRMLY IN HISTORY 24. E  XPLORING QUEBEC STREET: IT’S GUELPH — DISTILLED 30. DAYTRIPPIN’ WITH JENNA HARKNESS & WILL HUNTER 36. PHOTO SPREAD: OUR REGION'S MURALISTS 44. E  XPERT OPINION (INVESTMENT): MIKE HRYN 46. G  ETTING TO KNOW: THE MODERN BRIDE 48. MEET YOUR MAKER: STOCK EXCHANGE BONE BROTH 50. NOODLE GALLERY: SHOWCASING HAND MADE, SMALL BATCH, ARTISANAL WARES 58. HIP DEVELOPMENTS: BUILDING MORE THAN REAL ESTATE 66. GETTING TO KNOW: STUDIO SHIBUI 68. R  ICH UNCLE: REACHING BACK INTO THE PAST AND LOOKING TO THE FUTURE 80. PHOTO SPREAD: RIVERFEST 88. UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY: TASTE MAPPING 90. GETTING TO KNOW: CENTRE STAGED 92. M  EET YOUR MAKER: STUDIO KAMPINA 96. INTERACTIVE. IMMERSIVE. TASTY, EVEN: HANDS ON TODAY’S KITCHENER-WATERLOO ART GALLERY 104. P  HOTO SPREAD: GUELPH NIGHTHAWKS 114. PARK GROCERY: HISTORY AND THE VANGUARD 118. ANATOMY OF A BRAND: PARK GROCERY 122. D  ESIGNING FOR ‘HELLO’: HOW URBANISTYC IS BUILDING COMMUNITY INTO EVERYTHING IT DOES 128. FEATURE: THE CITY BUILDERS 136. KITCHENER FARMERS’ MARKET: REFUEL YOUR PANTRY & YOUR HEART 142. S  IDONIO’S FOR MEN & ART OF DENIM: EXPERIENCE, CURATION & CUSTOMER SERVICE 146. G  ETTING TO KNOW: FUSION HOMES’ THE METALWORKS HERITAGE BUILDING 152. DUNDURN MARKET: THE ARCHETYPAL (ECO)GROCER 160. COMIC: GOOSE 162. COCKTAIL HOUR WITH KATIE SHEWEN


illustration: Jay Stephens,

jaypopgun


14 NG

ST

THE WALPER HOTEL:

W

SE AT ED FI R M LY I N H I S T O RY BY CHRIS TIESSEN

QU

EE

N

ST

S

KI

KITCHENER

It’s morning. Early. Dawn is just breaking over

his hotel in 1893,’ Brad told us, ‘he insisted on

downtown Kitchener. A pinkish cast inches its

building it right up to the edge of his property

way onto and across the mix of buildings laid

line – which happened to include Queen Street

out in front of me. Solitary plumes of smoke

south of King. So Walper built. And the city

punctuate an otherwise calm urban landscape.

was forced to re-route Queen a handful of

I pull the curtains open wider, cinch my robe

feet east to accommodate this idiosyncratic

tighter, and look more intently out the massive

encroachment.’

round-arched hotel window – its intricate

history. I revel in this stuff.

brickwork inviting the same serene pink hue.

Local

personalities.

Local

Two floors below me, the hotel’s Barrister’s

Straight below and in front of me, four storeys

Lounge has begun breakfast service. It was in

down, Queen Street seems to emerge from

this lounge that Al Capone, so the story goes,

directly beneath my feet as though it’s been

once met representatives from Waterloo’s

birthed from this building itself: the historic

Seagram distillery to discuss running spirits

Walper Hotel. There’s a story here. One that

from the region into Prohibition-era America.

Walper GM Brad Lacey relayed to Liz and me

Remnants of that history remain, like the

last evening. ‘When Abel Walper constructed

nineteenth-century vent in the lounge’s ceiling.


15


16

‘A cigar vent’, Brad had told us. For Walper’s

With coffee on the brain, I rouse Liz. Within

cigars. Capone’s cigars. Seagram’s cigars.

minutes, we’re enjoying mugs of steaming

So much about this place evokes historic wonderment. I turn my gaze from the landscape outside our hotel window to the scene within. Liz remains asleep on the king-sized bed, wrapped in stark white sheets. Pillows – so many pillows – are everywhere. On the bed. And floor. And on the minimalist red chair where I’d spent time last night relaxing while Liz explored the perks of our room. A ‘Cityside King’, as Brad had called it. Featuring mid-century modern bedside tables and furniture. Unfinished hardwood flooring. Fresh fruit and squares upon our arrival. Boxed water in the fridge. A glass pourover coffee station with locally-roasted coffee by Smile Tiger Coffee Roasters. Bath products by Buck Naked Soap Company and Skoah. Robes by Pamuk & Co.

black joe and reminiscing about last night. About our leisurely drive from Guelph to Kitchener for this staycation. Our arrival at The Walper – where Brad greeted us and toured us around the impeccable hotel. The swanky suites and inner courtyards. Sumptuous event halls and corporate meeting rooms. Natty, luxurious lounge areas. ‘The Lokal’ – Walper’s hotel bar. We spent quite a bit of quality time at the long wraparound bar, actually. The streamlined aesthetic,

bold

artwork

and

custom

chandeliers had it feeling more like Queen West than Queen South. The attentive staff recommended a few of the bar’s distinctive cocktails, including ‘Amethyst Sky’ (Pisco El Gobernadora, Crème de Violette, simple syrup, lime and egg white) and ‘Ungrateful Apprentice’ (Gordon’s gin, Wyborowa vodka,


AROUND THE WAY Checked in at The Walper and wanting to explore #DTK by foot? Don’t miss these five downtown gems as part of an amazing stay – all within 350 metres of the hotel: SHOW & TELL COFFEE (150M WALK) 30 ONTARIO ST N Seasonal and rare coffees from roasters around the globe, teas from unique estates and delicious plant-based treats. Be sure to grab a chia seed pudding with your cuppa. THE RICH UNCLE TAVERN (50M STROLL) 45 KING ST W Pair hearty live-fire cooking and shareable snacks with craft beer, cocktails, wines or spirits. And be sure not to skip the lobster roll. THEMUSEUM (30M HOP, SKIP & JUMP) 17 10 KING ST W cranberry

inflused

Campari,

lemonade

and

re-hydrated cranberries) which we savored before deciding where to go for dinner.

Exhibitions. Events. Experiences. Downtown Kitchener’s TheMuseum offers something for everyone – including killer ‘after dark’ programming like TheMuseum’s ‘Beer&’ series.

It’s never an easy choice around these parts. Indeed, the region’s culinary scene continues to explode as more chefs take advantage of our communities’ proximity to so many farms, markets, and other local food producers. We finally made up our minds – to eat in. Right here at the hotel. Appetizers at the bar, and dinner at TWH Social – the hotel’s subterranean restaurant that folks can access either through the hotel or from its main entrance on King. The Lokal apps were delectable – and played homage to

GRAND TRUNK SALOON (200M SPRINT) 30 ONTARIO ST S Staples like Octopus & Grits. Chicken ‘N Waffles. Collard Greens. And enough cocktails, bourbons, wine, craft beer and mezcal to last you through the evening and beyond. Giddy Up.

Kitchener’s German roots. (Hey, when in Berlin…). Kaesespaetzle (house made bacon lardons, grainy mustard, cheese, chives, parsley and spaetzel), and sausage and pretzel (house made sausage and pretzel, cheddar cheese sauce and beer mustard). Then it was off to dinner at TWH Social. While the mains sounded phenomenal, and I knew from experience that they were fabulous (the duck breast

APOLLO CINEMA (350M MEANDER) 141 ONTARIO ST N Independent cinema at its best – including contemporary, classic and cult films. Not to mention rental options for events, parties and film screenings. And get this – The Apollo is licensed too.


18


with brioche bread pudding, honey and thyme roasted sunchoke, swiss chard and juniper jus is just gorgeous), we settled on more shareables. Pan-seared scallops (with cauliflower cream, bacon lardon, brioche croutons and pickled onion) and beef cheek poutine (braised beef cheeks, cheese curds and gravy). Fully satisfied and content, we ambled back to our ‘Cityside King’ to settle in for the night. And now, morning. We enjoy breakfast at the Barrister’s Lounge: avocado toast (with tomato, arugula, ricotta and marinated red onion with side fruit), Walper benedict (sourdough, arugula, bacon, poached eggs and hollandaise with side tomatoes), and sausage (because I always order sausage). Coffee. And freshlymade donuts – because they’re incredible. While we’re eating I look out one of the lounge’s huge windows at the building across the street. ‘Where Walper’s barrister’s office was located,’ Brad had told us, explaining the lounge’s name. I think about the range of historical figures who occupied the elegant spaces of this place: Walper, Capone, Seagram. And jazz legend Louis Armstrong, who played his trumpet from a second-storey balcony. The Queen Mother. Eleanor Roosevelt. Duke Ellington and Bob Hope. James Brown and Tony Bennett. And our current Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, who stayed at The Walper the same night the hotel was host to Governor General David Johnston. And us, of course. Liz and me. Here, in this

.

gorgeous boutique hotel. Situated firmly in downtown Kitchener. And seated firmly in history, too

THE WALPER 20 QUEEN ST S, KITCHENER

walper.com


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AVAILABLEAT EST. 1892 - BERLIN, ON



@schreiters_home

482 BELMONT AVE W (AT GAGE)

FREE PARKING


Guelph | Oakville | Toronto www.knar.com

H E A R T S O N F I R E S T O R E S , A U T H O R I Z E D R E TA I L E R S , H E A R T S O N F I R E . C O M


24 WY

EXPLORING QUEBEC STREET:

ND HA

ST

ST

BEC

M

QUE

N

IT’ S GUELP H – D I S T I L L E D

NO RF

BY KAYLA ZAWISKI

OL T K S

GUELPH

The slight fizz of homemade yogurt on my

has a place in my heart. And now I find myself

tongue. The smell of freshly-brewed coffee –

at the beginning of my Guelph adventure. But

roasted locally at Planet Bean. Fluffy slippers

first – a recap of my arrival the night before.

on my feet. The sound of my hosts – London House Bed and Breakfast proprietors Sheila and David – whipping up breakfast. It’s not even nine in the morning and already I know that this will be the perfect day.

I travelled from Kitchener to Guelph via Wroute – the fabulous micro transit program that connects the two cities with a fleet of sexy Teslas. As soon as I arrived at London House – a stately century-home with a splendid

Just two weeks ago, TOQUE’s Cai and Chris

wrap-around porch overlooking Exhibition

invited me to come to Guelph and spend

Park – I felt embraced by the space, and

the night at London House and then explore

immediately at home in the Masters suite. Its

Quebec Street in the downtown core. ‘To

antique furnishings, enormous bed and high

experience the city’s beating heart,’ suggested

thread count sheets were just what I needed. I

Cai. To be sure, the Royal City is not new to

ordered in: delicious Buon Gusto pizza paired

me. Although I now call Kitchener home, I was

with my favourite Elora beer. Then I began to

an undergrad at Guelph so the city certainly

fantasize about the next day, when I would tour this town I once called home.


London House Bed & Breakfasat

25


Miijiidaa

26

After breakfast I enjoy a bit of morning

Back onto Quebec Street, we make a beeline

relaxation before Chris arrives to pick me

for IF.. Footwear – located right in St. George’s

up. He’ll be my guide for the day. We make

Square where Quebec begins. My search for

the short trip from London House to Quebec

the perfect Chelsea boots has me entranced

Street for our first stop: lunch at Miijidaa,

by all the killer styles Joel and his IF.. team

tucked in beside what’s arguably Guelph’s

have in stock. I splurge on a pair and, boots in

cultural hub, The Bookshelf. Since it’s still too

arm, find Chris scouring the store’s Red Wings

cold for Miijidaa’s fantastic courtyard patio, we

section. He’ll be back, he remarks, as I manage

stroll past the restaurant’s long bar into the

to peel him away. Just up the square from IF..,

sun-drenched dining room. Perfect.

past the picturesque café, Capistrano, and

Celebrating the influences that have shaped Canadian cuisine, Miijidaa’s menu features culinary gestures from the First Nations to the French and English, the Portuguese to the Vikings. We decide on a number of dishes to share. To start: an elk scotch egg with market greens, gouda cheese, and pickled cranberries; and hay smoked arctic char with celeriac puree, sunchoke chips, pickled onions

pottery workshop, Play with Clay, we duck into Knar Jewellery, where Chris darts straight toward the timepieces. I am captivated by the John Hardy display, and try on a spectacular necklace

that

makes

me

feel

instantly

cosmopolitan. After only a few minutes, Chris urges me to keep moving. ‘Quebec Street may only be a block long,’ he advises, ‘but there’s lots left to see.’

and kale ribs. Then a pizza with elk sausage,

The next couple hours we are alternately

mushrooms, mozzarella and basil. Mouths

beguiled and inspired by a series of locally-

stuffed with local goodness, Chris and I plot

owned shops that leave me overwhelmed with

out how we’ll tackle the rest of our afternoon.

feelings of pride and abundance. I envision


Kennedy Park

27

IF..Footwear


Acqua Salon

28 The Truth Beauty Company; [RE]Fresh Juice Co


each of the founders of these remarkable ventures and begin to realize that the kind of creative energy I feel up and down Quebec Street is what initially pulled me from a nomadic existence to planting my roots firmly in this region. The Truth Beauty Company (an eco beauty and lifestyle shop for the conscientious shopper), Shop B (a chiq boutique featuring fabulous accessories), Grey Rock Clothing (a B Corp-certified shop specializing in sweatshop free eco fashion), and a host of other brilliant enterprises. I love the passionate, driven, humble and simply wonderful people who create places like this. They spread positive energy and put smiles on people’s faces. Makers and changemakers. Community builders. Utterly exhausted, Chris and I eventually find ourselves at [RE]Fresh Juice Co, in front of a fridge stocked with raw, unprocessed, cold-pressed juices. I grab an Eye Opener (with carrot, apple, ginger and lemon) while Chris chooses a Savoury Greens (kale, romaine, cucumber, celery, lemon and sea salt). I leave Chris to catch up with himself while I step back onto the street, anticipating a special indulgence. I stroll into Acqua Salon. Its luminous, elegantlyappointed Quebec Street location is a perfect place for taking a load off. Master stylist Brianna greets me at the door, pours me a flute of Proseco and introduces me to my stylist, Mikayla. For the next hour I’m in heaven. Magnificently pampered. My tresses exquisitely washed, cut and styled, I leave feeling energized. Alluring. Powerful. I am enfolded and content after my afternoon in this city that had, almost a decade ago, taught me to explore and be open. Sure, Guelph and I have both changed a little, matured and grown in our own ways. But this was the town I once embraced as my first love. Thankfully, it remains the dear friend that never got away. After all, it’s just a short drive down the road. And even by Tesla, if you want.

.

Until next time, old friend. Until next time


DAYTRIPPIN’

T W O B E E R- S L IN GI N’ BESTI ES. S HA RING A FA V OURI TE SATURDAY AROU N D OU R R E G ION .

JENNA HARKNESS

TERRITORY MANAGER, ELORA BREWING COMPANY

WILL HUNTER TERRITORY MANAGER, RED CIRCLE BREWING COMPANY As territory managers for two of our region’s most drool-inducing breweries, these besties have spent a ton of time discovering our communities’ most awesome locals. Tag along for one of their typical daytrippin’ Saturdays.

1. We begin any given Saturday at Elora’s favourite diner: Box Social. Like usual, the

B O X S O C IA L

place is packed. Still, we manage to snag a

103 GEDDES ST, ELORA

table for two up against the massive front window and split three of our faves: a breakfast burrito, the peameal eggs benny, and their magnificent club sandwich. And two drip coffees.

2. Finishing up just before 11am, we meander

30 30

down the street to the new (larger) iteration of Elora’s storied Shepherd’s Pub. We come for

S H E P HE R D ’S PUB 5 E MILL ST, ELORA

two things: the tight-knit staff and first call. For Jenna: whatever’s pouring on the Red Circle tap. For Will: whatever’s pouring on the Elora Brewing tap.

T HE FAT D UCK GASTR O PUB

3. After piling into Will’s Nissan Versa we travel down highway 6 past glorious countryside toward Guelph. Our destination:

210 KORTRIGHT RD W,

The Fat Duck. A pub where (seemingly)

GUELPH

everyone knows your name. For lunch, Jenna digs into the tofu burger while Will enjoys the butter chicken curry pie. We split the scotch

ARC H IT E C T HAIR D E SIGN

egg.

324 JAMES ST N, HAMILTON

4. After filling our bellies, we head south-east to Hamilton where Architect Hair Design awaits. Part barbershop. Part bar. Part meeting place. Will grabs a trim, while Jenna plays chess with some of the regulars.


5. Next stop is Steeltown’s Capitol Bar – an east end local. We sit at the bar and chat with Derek about the spot’s upcoming live music programming. And while the Capitol’s collection of whiskeys has us tempted, we stick with beer: something

CAP I TOL BAR

clean and crisp for Jenna, and dark and

973 KING ST E, HAMILTON

smooth for Will. We split an order of housemade pickled things and pass the time.

6.

As dinnertime approaches, we hop

back into Will’s car and race toward one of Waterloo’s best kept secrets: Jimmy’s Feed Co. This tiny spot in a nondescript

J I MMY ’S FEED CO

strip mall features some of the best

401 WEBER ST N, WATERLOO

sandwiches in the region – straightforward and wrapped in butcher paper. For Will: the ‘I’m Too Sexy’ with roast beef and smoked turkey. For Jenna: the ‘Hey Jude’ with smoked turkey and hot salami.

7. Now we drive just a few blocks toward Pin Up Arcade Bar where Will plays Ice Cold Beer and Jenna gets frustrated at the pinball machines. We crush a couple short cans of Wellington’s Helles lager before

P I N UP ARCA DE BA R

heading back to Guelph.

247 KING ST N UNIT 8, WATERLOO

8. We roll into downtown Guelph, park Will’s car for the night, and head for the city’s newest bar: Two Faces. Featuring craft beer and cider as well as a bunch of

TWO FACES 20 WILSON ST, GUELPH

biodynamic wines, this spot looks and feels as though it’s been lifted directly out of Montreal and dropped into the Royal City. We let Drea and Meg choose some wine

.

for us, order some olives, pickled eggs, and pretzel sticks with Dijon, and finish the night in style

DAYTRIP, TAG & POST!

@TOQUELTD #TOQUEDT #TOQUEDAYTRIPPING


Prices & details subject to change. All renderings are artist’s concept. Some suites may have a premium. E&OE. Please see Sales professional for details. February 2019


73 ARTHUR STREET SOUTH Used to be a factory. Is older than the city itself.

THEMETALWORKS.CA


#P HOT OS P R EAD

OUR REGION’S MURALISTS PREAMBLE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

‘A BIRD DOESN’T SING BECAUSE IT HAS AN ANSWER, IT SINGS BECAUSE IT HAS A SONG.’

-MAYA ANGELOU

THE TECH SECTOR HAS BROUGHT SO MUCH TO OUR REGION: BRAINS, IDEAS, INVENTIONS, INVESTMENT, PERSONAL CHEFS, PING PONG TABLES, EXPOSED DUCTWORK AND, IN MORE RECENT YEARS, MURALS. FANTASTICAL, 36

EYE-POPPING, STOP-YOU-IN-YOUR-TRACKS MURALS. FROM THE WALLS OF MIOVISION TO THE HALLS OF VIDYARD, IT SEEMS AS THOUGH EVERY TECH COMPANY WORTH ITS SALT HAS COVERED AT LEAST AN ACCENT WALL OR TWO (OR TEN) WITH CUSTOM PIECES. INSPIRED AS MUCH BY RENAISSANCE FRESCOES AS BY CONTEMPORARY GRAFFITI, OUR REGION’S TECH MURALS ARE A PERFECT EMBODIMENT OF HIGH ART MEETING POPULAR CULTURE. OF TECHNOLOGY BRUSHING SHOULDERS WITH THE URGE TO CREATIVITY. AND THE VIRTUOSOS BEHIND THESE MAGNIFICENT WORKS OF ART? WHILE THERE ARE MORE THAN A FEW, THREE ARTISTS IMMEDIATELY SPRING TO MIND: STEPH BOUTARI, STEPHANIE SCOTT AND TRISHA ABE. LET’S CELEBRATE THESE WOMEN. AND THEIR WORK. OFF THE WALL. ON THIS PAPER STAGE.


Trisha Abe, by Trisha Abe (a most permanent collection)

37


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STE P H ANI E BO UTARI Select clients: Thalmic Labs, Settlement Co., Goudie’s Lane, Lot42


@STEPHBOUTARI

39


40

STE P H ANI E SCO TT Select clients: Catalyst137, Vidyard, Hustl & Flow, Terminal


@SSTEPHANIESSCOTT

41


42

TRI SH A ABE Select clients: Him & Her, Communitech, TheMuseum, Downtown Kitchener


@TRISHAABE

43


WHY INVESTING IN COMMUNITY IS GOOD FOR YOUR PERSONAL INVESTMENTS MIKE HRYN

Mike Hryn | mike.hryn@richardsongmp.com | 519-827-2918

44

EXPERT OPINION | INVESTMENT

In traditional terms, we invest our money to generate more money – savings for retirement, education, and the like. A good portfolio manager helps you do this with precision and careful attention to realize the best possible return on your investment. We’ve all heard the term “Invest in community.” It’s an intentional phrase that infers a different “return.” At first glance, it doesn’t seem as relevant to the financial planning business: it’s more for governments, foundations, charities and philanthropists. Yet, there is a close relationship between giving back and building personal wealth. Investing in our communities creates resilience. Families can access affordable housing. Kids start their day with a nutritious breakfast. People dealing with mental health concerns can get the help they need. And so on. That resilience pays off. Employees take less time off for personal matters. They are more productive at work, contribute new ideas and show more leadership. People have the confidence, energy and support to innovate, and launch successful, profitable businesses that generate jobs and opportunity. This prosperity

radiates into the financial markets, net returns improve, and portfolios grow. It’s a logical “circular” investment that demonstrates that doing good is good for your investments. In our region, we are lucky to have a high level of community engagement. People understand that a community is built on the strength of many doing their part to try to improve things for everyone. Most of the clients we talk to aspire to doing good in the community, and want to leave a legacy that will not only benefit their families, but also the causes that matter to them. Part of their investment strategy is to invest in community. Our job is to advise them how to do this to maximum benefit – for the community, and for them. This becomes an important skill set for a financial advisor. If we only live in the “for profit” vacuum, we lose our ability to provide this important advice. All material has been prepared by Mike Hryn. Mike is a Portfolio Manager with the Mactaggart Hryn Team at Richardson GMP Limited. The opinions expressed in this report are the opinions of the author and readers should not assume they reflect the opinions or recommendations of Richardson GMP Limited or its affiliates. Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.


46

GETTING TO KNOW:

46

THE MODERN BRIDE INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN

W H E N I T COMES T O BRID AL BOUTIQUES, C ERTAIN DESTINATIONS SHINE B R I G HTE R T H AN OT H ERS. AN D WE’D HAZARD A GUESS THAT VERY FEW HOLD A L I GH T TO G U ELPH ’S T H E MO D E RN B RIDE – A M AGNIFIC ENTL Y-APPOINTED B O U TI Q UE ELEG AN T LY PERCH ED ON THE TOP FL OORS OF THE HISTORIC (A N D RE CE N TL Y REST O RED ) PET RIE BUIL DING. OW NED B Y MOTHER AND DAUGHT E R D O NN A A N D J ESS H IRST , T H E MODERN BRIDE DRAW S C L IENTS FROM AROUN D T HE R E GI O N AN D AROU N D T H E WORL D. QUITE SIMPL Y, A VISIT TO THIS D O W NTO W N BU SIN ESS IS BOU N D TO B E A M EM ORAB L E EXPERIENC E. W E R E C E N TLY SAT D OWN WIT H DONNA AND JESS TO FIND OUT (IN THEIR W O R D S ) H OW T H EY EN VISAG E T HE VERY SPEC IAL SERVIC E THEY OFFER.


THE MODERN BRIDE INHABITS PERHAPS THE BEST REAL ESTATE IN DOWNTOWN GUELPH. WHAT ACCOUNTS FOR THE MAGICAL QUALITY OF YOUR SPACE? We’ve got almost four thousand square feet on the third and fourth floors of Guelph’s splendidly restored Petrie Building. Fifteen and eighteen foot high ceilings, as well as floor to ceiling windows overlooking the downtown, contribute to the chic ambience of this gorgeous space. Original plank flooring and millwork as well as exposed stone and brick throughout the interior mix perfectly with the white walls to create a cool metropolitan vibe that resonates with our clientele.

YOUR DEVOTED CLIENTELE COME FROM ALL OVER. HOW FAR HAVE SOME OF YOUR BRIDES TRAVELED FOR THEIR DRESS? We’re so grateful to have local clientele. At the same time, we have been pleased to work with brides from Toronto, Vancouver, New York, England, Australia and beyond.

YOU SEEM TO BE VERY BUSY. HOW MANY FITTINGS DO YOU AVERAGE ON A GIVEN DAY? We have three beautiful private and semi-private rooms allowing us to accommodate fifteen to eighteen appointments each day. We’re open for appointments Tuesday through Sunday, though weekends are particularly popular. We’re usually fully booked two to three weeks in advance.

WHAT THREE DESIGNERS MIGHT BRIDES LOOK OUT FOR THIS WEDDING SEASON? Our picks for 2019 are Divine Atelier (Romania), Alexandra Grecco (New York) and Anais Anette (Canada).

YOU’RE A MOTHER-DAUGHTER COMPANY. HOW DO YOU BALANCE YOUR WORK-LIFE RELATIONSHIP? It’s tough finding that balance. Regular visits with our pets to the dog park or relaxed lunches together – simply as mother and daughter – are fun and relaxing.

FOR FUTURE BRIDES – WHAT’S THE MOST IMPORTANT THING TO LOOK FOR IN A BRIDAL BOUTIQUE? The client experience. We work hard to ensure that our brides, as well as their families and friends, feel comfortable in our boutique. Each of our brides has her own personal consultant in a relaxed, private and conversational appointment space.

AND IN A DRESS? It’s tough finding that balance. The bride’s dress should embody and THE MODERN BRIDE 15 WYNDHAM ST N 3RD FLOOR, GUELPH

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reflect the bride’s personality. She shouldn’t play an uncomfortable game of dress up but rather she should strive to achieve an elevated

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version of her own style. If she remains true to herself, she will find the gown that best expresses the elements of herself she wants to convey


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ALTON

S HO W C AS I N G H AN D MA DE, SMA LL BA T CH, A RT ISA N A L WARES BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘It’s an actual street light,’ Monica tells me as

you’re going to love a lot of stuff here.’ I nod

I approach the oversized lamp positioned

and follow her around the intriguing space,

behind two custom leather and chrome

eager to explore this world of beautiful things.

chairs near the back of the gallery. I take a

I’m at the Alton Mill Arts Centre. In Monica

good look at the piece – trying to determine,

Kerr-Coster and her husband Robin Coster’s

discreetly, whether it’s an art installation or a

Noodle Gallery.

functional light source. I decide it’s both. And it’s also a great conversation piece. The way it demands attention. Challenges expectation. And seemingly defies the laws of physics, too, by remaining upright even as its ‘post’ – which extends from the smallest of bases – bends ever so elegantly (and precariously?) up and over the chair directly beneath it.

There’s John Leenders’ wildly eclectic furniture – a reimagining of disused materials and equipment into arresting light fixtures, or eccentric dining room tables. And Jerre Davidson’s kiln-formed glass work. And Floyd Elzinga’s

idiosyncratic

three-dimensional

sculpture and relief work composed of stone and metal. There’s Fraser Forsythe’s

‘I think I really like it,’ I exclaim, before being

beautifully-glazed pottery. And Cheryll Collin’s

distracted by the custom wood table that

sterling silver and black rubber jewelry. Bridget

completes this living room tableau. ‘And I love

McKay’s quilted bags and purses. And so much

this even more.’ I can easily picture this table

more. Pieces that intrigue and excite; energize

in every house that I’ll call home some day.

and satisfy.

Monica chuckles before remarking: ‘I think


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Indeed, it seems to me that the entire gallery invites joy. When Monica, Robin and I eventually settle into a couple of couches in the middle of the large gallery space, Monica tells me about their opening the gallery in the spring of 2014. ‘It was upstairs back then, in a cozy 750 square foot room that doubled as Robin’s law office. Within a couple years we’d outgrown the area we occupied, so we took over this larger spot on the main floor. And we couldn’t be happier.'


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I can readily understand the pleasure they take in their surroundings. The gallery space really is beautiful. Hints of the old mill are everywhere. In the exposed stone walls and wonderfully-worn wood floors. In the massive square windows overlooking the Credit River. In the liberating high ceilings. Confirming the historical authenticity of the building itself is a heritage exhibit just down the hall, in the preserved mill turbine room that features the original turbine, governor, power take-off shaft and belts, nineteenthcentury vintage coal boiler and other vintage industrial equipment. In situ. An uncommon and popular backdrop for weddings and other events. I sip on the coffee Robin has grabbed from the mill's honour café while Monica and I resume our tour. ‘We specialize in hand made, small batch, artisanal wares,’ she tells me, ‘and feature furniture makers, potters, fine artists, folks who work in textiles and glassware. We

MAKE A DAY OF IT While you’re out and about at Alton Mill & Noodle Gallery, be sure to check out these nearby spots – as recommended by Noodle’s Monica Kerr-Coster: GOODLOT FARMSTEAD BREWING COMPANY 18825 SHAWS CREEK RD, CALEDON The first farm-to-barrel brewery in the Greenbelt serving ales & lagers using hops and other ingredients grown right on the farm. goodlot.beer HEATHERLEA FARM SHOPPE 17049 WINSTON CHURCHILL BLVD, CALEDON Hand-rolled pastries, scrumptious pies, freshbrewed coffee, prepared meals, and a curated selection of specialty items from over fifty local farmers and producers. heatherlea.ca

also sell natural body care products, jams, pickles, and even wood-fire roasted coffee.’ An eclectic mix of products, to be sure. And perfect for Noodle’s clientele – mostly out-oftowners seemingly prepared to grab anything from a four thousand dollar piece of custom furniture to a twenty-dollar bottle of hand crafted body lotion. ‘We cater to everyone from collectors of fine things to regular folk

SPIRIT TREE ESTATE CIDERY 1137 BOSTON MILLS RD, CALEDON Stop by for craft apple and pear ciders, and stay for a great meal in the cidery’s bistro. And don’t forget to grab a loaf of wood-fired stone oven bread. spirittreecider.com

just looking for something beautiful. We’re approachable. A welcoming space with no pretension.’ The perfect destination for folks traveling in and around Alton. Exploring the region. In a quest for a distinctive item for their home. Maybe a conversation piece.

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Like that street light lamp. Before I leave for my calming road trip back to Guelph, I size

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it up one more time. And mentally measure my home’s ceiling height. Next time, I think to myself, I’ll bring a measuring tape

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DOWNTOWN KITCHENER


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HIP D EV EL OPM E N T S : BUILDING MORE THAN REAL ESTATE BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘By far the greatest and most admirable form

Ever since first hearing about Scott and his

of wisdom is that needed to plan and beautify

company, HIP Developments, a handful of

cities and human communities.’

years ago. From my dad. At my parents’

-Socrates

house in Kitchener’s Old Westmount

‘Every town needs a superhero,’ I found myself dictating into my phone while I walked to my van across the (seemingly always packed) parking lot from Smile Tiger Coffee Roasters in downtown Kitchener: a benevolent and skilful – and inspiring – protector of the people. Setting my steaming americano on the hood so I could retrieve my keys, I continued: ‘And Scott Higgins just happens to be one of ours.’ I know I shouldn’t begin an article like this – that it’s too glib.

neighbourhood. Indeed, it seemed as though each time I’d drive in for a visit from my place in Guelph to my childhood home, my pops would have a stack of articles he’d saved from the Waterloo Region Record, or Exchange Magazine, waiting for me. And more often than not, they’d contain reports on HIP’s latest project. Or Scott’s vision for the region. Neatly cut out with scissors. The most interesting bits beautifully highlighted in orange or pink.

Clichéd. Cheesy, even. And yet, now that

These articles spoke of lofty, ambitious

I’ve arrived back at TOQUE headquarters in

initiatives. Urban developments, to be sure.

Guelph some thirty-odd minutes later and put

But so much more than mere building

pen to paper, it’s what sticks.

projects. Indeed, HIP developments seemed

And, truthfully, it’s what I’ve felt for a long time.

to focus as much – or more, even – on building out community than on building


Rendering from Gaslight District, Cambridge

Rendering from STRATA Launch, Uptown Waterloo


up condos. They invoked grand civic squares. And public art. Vibrant spaces where folks might be encouraged or inspired to interact with each other and connect with the environment around them. Places where kids might go to be creative. Learn new things. Expand their minds. And, as Scott has suggested, grow up not only to change the world, but to change the world from right here in Waterloo Region. ‘Because ultimately,’ Scott Higgins says, ‘it’s not enough for this region to grow and nurture the brightest minds. We also need to retain them. By investing in this community, of course. And more specifically and more urgently by redefining what a developer’s responsibility should be when it comes to lived spaces – both inside and outside of a twobedroom condo unit.’ Take HIP’s STRATA development in Uptown Waterloo, for example – a condominium project that promises to include five floors devoted specifically to STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math) opportunities for kids. This STEAM initiative, to be called ‘LAUNCH’, will be a regional hub for creative exploration, STEAM success stories, and

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unique programming. ‘Pairing a gorgeous condo development with space where our community’s kids’ creativity, curiosity and innovation thrive is far from accidental,’ Scott insists, ‘Instead, it’s a perfect example of how we’re re-envisioning lived spaces while we strive to build resilient, creative, and fun communities.’ HIP’s ability to inspire community confidence was on full display once more in Waterloo when, not even a year ago, the developer sold out its ambitious Circa 1877 condominium project in less than a weekend. Incorporating the old Brick Brewery building into its design, this nineteen-storey, 188-unit development right on the ION LRT line promises to invigorate the Uptown core. ‘It’s important to me,’ muses Scott,

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‘that we continue to develop in our community’s core[s], and build along public transit corridors that connect folks both to their places of work and to public cultural spaces.’ Scott sums up this recurrent theme: ‘To be sure, connectivity is key. Connecting folks to spaces beyond their condos.’ And we’re not talking only about Waterloo.

151 Charles St. W. Kitchener 5 Gordon St. Guelph 256 Phillip St. Waterloo

HIP’s Gaslight District project in Cambridge – a fantastically-inspired development that promises to transform the former Southworks foundry into


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Renderings from Circa 1877, Uptown Waterloo


a bustling hub of residential, commercial,

waterway through the use of technology.’

retail and dining spaces – also promises to

I am transfixed and ever more curious as I

animate and inspire community. Albeit in a

listen to Paul describe this ‘mix of art, science

different way. At its centre is Gaslight Square,

and engineering which will be a perfect

envisioned as a vibrant urban park. Paul

example of creativity informing technology,

Kalbfleisch, Scott’s confidante and author

and vice versa.’

of Waterloo Region’s influential ‘Creative

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Intersections’ strategy, offers some insight into the vision driving these initiatives: ‘For HIP, home isn’t limited to the condos it builds,’ he says. ‘Instead, it’s about the lived spaces both inside and outside your condo. It’s about boardwalks and promenades, parks and squares. It’s about public spaces where culture and identity can flourish.’ Like Gaslight Square, to be sure.

Over in Hespeler Village, HIP is at it again with its Riverbank Lofts – a boutique adaptive re-use condominium development that’s transforming an iconic century-old factory on the banks of the Speed River into a modern living environment. Historic stone walls. Solid wood posts and beams. River views. Riverbank Lofts is the perfect project to reanimate an area that seems to have forgotten that it was once a bustling urban core. ‘I was

And Tapestry Hall, too, which will emerge as

born and raised in Cambridge,’ Scott remarks,

a premier event space inside the Gaslight

‘and grew up watching these iconic buildings

District – showcasing a phenomenal art

become derelict and run down.’ Ever poised

installation by University of Waterloo

to inspire and enable, he continues: ‘It’s a

Architecture professor and globally-renowned

dream of mine to build vibrancy, quality of

artist Philip Beesley. Titled Meander, this

living and economic success back into our

permanent piece of ‘living architecture’

communities. Riverbank Lofts [and, I would

derives its dominant themes from the Grand

add – in admiration – all of these distinctive

River, which flows through downtown Galt

projects that will surely re-define and

mere metres from Gaslight. ‘The Grand is a

enhance our region] promises to do just that.’

central piece of our region’s narrative,’ Paul explains, ‘and all too often we ignore it.’ He elaborates: ‘This dynamic piece of art is meant to bring attention back to the river, and it will literally react to the flow of the

.

Superhero, indeed

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GETTING TO KNOW: 66

STUDIO SHIBUI

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INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN

W H E N N A TALIA BRAJ AK D ECID ED TO OPEN A W EL L NESS STUDIO, SHE KNEW T HA T Q U E B E C ST REET IN D OWN TOW N GUEL PH W AS THE PERFEC T VENUE. ‘ THI S C I TY H A S A LWAY S EN J O Y ED A REPUTATION AS A HOTB ED OF PROGRESSIVE I N I TI A TI V E S , ’ SH E O BSERVES, ‘AN D FOR ITS SUPPORTIVE C OM M UNITY. SO IT SE E M E D THE PERF ECT PLACE T O OPEN STUDIO SHIB UI.’ NATAL IA C OMES TO H E R N E W E N T ERPRISE WIT H A PHENOM ENAL AMOUNT OF EXPERIENC E. NO T O NL Y I S S HE CO -F OU N D ER OF MOKSHA [NOW M ODO] YOGA, B UT NATAL IA H A S A L S O TRAIN ED IN BIK RAM Y OGA, EL DOA, TRANSPERSONAL AND SPIRITU A L PS Y C H O THERAPY , N ON - VIO LEN T C OMMUNIC ATION, SPIRITUAL DIREC TION, E N NE A G R A M, BU D D H IST MED IT ATION, SHAM ANIC M EDIC INE TRANSFORMAT I ON A N D U NI TY CO N SCIO U SN ESS BU BB L E FAC IL ITATION. AND NOW B RINGS HER E X P E R TI S E T O G U ELPH .


and pain relief like nothing else. Getting chronic pain under management, having your spine feel good through your own movement is profound. Born from osteopathy, ELDOA (a French acronym) is especially great for folks suffering with disc issues, sportsrelated injuries, concussions and stress-related pain. ELDOA helps athletes have much better training and work-out recovery, increases body awareness and reduces injury. People who sit at a computer for many hours will counteract the negative effects of sitting in a very short amount of time. Most people will benefit from one to two ELDOA sessions per week. It’s like the cherry on top of any other self-care program you follow.

WHY CALL THE STUDIO ‘SHIBUI’? Shibui is a Japanese term that describes objects,

FIRST THINGS FIRST: WHAT’S STUDIO SHI BUI ALL ABOUT?

experiences, individuals or designs that appear to be simple overall but that include subtle details that

I like to say that the studio offers integrated therapies

balance simplicity with complexity. This balance

and thoughtful gatherings in downtown Guelph. We are

ensures that one does not tire of a shibui object but

ten instructors offering different classes – including

constantly finds new meanings and enriched beauty

ELDOA with myself and Gina Giammarco, meditation

that cause its aesthetic value to grow over the years.

with Jeff Warren and others, Kundalini yoga with

The seven elements of shibusa are simplicity, implicity,

Melissa Reid, restorative and yoga nidra with Lisa

modesty, naturalness, everydayness, imperfection,

Cipparone, moving and sounding into silence with

and silence – all concepts that speak to the mandate

Eva Dametto, mindful movement with Clare Esler, and

of the studio. It takes a bit of life experience to

more. Our website [studioshibui.ca] includes great

appreciate shibui, which speaks to a wide population

descriptions of all these practices.

of people looking for a practice that will support them

AND WHAT’S YOUR BACKGROUND?

now in mind, body and soul.

and co-founded Moksha [now modo] yoga in 2003. I

IS THERE ANYTHING UNIQUE ABOUT THE STUDIO?

taught Moksha in Toronto and Oakville for a decade

The intention was to have a more intimate practice

before a friend told me about ELDOA – a cutting-edge

space that would limit the number of clients to ensure

stretching and strengthening technique for the spine

personalized attention. I am happy to say that has

and joints of the body. I fell in love with the practice,

been achieved. We also offer a support group once

trained in it, and decided to open this multi-disciplinary

a month for educators, parents and care-givers who

space in Guelph – now my home town.

need help with implementing strategies that will

I opened a Bikram yoga studio in Toronto back in 2001,

WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN YOGA AND ELDOA? Without getting into the weeds, I’d suggest that while yoga is a way of living – focused on union of body and mind, and moving to remembrance of ultimately the truth of who we are – ELDOA is a fantastic cutting-edge exercise practice for the body that delivers mobility

balance the amount of time children are using screens day to day. There is also a Gratefulness Gathering once a month to further the conversation about what it means to live a gratitude-oriented life. These gatherings are offered by donation.

WILL STUDIO SHIBUI HAVE A RETAIL COMPONENT? Yes – I will be offering essential oils (for diffusing and using internally and topically), safe burning soy

STUDIO SHIBUI 11 QUEBEC ST, GUELPH

studioshibui.ca

.

candles, unique meditation benches, malas, and locally-made things that interest me and fit the focus of the studio


Need article RICH U N C L E :

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REACHING BACK INTO THE PAST AND LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

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BY CHRIS TIESSEN

KITCHENER

‘I’ll grab an order of duck wings to go,’ I call

massive front windows that face King Street.

out to our server as she refreshes our water

Outside, smartly-dressed downtown workers

glasses and begins clearing our dishes.

meander past. More than a few pause and

So many dishes. ‘But you just ate a plate

gaze into our cozy environ – looks of longing

of them,’ Cai observes incredulously. ‘Plus

etched onto their faces. On our other side,

everything else we just enjoyed. Aren’t you

a couple of tattooed gentlemen whom I

full yet?’ I am. And utterly satisfied, too. Yet

seem to recognize from my younger years

I’m wanting them again already. These duck

growing up in Kitchener sit at the massive

wings. With sweet maple soy glaze and chili

bar. Before long, one of them saunters over

crunch. From The Rich Uncle Tavern – in

and introduces himself to us: Kypp Saunders.

Kitchener’s downtown core.

Of course. From my (seeming endless) days

It’s early afternoon on a sunny day in early April, and my TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis and I are sitting up near the front of this gorgeous establishment for lunch. Beside us, a group of young professionals enjoys pints and cocktails on luxurious brown leather armchairs situated directly below the place’s

at The Jane Bond Café so long ago. We talk about the old days, before Kypp informs Cai and me of a speakeasy he’s about to open. Here – in Kitchener’s downtown core. What a time it is to be alive in this region. To live. And laugh. Eat. And drink.


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Our server returns with my boxed duck wings and our dessert – a maple and bourbon crème brulee. One dessert. Two spoons. Two espressos. And then there’s also the remainder of our beers – which we’ve been enjoying all meal long. A Red Circle Iron Horse Trail IPA for Cai. And a flight – ‘like some sort of tourist,’ Cai had quipped when I ordered it – for me. I’d gladly be a tourist if it would lead me here, I think to myself. And then take a sip from one of my samples – a rich coffee porter from Red Circle – and look around. This place is definitely a sight worth beholding. The soaring two-storey space with impressive winding wooden staircase. The penny-farthing, or high wheeler, on display near the top of the stairs. ‘From Clayton at Back Peddling in Guelph,’ Rich Uncle coowner Ryan Lloyd-Craig noted months before when Cai and I had first stopped in. The portrait galleries hung eclectically throughout the space, evoking a sense of history. The dark wood floors – worn to perfection. The plethora of cigar boxes positioned here and there containing lunch and drink menus. ‘Because the place is named after Rich Uncle Cigars, which was located right here on King some hundred years ago,’ Ryan had quipped.* The upstairs library – replete with antique couches, bookshelves, a gorgeous bar, and live music certain nights of the week. And the open kitchen at the back of the main floor dining room featuring a live fire ‘pit’ with heavy metal racks raised and lowered with chains. ‘Just like back in the days when this space was The Berlin,’ I note to Cai as she cracks the perfectly-prepared crème brulee with her spoon. ‘I’m happy they kept it.’ Indeed, the live fire experience is what makes this place so special. So much of the menu is done on the fire. From the locally-sourced

Investing Can Be Complicated.


72


meats to seasonal fish to the beets that came on our Soiled Reputation salad – a wonderful mix of seasonal vegetables, smoked walnut, pear, Hewitt’s goat cheese, soft poached hen’s egg and wildflower honey dressing. Even the bread for our steak tartare – baked at The Rich Uncle’s sister restaurant, Graffiti Market – was toasted over flames. Of course, some things remain safely out of the fire and in the pot, as folks are prone to say. (Except the other way round.) Like the wild boar ragu pappardelle (with San Marzano tomato, toasted breadcrumb and Grana Padano) that Cai and I shared, for instance. ‘One of the best pastas I’ve ever eaten,’ I’d told the crew beside us when asked. Or the lobster roll (on Red Circle brioche baked at Graffiti Market, radish and seaweed aioli) that we also enjoyed. And I mean really enjoyed. ‘It’s the single menu item I’d recommend to anyone coming in for a bite,’ restaurant co-owner Neil Huber remarked when I’d had the chance to chat with him about the place. I didn’t disagree with him then. And wouldn’t now, either, except for those wings. As Cai and I gather our things and get set to leave, I take a last walk through the dining room toward the kitchen. To take one more peek at the fire, and a few more shots of the culinary team in action. As I drift through the space, I recall what Ryan had said about the name of the restaurant – that it was named after a local business (Rich Uncle Cigars) situated at this address a century ago. I glance at the exposed stone walls, and look down at the fabulous worn floors.

You Need Precise Advise.


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(Only my favourite floors ever.) And at the place’s gorgeous furniture. And the portrait galleries. And then across the pass at the live fire. Blazing bright – like out of some old time movie. I’m struck by the beauty of it all. And the history of this space. And thank the heavens above that folks like Ryan and Neil and others are animating spots like this – reaching back into the past and looking to the future. What a time it is to be alive in this region. To live. And laugh. Eat. And drink.

*Here’s something interesting: Ryan first read about Rich Uncle Cigars in the 1979 monograph, ‘Berlin, Canada: A Self-portrait of Kitchener, Ontario before World War One,’ published by my parents – local academics Paul Tiessen and Hildi Froese Tiessen. But that’s a whole other story. THE RICH UNCLE TAVERN 45 KING ST W, KITCHENER

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RIVERFEST PREAMBLE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

‘WITHOUT MUSIC, LIFE WOULD BE A MISTAKE.' - N IE TZ S CHE

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FOR JUST OVER A DECADE NOW, THE TOWN OF ELORA COMES TO LIFE OVER A FULL WEEKEND IN AUGUST AS RIVERFEST - A THREE-DAY FESTIVAL OF MUSIC, FOOD, CRAFT VENDORS, COMMUNITY AND ALL ELSE THAT IS MIGHTY AND HOLY - TOUCHES DOWN IN BISSELL PARK ALONG THE BANKS OF THE GRAND. MEETING UP WITH OLD FRIENDS. FINDING NEW ONES. GRABBING A PINT IN FRONT OF MAIN STAGE. CAMPING IN THE GORGE. STROLLING ALONG DOWNTOWN STREETS. PICNICKING IN THE PARK. DINING AT THE BREWERY. LISTENING TO MUSIC UNDER THE STARS. GETTING TO THE

July Talk on Friday night. Photo by Wayne Simpson

AFTER PARTIES. HELLS YA. FOR THIS FEATURE, WE’VE DECIDED TO LET THE PICTURES DO THE TALKING. TO TRANSPORT YOU BACK TO LAST YEAR’S (TENTH ANNIVERSARY) FESTIVAL. AND TO ENTICE YOU INTO LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS YEAR’S FESTIVAL. BECAUSE, COME AUGUST SIXTEENTH THROUGH EIGHTEENTH, THERE’S REALLY NOWHERE ELSE YOU SHOULD BE.


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Photos by: Wayne Simpson ^ Chris Tiessen + Britney Townsend *


The Flaming Lips’ Wayne Coyne above the crowds on Saturday night. Photo by @oneintenwords

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Carly Rae Jepsen embraces Saturday afternoon. Photo by @oneintenwords

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SI X A C T S N OT T O M I SS A T THI S Y E A R ’S FE S TI V A L , A CCO R DI NG TO R I V E R FE S T A R TI S TI C DI R E CTO R & FE S TI V A L M A NA G E R S P E NCE R S HE WE N :

1.

KANDLE (MONTREAL) KANDLE-MUSIC.COM Kandle Osborne’s music provides a light for the lost – ablaze and raging, illuminating the places angels fear to tread.

2.

BONJAY (TORONTO) BONJAY.NET Pairing Alanna Stuart and Ian ‘Pho’ Swain, BONJAY is dancehall-bred, but orchestrated like old soul. Respendent with emotive vocals, inspired as much by Feist as by Yolanda Adams.

3.

BLACK CAVIAR (NEW YORK) REALBLACKCAVIAR.COM

85 Citing musical influences such as Timbaland, The Beastie Boys and Fatboy Slim, this NY duo of Troy Hinson and Jared Piccone approaches their music on a quest for the ‘perfect bounce.’

4.

LOS POETAS (TORONTO/VANCOUVER) WEARELOSPOETAS.COM Drawn together by their shared immigrant experiences, fuelled by the desire to celebrate their Latinx heritage, and driven by a passion for hip-hop, Los Poetas bridge the

5.

gap between first and second generation Latinx migrants. MOUTH BREATHER (MONTREAL) MOUTHBREATHER.CA There’s something sort of ‘uncanny valley’ about twentythree-year-old eclectic/alt-pop artist Owen Hooper’s music because he isn’t really sure what’s real and what’s fabricated reality.

6.

THE REDHILL VALLEYS (HAMILTON) THEREDHILLVALLEYS.COM A dynamic four-piece alt-country and roots rock band which skillfully combines grit-infused harmonies,

Photos by Britney Townsend

commanding musicianship, and an energetic, captivating live show.


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It’s about time. Spend it well.

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T WOTHIRT YSTRATFORD.COM


UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY

TASTE MAPPING

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Wellington County is FOOD. Known internationally as a centre for Agri Food Excellence, Guelph/Wellington has a lot to offer locally. Its excellent local food fabric, woven through the region, is deeply rooted in agricultural tradition and entrepreneurial spirit. We are talking local food, grown and prepared in Wellington County. There is plenty of it – and yet sometimes it’s hard to find or identify. Taste Real, an initiative by the County of Wellington, has been making it easier to explore local food destinations, by literally putting them on a (local food) map. The Taste Real Local Food Map is a well-loved guide to local farms, markets and retailers offering food from Wellington County. It also has information about restaurants, cafes and caterers – all committed to sourcing local. ‘It’s really a local food ‘treasure map,’ and it showcases many of our amazing taste makers in Wellington County,’ says Christina Mann, Coordinator for Taste Real.

‘The huge variety of products available locally include unique offerings like water buffalo meat, sheep milk ice cream and birch syrup.’ Get your hands on a brand-new Taste Real Local Food Map – available for free at libraries, tourism centres and participating businesses – or by mail upon request. If we tickled your taste buds and you’d like to know more about local tastes, food and farm experiences, check out tastereal.ca Bon Appetit!

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UPCOMING TASTE REAL EVENTS SP RI NG RU RAL ROMP MAY 25 Self-guided food and farm tour in Northern Wellington County.

LOCAL FOOD FEST JUNE 23 Festival celebrating all things local food in Guelph Wellington. Food vendors, farmers’ market, food skills workshops, live music, children’s activities, farm tours and more.


IT ’S ( AL M O S T ) F A RM E RS ’ M A R KET SEASO N ! Grab your shopping bags and explore one, two or all eight of Guelph Wellington’s unique farmers’ markets.

A B E R F OY L E F AR ME R S’ MAR K E T MAY 25 - OCTOBER 26 | SATURDAYS: 8:00 AM-1:00 PM 23 Brock Road South, Aberfoyle www.aberfoylemarket.ca

TO P TO UR AND T AST E AD VE NTURES 1. 2.

www.elorafarmersmarket.com

Discover Wellington’s railroad history in Palmerston: Explore the Railway Heritage Museum, browse local foods and craft at the Minto Farmers’ Market (held on the rail platform) and cheer on the competitors at the famous Handcar Races (June 22) –

MAY 4 - DECEMBER 21 | SATURDAYS: 9:00 AM-1:00 PM Raceway, Elora (November and December)

and sample the first tastes of spring on the Spring Rural Romp in Northern Wellington County (May 25).

E L O R A F A R M ER S’ MAR K E T Bissell Park, 127 E Mill St., Elora (May-October) | Grand River

Meet friendly farm critters, learn about local agriculture

palmerstonrailwaymuseum.ca.

3.

Learn a new food skill, enjoy listening to Hillside Music Festival talent and taste your way through the region at the Guelph Wellington Local Food Fest (Guelph/

E R I N F A R M ER S’ MAR K E T JUNE 28 - SEPTEMBER 27 | FRIDAYS: 3:00 PM-7:00 PM Bissell Park, 127 E Mill St., Elora (May-October) | Grand River 109 Main Street, Erin (McMillan Park)

Eramosa, June 23).

4.

followed by an evening of good food and music at FAN/

www.villageoferin.com/market

G U E L P H F A R M ER S’ MAR K E T YEAR ROUND | SATURDAYS: 7:00 AM-12:00 PM

JOY Restaurant (Hillsburgh).

5.

2 Gordon Street (at the corner of Gordon and Wilson), Guelph www.guelph.ca/farmersmarket

MI NT O F A R M ER S’ MAR K E T

6.

T WO R I V E R S MAR K E T

7.

www.tworiversmarket.ca

WE L L IN G T O N NO R TH F AR ME R S’ MARK ET MAY 31 - OCTOBER 4 | FRIDAYS: 3:00 PM-6:30 PM 320 King Street East, Mount Forest (Victory Community Centre) www.simplyexplore.ca

Pick up picnic supplies (don’t forget the butter tarts) at Misty Meadows Country Market (Conn) and head over to the Luther Marsh for an exceptional birding experience.

8.

Sign up for a weekly farm share from Terra Verde Homestead (Conn), Corwhin Herbs and Produce (Puslinch) or another Wellington County Community

MAY 24 - OCT 11 | FRIDAYS: 3:00 PM-7:00 PM Tytler Public School Grounds, 131 Ontario St, Guelph

seedlings, plants and flowers at Arthur Greenhouses

Produce and Flowers (Harriston).

JUNE 12 - OCTOBER 9 | WEDNESDAYS: 4:00 PM-7:00 PM www.therockwoodfarmersmarket.ca

Get your green thumb ready. Choose locally grown

(Elora), Little Tree Garden Market (Fergus) or Steckle’s

(Palmerston Railway Heritage Museum)

112 Guelph Street, Rockwood

from Circle 4 Farm (Erin), 4th Line Cattle Co. (Hillsburgh)

(Arthur), Gerrie’s Garden Centre and Farm Market

164 William Street, Palmerston

RO C K W OO D F AR ME R S’ MAR K E T

Try something new for the BBQ: Longhorn Cattle meat or Speckle Park Beef from Craig Family Farm (Arthur).

JUNE 8 - AUGUST 31 | SATURDAYS: 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

www.mintofarmersmarket.ca

Go for a (bike) ride on the Elora Cataract Trailway, explore the beautiful grounds of the Hillsburgh Library,

Shared Agriculture Farm.

9.

Treat yourself to dinner and a drink at the Drayton Chop House and a show at the Drayton Festival Theatre – draytonentertainment.com.

10.

Get outdoors and explore one or all of Wellington’s seven Grand River Parks. Pack your walking boots, fishing rods and/or binoculars – grandriver.ca.

For more information and experiences see tastereal.ca and experiencewellington.ca


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GETTING TO KNOW:

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CENTRE STAGED INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN

W H A T I N THE WORLD IS MORE CAPTIVATING, GRATIFYING AND FUL FIL L ING T HA N B E A U TIF U L SPACES? AT H OM E. AT W ORK. AND AT PL AY, TOO. SPAC ES T HA T M A K E PEOPLE F EEL U PLIF T ED. AT EASE. C REATIVE. ENGAGED. J E NN Y H I L B ORN AN D H ER H U SBA ND, JOSH, AGREE. W HIC H IS W HY THEY’VE RE CE N TL Y D ECID ED T O CO MBIN E THEIR BUSINESSES, C ENTRE STAGED A N D CE N TE X EN G IN EERIN G , U N DER ONE ROOF TO PROVIDE INTEGRATED C O M M E R C I A L AN D RESID EN T IAL STAGING, DESIGN, AND ENGINEERING SO L U TI O NS . F RO M N EW H OME BUIL DS TO OFFIC E FIT OUTS, JOSH AND JEN N Y’ S T E A M S O F ST AG ERS, IN T ERIO R AND EXTERIOR DESIGNERS, AND PROFESSION A L D R A F TI N G T ECH N ICIAN S WO RK HARD TO TRANSL ATE THEIR C L IENTS’ DREAMS A N D D E S I R E S IN T O IMPRESSIVE REAL ITIES. W E REC ENTL Y SAT DOW N W ITH J E NN Y TO D IST ILL T H E CO U PLE’S VISION.


SO WHY DID YOU AND JOSH DECIDE TO BEGIN WORKING TOGETHER?

be inviting, unobtrusive, and effortlessly usable

Because, quite simply, it’s a perfect fit. My business,

business.

Centre Staged, has been staging homes and commercial spaces across the region for a few years now. And Josh’s business, Centex Engineering, designs build outs and fit outs for infrastructure, residential and commercial clients. By working together under one roof, we’re able to provide clients with turnkey solutions that include everything from initial engineering plans to final interior and exterior design.

WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR CURRENT CLIENTS, THEN? We currently work with several home builders – including Mezcon Construction, Worton Homes and Sloot Construction – as well as with commercial clients like Demikon Construction and Clarion Medical Technologies.

– whether it’s someone’s home or their place of

WHAT ARE YOUR INSPIRATIONS? I’m from England, so I’ve always been inspired by European architecture and design – especially the older stuff. It’s all so timeless and classical – yet also pragmatic. Josh and I have traveled a lot, so I’ve been inspired by many global design cultures. Right now I’m especially loving the buildings and design of Barcelona and Singapore. Josh, on the other hand, is keen on net zero and carbon neutral builds – like Australia’s Pixel Building.

YOUR STAGING COMPANY, CENTRE STAGED, CONTINUES TO EXIST OUTSIDE OF ITS COLLABORATION WITH CENTEX. WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT IT? We’re an award-winning business with Guelph’s

YOUR IDEAL CLIENTS?

largest staging inventory warehouse. We stage

New home builders are always awesome to work

more than 150 homes each year, and work with

with. And commercial clients. I’d love to start working

almost all of the region’s brokerages. I don’t

with restauranteurs. Hair salons. Floral shops. Really

see this changing – no matter how much Centre

any client that would need integrated engineering

Staged continues to work with Centex. I love

and design solutions beginning to end – and that

staging homes – and seeing happy clients – too

appreciates clean, inviting, practical design.

much to let it go

HOW DO YOU BEGIN A PROJECT? We always begin by attempting to truly understand the client’s wants and needs. How they want to use a particular space. And how they want to feel while using it. It’s so important that any well-designed space

CENTRE STAGED 7-265 HANLON CREEK BLVD, GUELPH

centrestaged.com

.

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MEET YOUR MAKER

T H ER E’S S O MET H I N G R EA L L Y A L L U RI NG 92

STUDIO KAMPINA @studiokampina F AV OU RI T E CO L O U R S A N D

A B OU T A B R I L L I A N T L Y - C O L O U R ED RETRO S W EA T ER . OR A B R EEZ Y V I N T A G E S UMMER D R ES S . OR OL D - S C H OO L D O U B L E- K NI T R EV ER S I B L E S L A C KS . EX C EP T W H EN THEY D O N ’T F I T P R O P ER L Y . OR H A N G J U ST RI G HT.

PAT T E RNS ?

A T S T U D I O KA MP I N A – T H E B R A I N C HI L D

Anything bright or floral

OF EL O R A D ES I G N ER A N D S EA M S T RESS

T H E PE RF E CT P I E CE E V E R Y O N E

J A C Q U EL Y N V A N KA MP EN – KI L L ER RETRO

N E E D S I N T HE I R WA R DR O B E ?

P I EC ES A R E R E- D ES I G N ED , R E- T A I L ORED AND

A good graphic tee D O YOU W E A R Y O U R O WN

U P - C Y C L ED I N T O F A N T A S T I C ON E- OF - A- KI ND

C REAT I ONS ?

I T EMS W I T H A V I N T A G E V I B E A N D M O DERN

Oh yes – some of them are just too

F I T . T H I S A P R I L , J A C Q U EL Y N O P EN ED A

hard to let go

S W EET B R I C KS - A N D - MO R T A R S T O R EF RO NT ON G ED D ES S T R EET I N D O W N T OW N EL O RA, W H ER E S H E D OES C U S T OM W O R K FO R C L I EN T S A N D S EL L S U P - C Y C L ED A N D VI NTAG E P R OD U C T . S O G ET T H ER E. A N D C H E CK HER I G P A G E A T @ S T U D I O KA M P I N A


INT E RAC T I V E. I M ME R S I V E . TA S TY , E V E N : HANDS ON TODAY’S KITCHENER-WATERLOO ART GALLERY BY CHRIS TIESSEN EL

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KITCHENER

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I can still recall trekking through The Louvre

accessible and active cultural spaces?’ Sign

in Paris as an eight-year-old, with my

me up. ‘We’re doing all of this,’ Stephanie tells

parents and big brother. I remember the

me. ‘And more.’ At KWAG – the leading public

seemingly unending rooms of masterpieces.

art gallery in a region that’s quickly becoming

Resplendent, to be sure. But what struck me

the creative capital of Canada.

most about that grand gallery – and others, like the Uffizi, the Rijksmuseum, the Tate – was the life-denying quality of it all. ‘Do not touch.’ ‘Single file.’ ‘Stay behind the ropes.’ ‘Whisper only.’ It was enough to get a boy like me down.

‘Let me tell you about the food and art event,’ Stephanie begins. ’This semi-annual (May and November) ‘Feast for the Senses’ (supported by long-time sponsor Gowling WLG) features an art-inspired tasting menu with drink pairings.’ Past chefs, Stephanie tells me,

What I yearned for was interaction.

‘have included Nick Benninger of Fat Sparrow

Immersion. A hands-on experience. A sense

Group, Ryan Murphy of Public Kitchen + Bar,

of play. ‘Like, say, an event at the gallery

Jonathan Gushue of The Berlin, Top Chef

where local chefs are invited to interpret a

Canada finalist Rich Francis, Chopped Canada

current exhibition as a tasting menu with

winner Matt Kershaw, and others. Attendees,’

drink pairings?’ asks Kitchener-Waterloo Art

she observes with a grin, ‘tend to leave fat,

Gallery (KWAG) Communications Manager

happy and a little tipsy.’

Stephanie Vegh, who has broken into my narrative as we meander through the downtown gallery. Exactly, I think to myself. ‘Or a hands-on zine-making workshop?’ I’d love to do that! ‘Or culture talks with leading intellectuals who speak about open,

And what of the creative workshops, then? The subject clearly animates Stephanie, who describes the Gallery’s past workshop offerings from a ‘Vintage Macrame Owl’ workshop with Tanya Smith to ‘Introduction


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to Rug Hooking’ with the KW Rug Hooking

curator Lisa Myers’ ‘Planting One Another’,

Guild; ‘Abstraction through Islamic

a re-planting of a Medicine and Butterfly

Calligraphy’ with Soheila Esfahani to

garden by the late Mi’kmaq artist Mike

‘Miniature Portrait Painting’ with Sumaira

MacDonald – on the KWAG grounds facing

Tazeen, the City of Kitchener’s Artist in

Queen Street North.

Residence for 2018.

‘Of course the core of KWAG’s mission

And then there are those Culture Talks, on

remains its exhibitions,’ Stephanie reminds

Thursday evenings in Kitchener’s storied

me. ‘These tend to emphasize contemporary

Walper Hotel. Launched in November 2018

art featuring the work of living artists.’ In fact

in partnership with Craig Beattie of Perimeter

each year KWAG presents eight to ten major

Development, these talks encourage dialogue

exhibitions of contemporary art – either

that explores how culturally active spaces

organized by KWAG curators or presented

can positively impact a community’s physical,

in partnership with other Canadian galleries.

psychological and emotional well-being.

And the gallery’s permanent collection

Presenters have included architects, urban

includes some 4000+ works of historical

designers and cultural leaders such as Heidi

significance spanning the nineteenth to

Reitmaier, the Chief of Public Programs &

twenty-first centuries.

Learning at the Art Gallery of Ontario. On May 9th, Caroline Robbie, a leading interior designer who has led multiple award-winning projects in Toronto, will present.

Stephanie’s reference to conventional gallery activity takes me back to that eight-year-old tearing through some of the great galleries of Europe, bewildered by why they seemed

There are also, of course, the sorts of

so static and untouchable. I’m sure they’ve

activities with which galleries tend to be

developed community programs of their own,

identified. Like the March to mid-June solo

some of them even related to the locations

exhibition by Waterloo-born artist geetha

in which they find themselves. But at a

thurairajah (now based in Brooklyn, NY) – a

time when Waterloo Region is experiencing

two-time shortlisted nominee for the RBC

considerable, vibrant transformation and

Canadian Painting Competition and this year’s

growth, I am content to explore the active

KWAG Artist in Residence. And First Nations

creative life of KWAG, around here, for a

.

while


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KITCHENER-WATERLOO ART GALLERY 101 QUEEN ST N, KITCHENER

kwag.ca


CHANGE THE WAY YOU DREAM. Some say that living and dreaming are different. We believe that dreaming

Be on the look out for more project updates for Gaslight District in Cambridge. We’re not just building real estate; we are helping build the Creative Capital of Canada.

is part of living and it shapes creative, confident lives and vibrant communities. This belief is why we will be installing a permanent symbol of the region’s future creative potential at Tapestry Hall, in our Gaslight District project. “Meander”, a spectacular living architecture sculpture, created by UW School of Architecture faculty member Philip Beesley, is an example of STEAM in action — illustrating harmony between technology, nature and human expression. It will become a destination for today’s young dreamers and tomorrow’s inventors and visionaries.

Sibyl, by Philip Beesley. Sydney Biennale 2012


FIND THIS GOLD-MEDAL WINNING CRAFT LAGER AT LCBO AND BEER STORES ACROSS ONTARIO!

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g u e l p h cu s t o m ho m e s . c a d a n @ d a n c l ay t o nho m e s . c a 519-830-3797


#P HOT OS P R EAD

GUELPH NIGHTHAWKS PREAMBLE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

During the summer before high school my family took a trip to Chicago – probably so my professor parents could give some conference paper or other. Whatever the case, I had only one goal in mind for the Windy City: to visit Nike Town. And, more specifically, to grab some new kicks and swag for my upcoming freshman basketball season (at Kitchener Collegiate Institute). I managed to snag a bunch of gear at Nike Town – including a handful of Jordan shorts, a pair of Uptempos, and one particular t-shirt that summed up my life at the time. On the front, in black font, the motto ‘Sex, Drugs & Rock n Roll’ was crossed out with a bold red painterly brush stroke. On the back, a succinct punchline: ‘Basketball – the last vice.’

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While it’s been a while since I’ve laced up my kicks (custom Nike ID Kyrie IVs), I’ve never lost my love for the game. Imagine my elation, then, when I recently found out that a new professional league – the Canadian Elite Basketball League (or CEBL) – is going to kick off this summer. And that Guelph, along with five other cities across the country, will be fielding a team. The Nighthawks. It didn’t take long before TOQUE decided to sign up as an official team partner. And grab three courtside season’s tickets while we were at it. I can hardly wait for this summer, when The Nighthawks play their inaugural season at The Sleeman Centre in downtown Guelph. As a lead up to the season, in late March TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis and I found ourselves at the CEBL’s entry draft at the Art Gallery of Hamilton. It was a swanky event, to be sure. And one befitting a new professional basketball league. Take a gander at some of the captures from that flashy evening – as well as the two-pager taken on the court at The Sleeman Centre in anticipation of The Nighthawks’ arrival. And then grab yourselves some tickets. Get ready to enjoy some fantastic basketball. And don’t doubt that these spirited games will have you thinking back to your own career as a baller. After all, it didn’t take much for me to think back on mine. The kicks. Former teammates. That favourite t-shirt. The boiler room of a gym way down in the bowels of Kitchener Collegiate. And the game I hit nine threes against Southwood. (Now you know.)


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photo submitted by Guelph Nighthawks

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'IT IS A HAPPY TALENT TO KNOW HOW TO PLAY.' -RALPH

WALDO EMERSON


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GUELPH NIGHTHAWKS

thenighthawks.ca


GUELPH NIGHTHAWKS INAUGURAL SEASON DRAFTEES

CHRIS JOHNSON

JAMAL REYNOLDS

POSITION: Guard/Forward

POSITION: Guard

HEIGHT: 6’5”

HEIGHT: 6’4’’

WEIGHT: 205 lbs.

WEIGHT: 175 lbs.

BIRTHDATE: July 13, 1988

BIRTHDATE: February 27, 1994

HOMETOWN: North Preston, NS

HOMETOWN: Pickering, ON

COLLEGE: St. Bonaventure (2013)

COLLEGE: Canisius (2016)

ABEDNEGO LUFILE

CHADRACK LUFILE

POSITION: Forward

POSITION: Forward

HEIGHT: 6’7’’

HEIGHT: 6’9’’

WEIGHT: 240 lbs.

WEIGHT: 265 lbs.

COLLEGE: Carleton University (2017)

BIRTHDATE: June 8, 1994

BIRTHDATE: September 11, 1990

HOMETOWN: Burlington, ON

HOMETOWN: Burlington, ON

JEVOHN SHEPHERD

COLLEGE: Arkansas Tech (2017)

COLLEGE: Wichita State University (2014)

MESHACK LUFILE

MALCOLM GLANVILLE

POSITION: Forward

POSITION: Guard

HEIGHT: 6’8”

HEIGHT: 6’3’’

WEIGHT: 240 lbs.

WEIGHT: 189 lbs.

COLLEGE: University of Michigan (2009)

BIRTHDATE: October 21, 1992

BIRTHDATE: October 3, 1997

HOMETOWN: Burlington, ON

HOMETOWN: Toronto, ON

MARVIN BINNEY

COLLEGE: Cape Breton University (2016)

COLLEGE: University of Guelph (current)

CONNOR WOOD POSITION: Guard HEIGHT: 6’4” WEIGHT: 198 lbs. BIRTHDATE: May 29, 1993 HOMETOWN: Guelph, ON

POSITION: Guard/Forward HEIGHT: 6’5” WEIGHT: 215 lbs. BIRTHDATE: April 8, 1986 HOMETOWN: Toronto, ON

POSITION: Point Guard HEIGHT: 6’3”

MARVELL WAITHE

109 STATUS: USport Developmental Player

POSITION: Forward

MYLES CHARVIS

HEIGHT: 6’9”

POSITION: Guard

WEIGHT: 215 lbs.

HEIGHT: 6’0’’

COLLEGE: St. Mary’s (Texas) (2015)

BIRTHDATE: October 2, 1987

WEIGHT: 180 lbs.

HOMETOWN: Scarborough, ON

BIRTHDATE: September 21, 1994

EMANUAL SHEPHERD

COLLEGE: University of Arkansas (2012)

HOMETOWN: Mississauga, ON

WEIGHT: 195 lbs. BIRTHDATE: December 15, 1990 HOMETOWN: Toronto, ON

POSITION: Forward HEIGHT: 6’8” WEIGHT: 200 lbs. BIRTHDATE: December 29, 1995 HOMETOWN: Toronto, ON COLLEGE: Southern University (2018)

MYCK KABONGO POSITION: Guard

COLLEGE: Ryerson University (current) STATUS: USport Developmental Player

HEIGHT: 6’2” WEIGHT: 180 lbs. BIRTHDATE: December 1, 1992 HOMETOWN: Toronto, ON COLLEGE: University of Texas (2013)

2019 INAUGURAL SEASON HOME SCHEDULE:

MAY 2019

JULY 2019

Saturday, May 11th - 7 PM

Saturday, July 6th - 7 PM

Saturday, May 18th - 7 PM

Saturday, July 20th - 7 PM Saturday, July 27th - 7 PM

JUNE 2019 Saturday, June 1st - 7 PM

AUGUST 2019

Saturday, June 8th - 7 PM

Friday, August 9th - 7 PM

Saturday, June 15th - 7 PM Saturday, June 22nd - 7 PM


here to help. 111

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ALICEBLOCK.CA


ALICEBLOCK.CA

COMING SPRING 2019


PARK G ROC ERY:

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HISTORY AND THE VANGUARD BY JONATHON BARRABALL On a recent afternoon, just outside downtown

and visionary behind this, the Group’s latest

Guelph in the Royal City’s mature – majestic,

venture, which had only recently opened its

even – Exhibition Park neighbourhood,

doors.

TOQUE’s Chris Tiessen and I sat down to a sumptuous lunch at Park Grocery, the newest project of The Neighbourhood Group (whose other restaurants include The Wooly, Borealis and Miijidaa). As soon as we stepped through the front doors, located right on the corner of Woolwich and London, we were enveloped by the aroma of smoked meat and I knew we were in for an afternoon of good eating. And so did Chris, remarking: ‘I hope you came hungry. Because we’re gonna do this.’

While we sipped local beer (a Fixed Gear Alley Cat IPA for me and Wellington Upside IPA for Chris) and began to chat, Court flipped through an original ledger book that had been found on the premises, and showed us records of sales for briskets, pork loins, and whole chickens dating back to 1906 when Park Grocery was a meat market. ‘The whole concept of this place is to pay homage to its heritage,’ noted Court. ‘To bring back the neighbourhood grocer feel to this part of

After we took our seats in the bright and

town. And, of course,’ he added, ‘to serve up

cozy dining room (decorated with what has

some delicious regionally-sourced meats,

got to be the region’s most photogenic floral

sandwiches and sides.’ I couldn’t help thinking

print wallpaper), we were joined by Court

that it was a bit surreal to be waiting for a

Desautels, CEO of the Neighbourhood Group

platter of brisket and pork belly in a space


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that has provided such things for so many

do: we chased it all down with milkshakes.

others for so many years.

Strawberry for me. Chocolate for Chris. Each

As for the food – it was a dizzying array of soul satisfying smoked meats, hearty

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fresh salads, and an enticing array of other

topped with mountainous whipped cream and colourful sprinkles hiding my childlike, ear-to-ear grin.

delicious accompaniments. All served

While the focus on past and present at Park

on metal platters with deli paper. The

Grocery strikes a beautiful harmony, the

Portuguese-style chicken was entirely

place is also a compelling expression of a

addictive, tender meat under perfectly crispy

new era of sustainable culinary enterprise.

skin with a zingy piri piri sauce. Pork belly,

Aware of the transient nature of restaurant

after a three-day brine, was slow roasted

employment, Park Grocery pays its cooks

to perfection, and the BBQ braised pulled

and servers living wages and is working

mushrooms, a meat alternative, were equally

towards bringing health benefits to their

satisfying.

staff. And through their rewards program,

The true star, though, was the brisket. Marinated for twenty four hours and smoked for twelve, this notoriously difficult-to-cook cut of beef was perfect: an insanely flavourful

The Neighbourhood Club, Park Grocery and its restaurant siblings encourage community development and put money into local charities and initiatives.

crust capped a juicy interior, the fat rendered

All of which raises the question: what is

so precisely that each piece melted joyfully

a restaurant? There are many ways to

away in my mouth. ‘You want this last bit?’,

answer. Park Grocery gives insight into how

Chris asked me as we approached the

a restaurant can be a textured embodiment

finish line. His fork already hovering over

of time and place: an acknowledging (and

the bit of brisket, I gestured for him to take

fascinating) glance to the past, a material (and

it. Which he happily did. Food finished and

delicious) expression of the present - and

beers consumed, we then did what any

an inspired (and inspiring) vanguard for a

stuffed-to-the-brim, fully-satisfied patrons

positive future

of a restaurant like Park Grocery would

.


117

PARK GROCERY 294 WOOLWICH ST, GUELPH

parkgrocery.ca


ANATO M Y O F A B R A N D :

PA R K G R O C ERY CLIENT: PARK GROCERY ART DIRECTOR & DESIGNER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD. DESIGNER: JOSCHKA SAWATZKY, MYNAMEISJOSCHKA.COM

a TOQUE project TM

WE JUMPED AT THE CHANCE TO DESIGN THE BRAND FOR ANOTHER NEIGHBOURHOOD GROUP RESTAURANT - ESPECIALLY BECAUSE WE KNEW HISTORY COULD BE OUR INSPIRATION. THE NAME ‘PARK GROCERY’ HAS ITS ROOTS IN THE BUILDING'S ORIGINAL FUNCTION AS A GROCERY STORE IN THE EARLY 1900'S. TO GIVE THE BRAND AN APPROACHABLE FEELING OF HAND-CRAFT AND HAND-PAINTED SIGNS, WE ELECTED TO USE A VINTAGE STYLE. AND TO ENHANCE THAT ‘HANDSON’ AMBIENCE WE INCORPORATED ACTUAL HANDS AS AN IMPORTANT SECONDARY GRAPHIC. WE INVITED DESIGNER/LETTERER JOSCHKA SAWATZKY TO COLLABORATE WITH US ON THE MAIN LOGO WHILE TOQUE'S CAI SEPULIS ILLUSTRATED SECONDARY PIECES FOR USE ON THE BUILDING’S EXTERIOR SIGNAGE, RESTAURANT MENU, BUSINESS CARDS, ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS AND MORE.

118 118

MAIN LOGO

SECONDARY MENU DESIGN

PIRI PIRI CHICKEN

SANDWICHES

SERVED WITH PARK PIRI PIRI SAUCE

turkey pastrami house kraut swiss reuben sauce

note: for design reference only – menu options & pricing may have changed

1/4 1/2

Make it a meal

1/4

CHICKEN $6.99 dark $7.99 white

CHICKEN MEAL

+ 2 sides, 1 sauce $16.99 (add $1 for white)

1/2

CHICKEN

CHICKEN MEAL

+ 4 sides, 4 sauces $21.99

$11.99

WHOLE CHICKEN

$19.99

WHOLE CHICKEN MEAL

+ 4 sides, 4 sauces $34.99

$11.99

BRUNCH

PULLED CHICKEN

$10.99

SALADS

pulled chicken salad, poblano salsa, mustard greens SMOKED BRISKET

$12.99

smoked beef brisket, pickles, cheddar, apple mustard CRISPY PORK BELLY SEAFOOD SALAD

market fish, arugula, pickled onions

BBQ MUSHROOM

$3.99 SWEET POTATO WEDGES $4.99 VEGGIE CHIPS $3.9 ELORA LENTIL SALAD $4.99 PICKLES- bread + butter or sweet $3.99 SMOKED BEET COLESLAW

HUMMUS

$12.99

chickpea hummus, cucumber, radish, apple, veggie chips, mustard greens

1 protein, 2 sides, 1 sauce

MEDIUM 2 proteins, 2 sides, 1 sauce

SUPER SALAD $9.99

LARGE

marinated kale, chickpeas, lentils, roasted seeds, beets, roasted peppers, radish, green goddess LEAFY SALAD $7.99

arugula, mustard greens, dill, apples, pickled red onions, cucumbers, grape tomatoes, red wine vinaigrette SEASONAL SALAD

$9.99

compressed watermelon, butter lettuce, pickled onions, feta, basil, niagara balsamic

4 proteins, 4 sides, 2 sauces

$13.99

BRISKET HASH

smoked brisket, home fries, peppers, red onion, arugula, baked egg, bbq P.B.E.

FAMILY PLATTERS SMALL

$9.99

compressed watermelon, butter lettuce, pickled onions, feta, basil, niagara balsamic

BREAKFAST

$10.99

SALAD BOWLS

marinated kale, chickpeas, lentils, roasted seeds, beets, roasted peppers, radish, green goddess

SEASONAL SALAD

$11.99

pulled mushrooms, bbq, coleslaw, herb vinaigrette

$5.99

SUPER SALAD $9.99

arugula, mustard greens, dill, apples, pickled red onions, cucumbers, grape tomatoes, red wine vinaigrette

$11.99

PICKLED EGGPLANT

Available Saturday & Sundays from 10am – 3pm

LEAFY SALAD $7.99

$11.99

pork belly, coleslaw, herb vinaigrette

pickled eggplant, roasted peppers, cucumber, cilantro, honey mayo

SIDES SOUP

*Gluten freE bun add $1.99

TURKEY REUBEN

$11.99

pork belly, eggs, toast, home fries

$17.99 $23.99

$39.99

(serves 1-2 pPl) (serves 2-4 pPl) (serves 4-8 pPl)

Your choice of proteins:

PIRI PIRI CHICKEN – 72hr marinade, roasted, seared for crispy skin SMOKED BEEF BRISKET – 24hr rub, 12hr smoke

TURKEY PASTRAMI – 5-day brine, lightly smoked ROASTED PORK BELLY – 3-day brine, 6hr slow-roasted PULLED MUSHROOMS – bbq sauce braised

BREAKY SANDWICH

$10.99

house peameal, egg, tomato jam, cheddar, mustard greens, herb vinaigrette TEMPEH HASH

$11.99

braised tempeh, home fries, peppers, red onion, arugula, bbq HOT SMOKED FISH

$14.99

hot smoked fish, toasted sourdough, scrambled eggs, red onion, herb vinaigrette OMELETTE

$12.99

roasted red peppers, cheddar, arugula, pickled onions, home fries, toast


JOIN • EARn • Give • NEIGHBOURHOOD CLUB

How it works... 1

Eat

2

SHOW

at Park Grocery

your Neighbourhood Club card 119 119

3 4

earn

5% towards future purchases

We give

5% to local community and environmental initiatives

Get your club card today at Park Grocery or online at ParkGrocery.ca


120

Our Grand Finale Event!

Mark your calendar for June 20, 2019 Watch for details coming soon.

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through May 2019

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2019-03-21 10:17 AM


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KING ST N

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ERB ST E

WATERLOO

D E S I G N I N G F OR ‘ H E L L O ’ : HOW URBANISTYC IS BUILDING COMMUNITY INTO EVERYTHING IT DOES BY KAYLA ZAWISKI As the frothy bubbles of an oat milk

with a perfectly poured cappuccino. When

cappuccino touch my lips, I sit in the sunlight

Urbanistyc was founded by Paul Veldman just

at brch social taking pleasure in knowing how

four seasons ago, neither of us expected we

much can be done in under twelve months.

would be sitting here today.

Within the past year, Urbanistyc – an

It all started with a question. Why don’t

emergent regional developer that envisions,

people say hello to their neighbours

plans and implements exciting new concepts

anymore? Between technology, stress and

in urban living – took this once underutilized

disconnected spaces, we needed to reimagine

space on a prominent corner of Uptown

the spaces and places we design for.

Waterloo and transformed it into a bright,

We needed to start designing for ‘Hello’.

airy space that is a perfect mix of zen and caffeine. This happened alongside the launch and construction of two condo projects in Stratford: The Bradshaw Lofts and Two Thirty.

Our first project at The Bradshaw Lofts is a purpose-built condominium meant to become a student hotel for UW students attending the Stratford School of Business

I look up to see Catalina, my work partner and

and Interaction Design, students facing issues

the genius behind our designs, strolling over

with housing supply, and the lack of university

Two Thirty


INSPIRED TASTE. HERE ARE FIVE GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS THAT HAVE INSPIRED THE DESIGN, AESTHETIC AND PLANNING ETHOS OF THE URBANISTYC TEAM: 1. KRØYERS PLADS (COPENHAGEN, DENMARK) This stunning Danish project demonstrates how buildings can be adapted to their surroundings; it manages to blend old and new while encouraging social interaction. cobe.dk 2. MIRVISH VILLAGE (TORONTO, ONTARIO) We love this newly re-imagined, multi-use neighbourhood of character-rich buildings with a focus on sustainability, diversity and vitality. mirvish-village.com

lifestyle elements abundant in Waterloo. We set out to improve their lot with beautiful

3. THE MOUNTAIN (COPENHAGEN, DENMARK) An innovative condo development that tackles the integration & interaction of the building with its landscape, from its multi-story car park to the gardens that grace every unit. big.dk

common spaces, a UW classroom, event programming and a cafe space – all wrapped up in a gorgeous century building. We expect it to be buzzing come Fall. Cat is looking down at her laptop as she explores suppliers for our newest project. ‘I want us to push the boundaries and select makers that will deliver ultra-modern

4. DOCKSIDE GREEN (VICTORIA, BC) We can’t get enough of this mixed-use, fullysustainable neighbourhood that serves the well-being of its residents, the local economy and the environment too. docksidegreen.com

designs with high quality products that will stand the test of time,’ she declares. ‘I want to give our buyers the best of the best, so that we are proud of the work we’ve done.’ That Cat doesn’t settle for anything less than perfection (which is exactly what you want in a designer) is evident in her work on a project

5. PERIMETER INSTITUTE (WATERLOO, ONTARIO) An award-winning building that’s both timeless and innovative. Roam its grounds to appreciate the angles and textures of the building as it interfaces with its surroundings. perimeterinstitute.ca

123


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Two Thirty


like Urbanistyc’s Two Thirty. With modern quartzwrapped kitchens, integrated European appliances, wide-plank engineered hardwood flooring, recessed lighting, built-in closets and premium windows and doors throughout, this exquisite boutique condo will challenge the notion of ‘standard features and finishes’ throughout the Region. Cat and I take a moment to watch the traffic ebb and flow on Erb Street and make eye contact with a few of the people peeking in. When we took off the window coverings in brch cafe it was as if everyone wanted to get a look. This design is intentional. It makes the separation between the interior and exterior less pronounced so people can picture themselves being inside and even wandering in without knowing why. This is how we encourage ‘Hello’. Paul, the company’s visionary, conceptualized Two Thirty in true Urbanistyc fashion. He saw the availability of an underutilized church in the centre of town as an opportunity to take a building that was typically closed off from the rest of the world and transform it into something collaborative and beautiful: a building that will open its main floor to the Stratford community and


126 stand four stories tall as a symbol of what can

in his eye, he’s had a revelation in the middle

be done through creative collaboration.

of the night. Yet instead of being frustrated

With floor-to-ceiling glass spanning the entirety of the ground floor, Two Thirty welcomes residents and guests into a deliberately-designed, luxury condominium.

with the potential pivot or a tight deadline we’ll need to meet, we all band together in the knowledge that we are pushing the boundaries and striving for perfection.

With the help of EDGE Architects, every

Urbanistyc thrives on the realization that

square foot of the twenty-one residential

we can encourage change, collaboration

suites has been thoughtfully laid out to create

and community through well-considered

a boutique, space-efficient building. And

developments. With every project we push

partnership with the church community has

beyond convention. We may have started just

resulted in a stunning assembly space that

a year ago but we will continue to break down

will not only be used for their weekly church

walls with the hope that people will also lower

service but can also be transformed into a

theirs. So when you see us out and about in

meeting place, performance space, theatre

Waterloo, make sure you say hello

room and more.

.

Paul struts into brch, a set of rolled blueprints under his arm, and perches on one of the Kroft Studio stools. Cat and I prepare ourselves for another strategic discussion. We know that when Paul comes in with that look

URBANISTYC 1 KING ST N, WATERLOO

urbanistyc.com


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F EAT UR E:

THE CITY BUILDERS PREAMBLE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

AS LOCALITIES – TOWNS, CITIES, REGIONS – CONTINUE TO EXPAND, COMMUNITIES OF PEOPLE MIGHT FIND THEMSELVES BOUND TOGETHER BY ANY NUMBER OF THINGS. FAMILY, OF COURSE. FRIENDS. NEIGHBOURS AND NEIGHBOURHOODS. PUBLIC PARKS AND SQUARES. CLUBS AND RELIGIOUS CENTRES. SOCIAL HUBS LIKE RESTAURANTS, COFFEE SHOPS, BREWERIES. EVEN WORK PLACES CREATE SPACES WHERE FOLKS ARE ENCOURAGED TO FEEL LIKE THEY’RE PART OF SOMETHING LARGER THAN THEMSELVES. A GROUP, A POPULACE, A COLLECTIVE. LIVING CLOSER. TOGETHER. THRIVING AS A UNIT. 128

W HILE OUR COMMUNITIES EXPAND, THERE ARE FOLKS WHO STRIVE TO NURTURE WITHIN THE COLLECTIVE A SHARED SENSE OF THE COMMON GOOD. SOME WORK HARD TO CULTIVATE THE REGION’S SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND ECONOMIC PROSPERITY. THEY SUMMON, NURTURE AND SUSTAIN ROBUST CONGREGATIONS OF FOLKS WHO GATHER IN THE NAME OF DOING GOOD THINGS TOGETHER. OF BUILDING COMMUNITY. OF BUILDING THE FINEST OF CITIES. CITY BUILDING. W HEN BARACK OBAMA OBSERVED THAT COMMUNITIES HAVE TO BE ‘C REATED, FOUGHT FOR, TENDED LIKE GARDENS,’ HE ENCOURAGED HIS AUDIENCE TO SEEK OUT AND APPLAUD VISIONARIES, CHAMPIONS AND NURTURERS. THESE ARE THE SORTS OF PEOPLE WE NEED TO BUILD THE SPACES IN WHICH WE CAN LIVE AND THRIVE TOGETHER. WE DO WELL TO SALUTE THEM. HERE’S TO A HANDFUL OF OUR OWN REGION’S NOTABLE AND AUSPICIOUS CITY BUILDERS.


CFRU-FM 93.3 250 watts of community power for over 35 years

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Building awareness toward black heritage in Guelph & Wellington County

G uelph Black H eritage Soci e t y John & Denise

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Bikeables

orgs

131

Delivering nutrient-dense, ethicallyproduced, local foods – by bike & electric car BI KEAB L ES. co m Kyle, Justin & Roger H A MIL T O N


Steel Rails

132

An annual, mysterious interactive art party supporting The Community Edition

Steel Rails

Lakyn, Care & Beth C O MMU N IT Y ED IT IO N . C A / ST EEL RA IL S W A T ERL O O


NOW OPEN


KITCHENER FARMERS’ MARKET:

KIN

G S T

CED

AR

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E

KITCHENER

LA CASBAH

REFUEL YOUR PA NTR Y & Y O UR H E A RT BY CAI SEPULIS & SONIA PREISLER It’s Saturday morning. Which means coffee

With a large covered outdoor vendor area,

on the back deck. A leisurely dog walk. And,

high ceilings, large windows and skylights,

often around here, it means Sonia and I are

and a second floor seating area which

plotting some sort of adventure for the day.

overlooks the market below (perfect for a

New flavours to try. Spaces to see. Shopping

rest and for people watching, too), the space

to do. Possibly a treat or two. Today, it’s all of

is light and welcoming – even at peak times.

the above – we’re off to the Kitchener Market.

And, shoulder to shoulder, friendly faces

Having both grown up in Toronto’s west side, the novelty of now living in close reach to so many farms and markets has definitely not lost its luster. Each has its own personality and appeal, and we love refueling our pantry and hearts with a trip to our region’s markets. The Kitchener Market happens to be one of our favourites – the perfect blend of unique products, quality vendors, fair prices and tons to choose from.

seem to float around us. Placemaking. The heart of a city. We arrive early (knowing many of our favourite vendors will sell out before the day’s end) and are greeted with the smell of fresh baked goods, the vibrant colours of local produce, and the exciting energy of a busy market morning. We grab a piping hot cider and slowly start to meander – taking in all the market has to offer. Here are some of the gems we uncovered along the way:


FI ELD NOT ES

137

ANNA TOLAZZI CHOCOLATES TOP MARKET MEATS 'TRY EARLIDALE SUMMER SAUSAGE'

ESSEN 'WITH DIFFERENT SOUPS EACH WEEK, TRY NOT TO MISS DILL PICKLE OR BORSCHT'

A TASTE OF SEOUL 'KIMCHI MAKES A PERFECT SIDE DISH OR TOPPING ON BBQ-ED DOGS'


FI ELD NOT ES

138

SOUTH CENTRAL SAUSAGE 'SOUTH CENTRAL'S 'HAWAIIAN' STYLE INCLUDES PINEAPPLE AND A TOUCH OF HEAT – MAKES THE PERFECT TACO FILLING'


MILKY WAY FARM, WOODSTOCK FIRST RADISHES OF THE SEASON QUICK & EASY RADISH PICKLE THINLY SLICE 1 BUNCH OF RADISHES (USING A MANDOLIN WORKS BEST) AND SET ASIDE IN A BOWL OR GLASS JAR WHISK TOGETHER: 1/2 CUP WATER 1/2 CUP RED WINE VINEGAR 2 TBSP MAPLE SYRUP 2 TSP SALT (OPTIONAL) 1/2 TSP CHILI FLAKES POUR MIXTURE OVER THE RADISHES REFRIGERATE AT LEAST 15 MINS BEFORE SERVING ENJOY!

139

KITCHENER MARKET 300 KING ST E, KITCHENER

kitchenermarket.ca


HOMES BUILT FOR “STAYCATIONS”

t ac / .ca iva e qu to


THE SUMMERPEAK MODEL VISTA HILLS , WATERLOO

Homebuilder. Community Creator. Local. KITCHENER

WATERLOO

Huron Village Doon South Ormston Riverwood

Trailside Vista Hills Reflections

Photography may show optional features which may not be included in the base price. See Sales Representatives for more information. E. & O. E. MARCH 2019.


142

NOR FOLK ST

SUFF

T OLK S

GUELPH

SID ONI O’S FOR ME N & A R T O F DE N I M: EXPERIENCE, CURATION & CUSTOMER SERVICE BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘I started working here when I was eight,’

Smith comes dashing in. Paul’s quick to

recalls Paul Brombal with a chuckle. ‘For ham

greet Hudson, and assures him that his new

and cheese sandwiches from Dutch Toko.’ His

custom tailored suit is waiting for him. When

brother Marc, fitting a customer with a sport

I ask Hudson how many times he’s visited

jacket some distance behind us, takes note

Sidonio’s over the years, he ponders for a

and quips: ‘Musta been a good sandwich.’

second before answering, ‘Lots.’

The customer, Wellington Brewery President Brent Davies, cracks a grin as the Brombal siblings get into it. After all, it’s business as usual here at Sidonio’s for Men and Art of Denim – a duo of upscale clothing stores on the outskirts of Guelph’s downtown core.

‘Hudson’s a perfect example of our regular customer,’ Paul tells me later. ‘He’s selfemployed, always in a hurry, and appreciates a one-stop shop where he can pull into our parking lot, grab something quick, and get back out there.’ He goes on: ‘We understand

It’s a quiet Tuesday in March. Early afternoon.

that time is money, and that our ability to

A perfect time for bosses and entrepreneurs

curate fashion efficiently and effectively is

to shop while folks tied to their desks are,

what keeps our clients coming back.’ As they

well, tied to desks. As if on cue, local realtor

have been doing for some forty years now.

(and Sidonio’s client since 1989) Hudson


143


144

‘It was 1978 when our dad, Sid, started the

from the mall in 2002) to a stunning century

business where Old Quebec Street mall

building at the edge of downtown. ‘I always

is located now,’ Paul remarks. ‘When the

wanted to move the business into a large

mall was built in 1984, Sidonio’s was one

historic building,’ Paul says. ‘With parking,’

of its original tenants. When we opened

he adds, chuckling. ‘This place,’ he continues,

Art of Denim, a more casual clothing and

motioning his arms into the brightly-lit space,

accessories business for men and women,

‘was originally built as an all-girls school in

it was in the mall too.’ This was a period

the mid-nineteenth century – not that you

Paul remembers fondly. ‘I was tasked with

could tell when we purchased it in 2015.’

guarding product during sidewalk sales,’

After a ton of restoration and renovation a

he recalls. ‘It wasn’t long, though, before I

couple years back, the brothers opened the

was helping customers – and I wasn’t yet

new place. ‘We’re among the only remaining

ten.’ Mark adds: ‘When I was five I told my

independent menswear retailers left in the

kindergarten teacher I wanted to work

region,’ Paul tells me, a tinge of lamentation

in clothing when I grew up.’ He worked

in his voice. ‘And certainly the only one in

alongside Marc and Sid during his teenage

Guelph.’

years, college days, and ever since.

I look around the tidy room. Racks of jackets,

Now that the Brombal brothers are all grown

pants and full suits surround me. I recognize

up (and Sid has hung up his measuring tape)

some of the labels. Hugo Boss. Pal Zileri.

they’ve taken the opportunity to put their own

Coppley. In the adjoining room, Canada

stamp on the business – beginning with their

Goose jackets, AG Jeans and other lifestyle

move from a street front shop on Wyndham

brands. Near the front desk, Loake (from

(where Sidonio’s and Art of Denim relocated

England) and Lloyd (from Germany). ‘We


focus on elevated brands, and source Canadian product whenever available,’ Marc notes. ‘Our own private label is made in Canada – as are our made-tomeasure and custom suits, belts, and ties. Customers appreciate it.’ Indeed, Sidonio’s customers appreciate many things. The product, of course. But also the knowledge about clothing and fashion that Paul and Marc have carried with them through the years and that box stores and online outlets can’t provide. ‘We provide our customers with experience,

.

curation and personal service,’ Marc tells me. ‘That,’ he concludes thoughtfully, ‘is why we’re still here.’

SIDONIO'S CUSTOM MEN'S SHOP 186 NORFOLK ST, GUELPH

sidoniosformen.com


GETTING TO KNOW: 146 146

146 FUSION HOMES’ THE METALWORKS HERITAGE BUILDING INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN

A L O N G THE BAN K S O F T H E SPEED RIVER IN DOW NTOW N GUEL PH, THE ROYA L C I TY ’ S O WN F U SION H O MES IS D EVEL OPING AN EIGHT-AC RE MASTER-PL ANN E D C O M M U NI TY CALLED T H E MET ALWORKS. THIS FANTASTIC MIXED-USE PROJE C T W I L L CO N S IST OF F IVE RESID EN TIAL BUIL DINGS AND A FIFTY-FOOT-W IDE R I V E R W A L K P R O MEN AD E CO N N ECT IN G THE URB AN VIL L AGE TO DOW NTOW N GUE L P H A N D THE CI TY ’S IMPRESSIVE T RAIL NETW ORK. THE DEVEL OPM ENT W IL L FEA TUR E A F U L L Y R E IMAG IN ED AN D REST ORED HERITAGE BUIL DING – AN INNOVATIVE F US I O N O F CEN T U RY - O LD LIMESTONE AND C OB B L ESTONE W ITH MODERN STE E L A N D G L A S S T H AT WILL H OST CO MMERC IAL SPAC E W HIL E AL SO SERVING AS H O M E TO A N EX CEPT IO N AL REST AURANT AND NOTEW ORTHY C RAFT DISTIL L E R Y. A CO U P L E MON T H S BACK T O QU E SAT DOW N W ITH FUSION’S FOUNDER AND C H I E F E X E CU T IVE OF F ICER LEE PIC C OL I TO C HAT AB OUT HIS VISION FOR TH I S D I S TI NCTI V E SPACE.


IT’S TAKEN A LOT OF WORK TO BRING THE HERITAGE BUILDING BACK TO LIFE. WHAT MADE IT WORTH THE EFFORT? It is not often people get the opportunity in life to

WHAT CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT SPRING MILL DISTILLERY – THE CRAFT DISTILLERY TO BE HOUSED IN THE HERITAGE BUILDING?

revitalize something of such historical prominence

Spring Mill Distillery is John Sleeman’s newest

in the city where you were born and raised. The

project. We are tremendously excited for Spring

heritage building at The Metalworks was just that – an

Mill to be ramping up, and cannot wait for the

opportunity to honour the rich history of the site and

people of Guelph and out-of-towners alike to

its founders and elevate it for the future. This building

experience it. John has already contributed so

has always been a fixture in the community. Since

much to Guelph’s beer culture; it’s going to be

its construction in 1827 (the same year Guelph was

incredible to see what he can bring to distilling in

founded), it’s served as a grist mill, distillery, brewery,

the Royal City.

copper shop, and home to several metalworking companies. What we’re doing here is simply writing the next chapter in its remarkable history.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO BRING LIFE BACK INTO THE HERITAGE BUILDING WITH DESTINATIONS LIKE A RESTAURANT AND CRAFT DISTILLERY?

THE HERITAGE BUILDING’S RESTAURANT SPACE HAS YET TO BE FILLED. HOW’S THE SEARCH BEEN GOING? WHAT’S THE SPACE LIKE? The search has been going well – we’re currently reviewing multiple proposals. We’re keen to choose the restaurant with the right vibe and

Our goal has always been to honour the history of the

vision for The Metalworks community and for

site and the building, including the original distillery

Guelph. The space is beautiful. Exposed limestone

that was present hundreds of years ago. With that, we

walls. Beams. Original wood flooring. And,

just could not miss the opportunity to house a distillery

when it’s done, patrons will be able to enjoy an

once again and continue writing the story alongside an

outstanding patio overlooking the River Walk and

incredible local talent, like John Sleeman. His passion

Speed River.

for quality – whether it be local ingredients, the best equipment, or the experience he curates – is so well aligned to the true epitome of The Metalworks vision: Authentic, Genuine Guelph.

THE METALWORKS IS POSITIONED TO BREATHE NEW LIFE INTO DOWNTOWN GUELPH. HOW IMPORTANT WAS IT TH AT THIS PROJECT BE LOCATED SO CLOSE TO THE HEART OF THE CITY? Nearly two hundred years ago, just steps from

THE METALWORKS

themetalworks.ca

The Metalworks, Guelph founder John Galt felled the first tree to make room for the development of the Royal City. It’s fitting that we continue building on this city’s rich heritage by developing a community with the scale and vision like this so

.

close to downtown – on a plot of land that’s had an intrinsic link to Guelph’s success since the early nineteenth century

147


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FERGUS, ON 519-843-1365 | GORDON ST, GUELPH 519-824-9050 SPEEDVALE AVE, GUELPH 519-821-6191 | ROCKWOOD, ON 519-856-9922 **Broker *Sales Representative Not intended to solicit listing currently listed for sale.


LUXURIOUS LIVING AMONGST NATURE’S SPLENDOR.


VISIT OUR DESIGNER-DECORATED MODEL HOME TODAY.

Artist’s concept only.

MODEL HOME & SALES CENTRE: 1 Owens Way, Guelph, ON. (Located off of Victoria Road South between Macalister Blvd. and Stone Rd.)

ReidsHeritageHomes.com


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BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘Roger was right,’ I exclaim to TOQUE Partner

the side of the glass: Dundurn Market. The

Cai Sepulis as we navigate our way through

neighbourhood grocer from which we’ve

Hamilton traffic toward highway 403 – which

just come. And, to be sure, to which we shall

will spill us out onto the 6 back to Guelph.

return. For granola. And for so much more.

‘This really is the best granola in the world.’ I push my oversized hand back down into the glass jar and struggle to grab a few of the remaining clusters that seem to be deliberately evading my fingertips. Having no luck, I acquiesce and turn the jar over into my open palm – making sure not to spill any of the remaining nuggets onto my lap or between the front seats of Cai’s Toyota.

‘When my son Justin and I opened Dundurn Market back in June 2018,’ Roger Abbiss had told Cai and me earlier that morning, ‘it was as a bricks and mortar manifestation of another one of our businesses – Bikeables.’ And what’s Bikeables, then? ‘Bikeables was conceived as an online market of local, organic produce and artisanal foods delivered to your door either by bike or, if you’re further afield, electric car.

I savour my palmful. And then deposit the few

It was – remains – our way of connecting local

crumbs that remain into Cai’s outstretched

producers’ products to local consumers by the

hand before turning the clear vessel over

most eco-friendly means possible.’ Roger went

to take a closer look at the inscription on

on: ‘It didn’t take long for us to realize that we


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needed a physical space to house the produce and foods we sold online. And it didn’t take much longer for us to discern that, if we found the right space, we could open it up to the public as a market.’ Hence Dundurn Market. 346 Dundurn Street South. Nestled in the shadow of Hamilton Mountain. It really is the perfect exemplar of a classic neighbourhood grocer, I’d thought as I meandered through the space. The distressed wood shelving that houses tasty, colourful things in beautiful glass jars and gorgeous packaging. Wooden crates lined with burlap, displaying fresh produce. Antique harvest tables. A central glass display case. Original wide plank floors. All so perfectly staged. Almost as if the

WE ARE OPEN AND CLASSES ARE RUNNING!

place were created as a set for some sitcom based in Vancouver. Portland. Seattle. Brooklyn.

11 Quebec St.

Hamilton.

Downtown Guelph

‘We love this location,’ Roger had remarked, as if reading my mind. ‘Which is a problem, really, since we’ve already essentially outgrown the space, and parking is a serious challenge. Yet we can’t seem to leave.’ I had no trouble comprehending his sentiments. ‘I wouldn’t leave either,’ I’d found myself responding. ‘It just looks, and feels, so perfect.’ Indeed. Not only the handsome shelves, crates, tables, but also everything they contained and displayed. Local produce – from Manorun Organic Farm in Copetown, Paradise Fields in Binbrook, Backyard Harvest in Hamilton, and more. Fresh bread from de la terre bakery in Vineland and Dear Grain in Dundas. Locally-ground coffee from Coffeecology – another of Roger’s businesses. And a wide range of incredible local, organic, sociallyconscious products. Bulk by the jar. Canned

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and jarred. Oils, vinegars, sauces. Spreads and sweeteners. Dry goods. Preserves. Dairy products and alternatives. Meat products and alternatives. ‘We stock products from over one hundred vendors,’ Roger declared enthusiastically, ‘and pride ourselves in the fact that we don’t stock products from any large corporation.’

Register ahead for free ELDOA classes on Saturday June 22 during Art on the Street STU D I OS H I B U I .C A | 519-265-8848


156 And then there’s Dundurn’s prepared

for that charming, local-centric, eco-friendly

foods made in-house. From scratch. Like

venue devoted to providing Hamiltonians

that granola. ‘So much of what we sell is

with the best local, organic produce and

made by our fantastic kitchen team,’ Justin

artisan foods.

observed when I asked about Dundurn’s own prepared foods. Like mason jar salads – including the awesome kale, quinoa and sweet potato salad I grabbed on my way out. And chia parfait. Glorious vegan cheesecake. And delicious sandwiches, too. ‘One veggie, one vegan and a couple different chicken sandwiches each day.’ Indeed, Dundurn even makes its own kombucha. ‘And we teach others how to make it too,’ Justin announced, alluding to the market’s soonto-be-launched vegan cooking class series

Cai steps on the gas, and I recall what Roger said as we left for home. ‘We created Bikeables and Dundurn Market to encourage folks to keep their money in the city by supporting local producers. And the cool thing is it’s happening in Hamilton right now. We can feel the movement afoot. We’re just proud to be part of it.’

.

And if it means eating more granola, I’m happy to be part of it too

– which will focus on nut cheeses, nut milks, knife skills and, of course, kombucha. Cai merges onto the 6, and I place the empty granola jar on the floormat by my feet. ‘I wish I would’ve saved some for back home,’ I lament. We’ll go back. For granola and

DUNDURN MARKET 346 DUNDURN ST S, HAMILTON

bikeables.com


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Where Great Ideas Meet opportunity three spaces, endless opportunity

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Guelph’s premier business district

The Junction is a 45,000 sq. ft. mixed-use development located in the heart of Guelph, offering clients and colleagues an unparalleled place to connect and a unique opportunity to join Guelph’s rapidly expanding business community.

now leasinG | contact mike taylor guelphjunction.ca | mtaylor@granitehomes.ca | 519.400.8527


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GOOS E 'A D IZZY ING WINTE R' B Y CA i SE P U L iS

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C OCKTAIL HO UR WITH KATIE SHEWEN

AS DAYS BECOME WARMER AND BIRDS BEGIN TO SING AGAIN, MY TASTE BUDS TINGLE FOR THE BITTER & SWEET TASTE OF PIMM’S. THIS TRADITIONAL ENGLISH DRINK IS SO POPULAR DURING THE LATE SPRING AND SUMMER IN THE UK THAT YOU CAN EVEN FIND IT ON DRAUGHT IN SOME PUBS. DATING BACK TO THE MID-NINETEENTH CENTURY, THIS GREAT APERITIF SCREAMS PATIOS AND SUNSHINE.

THE PIMM’S CUP Method: Build in a Glass Glass: Highball In a glass, muddle:

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4 cucumber slices or wheels

6-9 mint leaves

2 strawberries (diced)

2 orange wedges

2 lemon wedges

2 lime wedges

Add 2 oz Pimm’s* Add ice, stir and top with lemon/lime soda. Garnish with a mint sprig and cucumber. *For something a little stronger, try 1.5 oz Pimm’s & 0.5 oz London dry gin.


HANDCR AF T ED NAGA & MODERN CHAIN

Profile for Toque Magazine

TOQUE Magazine – Issue 7 – City Builders  

Issue #7 of TOQUE Magazine. We're a regional lookbook featuring stories, destinations and great eats in Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton...

TOQUE Magazine – Issue 7 – City Builders  

Issue #7 of TOQUE Magazine. We're a regional lookbook featuring stories, destinations and great eats in Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo, Hamilton...