Page 1

03.WINTER 2018

ANDY COX

REGIONAL LOOKBOOK

THE CITY BUILDERS

TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


Where did you think you’d find us?

On the best real estate. Albert Ashley, Sales Representative Julie Ashley, Sales Representative Irene Szabo, Sales Representative Stacey Armstrong, Client Care Peter Szabo, Client Care

304 Woolwich Street, Guelph ON N1H 3Y9 519.841.1924 jashley@sothebysrealty.ca iszabo@sothebysrealty.ca


PR For Yo

PR For Yo


our Property

our Property

PR For Your Property

Condominium Sales and Leasing PR For Your Property

Are you looking to enjoy the excitement and energy of condo living? Planet Realty Inc. is Guelph’s premier full service brokerage with over 30 years of experience in serving the local community. Contact us today and start living the carefree lifestyle you have been imagining.

planetrealty.ca | guelphism.com | 519.837.0900


NETT NE RO ZZE ERO LUXURY. LUXURY. WELC OM MEE W ELC O HOM E. HOME.

u dbuilder b u i l d e rofofCanada’s C a nada’sfirs fi rs cetifie r tifide dNet Ne tZero Ze roluxur lu xur hom e PPro roud t tcer y yhome


3. W INTER 2018

We see their future.

The journey begins here.

CAi SEPULIS illu stra ti on & desi gn

St. John’s-Kilmarnock School (SJK) is the leading co-educational independent school in the Waterloo and surrounding region. Since 1972, SJK has been providing an enriched educational program for students in JK – Grade 12.

CHRIS TIESSEN writin g & phot ography

At SJK, every child is our world. Individualized learning paths

supported by our qualified and dedicated faculty help our students realize the dreams they dare to dream.

For advertising opportunities, contact chris@toque.ltd

As the only accredited IB World Continuum School in Southwestern Ontario, our students find their excellence within, love to learn, and

Contributors: Ryan Christodoulou, Sonia Preisler, Jenna van Klaveren, Rachelle Waterman

graduate as confident, well-rounded individuals fully prepared for post-secondary education and life beyond. The journey begins here.

Go beyond.

Printed on 100% post-consumer ROLLAND ENVIRO paper. This print run saved: 76 trees 5 tennis courts 73,764 gal. US of water 798 days of water consumption 7,547 lb. of waste 70 waste containers

Call our enrolment team at 519-648-2183 and book your personal tour. Learn more at www.sjkschool.org/gobeyond SJK Grand Magazine ad 5.050 x 9.825.indd 1

APPLY NOW!

1/31/17 2:40 PM

24,795 lb. CO2 emissions of 4 cars per year 64 MMBTU 310,307 60W light bulbs for one hour 32 lb. NO X emissions of one truck during 45 days

TOQUEMAGAZINE.com @toqueLTD


WELCOME TO THE THIRD ISSUE OF TOQUE MAGAZINE – YOUR QUARTERLY REGIONAL ‘LOOKBOOK’ THAT’S GROWING FASTER THAN WE’D EVER IMAGINED. MUCH LIKE THIS REGION WE LIVE IN – A BAND OF MUNICIPALITIES THAT HAVE BECOME MAGNETS FOR GLOBAL TALENT. DRIVEN, NO DOUBT, BY THE EMERGENT TORONTO-WATERLOO INNOVATION CORRIDOR. AND BY OUR REGION’S GLORIOUS AND VISIONARY CITY BUILDERS – THOSE FOLKS WHO’VE TAKEN IT UPON THEMSELVES TO FASHION THE SPACES AND PLACES OF OUR LOCALITIES INTO DELIBERATE AND THOUGHTFUL COMMUNITIES. INTO SOMETHING WE CALL HOME. ESPECIALLY AT A TIME LIKE THIS, IN A REGION LIKE OURS, IT’S THE CITY BUILDERS – ARCHITECTS, CULINARY CHAMPIONS, DEVELOPERS, ARTS & CULTURE WARRIORS, HOME AND COMMERCIAL BUILDERS, OTHERS – WHO SHOULD BE LAUDED AS CHAMPIONS OF COMMUNITY. FOR IT’S THESE FOLKS WHO CONTINUE TO DESIGN AND BUILD PERMANENCE INTO THIS REGION WHERE TRANSIENCE SEEMS TO BE THE ORDER OF THE DAY: TRANSIENCE EMBODIED IN START-UPS DETERMINED TO ‘OUTGROW’ THIS AREA, AND IN ENTREPRENEURS IMPATIENT TO EXPAND WELL BEYOND IT, AND IN MANAGEMENT TYPES LOOKING TOWARD BIGGER JOBS. IN LARGER CITIES. THERE’S NOTHING WRONG, OF COURSE, WITH THIS URGENT DESIRE BY SOME TO EXPAND BEYOND THE LOCAL. AFTER ALL, GROWTH AND TRANSITION DEMAND DEXTERITY. AND OFTEN DISPLAY NIMBLE GRACE. AND ENCOURAGE ADAPTATION. WORTHY GESTURES, INDEED. BUT IMPERMANENCE DEMANDS A COUNTERBALANCE. OF STABILITY. CONSTANCY. COMMITMENT. ARTS & CULTURE. AND INSPIRED PLANNING AND EXPRESSIVE DESIGN. INCORPORATING EARTH AND AIR. INVOKING COMFORT AND LIGHT. AN IMPASSIONED AESTHETIC. AND A VISION FOR COMMUNITY. BY OUR CITIES' BUILDERS. LET’S MEET THEM NOW. .ca


CONTENTS 9. EDITOR’S LETTER: THE CITY BUILDERS 14. ‘IT’S ALL ABOUT STEWARDSHIP’: HOW MARTINSIMMONS IS IMPROVING OUR REGION – ONE PROJECT AT A TIME 22. MEET YOUR MAKER: AMBROSIA PASTRY CO. 24. (ALREADY) PLANNING OUR RETURN: HAMILTON’S BRUX HOUSE 30. EXPERT OPINION (PROPERTY MANAGEMENT): MARIA FINORO 34. DAYTRIPPIN’ WITH JENNA VAN KLAVEREN & RACHELLE WATERMAN 36. BETWEEN THE SHEETS WITH THE BOOKSHELF STAFF 46. BUILDING COMMUNITY WHILE NURTURING RESILIENCE: MEET MINGA’S AMI DEHNE & ELLA HENDERSON 51. EXPERT OPINION (INVESTMENT): WILL MACTAGGART 52. UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY: CIRCLE FOUR FARMS 54. K  EEPING THE PAST FROM SLIPPING AWAY: SETH’S ACTS OF PRESERVATION 62. DTK’S J&P GROCER: ‘THE ANTI-GROCERY-STORE GROCER’ 69. W  ELCOME TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD: ADAPTIVE REUSE PROJECTS ARE BREATHING NEW LIFE INTO OLD BUILDINGS 76. MEET YOUR MAKER: STEPHANIE SCOTT 78. EXPERT OPINION (REAL ESTATE): JEFF NEUMANN 82. BLAZING WATERLOO REGION’S HYDROCUT TRAILS 94. I NVESTED IN COMMUNITY: TOURING REGIONAL LANDMARK LISTINGS WITH CBRE CAPITAL MARKETS 100. A COMMUNITY FOR ALL 102. ‘BOLD & PRECIOUS’: REVELING IN TRADITION 110. EXPERT OPINION (EDUCATION): MICHELLE FACH 112. FEATURE: THE CITY BUILDERS 121. MEET YOUR MAKER: [RE]FRESH JUICE CO. 122. ‘THE WORLD IS OURS’: CRAFT BEER, CLASSIC HIP HOP & A HAMILTON RENAISSANCE 130. ANATOMY OF A BRAND: QUEBEC STREET, GUELPH 132. PERIMETER DEVELOPMENT: LETTING IN THE LIGHT 138. (HAND)CRAFTING A CAREER: THE PLANE WORLD OF KONRAD SAUER 144. COMIC: GOOSE 146. COCKTAIL HOUR: THE CIDERGRIA

Grand River


speed River


Find us Follow us See you soon, guelph


Hudson Smith, Realtor Sidonio’s customer since 1996

+ fashion for men and women • 186 Norfolk St, Guelph • sidoniosformen.com • artofdenimonline.com


‘IT’ S ALL ABOUT S T E W A RD S H I P ’ :

14 B

I RE

TH

AU

PT

ST

.

HOW MARTINSIMMONS IS IMPROVING OUR REGION – ONE PROJECT AT A TIME BY CHRIS TIESSEN

D U KE ST .W

KITCHENER

The region is in good hands, I cannot help

Google’s Canadian headquarters. And the

but think to myself as I listen intently to

impressive Waterloo Region Courthouse. Then

Jason Martin and Patrick Simmons – the

there’s Mammoet Canada Eastern Ltd’s offices

‘Martin’ and ‘Simmons’ of Kitchener’s storied

– a sprawling compound just outside Guelph

MartinSimmons Architects – espouse what

in the Township of Puslinch. Waterloo’s Open

it means for them to ‘do architecture’ across

Text headquarters. Blackberry’s Creekside and

Waterloo Region and (increasingly) Wellington

Northfield Campuses. The Blacksmith Lofts in

County. It’s a subject about which they know

Cambridge. The list goes on (and on, and on).

more than just a little. For over the past seven decades, this local firm has helped design, plan and build some of the most architecturallysignificant spaces and places across our communities. From corporate headquarters to educational institutions; from mixed-use infill to residential and adaptive reuse projects – MartinSimmons has seemingly done it all.

‘It’s all about stewardship,’ notes Patrick as he explains what drives the firm’s vision for our local communities. ‘About carefully and deliberately considering where our region has come from, and where it needs to go in order for this group of thriving, livable cities to be nurtured and sustained. Our buildings and the spaces they encompass shape our abilities to

Kitchener’s Breithaupt Block, for example – an

gather, and communicate, and work and play,

inspiring adaptive reuse project that houses

and, ultimately, to thrive. It’s imperative then,’


‘BY FAR THE GREATEST AND MOST ADMIRABLE FORM OF WISDOM IS THAT NEEDED TO PLAN AND BEAUTIFY CITIES AND HUMAN COMMUNITIES.’

-SOCRATES

15


16

he adds, ‘that we support and facilitate those

that project,’ Jason notes, ‘we sought to

functions through good planning, design and

perfectly balance purpose, need and design.

execution. ’

The purpose – to create a building that would

Patrick continues: ‘We’re living at a time when our communities are undergoing massive transformation. Consider Kitchener-Waterloo, for example. What was once an industrial powerhouse is now driven by a digital, or knowledge-based, economy.

Our region’s

architectural landscape reflects this dramatic change insofar as the specific utilitarian and aesthetic needs and wants of the innovation sector

seem

to

demand

contemporary

building design.’ ‘What makes Kitchener-Waterloo so special,’ adds Jason, ‘is that there are so many remaining examples of industrial architecture here. Closed-down factories provide the bare bones upon which creative architects can build something new and extraordinary. Adaptive reuse projects are extremely challenging ,’ he adds, ‘yet they provide great opportunities for fantastic builds.’ Like the Breithaupt Block, for instance. ‘For

potentially serve not only as Google’s Canadian offices but also as a tangible expression of Kitchener-Waterloo’s emergent position as global innovation hub. The need – to function seamlessly as an integrated space that serves both a primary tenant’s needs and the needs of other businesses that call Breithaupt home. And the design – to gesture towards the region’s industrial past while invoking its brilliant future as global tech giant.’ I am swept away by these statements of vision, and equally mesmerized by the Google project itself. From its century-old brick shell to its awe-inspiring glass addition, it’s truly magnificent – whether viewed from a window seat at Smile Tiger or from a car driving down King toward Kitchener from Uptown Waterloo. It’s especially from this latter view that I – as someone raised in Kitchener – feel the project’s spectacular impact. ‘What you’ve given to this community is so much more than great design,’ I blurt out to these city

..CONTINUED PG. 19


W E ASK E D M A RT I NS I M M ONS ’ P AR TNE R S J AS O N MAR TIN & PA T R I C K S I M M O N S T O LIS T A FE W O F THE IR FAVO UR ITE EX AM PL E S O F A RC HI T E C TUR E FR O M THE R E GIO N THAT THE Y DI DN ’T H A VE A H A ND I N DE S IGNING. H ER E’S W HA T T HE Y HA D TO S AY :

JASON MARTIN Waterloo County Courthouse, Kitchener: ‘The first building that, as a young child, I can remember identifying as unique. Its distinctive boomerang plan and one-of-a-kind cast-in-place hyperbolic concrete canopy always filled me with wonder.’

Perimeter Institute, Waterloo: ‘This Governor General’s Award-winning building represents the highest level of architectural excellence in Canada, and houses one of the world’s foremost centres for theoretical physics.’

17

PATRICK SIMMONS Seagram Barrel Warehouses, Waterloo: ‘We are lucky to have these remarkable and unusual structures in the middle of Uptown Waterloo. Their powerful, masculine forms give us an idea of Waterloo a century ago.’

Langdon Hall, Cambridge: ‘Classic, timeless beauty, well-preserved, and lovingly cared for. This Georgian mansion and Olmsted Brothersdesigned estate are worth visiting regularly to experience their genteel presence any season of the year.’

The Petrie Building, Guelph: ‘This building seems almost alive – like a stone, stamped iron, and glass creature that somehow found itself in downtown Guelph.’


Photos provided by MartinSimmons

18


builders – hardly able to contain myself. ‘And more, even, than an impactful cityscape – which is itself such an incredible gift.’ Mind racing, I try to collect my thoughts. ‘It’s a stake in the ground – signaling, through these spaces and places you’ve designed and helped create, the re-emergence of this region as something truly great. And truly global.’ And all by this local firm. Indeed, MartinSimmons knows this region. And lives it every day. In a world where so many developers look toward larger Toronto-based architectural firms for their design work, Patrick points to his firm’s ability to, in his words, ‘punch above our weight.’ And they do it with a nimble team of twelve staff and experienced contract employees. ‘Consider the Blackberry Northfield campus, for instance,’ Jason remarks. ‘Four buildings. 500,000 square feet. All completed in four years. It was the largest and fastest commercial project in Waterloo Region – and probably in Ontario – at the time.’ He continues: ‘We’re always looking to push the envelope, while collaborating with younger developers and progressive clients who require compelling design solutions.’ I can feel the creative drive and energy, vision and commitment of these two amazing men. ‘We do what I’ve labeled ‘real architecture’,’ Jason says. ‘Thoughtful design. A true understanding of context. And a legitimate effort to tie the community together. At the end of the day, we’re stewards,’ he adds, circling back to Patrick’s observation. ‘We make great architecture for clients who want great design – and

.

for a community that deserves it.’ He pauses, and then continues: ‘Really, what we’re looking to do is improve our region – one project at a time’

MARTINSIMMONS 113 BREITHAUPT STREET, SUITE 200, KITCHENER

martinsimmons.ca

19


1

% 0 0

SO

LD

O

U

T

20

CIRCA1877.CA


CIRCA1877.CA

The intersection between what once was & what will be. Located at 181 King St, in the heart of the Bauer District, CIRCA 1877 is central to boutique shops, restaurants and the ION LRT. Its leading-edge amenities will elevate your living experience, and its modern home automation will simplify your life. Fusing historical brick and beam elements from the former Brick Brewery building with modern architecture, every level has a space dedicated to living well. This chic building features a distinct dining experience for the public on the second floor with a patio overlooking King Street. The sixth-floor has a beautifully landscaped terrace, complete with pool, lounge and cabana. Welcome to condo living that is far from ordinary.


MEET YOUR MAKER

AMBROSIA PASTRY CO. 22

L I KE S O M A N Y OF O U R R EG I ON ’S I N C R ED I B L E C U L I N A R Y MA S T ER M I N D S,

150 ROGER ST, WATERLOO

A MB R OS I A P A S T R Y C O .’S A U R A H ER T Z O G

H OU RS : S at 10am-3pm

A N D T I M S I M P S ON L I V E B Y T H E M A N TRA:

ambrosiapastry.com

‘M A D E F R OM S C R A T C H .’ I N D EED , T H ESE

E S S E N T I AL I NG R E DI E N T( S ) ? Cocoa

F R EN C H - T R A I N ED C H EF S A R E T W O OF O NL Y

beans & butter FAV E KI T C H EN U S T E N S I L ( S ) ? A

A H A N D F U L O F C H OC OL A T E MA KER S I N

knife (for cutting croissant

N OR T H A MER I C A MA KI N G ‘B EA N T O BAR’

dough & chocolate) & spatula

C H O C OL A T E – S O U R C I N G O R G A N I C , FAI R

FU N T E C H N I Q U E ( S ) ? Freeze drying

T R A D E A N D ET H I C A L L Y - S OU R C ED B EA NS

fruits, marshmallows & more. And experimenting with chocolate panning

F O R T H EI R S I N G L E OR I G I N B A R S . J U ST S T EP S F R OM W A T ER L OO ’S S P U R L I N E TRAI L , A MB R OS I A I S A S A T U R D A Y D ES T I N A T I O N F O R EV ER Y O N E F R O M N EI G H B OU R S T O T OP TI ER C H EF S W H O J U S T C A N ’T G ET EN O U G H O F A U R A A N D T I M ’S C H OC OL A T ES , P A S T RI ES, T A R T ES , C OO KI ES , M A R S H MA L L OW S , P R ES ER V ES A N D MO R E.


23

FOPE.COM

Guelph | Oakville | Toronto www.knar.com


(A L R EAD Y ) P LANNI NG O U R R E T U R N:

HAMILTON’S BRUX HOUSE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

24

ST . W

LO C KE ST . S

H U N TE R

LOCKE STREET, HAMILTON

‘They’re really treating us well, eh?’, I remark

and his Brux House team have created for

to TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis before taking a

us – from the homemade liverwurst with

sip of my ‘Ghost Orchid’ – another incredible

house pickles, spicy mustard, and homemade

(and very juicy) Bellwoods IPA. ‘I feel just like

baguette, to the fat baked pretzels with beer

Anthony Bourdain in The Layover.’ Just then

and emmenthal fondue, to the crispy chicken

our waitress arrives with yet another dish.

skins with maple chili glaze and caramelized

‘And what we have here,’ she announces with

onion ranch sauce, to the aforementioned

obvious pleasure while setting the plate in

pastrami-smoked salmon. ‘A creation,’ notes

front of us, ‘is a little something Chef thought

Chef Kyle, ‘by our Sous Chef, Dmitry Perov

you’d enjoy.’ She pauses, before reciting:

– among the most brilliant cooks I’ve ever

‘Pastrami-smoked salmon with pickled quail

worked with.’ Brilliant, indeed. Dmitry. And his

eggs, scallion cream cheese and poppy seed

creation.

pringle.’ I look down at the wonderfullycolourful creation, and then up at Cai. She reciprocates the grin I’m giving her with one of her own, before noting: ‘I don’t think I’ll have room for my main.’

Brux House. If you haven’t been, you’re missing out. If you have, you’re likely already planning your next trip back. Located in the heart of Hamilton’s hip Locke Street strip, the restaurant has gained a well-earned

Halfway through the exquisite dish, Chef

reputation as the trailblazer of what’s become

de Cuisine Kyle Forth – the architect of our

an agreeably ambitious local culinary scene.

lunch – pays us a visit. ‘How’s the food so far?

And on this brisk but bright and sunny noon

Enjoying yourselves, I hope.’ Quite. Indeed,

hour in early November, it’s our road trip

we are thoroughly enjoying everything Kyle

destination as TOQUE begins its expansion


25


26

Chef de Cuisine Kyle Forth


into Hamilton. ‘We opened three years ago,’

relationship with the brewery – including

notes Kyle of the restaurant, ‘as the sister

hosting special dinners pairing up to six

restaurant to Dundas’ Quatrefoil.’ Quatrefoil.

courses with different Bellwoods beers.

Rated one of the top new restaurants when it opened by both Toronto Life and En Route magazines. Not a bad lineage, then. As if reading my thoughts, Kyle adds: ‘When we opened, Brux House was shortlisted by En Route as one of the top new restaurants. It’s a destination held dear by Hamiltonians and out of town visitors alike.’

‘It’s something we do quite often,’ remarks Kyle of these types of collaborative dinner events. He continues: ‘Just recently, we collaborated with [Hamilton restaurant] Berkeley North to create a dinner at Collective Arts Brewing. And in the near future, the restaurant is hosting Michelin Star-rated Dill Restaurant and Kex Brewery – both from Iceland – for a dinner

Makes sense. After all, I think to myself,

event that’ll also feature Collective Arts.’ Very

what’s not to love about this cozy two-storey

cool.

converted red brick that's loosely based around the idea of pairing great food with craft beer. I look up at the beer list and note no fewer than three Bellwoods options scrawled in chalk on the board. I ask how this can be (as I’ve never been anywhere with this much of Ossington’s finest), and Kyle lets me know that Brux House has developed a really close

At this point in the conversation, Cai and I have polished off the pastrami-smoked salmon and I’ve managed to finish my main too – a kale salad with goat cheese, pumpkin seed, crispy sweet potato, currant and red wine vinaigrette. Cai’s main – the Brux Brekkie Sandwich with scrambled egg, housemade back

bacon,

tomato,

Worchestershire,

27


28


portobello, cheese sauce, home fries and

us everything from Tokyo turnips to Jerusalem

petit salad – has been packed for takeaway.

artichokes, instantly spring to mind. In fact,’ he

‘Room for dessert?’ I laugh at Kyle’s query, but

continues, ‘next year we are going to sit down

am willing to take one more for the team – in

with Russ and his seed catalogue, and plan the

the name of research. Kyle disappears into

menu around his harvest season.’ Brilliant, to

the small kitchen and, a few minutes later,

be sure.

reappears with a Chocolate Cremeux served with preserved raspberry, vanilla mousse, almond crunch, and housemade amaretto ice cream. I dig in. Cai, not surprisingly (given what sits before us), joins me. And, once again, we’re in heaven. Between mouthfuls, I ask Kyle what makes the place work so well. ‘Fraser MacFarlane,’ he replies – alluding to the

‘And Hamilton.’ Kyle elaborates: ‘We’re living through a special period in Hamilton’s story. The conditions are perfect. The location is perfect. This city is undergoing a culinary revolution.’

.

A revolution Cai and I – and TOQUE Magazine – are more than happy to help document. In this case, one bite at a time

restaurant’s Executive Chef and Owner. Fraser and his wife, Georgina Mitropoulos, also own the aforementioned Quatrefoil. ‘And our close relationship with regional craft breweries, of course. And regional farmers, too.’ Kyle pauses to collect his thoughts. ‘Carol from Chassagne Farms, who provides us with quail, and Russ from Backyard Harvest, who grows

BRUX HOUSE 137 LOCKE STREET S, HAMILTON

bruxhouse.com

29


CONDO LIVING’S A DREAM – WITH THIS ONE ESSENTIAL INGREDIENT MARIA FINORO RCM, ACCI, FCCI, Condo living. The term conjures up different positive things for different people. Freedom from mowing the lawn or shovelling snow. The use of swimming pools and party rooms. Easy access to work, shops, parks, restaurants, grocers, drycleaners and public transportation. Condos come in all shapes and sizes, including townhouses, high-rises, mixed-use buildings and more. Some are brand new while others are adaptive re-use projects: existing apartments, factories or industrial buildings re-purposed and re-introduced to their communities as premier living spaces.

mfproperty.com

30

EXPERT OPINION | PROPERTY MGMT

PRESIDENT OF MF PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LTD & FIRST PRESIDENT OF CCI-GRAND RIVER CHAPTER

Often particular condos appeal to particular groups of people – families might enjoy a condo in the suburbs, for example, while young professionals and older adults might prefer the downtown because they’re committed to walking or biking. Some folks are attracted to ‘green buildings’; others seek out alternative structures such as ‘mixed use’ commercial/ residential developments where residents and surrounding services deliberately support each other.

It’s all about lifestyle, really – a feeling of security among close neighbours, the proximity of what you want close by, and even the sharing of major costs like roofs or windows. But once these communities and lifestyles are established, who ensures that they continue to be successful? It doesn’t take long for the ‘shine’ to wear off if condo owners fail to understand the need to surround themselves with industry professionals whose job is to guide them in managing their communities. Successful, sustainable condo communities tend to engage local experts who understand the communities they serve – a licensed condo management company, for example, and a licensed condo manager contracted by the board. New provincial legislation acknowledges the need for expert management. It mandates that directors take educational courses and sign a code of ethics, and demands the completion of forms that ensure transparency between condo boards and condo owners. Condo living – the term has an abiding appeal. The local, professional property managers in your community are committed to keeping it that way.

Jean Philippe Joly is the epitome of art, craftsmanship and passion. —Neil Moser, Buyer

independent eyewear. sourced globally. styled locally.

49 ALBERT ST. WATERLOO

519.885.2020


31

#midcenturymodern 482 Belmont Ave W, Kitchener 519-743-4151 schreitershome.ca


32


DAYTRIPPIN’

TWO COMMUNI T Y LE ADE R S. SH ARI NG A FAVO U R IT E DAY OU T AR OU N D OU R R E G ION .

JENNA VAN KLAVEREN

NEW MEDIA CULTURALIST, THE CHARCOAL GROUP OF RESTAURANTS

RACHELLE WATERMAN JENNA

RACHELLE

MARKETING & PR LEADER, HABITAT FOR HUMANITY WDF While both these childhood besties call Hamilton home, Rachelle and Jenna spend their weekdays working in Guelph and Kitchener, respectively. And their weekends? Across all three cities, of course. Take a peek:

GAGE PAR K & VINT AGE C O FFE E R O AST E R S 1000 MAIN ST E & 977 KING ST E, HAMILTON

1. Hamilton’s east end is ideal for weekend mornings: a walk with the dogs, coffee, and a cookie. We begin in beautiful Gage Park and make our way west to Vintage Coffee, where Jesslyn, the owner, makes a mean compost cookie – and fantastic coffee. The café feels like your cool friend’s apartment – a place you never want to leave.

34

J A M ES S TR E E T NO R T H N E IG H B OUR HO O D JAMES ST N, HAMILTON

2. We make our way across the city to James Street North, where we pop into O’s Clothes, and usually walk out with at least one purchase: the new SNEEZE mag, a #HamOnt mug, or – depending on the season – a slip dress or flannel shirt. We peruse used books at Chaises Musicales and stop at Mixed Media to stock up on stationary.

3. We get pretty amped when it comes to antiquing – especially at Freelton Antique Market. We roam the aisles of terrifying dolls, vintage clothes and vinyl. Then we’re off to Guelph’s ReStore for retro furniture. Best find? A vintage teak credenza for just $55!

F R EE L T O N ANTIQ UE MAR K E T & HA B IT AT F O R HUMANITY R ES T O R E 248 FREELTON RD, FREELTON & 104 DAWSON RD #300, GUELPH


T HE B A U ER K ITC HE N

4.

187 KING ST S, #102, WATERLOO

Lunchtime! We head to The Bauer Kitchen

– set in a restored warehouse nestled on the edge of Uptown Waterloo – to split a stone-oven pizza and Bauer Salad, and enjoy an Elora ‘Lady Friend’ (Rachelle) and Block 3 ‘King Street Saison’ (Jenna).

5. After lunch we head to Open Sesame in Downtown Kitchener – a micro-market stocked with books, paper goods, and the KW Zine Library. Operated by Lauren Weinberg and Sarah Kernohan, the space doubles as a gallery and events hub for workshops, concerts, and comedy.

O P EN S E S AME 220 KING ST W, KITCHENER

6.

What drives us back to Hamilton? Two

words: avocado fries. Oh, and pulled pork tacos and kimchi nachos, too. There’s so much culinary goodness at Work Progress. We eat, and then drift off to whatever they’re playing on Netflix. Don’t worry about spoilers – they never

WO R K P R OGR E SS

play anything you’re waiting to watch at home.

337 JAMES ST N, HAMILTON

7. We drop our car and make our way back to the east end. The Capitol Bar – a great spot for wine, beer and, when we’re feeling really fancy, a cocktail. (Corpse Reviver #2 is superb.) And the cheese plate, of course.

.

As the night wraps up, we head back to one of

THE C APITO L BAR

our places for dog cuddles, tea, and a movie. And, of course, more cheese. Sleep tight

973 KING ST E, HAMILTON

DAYTRIP, TAG & POST!

 @TOQUELTD #TOQUEDT #TOQUEDAYTRIPPING


36

W

B ET WEEN T HE S H E E T S

YN D H .N

E

.

ST

U

ST

AM

Q

C BE

DOWNTOWN GUELPH

WITH THE BOOKSHELF STAFF INTERVIEWS BY CHRIS TIESSEN

THERE’S

NO

DENYING

THE

EXPERT CURATORS IN THEIR OWN

BOOKSHELF – GUELPH’S FAVOURITE

RIGHT, THE BOOKSHELF STAFF KNOW

BOOKSTORE,

RESTAURANT

A THING OR TWO ABOUT GREAT BOOKS

AND BAR – IS AMONG THE MOST

AND MAGAZINES, OBSCURE MOVIES,

IMPORTANT

IN

AND HOW TO ROCK A PARTY. NOW

OUR REGION. A MAJOR REASON FOR

IT’S TIME TO KNOW A THING OR TWO

THIS: THE STAFF WHO WORK THERE.

ABOUT THEM.

CINEMA, CULTURAL

THAT

HUBS


CHARLOTTE CLARKE PROJECTIONIST

CRAZIEST THING THAT’S HAPPENED IN THE PROJECTION BOOTH? I’ve been told that when we still used real film, one of our projectionists had a film platter break before a sold-out show. He ended up having to feed film into the projector by hand throughout the entire screening.

BEST FILM YOU EVER SAW AT THE BOOKSHELF? Probably ‘The Lobster.’ We had a few people walk out, so I was a little nervous to watch it. In the end, though, I thought it was great.

WHAT MAKES A GREAT MOVIE NIGHT? Some of my favourite movie nights have been just coming to the theatre by myself. For a night at the movies with friends, it's pretty convenient to grab a drink at the eBar afterwards and enjoy discussing what you’ve just watched.

BEST PART OF YOUR JOB? I really like being aware of current movies and seeing so many of them in the theatre. And I love being around people who want to talk about what they've watched, whether it’s people I'm working with or folks who are just visiting

.

ANDREW HOOD BOOKSELLER, BOOK REVIEWER & MOONLIGHTING PROJECTIONIST

WHAT ROLE DOES THE BOOKSHELF PLAY IN OUR COMMUNITY? For some people, The Bookshelf is a reliable public bathroom. For others, though, it’s the hub around which their cultural lives spin. The place has no single function, and I think that malleability is the closest to a role in the community we have. The Bookshelf is whatever the community needs it to be.

MOST SURPRISING THING YOU’VE EVER FOUND IN THE STACKS? For a while someone was tearing racy pages from the books in our Health - Sexuality section and stuffing them into random books around the store. From time to time, someone would come up to the counter with a handful of nudity to report.

FAVOURITE AUTHOR? Lorrie Moore.

ASTERIX OR TINTIN? Get out of here. Calvin and Hobbes.

BEST PART ABOUT BEING AROUND BOOKS ALL DAY? As an author, I can find it tough being around books all day. There are books I think deserve to be read by everybody that nobody reads. By the same token, there are books that I didn't think anyone would read that everyone reads. The one noble truth of bookselling is that every book is someone's favourite book

.

37


38


KRYSTAL EIPL GENERAL MANAGER, EBAR & GREENROOM

WHAT’S EBAR’S DIFFERENTIATING FACTOR? Our ability to host so many types of events – from live bands to DJ nights; burlesque to drag shows; book launches to poetry events; pop-up kitchens to weddings. We’ve built a solid reputation as being great hosts for all sorts of things.

WHICH WEEKLY EBAR NIGHT IS A MUST-GO FOR FOLKS? My favourite is our 'Playful & Rowdy' Saturdays with DJ Jinx – it’s good vibes & great tunes. However, we host a variety of monthly events that are so much fun I can’t choose one over any other.

WHAT’S YOUR RECOMMENDED MENU ITEM & COCKTAIL AT EBAR? I love the Canadian Thin Crust Pizza paired with a Wellington SPA. Our mixologist, Jess, creates some of the finest craft cocktails in the city.

THE BEST PART OF YOUR JOB? Definitely working in the downtown community; the creative freedom to try so many things; and the great team that surrounds me each day (and night) at work

.

BRAD de ROO BOOKSELLER, MAGAZINE GURU, INTERVIEWER

FAVOURITE AUTHORS, BOOKS & MAGAZINES? One of the last really great books I read was ‘The Complete Stories of Leonora Carrington.’ As for magazines – I regularly read The Literary Review of Canada, The New York Review of Books, and Wire (a UK avant-garde music magazine). And Canadian Notes & Queries. I do author interviews for their website, which is gorgeously designed by famed cartoonist Seth, and features consistently great literary criticism, poetry, graphic works, and short fiction.

MONOCLE OR THE NEW YORKER? The New Yorker – for the short stories and the cartoons.

WHAT'S SO SPECIAL ABOUT PRINT? Print is especially adept at sopping up design, texture, tears, and beer. It also makes you slow down and take note of the quality of your thinking, empathy, and intoxication.

BEST PART OF YOUR JOB? Aside from being surrounded by great books and coworkers, I get to chat with all sorts of creative people. And The Bookshelf is very supportive of any creative work I do. They told me to tell you I have a new album called ‘Chimeras of Decline’ coming out - it will be available at bradderoo.bandcamp.com by the end of January

.

YOUR INVESTMENT ROAD MAP IS CONSTANTLY CHANGING


40


CATALINA NOVOA BOOKSELLER, EVENT PROGRAMMER & EBAR DJ

WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK THE BOOKSHELF PLAYS IN OUR COMMUNITY? As an independent bookstore and cinema, we can champion and showcase voices – authors, directors, musicians, artists – that aren’t part of the mainstream.

A SUREFIRE TRACK TO GET PEOPLE RUNNING ONTO THE DANCE FLOOR? Jorja Smith x Preditah, ‘On My Mind.’

WHICH BOOKSHELF PROGRAMMING ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF? Probably starting up ‘Fierce’ – our LGBTQ2+ night with DJs M’Damn D & Orangadang. Folks were being harassed at other bars and weren't feeling safe. They needed a place to come dance and do their thing, so we started up ‘Fierce’ in May 2015, and haven't looked back. It’s the busiest monthly night at eBar.

FAVOURITE ARTIST AND FAVOURITE AUTHOR AT THE MOMENT? I'm currently obsessed with IAMDDB from Manchester. For authors, Eva Crocker from St. John's is my new favourite. Her collection of short stories, 'Barrelling Forward,' is amazing

.

THE BOOKSHELF 41 QUEBEC ST, GUELPH

bookshelf.ca

WE’LL CHART A COURSE THAT’S RIGHT FOR YOU


42

ANIMATING THE CORE Tannis Slimmon plays in Miijidaa as part of Downtown Guelph's 2017 Music Weekends. Music Weekends returns in 2018 and runs from January 6 thru March 11


‘I WAS ALWAYS FISHING FOR SOMETHING ON THE RADIO. JUST LIKE TRAINS AND BELLS, IT WAS PART OF THE SOUNDTRACK OF MY LIFE.’

-BOB DYLAN

WE ARE YOUR NAVIGATORS

Financial leadership for your future. TheMactaggartTeam.com Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.


44

5 2 .0k m

FROM YOUR PLATE

mountainoak cheese

Meet adam. one of our farmers.


45

Guelph • Oakville • Toronto www.knar.com

H E A R T S O N F I R E S T O R E S , A U T H O R I Z E D R E TA I L E R S , H E A R T S O N F I R E . C O M


B UI LD I N G C OMM U NI T Y W H I L E NU RT U RI NG RE S I LI EN C E: 46

MEET MINGA’S AMI DEHNE & ELLA HENDERSON INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN Ever wish you knew how to brew your own hard cider, or butcher a whole hog, or knit something you’d actually wear, or forage for edible plants and fungi, or maintain a sourdough starter so legendary that you bequeath it to someone in your will? Minga Skill Building Hub in Guelph runs hands-on workshops where you can learn these skills – and bring home the bounty of your efforts. Run by experts with a passion for their craft and the desire to share their expertise, Minga’s workshops are helping build resilient communities by empowering participants to change how they live, work, produce and consume.

W HEN W E SAT DOW N W ITH MINGA’S FOUNDER, AMI DEHNE, AND BUSINESS PARTNER, EL L A HENDERSON, TO C HAT AB OUT M INGA’S ORIGINS, SUC C ESSES, AND AMBITIONS, HERE’S W HAT THEY HAD TO SAY:


WHEN DID MINGA GET STARTED? WHAT WAS THE INSPIRATION?

– someone who can recommend local

Ami: I first thought of starting Minga when I

avoid the mistakes that come with learning

was traveling around New Zealand. My desire

any craft – while stoking everyone’s

to learn all sorts of skills – canning, bread

enthusiasm for the project at hand. On

baking, cheese making, animal husbandry –

the deepest level, Minga workshops are

drove me to seek work on various farms as

an antidote to the paradoxically hyper-

I moved through the country. I absolutely

connected yet hyper-isolated world in which

loved learning new skills – and connecting

we live.

with people at the same time. When I moved to Guelph, I wanted to continue what I’d been doing – learning skills.

resources and help workshop attendees

WHO’S ON THE TEAM? WHAT ARE YOUR RESPECTIVE ROLES? Ami: Minga started with just me, but became

Ella: And teaching them too. And giving

a dynamic duo in April 2017 when Ella

others the chance to learn and teach.

came on board. Ella’s a master of getting

Ami: We held our first Minga workshop in September 2012 when I taught a ‘pay-whatyou-can’ canning workshop. A lot of folks showed up and had a super time. But they

stuff done and is passionate about creating transformative experiences that give people the opportunity to slow down, connect, and learn.

paid almost nothing. So now we charge a

Ella: For the most part, we’re Jills of all

proper fee – which is always great value.

trades, sharing responsibilities when needed.

WHERE DOES THE NAME ‘MINGA’ COME FROM? Ella: Minga (or ‘minca’) is a South American term referring to a gathering meant to accomplish a task in which the whole community benefits. It’s our belief that our community’s essential needs can be met by the skills held within it.

WHAT’S THE PHILOSOPHY BEHIND THE BUSINESS? Ella: There’s nothing Minga offers that can't be learned on YouTube – except the one thing humans need to thrive: community and connection. That’s what we’re all about. Connecting people and building community. Ami: And re-connecting folks with skills that, only two generations back, most of us would have taken for granted. Ella: It’s amazing how quickly a person can learn a skill when s/he participates in a hands-on workshop with an expert instructor

Generally, Ami takes care of the money and I take care of the marketing and promotions requirements. We work together on business development and visioning. Although we do some of the teaching, we hire experts to teach in particular fields.

WHAT HAVE BEEN YOUR FAVOURITE WORKSHOPS TO DATE? Ami: We love developing workshops in collaboration with others – watching the creative juices flow while we build something together. Recently we partnered with Verge Permaculture, for example, to offer a number of introductory courses that culminated in a two-week Permaculture Design Certificate course teaching participants how to understand and use nature’s patterns and rules as a basis for the design of a food production system.

47


48

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE OTHER WORKSHOPS YOU’VE RUN?

WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS GOING FORWARD?

Ami: O jeez – there have been all sorts. We’ve

Ami: Our business helps create more resilient

done the Art of Pork Butchery; Designing

communities through sustainable skill-

Tiny Homes, Cozy Cabins, and Small Spaces;

building. We connect folks around hands-

Natural Soap Making; Cider Making – from

on, in-person learning experiences that

Apple to Alcohol; Sourdough Bread Baking;

encourage them to slow down and be more

Foraging for Wild Edibles; Custom Sausage

mindful about food and the environment. In

Making and more.

the future, we plan to expand our offerings

Ella: You can find a list of upcoming workshops at mingaskillbuilding.ca

to include immersive retreats, full-day experiences, re-skilling fairs, and seminars and coaching to help hobbyists launch potential new income streams. Ella: Minga’s goal is nothing less than to change the world – one workshop at a time.

.

Ami: And that, my friends, is why Ella’s in charge of marketing


@MINGASKILLBUILDING

49

MINGA

mingaskillbuilding.ca


50


PROPOSED TAX CHANGES 2017: WHERE DO WE STAND?

The proposal to close the loophole on 'income sprinkling' is designed to level the playing field for all taxpayers. The Ministry of Finance is planning a reasonableness test to limit the dividends paid to a family shareholder where there is no capital contributed or work performed. Finance is also proposing changes to the 'kiddie tax' rules affecting dividends paid to minor children, which are currently being taxed at the highest rate. The new rules will apply to second generation income until age 24. The current structure of business ownership by family members provides an approximately $835,000 lifetime exemption of capital gains to each shareholder on a sale where certain qualifications are met. Changes to the capital gains exemption with respect to Qualified Small Business Shares and Qualified Farming and Fishing Property have been abandoned.

With regards to another proposal, to limit passive investments in a business, the government adjusted their initial stance. They recognized that many business owners use their businesses to save for retirement and employ investment strategies in their corporations to save for capital expansions, medical costs, low business cycles and parental leave. To accommodate these strategies, proposed relief measures would see the first $50,000 of passive investment income in private companies not subject to a new tax, where conditions are met. Given the complexity and broad impact of these proposed changes, we await the details of this legislation in the 2018 fiscal budget. All material has been prepared by Will Mactaggart, a Director, Wealth Management and Portfolio Manager at Richardson GMP Limited. The opinions expressed in this report are the opinions of the author and readers should not assume they reflect the opinions or recommendations of Richardson GMP Limited or its affiliates. Richardson GMP Limited, Member Canadian Investor Protection Fund. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited.

themactaggartteam.com

This year 'income sprinkling,' passive investments, and taxing of small private businesses have captured attention as we all try to understand the impact of the latest proposed government tax reforms.

EXPERT OPINION | INVESTMENT

WILL MACTAGGART

51 51

harmonylunch.ca

NICK & NAT

we are quality we are fresh we are local we are committed


UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY

CIRCLE FOUR FARMS

52 52

BY CHRIS TIESSEN

ACTON

If you ever get the chance to visit Ron

Farms is a partner of Taste Real – a County-

Chauvin’s Circle Four Farms, go. The farm's

wide program that helps promote local food

115 acres includes some of the most serene

and creates lasting and valuable connections

countryside you’re ever likely to tour. But

among food businesses, consumers and

that’s not all. Texas Long Horn cattle graze

farmers in the County of Wellington.

alongside Gypsy Vanner horses on fertile pasture. Free range Artisan Gold turkeys strut near pens of Tammworth pigs. And still ponds and meandering streams cut across grassy fields and picturesque forest groves. Circle Four's primary business is its horses and horsemanship centre – including a 31-stall facility, an 80 x 120-foot indoor riding arena, a large outdoor sand ring, a round pen, and acres of trails. The farm’s ancillary enterprise is its grass-fed Texas Long Horn cattle, which Ron started raising (mostly for friends and family) eight years back. Like so many of the outstanding farms and exceptional local food businesses that dot Guelph and Wellington County, Circle Four

The zeal, creativity, and business acumen of farmers like Ron Chauvin bring flavour

.

to our region. And to your plate. Visit circlefourfarms.com and tastereal.ca to learn more


TOP TEN TOUR AND T A S T E A D VE N T U R E S IN W EL L I N G T O N C O UNT Y

REC IPE : BACON-WRAPPED TEXAS LONGHORN TENDERLOIN WITH HORSERADISH CRUST (W/ FOUR CIRCLE FARMS TEXAS LONGHORN)

1. 2.

by Chef Lloyd Jordan (Chomping At The Bit, Rockwood)

I N GR ED I EN T S :

(serves 4)

4x 5-6oz Texas Longhorn tenderloins 4 slices of bacon 4 bamboo skewers (soaked in water) 2c red wine 2tbsp cold diced butter ½c leftover mashed potatoes ½c prepared horseradish squeezed of its liquid (save the liquid) 2tbsp fine chopped rosemary 1tbsp oil kosher salt & fresh cracked pepper for seasoning

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

DIRECTIONS: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Wrap bacon around round surface of tenderloin, and secure it with water-soaked skewer. Set aside until ready to cook. Place potatoes, drained horseradish & rosemary into bowl and mix until combined (if too dry & crumbly, add reserved horseradish liquid until it forms a soft moldable texture). Place oven-safe pan on stovetop, preheat on medium high, and add oil. Season beef with salt & pepper and sear on first side for 1-1.5 minutes. Turn over and top with the potato horseradish mixture (evenly divided among steaks). Place the pan in preheated oven and cook 5-8 minutes longer or until medium rare (135-138 degrees). This type of beef is best served medium rare to keep it tender and moist. Remove pan from oven. Place steaks on cutting board to rest, and proceed to make the sauce. Place pan on the stovetop, adding red wine to release yummy bits from cooking. Heat to medium high and continue cooking until wine mixture is reduced to a half cup. At this point, remove pan from heat and whisk in the cold, diced butter until butter is incorporated and a fine sheen has developed. Keep warm. When ready to serve, ladle the sauce onto four warmed plates. Add your choice of vegetables. Place crusted steak on top of the sauce and serve with your favourite wine.

Learn more about finding local food, experiences and events in Wellington County/ Guelph at tastereal.ca

8. 9. 10.

Tour our local taps at Royal City Brewing Co, Wellington Brewery or Elora Brewing Co Keep your paws warm with a pair of alpaca socks and mitts from Harmony Meadows Alpaca, Pootcorners Alpaca or Alpaca Time Take to the ice for skating, shinny, or ice fishing at a GRCA family day event Glide through a winter wonderland on the crosscountry ski trails at Ignatius Jesuit Centre Add some spice to your winter menu by taking a class at Krisha Indian Cooking School Pack a thermos or winter picnic and head towards the Wellington County walking trails for a hike or snowshoe adventure Take a break from the cold and warm up at a cozy downtown coffee shop like A la Mode or With the Grain Plan for the spring by signing up for a local CSA farm share – visit tastereal.ca to learn more

53

Warm up with a hot bowl of soup from Fountain Head Café or Heaven on Seven Share a locally-sourced Sunday dinner with friends and family – consult the Local Food Map for yearround options

U PC O MI N G T A ST E RE A L EVENTS TASTE REAL EXP ERI ENCES FEBRUARY 2ND THROUGH 18TH EAT UP YOUR FEBRUARY! Discover some of the best winter eats and local food options in February with Taste Real Experiences. Visit tastereal.ca to learn more. Dining – Shopping – Events – Classes – Tours – Deals


54

KEEPING THE PAST FROM SLIPPING AWAY:

S ETH’S A CTS O F PR E S E R V A TI O N BY CHRIS TIESSEN I can still recall the first time I came upon

something peculiar on the lawn of an old two-

Seth’s house. You know – Seth. The famous

storey red brick abutting the tracks. A massive

and enigmatic Guelph-based cartoonist and

boulder. Just sitting there. As if it had dropped

graphic novelist and, increasingly, visual

from the sky. And a commemorative plaque

artist of all sorts. (If you’re not familiar with

mounted to it. With Lucy in tow, I drew near

his extensive – and greatly valued – works,

enough to read the plaque’s inscription which

a good place to start is in the stacks at The

states, in part:

Bookshelf in Guelph. Or on the building’s exterior wall, which features a massive mural by this gifted storyteller and graphic artist.)

Upon this spot, the morning after the terrible Allan Bridge Train Disaster of 1912, this 10000 pound stone was mysteriously discovered.

It was approaching dusk one evening a

According to local legend, it had not been there

handful of years back when I was out walking

the day before.

my old dog, Lucy, through ‘The Ward’ – our Guelph neighbourhood. Just when Lucy and I were about to head underneath the old railway bridge that separates ‘The Ward’ from the more affluent ‘St. George’s Park’, I noticed

Though no remains were ever officially recovered, locals swore that this same spot was also where the lifeless body of the train’s brakeman had been seen in the fiery aftermath of the crash.


55


In the decades following the tragedy, residents of

Times Magazine – all constructed out of Seth’s

The Ward have reported strange mists hovering

desire to evoke the feeling of remembering.

over the rock…

Of watching the past slip away. And of, as

‘Incredible,’ I murmured as Lucy and I stood there at dusk. I reread the inscription and

Fast forward to a late morning this December.

marveled at the story behind it. Not at the

I’m perched on a couch in Seth’s sitting room.

fiery crash, mind you. Nor the brakeman’s

Across from me, Seth is settled into an arm

plight. That’s all pure (and great) fiction, of

chair. Just like in almost every photo I’ve seen

course. But instead at why someone would

of him, he is impeccably dressed in a three-

have played with history in such a way –

piece suit from a bygone era. The room is

effectively inscribing a fictitious historical

replete with pastness. Vintage furniture and

narrative of our city’s past onto its very

antique toys crowd bookcases and shelving

landscape. I looked up at the house. It was

units. Rotary phones are hung on walls and

darker now, and the front windows of its

perched on heavy wooden desks. A row of

covered porch were shining bright with

period Biltmore hats – the stuff of legend in

what seemed to be backlit illustrations or

Guelph – hangs above the front door. ‘When

decorative vignettes – like stained glass

I moved to Guelph a decade ago,’ he tells me,

windows in reverse. I immediately recognized

‘I began collecting things from this town –

the style as Seth – a sort of hybrid mix of old-

that help me feel at home.’ Seth points out a

fashioned comics with modernist art deco.

framed hagiographical canvas he purchased

On the front door, another inscription: ‘Inkwell’s End.’ I recognized the name of Seth’s

56

Seth has noted, ‘world building.’

home from a short Maclean’s documentary I’d watched about the house and its inscrutable owner. And I knew, then, that I wanted inside the place. I wanted to visit the man who called it home, and who has made – and continues to make – his living building cities and a whole world on, and out of, print. The graphic novel series, ‘Palookaville’, for instance; and the

from the Basilica of Our Lady, as well as an antique print of Guelph depicting the Allan’s Mill site. Which became the WC Wood factory. Which is now Fusion’s Metalworks development. Which sits directly across the street from Seth’s front door. ‘It’s as though the artist was sitting here in this house when he produced it,’ Seth observes, ‘creating his own version of Guelph from this very room.’ Much like Seth – so many decades later.

mock-autobiographical, ‘It’s a Good Life, if

When I ask him what drives his work, Seth

You Don't Weaken’; and ‘Dominion’ – a paper

eloquently remarks: ‘History disappoints.

model city created out of Seth’s imagination;

By creating my own, I can build my own

and ‘Clyde Fans’; and New Yorker Magazine

– without constraints. And,’ he adds,

covers; and the Funny Pages in The New York

‘without sadness too.’ After a while, we


57


58 head downstairs to Seth’s studio where he

and graphic novels. Much like the boulder

graciously shows me the sketchbooks he

on Seth’s front yard. He tells me that he

filled while creating ‘Dominion’ – a complete

once had someone knock on the door to

city Seth conceived, constructed and finally

learn more about the tragic circumstances

assembled out of intricate paper models now

inscribed on the plaque. ‘I couldn’t bring

on display at the Art Gallery of Ontario. I am

myself to tell her I’d imagined the whole

transfixed by page after page of cartoons

story,’ he notes. ‘So I didn’t. We were both

he shows me – and notes, listing imaginary

happier this way.’

people, for example. And streets. And parks. And cemeteries. Magnificently detailed. Spectacular. Formidable. ‘I create these things so that, if I ever need to create a lawyer character, for instance, she will already exist.’ In Seth’s mind. And in this palpable chronicle of his imaginings.

Seth was quoted, about a decade ago, as remarking: ‘I began to believe comics were art when I began to see they could really talk about the human condition.’ Whenever I walk by that boulder, now, it seems to me that Seth’s house, full of imaginary conceptions of past urban microcosms and the people

It’s amazing, really. Seth’s process. Countless

who populated them, represents a sort of

hours spent in the studio – alone – creating

reliquary, a mysterious still centre in our

cities and worlds that exist as a past that

brave metropolis, an evocative commentary

seems to want to resist slipping away.

on what it takes to build a city. And share it

Imagined and executed for himself. Yet

with the world

shared with so many through his comics

.

SETH

drawnandquarterly.com/author/seth


59


60


3_crow

live edge. custom.

threecrow.ca 61


DTK’S J&P GROCER:

‘T H E A NTI-GR O C E R Y - S TO R E GR O C E R ’ BY CHRIS TIESSEN

62 KE

ST

. W

QU

EE

N

ST

.

DU

KI

NG

ST

. W

DOWNTOWN KITCHENER

J&P is much more than a neighbourhood

have one of these, I think to myself, relaxing

grocer. It’s part of a movement that began

into my chair. ‘Pretty awesome, eh?’ It seems

in downtown Kitchener over a decade

that Sarah reads my mind. She continues: ‘We

ago, just after I’d uprooted from the city

created J&P for moments like these – and for

to Guelph. A movement that has seen

folks like us.’ She nods towards her husband

Kitchener's downtown core transform from

and business partner, Johnny, who’s seated

a place we tended to ignore as kids to a

with us. ‘For folks who chose to live and work

global destination for talent. And innovation.

downtown but – until now – didn’t have a

And entrepreneurship. A place in which

neighbourhood grocer where they could do a

visionary thinking is not only encouraged

full grocery shop.’ I peer over the mezzanine

but supported by like-minded folks who

at shoppers below. Young professionals

are collaboratively re-animating the core –

and mothers with strollers treading up and

seemingly one old factory at a time. A place

down the aisles. Seemingly biding their time.

John Kent and Sarah Pepper – the ‘J’ and ‘P’

Enjoying the process.

of ‘J&P’ – call home. At their nest on Victoria Park. And at their business, too – a 5,200 square-foot space that used to house the old Goudies department store. J&P Grocery.

‘When we first started talking about opening what would become J&P,’ Johnny adds, ‘we were driven by very particular influences and inspirations. West coast independent

‘We’re like the anti-grocery-store grocer,’

grocers, for instance, that all seem to have

remarks co-owner Sarah Pepper as we sip

cool mezzanines and comfortable cafés. And

Americanos together at the coolest little café

European grocery stores, where folks tend

perched high up on a century-old mezzanine.

to visit – by foot or by bike – more than once

Inside the grocer. Every grocery store should

a week to pick up the essentials. Places and


‘THIS IS WHAT A CITY IS, BITS AND PIECES THAT SUPPLEMENT EACH OTHER AND SUPPORT EACH OTHER.’

- JANE JACOBS 63

spaces we’ve loved visiting on our travels

with unique, local products. Products that

– and that we think fit well into the vibe

Sarah and Johnny are so very proud to

of our emergent downtown scene.’ A vibe

discover and curate. ‘We love showcasing –

that’s been driven primarily by Kitchener’s

and moving – local makers’ creations. Like

ever-expanding tech sector: a sector whose

West of Seoul Kimchi. And Essen Soups. And

workplace aesthetic is informed in equal parts

other amazing products that excite us.’

by an ode to the city’s industrial past, and by playfulness, and child-like wonderment too.

And then there’s the grocer’s commercial kitchen – an integral ingredient of J&P’s recipe

An aesthetic that’s evident from top to

for success. ‘Chef Brendan Gingrich and his

bottom at J&P. Nestled at the end of Goudies

team are awesome,’ rhapsodizes Sarah about

Lane in downtown Kitchener with one

the grocer’s in-house kitchen crew. ‘What he’s

entrance facing onto the lane and the other

been able to do for our catering program

onto the back of a nondescript parking lot,

is invaluable to the sustainability of the

the place seems less grocer and more secret

business. From barbeque to classic French

clubhouse. Happen inside and a hip vibe

cuisine, J&P is becoming a fixture on the local

pervades the space. The splendid hardwood

catering scene.’ A scene whose clients include

floors. The soaring interior expanse that’s

Kitchener’s largest tech and innovation firms.

punctuated by the upper level mezzanine

Like Vidyard, for instance – the grocer’s

outfitted with the grocer’s café – the co-

neighbour next door.

branded Smile Tiger at J&P. (Yep. That Smile Tiger.) The minimalist, airy shelving stocked

‘They’ve been phenomenal to us,’ Johnny says of the uber-successful tech firm. ‘Even


64

before we opened, the company committed

J&P Grocery thrive. A community determined

their support for us – laying out what we

to see this downtown movement through to

could expect from them, and from their

the end. Driven by talent. And innovation.

employees. It’s become a common theme –

And entrepreneurship. And, now, by a killer

ongoing support from downtown businesses

downtown grocer, too

and business leaders who work to ensure

.

each others’ success.’ Sarah chimes in: ‘It’s actually been incredible how much help and continued encouragement we’ve received

This article was produced in

from folks who really don’t owe us anything.

partnership with the Downtown

Our landlord, Frank Voisin, for instance, has

Kitchener BIA, and is reproduced

been fantastic – always asking us how we’re doing and what we need. And Craig Beattie

in Issue #3 of OWN IT – the BIA’s

from Perimeter Development,’ she adds,

annual publication that sheds a

‘continues to check in on us – even though we

light on the dreamers, creators

didn’t end up leasing one of his buildings.’

and makers who call Kitchener

Community support. It’s a common theme

home. Locate your copy of

that runs through the J&P narrative. Support

OWN IT next time you’re doing

for the downtown community by Sarah and Johnny who saw the real need for a neighbourhood grocer. And support for Sarah and Johnny by the same downtown community that has a strong desire to see

something awesome in DTK.


65

J & P GROCERY 8 QUEEN ST N, KITCHENER

jandpgrocery.com


66

info@perimeterdevelopment.com 519.745.3800


67


marblesuptown.com

NICK & NAT

we are quality we are fresh we are local we are committed

Stories of those who searched for new beginnings in Guelph, and who shaped and enriched our community Curated by Lisa Hunter

C NADIAN, EH!

68

A History of the Nation’s Signs and Symbols

Organized and circulated by Museum London

UNTIL FEBRUARY 25, 2018

52 Norfolk St · 519-836-1221 · guelphmuseums.ca


69 Frank Voisin, President of Voisin Capital, inside the heritage building at The Metalworks site adjacent to downtown Guelph

WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD: AD A P T I VE R E U SE P R O JE CT S A R E BR EA T HI NG NEW LI F E I N T O O L D BU I L D I N G S Adaptive reuse. It’s all about finding new ways

Indeed, as our communities continue to

for old buildings – repurposing, restoring,

grow, a handful of our most innovative

conserving, converting, reclaiming. It’s about

architects, developers, and builders are

giving architecture a second chance. It’s

enacting adaptive reuse projects across

about re-animating places, and spaces, and

the region. These next few pages serve as

entire neighbourhoods by transforming tired

a sort of introduction to a handful of these

properties into leading-edge destinations. For

developments. And also as a re-introduction

living. Or commerce. Or tech. Or sometimes

to some of the incredible establishments –

all at once.

our region’s hidden treasures – these new

And it’s happening here.

adaptive reuse projects will call neighbours. Grocers. Breweries. Comedy clubs. Coffee shops. And more. Welcome to the neighbourhood.


WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

C A T A L Y ST 1 3 7

137 GLASGOW ST, KITCHENER In the not-too-distant future, Catalyst137 will come

Chef Kate Sauer specializes in classic French baking

online as the world’s largest Internet of Things (IoT)

– including delectable cakes, pastries, viennoiserie,

manufacturing space and will further invigorate

breads, macarons, handmade candies – and savoury

Kitchener’s emergent Midtown neighbourhood. This

treats too.

475,000 sq ft campus will revive a large parcel of land that, about a century ago, was developed for the Dominion Tire Company (later Uniroyal) to make Kitchener the rubber capital of Canada. And, because

70

this maker space abuts the picturesque Iron Horse Trail – a 5.5-kilometre-long walking/biking (formerly railway) corridor that connects Victoria Park with Uptown Waterloo – this spectacular new development will also encourage the folks who will call Catalyst home to discover some of the region’s most distinctive culinary sites located along that distinctly pastoral thoroughfare. Like (1) City Café Bakery (175 West Ave, Kitchener), a former corner garage-turned-bakery whose Montrealstyle bagels, ‘Italian peasant-style’ sourdough loaves and wood oven pizzas will blow your mind. Stopping for breakfast? Try a sesame bagel straight from the wood oven, smothered with butter or cream cheese and chased with a fair trade coffee. Lunch? You can’t go wrong with the place’s signature tuna melt or a slice of thin crust pizza: how about chicken, roasted red pepper and pesto? Be sure to bring cash because the bakery's self-serve ‘honour system’ fare terminal –

Looking for something a bit closer to Catalyst? Perhaps for a client meeting or team lunch? Then be sure to explore the Belmont Village Food Avenue – a blockslong array of kitchens featuring everything from fine dining and bistros to sandwich shops and a heavenly beer bar (read about (3) Arabella Park Beer Bar in our recent ‘Food Issue’). Belmont Village even offers a place you can learn some serious culinary craft. Ever thought of cooking with colleagues in a team-building exercise? Then (4) The Culinary Studio (740 Belmont Ave W, Kitchener) is definitely worth checking out – for lessons or for lunch. And then, of course, there’s (5) Vincenzo’s. This Italian grocer with an old market feel has been a foodie staple since it first opened in the living room of a small redbrick on Bridgeport fifty years ago (before its tenure in Belmont Village). Now located along the Iron Horse Trail in Uptown Waterloo (150 Caroline St S, Waterloo), Vincenzo’s features a phenomenal array of cheeses, cold-cuts and pastas, an expansive hot counter, and sponsored pop-up lunches. Add fresh produce, meat and fish; local and imported

rescued from a retired trolley – is the only way to pay!

confections from chocolate to jam; coffees and teas,

If you’re feeling the need for something sweeter, or

neighbourhood grocery and a must-visit tourist site.

and you’ll recognize why Vincenzo’s thrives both as the

want to wow the pants off your friends at your next dinner party, check out (2) Sabletine, located just off the Trail in Uptown Waterloo (203 King St S, Waterloo).

Bon appetit.


(1)

(2)

(3)

71 (4)

(5)


WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

T H E G A SL I G HT D I ST R I CT GRAND AVENUE, CAMBRIDGE

72

Over the coming years, downtown Galt will be

And while you've got beautiful things on your mind,

fundamentally transformed as HIP Developments

a trip to Galt is not complete without a stop at

completes its masterful Gaslight District project – a

(4) Idea Exchange – an amalgam of city-run libraries

thoughtfully textured combination of commercial

and art galleries. With five locations across the City

and residential spaces, including the elegant Gaslight

of Cambridge, the Idea Exchange is an extraordinary

Condos, at the historic Southworks foundry site. And

environment of curiosity and discovery. ‘The Whole

while this ambitious project – a compelling synthesis

Shebang: A Research Project’ at Idea Exchange’s

of historic landmarks and new builds – promises

Queen’s Square location (1 North Square) features

a plethora of brand new entertainment, dining,

the entire collections of the Cambridge Art Galleries

and retail opportunities, there is also much to be

gathered in one space – an exhibition meant to

discovered that’s already animating the Galt core.

provoke questions like ‘what does it mean to collect?’

A great first stop for any day in Galt has got to be (1) Monigram Coffee Roasters (16 Ainslie St), a café comfortably nestled in a gorgeous restored heritage

The over two hundred works on display include Angelika Werth’s 2003 ‘Ode to Isobel Stanley and Hayley Wickenheiser’ (pictured).

building. Owned and operated by husband-wife team

(5) Blackwing Coffee & Craft Beer Bar, although

Monica and Graham (hence the name), this happy

it doesn’t open until Spring 2018, will surely be the

place is a welcome retreat all through the day. Come

perfect destination for post-gallery conversation.

for house-roasted coffee and a pastry, alone or with a

Brought to Cambridge by the same masterminds who

friend. This is a worthy place for you to spend some

brought Death Valley’s Little Brother to Waterloo and

precious time.

Smile Tiger Coffee to Kitchener, Black Wing – directly

Feeling like something more than a coffee? Love the ambiance of an old English pub? Then why not amble down to (2) Cafe 13 Main Street Grill (13 Main St). With a number of craft beers on tap and a cozy

across the Grand River from the Cambridge Mill (you can walk across one of Galt’s fabulous bridges to get there) – is poised to assume its place in the transfigured Galt landscape.

tavern atmosphere, it’s sure to take the nip out of this

And, of course, (6) the Cambridge Mill (100 Water St

winter’s cold.

N). This beautifully-restored five-storey nineteenth-

Maybe you’re in the mood for something local and handmade – but not necessarily edible. Cambridge’s regional consignment boutique (3) iris (43 Main St) sells distinctive artisanal goods from paper products and pottery to soaps and lotions, wall art and furniture to jewelry.

century mill with its spacious dining rooms and allseason patios perched above the mighty Grand River is the perfect venue for a dinner with family, friends, or colleagues. Or a magnificent Sunday Brunch. Or a wedding or some other momentous event. Like the transformative new development of the fabulous Gaslight District, the Cambridge Mill honours a congenial blend of restoration and innovation.


Photo by Ryan Christodoulou

(1)

(4)

(2)

(3)

(5)

(6)


WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

THE METALWORKS

53 ARTHUR STREET SOUTH, GUELPH When Guelph homebuilder Fusion Homes announced

Box has sold out every show they’ve ever presented –

plans to develop one of the city’s oldest downtown

so grab your tickets before you get left out in the cold.

industrial sites into an expansive condominium

Feeling courageous? Then throw your hat in the ring

community, people noticed. And it’s no wonder.

by performing at one of The Making-Box’s infamous

Replete with five residential towers, riverfront towns,

‘first-timers’ shows. Just think: Guelph’s still a small

up to 30,000 square feet of shopping, dining, and

enough town that, if you bomb, at least the word won’t

even a craft distillery, The Metalworks has almost

spread too far.

single-handedly signaled a turn for the Royal City from

74

sleepy university town to aspiring metropolis. Perched alongside the Speed River, sandwiched between the downtown core and Guelph’s storied ‘The Ward’ neighbourhood, The Metalworks serves as a sort of gateway for its residents to many of the city’s best craft breweries, live entertainment, and independent downtown businesses. Couple these amenities with bus and GO stations that are but a five minute walk away, and it quickly becomes apparent that The Metalworks has the world – or, at least, the region – at

Want to experience Guelph in a single block? Then take a walk down Quebec Street. Cafés. Restaurants. One of Canada’s greatest independent bookstores (and cinema). Tattoos. A fantastic hair salon. And phenomenal

clothing

spots

featuring

Canadian

designers and sustainable brands. All on a single block. It’s like Guelph. Distilled. After you’ve perused the street’s handful of unique shops, be sure to pop into (4) Miijidaa Café + Bistro (37 Quebec St) for a taste of Chef Shea Robinson’s interpretation of

its fingertips.

Canadian cuisine – a fusion of First Nations, French,

For those folks craving the craft brewery experience,

right, you could even enjoy live music while you nosh.

there are two options only a short jaunt away: downtown’s (1) Brothers Brewing Co (15 Wyndham St N) and (2) Royal City Brewing Co (199 Victoria Rd S) in ‘The Ward.’ While at Royal City, be sure to check out the beer labels – created by TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis, and depicting Guelph icons including

English, Viking and Portuguese foods. If you time it just

More in the mood for coffee and something sweet? Then (5) The Bakery by Appetizingly Yours (54 Elizabeth St) is your spot. Just up the block from The Metalworks, this serene space specializes in Chef Lana’s French pastries, Mad Dog Donuts, and a calm

Exhibition Park, Gordon Hill and the 100 Steps.

atmosphere perfect for dates, studying, or alone time.

In the mood for live entertainment? Look no further

Catch you in the neighbourhood.

than the Sleeman Centre (50 Woolwich St), home of the OHL’s Guelph Storm, or (3) The Making-Box (43 Cork St E), Guelph’s downtown hub for live comedy. We’ve heard from trusted sources that The Making-


(1)

(2)

(3)

(5)

(4)


MEET YOUR MAKER

76

STEPHANIE SCOTT stephaniescott.design Y OU R I NS PI RATI O N ?

History,

no stalgia & te c hno l o g y – I l i k e c o mb in i n g th e p a s t wi t h t he fu tu r e DREAM C L I ENT ? A ny o ne – a s l o ng a s w e h av e a g o o d r a p p o r t we c a n

I T ’S N O T OF T EN T H A T S O MEO N E’S T A L ENTS A R E S O U G H T A F T ER B Y A N U MB ER O F T H E R EG I O N ’S M OS T N OT EW OR T H Y T EC H N OL O G Y C O MP A N I ES . ES P EC I A L L Y W H EN T H A T S O MEO N E I S A V I S U A L A RTI ST. A N D Y ET T H I S P R EC I S EL Y D ES C R I B ES WHAT’S C ON T I N U I N G T O H A P P EN T O KI T C H EN ER-

c r eate so meth i ng g r e a t t o g e t he r

W A T ER L O O R ES I D EN T S T EP H A N I E S C O TT, AN

F AV OU RI T E C OL O U R S T O WO R K

I L L U S T R A T OR & G R A P H I C D ES I G N ER WHO SE

WI T H ? Cu r r e n t l y I ’ m l o v i ng

R EMA R KA B L E T A L EN T S A S A MU R A L A RTI ST

fu ch si a, mi n t & ne o n r e d B E S T L OC AL S PO T TO G E T CR E A T I V E ?

H A V E L A N D ED H ER ( A N D H ER W O R K) I N THE

T h e lib r ar y – e s p e c i a l l y KP L

H O T T ES T S P OT S . T H E L O B B Y A T V I D Y ARD.

C e n tr al

T H E F O Y ER A T C A T A L Y S T 1 3 7 . T H E S H O PI F Y O F F I C ES . T R I B E H R . S T EP H H A S L I T ER A L L Y B EEN P A I N T I N G T H I S T O W N ( A N D I T S TECH C OMP A N I ES ) – I N A W H OL E B U N C H OF C OL O U R S . W A N T H ER T A L EN T S ? G ET I N L I NE.


When it’s time to turn the page on the next chapter of your life...


OUR CHILDREN’S GUELPH

78

It is easy to think in historic terms when the subject of city builders comes up. After all, many of our street names pay homage to yesterday’s industrialists, developers and home builders. However, the city that Guelph will become is very much being decided today. Large areas of undeveloped land, most notably the provincially-owned reformatory site on York road and the lands to the south of Clair Road, are currently in the early stages of civic planning. The location of tomorrow's schools, houses, commercial services, parks, places of employment, and community centres are but some of the issues to be decided.

cbn.on.ca

EXPERT OPINION | REAL ESTATE

JEFF NEUMANN is not the intention of this article to suggest the planning process be hurried along. As a lifelong resident of Guelph earning my living in an industry dependent upon a stable, well thought out, desirable community, I have a vested interest in this process yielding positive results.

Rather, it is intended to be a reminder (for those in the market for a home) or a reassurance (for those already in the market), that the end results will have an inflationary effect on real estate prices. Economics 101 introduced us to the theory of supply and demand. When supply is limited, the pressure on price is up. By the very nature of the civic planning exercise currently underway, supply will be limited both For those of us inclined to pay attention to in terms of time and inventory of land deemed such things, the process is fairly accessible. There have been numerous public consultation un-developable for socio or environmental reasons. This is not a problem with a solution. meetings that allow you, as a tax paying More demand for homes than supply of land resident of the city of Guelph, an opportunity will allow is only a bad thing until you consider to have your say and express your vision for the alternative. Just ask Detroit. your children’s Guelph. There are bound to be more. Very little has been decided, yet one Thanks for reading, thing is clear: this won’t be a quick process. It Jeff Neumann


...we’ll be ready royalcity.com


80


81


B LA ZIN G WA TE R L O O R E GI O N’ S HYDROC UT TR AI LS 82

BY CHRIS TIESSEN As I pull into the small gravel parking lot that

good, parenthood and ‘research’ for work

marks the trailhead of Waterloo Region’s

(especially TOQUE’s food issue, released a

famed Hydrocut, I note that Brent Ellis and

few months back) have transformed me into

Joanne Beattie have already arrived. Local

something less than the lean, mean cycling

cycling legend Andy Cox has yet to appear.

machine I like to think I once was.

Brent’s in the midst of unloading his bike from

The sound of a third vehicle pulling in has me

his van. As I pull my own van into the spot

forget about the pain I’m about to endure. It’s

beside him, I give his rig a once-over. Carbon

Andy and his dog, Duke. Andy Cox. Of King

frame, Fox forks, rear suspension, dropper

Street Cycles and, before that, Vancouver’s

post. Sexy kit. Jo’s already on her bike – a

North Shore. Andy’s Wednesday night rides

gorgeous carbon hardtail with race pedigree

are legendary, as are all the other events he

– ready to roll. I see only the two vans in the

and his shop put together. The one thing

parking lot, so ask Jo where she’s parked. ‘I

they have in common? ‘They usually end at

biked here,’ she replies. ‘From Uptown.’ O

Ethel’s,’ he notes with a laugh. Decked out in

jeez, I think to myself, still recovering from the

plaid Race Face gear and riding a slick Rocky

burger, fries, and pint I’ve enjoyed at Harmony

Mountain full susser, Andy certainly looks –

Lunch with Nick Benninger less than an hour

and rides – like a dude who can shred.

before. I’m in for a rough afternoon.

And so here we are. Three serious mountain

I grab my bike from the back of my van and

bikers and me. On a Monday afternoon in

pray that Brent and Jo don’t think my prized

November. About to navigate the Hydrocut

Chromag hardtail reflects my abilities on the

– a system of twenty-eight unique mountain

trails. For while I used to be able to rip pretty

bike trails that span thirty kilometres.


83


84

Considered by many to be among the

he could possibly know these figures, he

best in Ontario. And right here in our own

answers succinctly: ‘Electronic trail counters.’

backyard. The reason these three have met

Very cool. And certainly a far cry from the

me here? To show me the work they’ve put

primitive trail system that, as high school

into helping to build this trail system. Bit

students in the mid ‘90s, my brother and I

by bit. With picks and shovels and heavier

would ride with abandon. Trails that, back

machinery, too. And sweat equity. Lots of it.

then, were accessible to us only if we cut

As members of the Waterloo Cycling Club

across farmers’ fields to a well-hidden (and

(WCC) Trails Committee, Brent, Jo and Andy

mostly overgrown) trailhead marked merely

– and a handful of others – are the folks

by the hydro lines above.

who work tirelessly to build and maintain the Hydrocut’s extraordinary trail system. As Brent notes: ‘We usually organize four trail maintenance days each year – two in the Spring and two in the Fall. We’ve had as many as sixty volunteers out with us at one time.’ Impressive numbers, no doubt. With more on the way.

‘This place has definitely changed a lot since those early days,’ Andy says as our group pauses to study an engineered dirt berm (with irrigation system) the committee recently built. ‘The whole area was all but shut down in 2001 when the Region noticed a bunch of unauthorized mountain bike stunts and trails on several private parcels of

While we cruise down the first bit of

land. Since then,’ he continues, ‘the WCC has

singletrack, I ask Brent about the Hydrocut’s

worked hard to build a solid partnership with

popularity. ‘We had over 38,000 visits to these

the Region that has allowed mountain bikers

trails last year,’ he tells me over the sound

back here.’ Brent adds: ‘In 2009, we finally

of buzzing freewheels, ‘and we expect over

managed to sign a stewardship agreement

40,000 this year.’ Staggering. When I ask how

with the Region. Essentially, it stipulates that


85


86

Andy Cox tears down 'Kamikaze' at the Hydrocut


87

‘NOTHING COMPARES TO THE SIMPLE PLEASURE OF RIDING A BIKE.’ - JOHN F KENNEDY


88 88

the WCC will build and maintain the Hydrocut

‘Mountain Goat Loop’; ‘Godzilla’ – and

in accordance with International Mountain

difficulty rating. (Detailed trail maps are

Biking Association (IMBA) guidelines.’

available for purchase at King Street Cycles

Hydrocut is code, here, for the whole system

in Waterloo.)

of trails like the one we’re on. Each with its own name – ‘Adam’s Run’; ‘Kamikaze’;

As we hop on our bikes and begin to


grind up a steep bit of singletrack, Jo notes:

sponsorship opportunities with regional

‘The Hydrocut is designed to be enjoyed by

businesses.’ A quick perusal of the Hydrocut’s

riders of all ages and skill levels – offering

website – thehydrocut.ca – reveals a healthy

something for everyone. Still,’ she adds, ‘there

list of businesses already on board. Waterloo

are a whole bunch of trails and features that

Honda. Taco Farm. Adventure Guide. Devinci

are designed for experienced riders.’ And, I

Cycles. Communitech. And more. I fantasize

think to myself, fit ones too. I shift into my

about how good a TOQUE logo would look on

lowest gear and drop further behind the

the site – and on the billboards close to the

group. I curse at the heavy Blundstones I

Hydrocut’s two trailheads. But not for long.

decided to wear and feel my massive winter

The sound of Jo dropping in to ‘Kamikaze’

jacket beginning to suffocate me. And, just

– a downhill with sweeping berms and a

when I think I’m going to fall away onto the

substantial jump – jars me back to reality.

side of the trail, we crest the hill. Completely spent – and with a taste of lunch in the back of my throat – I wheeze out a question (anything to stop the biking for a little bit): ‘So how do you support all the work you do here?’ Thankfully, Brent’s more than happy to chat. ‘We sell branded clothing and cycling

89

And we’re off again. Jo, Andy, and Brent in front – and me holding on for dear life. When we arrive at the end of the trail, I am elated – and done in. While I anticipate the rest of

.

the day and beyond, I console myself with the words of Khalil Gibran: ‘Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls’

apparel, as well as our own Hydrocut beer [by Kitchener’s TWB Brewing] and coffee [by local craft coffee roaster, Contrabean].’ He continues: ‘And we’re always happy to talk

THE HYDROCUT TRAIL MAP: THEHYDROCUT.CA/TRAILS-MAP

thehydrocut.ca


90


ARCHITECTURE SHOULD SPEAK OF ITS TIME AND PLACE, BUT YEARN FOR TIMELESSNESS. 91

-FRANK GEHRY


92

MARTINSIMMONS.C A


93


INVESTED IN COMMUNITY:

TO UR I NG R E GI O NA L L A ND MA R K L I S TI N G S W I TH C B R E C A PI TA L MA R K E TS

94


JAMES CRAIG SEN IOR SALES ASSOCIATE CBR E CAPITAL MARKETS PHOTOGRAPHED AT 100-108 WALTER STREET, KITCHENER (C URR E NTL Y O N THE M A R K E T)

( S E A T E D L E F T T O R IG HT ) :

JAMES CRAIG (SENIOR SALES ASSOCIATE, CBRE CAPITAL MARKETS), MARTIN COTE (ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT, CBRE CAPITAL MARKETS), JOE BENNINGER (VICE PRESIDENT, CBRE CAPITAL MARKETS)

brokered land deals with pretty much

PHOTOGRAPHED AT 1 VICTORIA STREET S, KITCHENER

every development group in Waterloo

( SO L D T O MO MEN T U M D EV EL O PMEN T S IN 2 012)

‘In the last 5 years or so, CBRE has

Region, Guelph, and Hamilton, totalling 7,000+ units of residential – mostly inner city infill and intensification projects: townhouse, highrise, midrise, condo and rental. 100-108 Walter Street, a brand new condo-quality rental building, is exactly the type of development Waterloo Region was looking to attract as part of the ir investment in the LRT. It’s located near two ION stops, and within short walking distance of Kitchener’s downtown and man y of the region’s tech companies.’ - JC

‘This site had been a single-storey strip plaza with multiple vacancies. The seller wanted an extravagant price – too high for a low-density development. So we called upon a few engineering/planning friends to fashion sketches showing that a tower with parking garage could be successfully executed on the site. Then we showed the sketches to Momentum, and the rest is history.’ - JB

95


96 MARTIN COTE ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT CBR E CAPITAL MARKETS

JOE BENNINGER VICE PRESIDENT CBRE CAPITAL MARKETS

PHOTOGRAPHED AT 51 BREITHAUPT STREET (‘THE BREITHAUPT BLOCK’), KITCHENER

PHOTOGRAPHED AT 132 QUEEN STREET S, KITCHENER

(SOLD B Y CB R E TO P E R I M E TE R

V A N G U A RD D EV EL O PMEN T S IN 2 0 1 6 )

( SO L D B Y C B RE T O W O O D H O U SE G RO U P +

DE VEL O P M E NTS I N 2 0 0 9 )

‘We serve as a resource for our clients ‘Every crane you see in the sky and every boarded-up building starts with a real estate deal that was probably contemplated years earlier. That ’s where we come in. We broker the development land deals, and the building repurposing deals. The potential for the 250,000 sq ft ‘Breithaupt Block’ was palpable at time of sale. Fortunately, it sold to Perimeter Developments – a group that had the vision and patience to execute a first-class redevelopment. Now it’s a landmark building, and home to Google Canada.’ - MC

to invest with confidence. Our function is to procure real estate opportunities for them to execute their vision and shape the community (along with their customers/tenants). 132 Queen Street was built in 1918 by Jacob and Mary Kaufman of Kaufman Rubber. By 1929 it had become Schlichter’s Automative – a successful business for 87 years. It’s currently undergoing significant renovations for offices & retail.’ - JB


97


F R O N T E L E VAT I O N

Artist’s concept

98 B AC K E L E VAT I O N

Artist’s concept

F E A T U R E D

H O M E

W h i t e C e d a r | 1 7 9 6 S Q . F T.


T H E

P E R F E C T

F O R E S T E D

S E T T I N G

Luxury detached homes in a forested area An exclusive enclave of just 18 prestigious single family homes in Guelph’s most desirable residential area with elegant bungalows and 2 storey homes on 50’ lots. The modern architecure of these homes are guaranteed to impress. The community’s many highlights include easy proximity to highways and schools, thriving green spaces and premium local amenities, enriching your lifestyle. STARTING FROM THE

$980’s Visit us today! SALES CENTRE 98 FARLEY DR. (BEHIND ZEHRS)

519.265.0826 All prices, figures, sizes, specifications and information are subject to change without notice. All illustrations are Artist’s concept only. E. & O.E.

ReidsHeritageHomes.com

READY Energy Savings Plus Increased Comfort And A Healthier Environment

• The potential for saving money on energy costs all year round and protecting families from future energy price increases • Providing healthier, more comfortable living spaces with better indoor air quality, stable temperatures, and healthier building materials • Lowering greenhouse gas emissions, conserving resources, reducing pollution, and minimize the household’s ecological footprint.

99


Cityview Village rendering provded by Habitat WDG

A COMMUNITY FOR ALL 100

BY RACHELLE WATERMAN & CHRIS TIESSEN

Imagine cooking up an inclusive, affordable

so does the need for affordable homes as

community. If there were a recipe, the

more and more people are priced out of the

ingredients and method would be simple:

market.

begin with community support and leadership, add a splash of partnerships, mix in donations from individuals, blend in some leveraging, then bake on high. In real life, the ingredients are the same, but miss a step and the results may vary.

‘One part of our mission is to mobilize all parts of the community to build affordable housing,’ Steve Howard, CEO of Habitat WDG, explains. ‘This is the part of Habitat that most people associate us with, but it’s another part of our mission that creates a lasting

It’s this recipe that Habitat for Humanity

impact on our community. We build homes

Wellington Dufferin Guelph uses to achieve

to provide a hand-up into home ownership,

their vision of a world where everyone has

creating a platform for equity accumulation,

a safe, decent, and affordable place to live.

which is what enables the cycle of poverty to

With 24 builds under their toolbelt, the local

be broken.’

non-profit is now working on 30 more homes in Guelph, in a development called Cityview Village. This new multi-unit development – the first of its kind for Habitat WDG – will provide homes to single- and dual-parent families, people with disabilities, and senior citizens. Normally the organization builds one home a year, but as house prices continue to climb,

Equity accumulation is not a term heard very often in the affordable housing debate, but it’s this piece of their mission that Habitat WDG is striving to make known: affordable homes are a foundation for both personal and financial growth.


The faces of Habitat WDG (clockwise from top left) Rachelle Waterman – Marketing & PR Adam Thompson – Board Member Rebecca McEnvoy – Planning Marc Petitpas – Board Member Amber Wood – Programs & Policy

So how does a charity provide this growth

Habitat reinvests all the funds they receive

to an entire community? By involving the

into affordable housing – more of it. A

community, of course.

dollar turns into four dollars; a home turns

They say it takes a village to raise a child, but

into four homes.

Habitat WDG has a different motto: It takes

Of course, the recipe for building an

a community to build a village. Community

inclusive and affordable community can

support is paramount to what Habitat does:

always use more ingredients. The most

community leadership is needed to bring the

important of these? You.

affordable housing crisis to the forefront, and then to support it through policy and action; partnerships with corporations

Visit habitatwdg.ca to learn how you can help.

and collaboration with non-profits provide funding, advocacy and additional expertise; donations from individuals fund ongoing costs; and leveraging and scale enable the organization to continue to build more.

HABITAT FOR HUMANITY, WELLINGTON DUFFERIN GUELPH

habitatwdg.ca

101


‘BO L D & PRE C I OU S ’ :

REVELING IN TRADITION

102

BY CHRIS TIESSEN ST. N

W G ST.

K IN G

YOUN

E B R ID G

PORT

RD. W

UPTOWN WATERLOO

‘Hey Nick,’ I mumble through a mouthful

‘Fries come with our burgers. But many of

of cheeseburger, ‘you wanna know what

the Harmony’s long-time regulars who got

nostalgia smells like?’ Nick Benninger,

to know the place before we took it over

Chef-Owner of the Harmony Lunch and Fat

last year had always ordered their burgers

Sparrow Group, looks up from his plate – a

without fries. So we grandfathered in a menu

quizzical expression on his face. ‘This place,’

item – the Old and Precious – for them.’ Nick

I note emphatically, motioning to the space

takes a swig of beer, and adds: ‘And for you, I

around us.

suppose.’

‘Nostalgia smells like this place.’

While I’m really not that old (although I’ve

It’s lunchtime. At the Harmony Lunch. On King Street in Uptown Waterloo. Where the Harmony’s been for the past hundred years or so. And I’m reveling in the tastes and sounds of the place. And especially in its gloriously recognizable smell. Fried onions. Heavenly. Intoxicating. Much like the Wellington Upside IPA I’m enjoying with my burger – a perfectly executed pork patty loaded with the works. Mine without fries. ‘Ah, the Old and Precious,’ remarks Nick of my order sans potatoes. He elaborates:

been having intimations of mortality as I approach my forties, and some might say I’m precious), I am certainly a long-time regular of this place. Or at least I was while growing up in Kitchener-Waterloo. Indeed, some of my most glorious childhood memories include Saturday lunches at ‘the Harmony’ (as we called it). Usually with my dad. Sometimes also with my older brother Matt and aunt Vi. We’d almost always sit at the counter overlooking the mass of fried onions and pork patties sizzling on the giant fry top that


103


104 gave Harmony its distinctive – delectable

like a Holy Grail of sorts for so many folks,’

– smell. We’d place our orders – two

I remark to Nick. He nods affirmatively: ‘We

cheeseburgers with the works, fries, coleslaw,

definitely didn’t want to mess around with the

and a chocolate shake for me and the same

burgers too much when we took over. In fact,’

for my pops – and then I’d sprint next door to

he adds, ‘there’s not too much we wanted

survey the bikes at McPhail’s until our burgers

to change. It’s almost impossible to improve

were served.

upon historical authenticity like this.’ Indeed.

We’d mostly sit in silence – our attention

I look around the joint. So much of it remains

drawn towards our food. Sometimes my dad

familiar and recalls my childhood. The display

would recall the days when, as a sixteen-year-

case near the front door featuring Harmony

old driver for Pepsi, he delivered soda to this

swag. The old school milkshake mixer behind

place. I remember dreaming about having a

the counter. The massive mirror hanging

similar job – being able to visit outfits like the

back there, too, that gives the illusion of

Harmony for work.

texture and depth. The wooden floors – worn

And now here I am – all these years later – on what has to be the exact same bar stool, with the exact same wobble. At work, too. And while the company may be different, the cheeseburgers are almost exactly as I remember them. ‘Harmony burgers must be

and patina’d by the thousands (hundreds of thousands?) of customers who have enjoyed this amazing diner over the decades. The phone booth. Nick draws me out of my reverie: ‘My fantastic team and I consider ourselves custodians of Harmony Lunch more than anything – caregivers lucky enough to be


H ARMO N Y LUNC H 5 BURGERS BY 5 VISITING CHEFS CHRIS

BARKSHIRE, Blackshop Restaurant:

‘The Big Sleaze’ – double Harmony patty, shredded lettuce, raw onion, pickle, tomato-bacon jam, cherry bomb mayo & sharp cheddar

DARNELL GREGG, Fistro Bistro: ‘Fiery Fistro Burger’ – single Harmony patty, smoked bacon, lettuce, onion ring, red onion slaw, roasted jalapeno ketchup & Ontario cheddar

TAYLOR

DEVALK,

Eat

&

Speakeasy:

‘The Seoul Mama’ – single Harmony patty, green onions, over easy egg, fried onion strings, gochujang mayo & kimchi relish

105

KAREN WILLOUGHBY, The Merchant Tavern: ‘The #handmadebyhand’ – pepper-crusted single Harmony patty, bacon, crispy onion rings, sautéed mushrooms & smoked Swiss cheese

JARET FLANNIGAN, The Wooly Pub: ‘The Heart Attack’ – double Harmony patty, corn dog bites, iceberg lettuce, pickles, chili salt, special sauce & pimento cheese


106

able to keep this local treasure going, both for

Greg of Fistro Bistro, Jaret Flannigan of The

the folks who grew up with it and for those

Wooly, Karen Willoughby of The Merchant

yet to discover it.’

Tavern, and others.

He pours us each another Upside, and

By this point in our conversation, my plate

continues: ‘We’re committed to adding only

is clean. I look around the place. It’s packed.

those improvements that’ll complement

With regulars, of course. But also with so

what’s already been here for so long.’ Like

many folks younger than me – potentially

offering craft beer, I think to myself. And

trying this spot for the first time.

mixed drinks. And a garage-door frontage that allows the sun to bathe the place in natural light. And locally-sourced ingredients from area farmers – including the pork for the burgers. And late-night chef takeovers too – something Nick seems especially excited about.

I think back upon the happy memories I’ve made here, and about my own kids, who’ve yet to try a Harmony burger. I picture my seven-year-old scurrying over to McPhail’s (or, perhaps, down the street to King Street Cycles) between the time we place our order and the burgers are ready. And of him and his

‘There are so many great chefs Uptown and

older brother and little sister digging in. And

around the region. And this no-frills diner

I’m so elated that someone has resurrected

with so much tradition is a perfect platform

the place.

for them to see what they can do with something as simple – and timeless – as a burger.’ Over the past months, a handful of regional chefs have embraced the task of building on the Harmony’s paddy perfection – Chris Barkshire of Blackshop Restaurant, Taylor Devalk of Eat & Speakeasy, Darnell

.

I turn to Nick, catch his eye, raise my glass, and murmur: ‘Yep, nostalgia certainly smells like this place’


@HARMONY_LUNCH

107

HARMONY LUNCH 90 KING ST. N, WATERLOO

harmonylunch.ca


Guelph’s Only Luxury Dealership Guelph Infiniti

943 Woodlawn Road West, Guelph - Across from the Wellington Brewery 519-515-1400 | Guelphinfiniti.com #InfinitiLovesGuelph

108

Local Luxury.


Curated by Jane Tingley + Alain Thibault Co-Produced with

109

Object of the Internet, Projet EVA

Opens January 26, 2018

DIGITAL DYNAMICS 2018


C R EA T I N G A C C ESS IBL E C O MMU N IT IE S MICHELLE FACH

EXPERT OPINION | EDUCATION

Accessibility: ‘the design of products, devices, services, or environments for people who experience disabilities’ (accessontario.com) City building comes in many forms. Making spaces and places accessible is essential for creating an inclusive environment for everyone. The University of Guelph (or U of G) is doing just that and is committed to making campus and online environments more accessible for individuals with varying needs. In 2017, the U of G became Canada’s first university campus to utilize BlindSquare, a wellknown accessible GPS-app designed for people who are blind, visually impaired or deaf-blind. ‘BlindSquare is an app for mobile devices that works in tandem with small Bluetooth beacons that can easily be installed both inside and outside of buildings,’ explains Athol Gow, Manager of Library Accessibility Services at the University of Guelph. ‘It’s a very neat use of (relatively) simple and ubiquitous technology to address an accessibility need.’ BlindSquare was introduced to participants at last year’s annual University of Guelph

Accessibility Conference through a walking tour of campus. The U of G Accessibility Conference brings together a community of like-minded individuals looking to learn practical ways to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). The event is comprised of informative sessions and workshops that cover topics such as creating accessible documents, web and multimedia accessibility, inclusive design, adaptive technology and an array of other teaching, learning, and AODA-related topics. ‘The Conference is one of the few of its kind in Canada and attendees and presenters come from across North America,’ says Gow. ‘Participants enjoy being part of the community that forms here for a couple of days in May and many have attended every year since the conference's launch.’ The theme for the tenth anniversary of the Accessibility Conference is ‘Designing for Diverse Ability’; the conference will take place on May 28 and 29, 2018. Visit accessconf.ca to learn more.

tacofarm.ca

nick & nat ad we are quality we are fresh we are local we are committed


Museum After Dark. Bringing you Cool Sh*t to do in downtown Kitchener. Join today! Museum After Dark was built for you and your friends – foodie festivals, dance parties, and cultural experiences downtown, after hours. Check out a Social Membership that offers you and a friend discounts, dibs on tickets to the best events in town and exclusive benefits all year round. Become a regular at THEMUSEUM.

Memberships starting at $60! For a full list of membership benefits, check us out online at:

MuseumAfterDark .ca @MuseumAfterDark @MADKitchener MuseumAfterDark THEMUSEUM.ca

DOWNTOWN KITCHENER


FEATURE:

THE CITY BUILDERS OUR REGION IS GROWING. FAST. WHICH IS EXCITING. AND INVIGORATING. AFTER ALL, GROWTH ENCOURAGES FRESH IDEAS. AND 112

PROMPTS NEW OPPORTUNITIES. AND IS ONE SIGN – AMONG MANY – THAT WE’RE DOING SO MANY THINGS RIGHT. AND YET GROWTH CAN ALSO ISOLATE. AND SEGREGATE. AND THREATEN THE VERY COMMUNITIES THAT FUEL IT. THAT’S WHY IT’S SO IMPORTANT THAT DURING PERIODS OF GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT AND PROGR ESS, OUR REGION IDENTIFIES AND ACKNOWLEDGES THOSE ORGANIZERS, SOCIAL ENTERPRISES AND SMALL BUSINESSES WHO SEE THEIR MISSION AS SUMMONING, NURTURING AND SUSTAINING ROBUST CONGREGATIONS OF FOLKS WHO GATHER IN THE NAME OF DOING GOOD THINGS TOGETHER. HERE’S TO A HANDFUL OF OUR REGION’S GLORIOUS CITY BUILDERS.


Queen of Craft

113

Empowering and celebrating women on their beer journeys, while creating lasting impressions and friendships.

QUEEN o f CRAFT

Wilma & Karyn

W EL L IN G T O N B REW ERY . C A / EV EN T S/ Q U EEN - O F - C RAF T


114

the SEED Working towards a community with no barriers to healthy food.

The SEED T H ESEED G U EL PH . C A

Lindsey, Tom, Madeline, Kelly, Goldie & Becca


Installation: Aislinn Thomas, 'This Being Here' (2013)

LOL, Rainbow Reels & KW Poetry Slam

orgs

115

LADIES AND LGBTQ2+ OUT LOUD (SUZIE & ERINN) RAINBOW REELS QUEER & TRANS FILM FESTIVAL (JANICE & SUZIE) KW POETRY SLAM (JANICE) FA CE B O O K . CO M /L O L K I TCHWA T R A I NB O WR E E L S . O R G FA CE B O O K . CO M /K WP O E TR Y S L A M

Suzie, Erinn & Janice

Organizing, curating, producing & performing spoken word and LGBTQ2+ comedy & cinema


The Making-Box

116

Creating strong bonds through live comedy and improv education T H E M A K I N G -BO X TH E MAKINGBOX.C A

Hayley & Jay


orgs 117

Riot Axe Axe throwing as a way to spread happiness and build community

RI OT AXE RIO T A X E. C O M

Chuck & Corey


BUILDING PARTNERSHIPS We’re making it easy for business to do business with City Hall 118

Our “get to yes” mandate means we work with you to help bring your plans to life. Predictable processes The right tools The best team for you

guelph.ca/business We’ve signed the pledge – Your success is our success!


uptown21.ca

we are quality we are fresh we are local we are committed

119

VOL. MIX PACK IS HERE!

NOW AVAILABLE AT OUR BREWERY, LCBO, AND BEER STORES


MACT_OakTree_Toque_Winner_Ad_HP_Hoz_SB_Nov1717.pdf

1

2017-11-17

8:57 AM

Thank you to everyone who participated in The Oak Tree Project 2017!

CONGRATULATIONS to our Grand Prize winners, Shelldale Better Beginnings Better Futures, and all of the other winners. We appreciate all that you do for our community! Watch for news about Oak Tree 2018 this Spring.

oaktreeproject.ca

@oaktreeguelph


MEET YOUR MAKER

JUI CE . SE R I OU S LY – W H A T ’ S NO T T O L OV E? FLAVOUR FU L. S A T IS FY ING. DE L I C I OU S . A N D , WHEN YOU G E T Y O U R J U IC E F R OM [R E ]FR E SH J U IC E C O . IN DO W N T O W N G UELPH , 100% O R GANIC A ND C OL D - P R ES S ED

[RE]FRESH JUICE CO.

121

33 QUEBEC ST,

TO O. W H I CH M E A NS R A W A ND U N P R O C ES S ED

DOWNTOWN GUELPH

– LI K E A ‘L I VING ’ J UIC E T H AT ’ S PA C KED W I T H

H OURS: M on-Thurs: 9am-5pm

AC TI VE N UT R IE NT S , B E NE FIC IA L EN Z Y M ES AND I N CRE DIB LE F R E S H NE S S . C O - F O U N D ED BY CHI LD H O O D B U DS W H IT NE Y D O U G L A S AND AMAN DA W O O DH O U S E , [RE] F R ES H

Fri: 9am-6pm Sat: 10am-5pm Sun: 10am-4p m refreshjuiceco.com Y OUR G O- TO J UICE? Anyth in g w ith

REMAI N S GUE LP H ’ S F IR S T A ND ON L Y R A W

gi nge r and spi nac h i s magic

JUI CI N G COM P ANY – AND A S T A P L E F O R S O

F AVE LOCAL SPOTS? Mijiida, Crafty

MAN Y FOL K S AR O UND T H E R E G I ON EI T H ER

Vietnamese

Ramen, Na Ha’s Kitchen, Nguyen’s

S IMPLY LOO K ING FO R A H IT O F S O MET H I N G

W H Y G UELPH ? The great people &

IN CR E DI BL E , O R A M O R E S UB S T A N T I A L

sustainability. And we grew up here

HEAL TH Y LI FE S T Y LE C H ANGE . [R E] F R ES H – LI KE LOVE IN A B O T T LE .

supportive community with a focus on


‘TH E W ORL D I S O U R S ’ : 122 MA IN ST. W

D. EWEN R OF IEL D RD .

CRAFT BEER, CLASSIC HIP HOP & A HAMILTON RENAISSANCE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

Gra in & Gri t

Fai rwe ath er Bre win g

HAMILTON

I notice it again, as soon as we walk in the

‘I think there’s a simpler – and slightly less

front door of Fairweather Brewing Co –

sophisticated – explanation,’ he suggests, as

located in Hamilton’s west side. The DJ

Cai and I take off our jackets and begin to

Premier beat gives it away. The MC’s familiar

make ourselves comfortable. ‘I’ve got Nas

silky-smooth voice seals the deal. Nas’ debut

playing because it’s the music that I grew up

album – the 1994 hip hop classic, Illmatic.

with, too.’ And that’s when it dawns on me.

‘It’s an incredible thing,’ I remark to TOQUE

An epiphany. ‘So that means,’ I exclaim, ‘we’ve

Partner Cai Sepulis, who’s accompanied me

arrived.’ I expand on the point as Ram and Cai

on this journey of (craft beer) discovery in

nod in agreement. ‘Our generation is finally

Hamilton. ‘This is the third business we’ve

running the show – business owners who

visited in the last two days that has been

can play whatever music we like. And make

playing classic hip hop – the music we

whatever we want. And define what’s cool.’

grew up with.’ I briefly mull over my own observation. ‘I think it’s a ploy,’ I remark, ‘to attract customers our age.’ Fairweather Owner and Head Brewer Ram McAllister, standing behind the polished wood bar, overhears my theory. And laughs.

As if on cue, the next Illmatic track drops: ‘The World is Yours.’


123

Vignettes of Fairweather Brewing Co


Located in an industrial section of Hamilton’s Ainslie Wood neighbourhood, Fairweather – and not far down the road, Grain & Grit Beer Co – are building upon an emergent Hamilton craft beer industry that’s got so much going for it. As Ram notes: ‘The beer scene around here is nothing short of an explosion – and the local breweries are punching up in a big way. Honestly, I can’t think of a more exciting city to be in right now.’ Neither can Cai and I, actually, whose plans for TOQUE have always included sideways glances into Hamilton – or #HamOnt, as it’s come to be known by folks much younger (and hipper) than us. Which is why we’re here. On this roadtrip. Into this industrial neighbourhood of a city in which creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship seem to intersect in a uniquely energetic way. ‘It’s the reason we set up shop here’, says Ram. ‘Honestly, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a city so clearly in the early stages of a renaissance.’ He goes on: ‘I genuinely believe that the potential of any business is largely

124

defined by the community it calls home. And Hamilton right now is the perfect place to call home – particularly for small breweries.’ Which might explain why small breweries have been popping up in so many places in Hamilton. Fairweather. Grain & Grit. Merit. Collective Arts. And more. Each with its own vibe, and personality, and flavour(s) too. As Ram, who sharpened his brewing teeth with legendary Victoria BC brewer Sean Hoyne, notes of his own (ever-evolving) brewing process: ‘We’ve never attempted to recreate past beers verbatim at Fairweather; instead, it’s all about constant improvement. What we want to brew today may not be what we feel like offering people a year or two down the road. While our current beers are inspired by past creations, it’s my opinion that personal growth – and ever-evolving styles of beer – are what keep things interesting.’ This talk of moving forward encourages me to polish off my glass of ‘High Grade’, a luscious fruitforward American IPA. Cai does the same with her half-pint of ‘Silky’, an American oat


125

Grain & Grit's Lindsey Mrav


126

porter with a soft chocolate mouthfeel. We

different beers once a month to four couples.

thank Ram and his awesome team for the

They, in effect, became our tasting team, our

incredible hospitality and hit the road for

sounding board.’

Grain & Grit – about thirty seconds away by car (or four minutes by foot).

‘And now we’re here,’ adds Lindsey, a former graphic designer and digital strategist who

The brewery is gorgeous (as is the label

brings her particular skills to the brewery for

artwork – executed by playful Guelph

branding, interior design and marketing. ‘And

illustrator Gillian Wilson). A former

loving it.’ She continues: ‘It’s especially nice

automotive shop, the space is bathed in

to have Fairweather so close by. Not only do

afternoon sunlight that streams in through

we rent space from them to store some of

the massive retractable glass garage doors.

our stuff, but we’re constantly bouncing ideas

Owners Joe and Lindsey Mrav, together with

off each other – and trading customers too.’

head brewer Alex Sporn, greet us as soon as

I look around and note that, sure enough, at

we enter. It’s not long before I’m headlong

least two groups of craft beer enthusiasts I

into an introductory flight of what Grain &

saw at Fairweather just minutes before have

Grit has to offer, including a ‘West End’ IPA,

arrived at Grain & Grit.

‘Citrus’ saison, and ‘Pineapple’ rye pale ale – the beer that, along with G&G’s ‘Breakfast’ milk stout (one of Cai’s all-time faves), started it all. Joe, a former mechanical engineer, explains: ‘I really only started home brewing a couple years back, but instantly fell hard for it. It wasn’t long before I was brewing two batches a week. It was way too much for us to drink ourselves, so we’d gift much of it to a group of friends. A twelve-pack of four

I get up from my seat at the bar and head for the brewery’s small bottle shop, where I grab a few tall cans and can’t help but add a couple of their distinctive t-shirts to my cache. I hold one up and admire its Gillian Wilson design. The idea of a Guelph artist helping build a Hamilton brewery tickles me. I think back to Ram’s observations about a Hamilton renaissance, and can’t help but think that


127

this renaissance may actually be much more wide-ranging than we can grasp – propelled by creatives and visionaries and city builders collaborating across many communities:

FAIRWEATHER BREWING CO. 5 OFIELD ROAD UNIT #1, HAMILTON

fairweatherbrewing.com

Hamilton. Kitchener. Guelph. Waterloo. Cambridge. Elora. From Brooklyn to Berlin. I head back to the bar and take my seat. Cai is chatting with head brewer Alex, while Joe and Lindsey are serving a couple who’ve just walked in the door.

.

I find myself humming Nas’ track, ‘The World Is Yours’. And smile

GRAIN & GRIT BEER CO. 11 EWEN RD, HAMILTON

grainandgritbeer.com


January 18–21, 2018 Guelph

Conversations Performances Literature Music Ideas

128

Media and Promotional Partners Get Noticed. Get Found.

Sponsors

Image: Il-Dong Bae, Pansori artist

Tickets: festival.artseverywhere.ca

Presenters


129


ANAT O MY O F A B R A N D :

Q UEB EC S T R EE T, G U EL PH CLIENT: SHOPS & BUSINESSES OF QUEBEC STREET DESIGNER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD.

QUEBEC STREET IN DOWNTOWN GUELPH IS A MICROCOSM OF THE ROYAL CITY: A ONEBLOCK STRIP WHERE YOU CAN ‘GET IT ALL’ – AND ‘HAVE IT ALL’ TOO. LUNCH WITH FRIENDS. READING IN A CAFÉ. A NEW TATTOO. SHOPPING FOR BOUTIQUE KIDS CLOTHES AND TOYS. A HAIRCUT. A MANI PEDI. GORGEOUS JEWELLERY. AND SO MUCH MORE. TOQUE LTD WORKED WITH THE BUSINESSES OF QUEBEC STREET, CITY OF GUELPH TOURISM, REGIONAL TOURISM ORGANIZATION 4 (RTO4), AND THE DOWNTOWN GUELPH BUSINESS ASSOCIATION (DGBA) TO DEVELOP A BRAND FOR THIS UNIQUE STREET AS A MICRO-TOURISM DESTINATION. THE CORE OF THIS BRAND: A DISTINCTIVE AND STYLIZED LOGO THAT VISUALLY REPRESENTS THE DIVERSE EXPERIENCES AND PLAYFUL, ENGAGING ETHOS THAT ARE QUEBEC STREET. IT’S GUELPH. DISTILLED.

@CAPBISTROGUELPH @ACQUA SALON

@KENNEDYPARKSHOP

@MIIJIDAA @FALLOWFIELDKIDS

130 130

a TOQUE project TM


132

PERI M ET E R D EV E L O P ME N T:

LETTING IN THE LIGHT BY CHRIS TIESSEN I never anticipated that I could be inspired by

the place like he owns it. Because he does. Or,

a vacant floor of a drab 1960s office building

more precisely, the company he helped found

– originally constructed to house a banking

– Perimeter Development – owns it. Along with

headquarters, no less. And yet here I was.

co-founding partner David Gibson and partner

On the top floor of 305 King Street West in

Stewart Barclay, Craig and the Perimeter

downtown Kitchener. A building I’d grown up

team have been actively looking for projects

noticing simply because it was so impressively

like 305 King West not only to resuscitate the

unexceptional. And I was energized. And

downtown core but also to continue readying

excited. And absolutely inspired – all for one

the region for continued growth.

simple reason. Because of who I was with. Craig Beattie. Or ‘Craig’, as he’s known by folks across Kitchener-Waterloo. (He has made such an impact in so many circles in these cities that folks around here tend to know exactly who I mean when I mention ‘Craig’. But I digress. Back to 305 King West.)

As Craig notes: ‘What our community has been able to do in the tech sector is outstanding. Indeed, the very fact that companies like Google are choosing this region to set up shop speaks to so many of our strengths. What Perimeter has been able to do is make sure that there’s phenomenal space ready for

Craig and I have just arrived by elevator to the

businesses to open shop when they’re ready

twelfth floor, and he’s showing me around

to make the move here.’


133

Photos provided by Perimeter Development


Photos provided by Perimeter Development

134

Spaces like the Breithaupt Block, which

The drop ceilings were horrific. Needless to

Perimeter developed (and is continuing to

say, there was no real joy to the place.’ He

develop) – and where Google made a home.

motions his arm into the deep space of the

And 345 King West, a planned six-storey LEED

twelfth floor, adding: ‘This floor, for instance,

Gold Class ‘A’ new build that international

was divided up into so many small rooms

law firm Gowling will call home. And 119 King

that hardly any natural light could make its

West, an adaptive reuse project that now

way in – anywhere.’ Not anymore, though.

houses the CBC Kitchener-Waterloo offices,

Now the top floor of 305 King West is all

Matter of Taste Coffee, and Perimeter’s own

natural light. And open spaces. And really

offices. (Offices that Perimeter made their

high ceilings. ‘The first thing we did was get

permanent home a few years back as a

rid of the drop ceilings,’ remarks Craig. ‘And

deliberate signal that they are truly invested in

then we got rid of everything else.’

this region.) And The Walper Hotel – a passion project for Perimeter that has seen Craig and his colleagues completely restore the grand old downtown hotel that, as legend has it, not so long ago housed both Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Governor General David Johnston on the same night, without either of them knowing the other was going to be there. The Walper is a local treasure. Indeed, everyone should make a point of staying there sometime. And, of course, 305 King West. Where we’re standing, on the top floor. ‘When we purchased this building back in 2014,’ Craig tells me, ‘it was sixty percent vacant.’ He continues: ‘And it wasn’t hard to see why. Each floor was divvied up into a maze of offices.

Or, at least, almost everything else. In a far corner of the vast space, I focus on what looks like something straight out of The Jetsons. ‘Radio booths,’ Craig remarks, following my bewildered gaze, ‘left here by the last tenant. Hopefully we can do something cool with them.’ I don’t doubt it. After all, Perimeter has built its reputation doing cool things with old stuff. On a massive scale. ‘It’s worth noting’ Craig says, ‘that we wouldn’t have been able to move forward with any of our projects, whether adaptive reuse or new build, without a City administration that shares our vision. Since we moved our offices into downtown Kitchener from Toronto, we’ve experienced nothing short of incredible


135

support from all departments at the City.’

– sits like a beacon in the near distance.

He continues: ‘I truly believe that Kitchener-

Perimeter’s handiwork – with so much help

Waterloo is one of the strongest markets of

from collaborators CBRE, MartinSimmons

its size in North America – and not by fluke.

Architects, the City of Kitchener, among

When builders and developers and City

others. No wonder I find this building

administration decide to work collaboratively

inspiring, I think. We’re on top of the world

together – to meet each other where they are

here. Perimeter’s world. Which is a really

– it makes all the difference in the world.’

good thing for this region

.

By this point, we’ve made our way over to the gorgeous Modernist windows to have a look out over the city below. I squint through the late afternoon sunlight at the world. The cityscape is only barely recognizable to me, given what it looked like when I was growing up here. The Breithaupt Block – all century-old brick and shimmering glass

PERIMETER DEVELOPMENT 119 KING STREET WEST, SUITE 220, KITCHENER

perimeterdevelopment.com


REVERSED

FINAL LOGO: ACCEPTABLE FORMATS FOR USAGE Site Identity HIP Developments Gaslight_Logo_Final.ai

Accepted Logo Variations N/A March 2016

136

BROKER OF RECORD

x x x x x x

OPTIONS AVAILABLE

PANTONE CMYK BLACK AND WHITE INVERTED COLOUR BACKGROUND OTHER OPTIONS

COLOUR SPECS


(HAN D )C RAF T I NG A CA R E E R : 138

THE PLANE WORLD OF KONRAD SAUER BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘Those are like my Wayne Gretzky rookie

life, he built by hand. Located just behind his

cards right there,’ remarks master toolmaker

redbrick home near downtown Kitchener, the

Konrad Sauer with a laugh, gesturing toward

space is a wonderland of custom machines

six boxes filled with what appear to be neatly-

and specialized power and hand tools.

arranged, squared wooden sticks. At least a

Punctuated by beautiful handcrafted work

few hundred of them in total. Each measuring

tables bathed in natural light. And by models

around one-by-one inch and no more than a

and prototypes and in-process work and

couple feet long.

finished pieces. And wood. Lots of it.

‘It’s Brazilian rosewood,’ notes Konrad. ‘Off-

African Blackwood. Kingwood. Honduran

cuts from C.F. Martin & Co guitars.’ He pulls a

Rosewood. Desert Ironwood. Boxwood. And,

length out of one of the boxes and carefully

of course, the aforementioned Brazilian

hands it to me. I turn the solid piece in my

Rosewood – almost impossible to locate in

hand and note the date scrawled onto it in

any real quantity nowadays. Stacked and

faint chalk: 1966.

bundled and parceled all about the floor.

‘My Porsche money,’ Konrad adds with a chuckle. I’m standing with Konrad on the ground floor of his workshop – a glorious two-storey structure that, like so many things in Konrad’s

Meticulously collected over the years. Just waiting for Konrad’s deft hands to transform them into what have become some of the most sought after woodworking tools in the world: infill planes by Sauer & Steiner. It was not always this way. ‘Two decades ago,’


139


140

‘HE THAT WOULD PERFECT HIS WORK MUST FIRST SHARPEN HIS TOOLS.’ -CONFUCIUS


141 notes Konrad, ‘I was an Art Director working

Besides,’ he remarks, ‘I wanted to work with

in downtown Toronto. There was lots of

my hands again.’ He pauses, before adding: ‘I

work. And big clients. And yet by the end of

needed to work with my hands again.’

my tenure I felt far from fulfilled.’ By now we’ve left the workshop and are standing in the Sauer kitchen. He’s enjoying a bagel. I’m delighting in a coffee. And in the incredible cabinetry that surrounds us. Local Black Walnut cupboards. With African Blackwood handles. By Konrad, of course.

And so that’s what Konrad did. As we wander from the kitchen toward the dining room, Konrad’s handiwork is evident almost everywhere I look. The millwork framing doors and covering walls. The herringbone parquet flooring. The dining room table. The dining rooms chairs. My god, those dining

‘I became especially exhausted by what

room chairs. All expressions of Konrad’s

I perceived to be the tired uniformity of

desire – need, really – to make things with

design work coming out of agencies,’ he

his hands. And all projects that demanded

continues. ‘My creative work had become

good tools with tight tolerances. It wasn’t long

overwhelmingly computer-driven, supported

before Konrad knew he wanted to make his

by a limited number of design programs. The

tools, too. And so he began.

computer, which was once one of the tools in the designer’s arsenal, had become the only tool. As a result, the process of work had become lifeless. Without personality. Or soul. I prefer to work at design first; then I figure out how to make it, not the other way around.

‘I continued working in Toronto for three years after creating my first plane,’ notes Konrad, ‘before quitting to do this full-time.’ We’re back in his workshop. Upstairs. And ‘this’ is all around us. The most exquisite infill


142 planes – some finished, others in various

have stories behind them. Either because of

states of completion – seem to fill the place.

who made them for me, who sold them to

On shelves. Work tables. I am quick to note

me, or who gave them to me.’

a full set of planes neatly positioned sideby-side on a shelf. ‘My personal set of ‘K’ Series planes,’ he notes. ‘The ones I use for my own work.’ I’ve heard of these before. The planes that put Sauer & Steiner on the map. Designed and executed when an early customer asked Konrad to rethink the infill plane. Absolutely gorgeous.

Tools with stories behind them. Like Konrad’s planes. Inspired by the story that got him here, and influenced by his insatiable need to create wonderfully-alluring yet soundlyfunctional things. By hand. I pick up one of Konrad’s planes off the nearest work table and rotate it in my hands. It’s weight is substantial. As is its mesmerizing beauty. ‘I

And yet these are not Konrad’s most prized

have always figured,’ Konrad notes as I place

tools. Instead, that title goes to those tools

it carefully back down, ‘that if you’re going to

that, over the years, Konrad’s clients have

build something, you should at least make it

gifted to him. A set of Japanese chisels by

beautiful.’

a blacksmith whose grandfather was a samurai sword maker. A series of saws and

Words to live by, no doubt

.

several hammers – also handcrafted in Japan. And other irreplaceable tools Konrad uses to create his own artisanal planes. As he remarks: ‘My favourite tools are those that

SAUER & STEINER

@sauer_and_steiner


143


144 GO OS E " F IRS T S NO W" B Y CA i SE P U L iS


145


COCKTAIL HOUR WITH KATIE SHEWEN

WHEN THE COLD WEATHER HITS, FOLKS TEND TO MOVE INDOORS FOR SOCIAL GATHERINGS, OFTEN BY THE FIRE. IT’S OUT OF THIS DESIRE FOR INTIMACY AND COMMUNITY THAT THE CIDERGRIA WAS BORN. ANIMATED BY ONTARIO’S BOOMING CIDER REVIVAL, AND TAKING INSPIRATION FROM CLASSIC PUNCHES AND POPULAR SHARING DRINKS, THE CIDERGRIA CAN BE PREPARED BY THE GLASS OR BY THE BOWL/PITCHER. SERVED ON ICE OR SLIGHTLY WARMED, IT’S THE PERFECT COMPANION DURING THE LONG, DARK EVENINGS OF WINTER. (FRIENDS AND FIRE OPTIONAL, BUT RECOMMENDED.)

BREAD BAR CIDERGRIA (PITCHER) METHOD: BUILD, TOP

146

GLASS: PITCHER In pitcher, add the following:

30 oz Pommies Cider (1.5 pints)

6 oz apple juice

1 oz apple brandy

2 oz brandy

Add ice; top with ginger ale. GARNISH: apple slices tossed in nutmeg & cinnamon sugar. Or try garnishing with a bit of orange peel and fresh cranberries for an even more wintery flair.

EARTH TO TABLE BREAD BAR 105 GORDON ST., GUELPH

guelph.breadbar.ca

EARTH TO TABLE: BREAD BAR IS A LIVING EXTENSION OF THE FOOD PHILOSOPHY THAT CELEBRATES WHAT IS BEST ABOUT FOOD BY SHORTENING THE GAP BETWEEN PRODUCERS AND CONSUMER. OUR RESTAURANT CELEBRATES AND COOKS WITH THE SEASONS BY OFFERING HANDCRAFTED FOOD MADE WITH THE FINEST INGREDIENTS, FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT A BETTER QUALITY MEAL. GOOD INGREDIENTS MATTER.


Intuition is the only thing you’ll follow.

BORN ON THE TRACK. BUILT FOR THE ROAD. The all-new Audi RS 3 Starting from

$65,558 2350 Shirley Drive, Kitchener 519.514.0100 | 1.844.566.2506 See all of our inventory at

www.audikw.com

*Price shown Is for a 2018 Audi RS3 quattro model. MSRP is $62,900, plus $2,095 Freight & PDI charge, $100 Air Tax, $17.75 Tire Stewardship Fee, $150 Audi Anti-Theft Registration, and a $295 Dealer Administration Fee. Licensing and HST are additional. As a limited production vehicle, a factory order would most likely be required.


Toque - Issue 3 - The City Builders  
Toque - Issue 3 - The City Builders  

Toque Magazine Issue 3 featuring articles and stories from Guelph, K-W and Hamilton.