Page 1

02.FALL 2017

RYAN GOODFELLOW

REGIONAL LOOKBOOK

FOOD ISSUE

TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


UNLEASHING THE EXTRAORDINARY IN EVERY HOME WE TOUCH

Over 25 years of combined real-estate experience providing uncompromising and exceptional service.

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2. FAL L 2017

CAi SEPULIS illu stra tion & desi gn

CHRIS TIESSEN writin g & phot ography

For advertising opportunities, contact chris@toque.ltd

Printed on 100% post-consumer ROLLAND ENVIRO paper. This print run saved: 66 trees 4 tennis courts 63,630 gal. US of water 578 days of water consumption 5,510 lb of waste 0 waste containers 21,388 lb CO 2 emissions of 3 cars per year 55 MMBTU 267,673 60W light bulbs for one hour 28 lb NO X emissions of one truck during 39 days

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‘FIRST WE EAT, THEN WE DO EVERYTHING ELSE.’ -MFK FISHER WELCOME TO THE SOPHOMORE ISSUE OF TOQUE – YOUR QUARTERLY REGIONAL ‘LOOKBOOK’ THAT, AS WE’VE COME TO LEARN, SMELLS AS GOOD AS IT LOOKS (AND FEELS). INDEED, FROM WHAT WE’VE GATHERED AS WE CONTINUE TO DISTRIBUTE TOQUE FROM WELLINGTON COUNTY TO WATERLOO REGION – FROM BROOKLYN TO BERLIN – FOLKS HAVE BEEN AS EAGER TO BURY THEIR NOSES IN ITS PAGES AS THEY’VE BEEN PRONE TO LOOK AT AND READ IT. WHICH SEEMED A MOST CURIOUS PHENOMENON ESPECIALLY THE FIRST TIME WE WITNESSED A COUPLE PASSING THEIR ISSUE OF TOQUE BACK AND FORTH AT A DOWNTOWN RESTAURANT – EACH TAKING TURNS INHALING THE SMELL OF INK ON GLORIOUS 80LB PAPER STOCK. THAT IS, UNTIL WE REALIZED THE SEEMING BROADER IMPORT OF THIS COMICAL CONDUCT: AN IMPULSE TOWARD THE TACTILE. THE TANGIBLE. THE MULTI-SENSORY. FOR WHILE OUR SCREENS EFFORTLESSLY SERVE UP THE WORLD AT OUR FINGERTIPS, PARADOXICALLY THEY ALSO KEEP THIS WORLD AT BAY – TRAPPED BEHIND GLASS AND SUBJECT TO THE TEMPORAL LIMITS OF BATTERY LIFE AND A STRONG WI-FI SIGNAL. TO SMELL A BOOK, THEN, IS TO EXPERIENCE THE WORLD AS IT IS – NOT SIMPLY AS IT SEEMS TO BE. TO HOLD IT. TO FEEL IT. HECK, EVEN TO INGEST IT WHOLLY – LIKE THOSE MEDIEVAL MONKS WHO INGESTED BOOKS TO ‘EAT GOD’S WORDS.’ (AN INCOMPLETE PhD IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN POPULAR CULTURAL HISTORY TEACHES THE MOST WONDERFULLY ANECDOTAL TIDBITS.) AND YET WE WOULD NEVER RECOMMEND TASTING A TOQUE, BUT INSTEAD ONLY ATTEMPT TO DEMONSTRATE GOOD TASTE BY HIGHLIGHTING OUR REGION’S GLORIOUS TASTEMAKERS. OR, QUITE LITERALLY, THOSE MAKERS OF TASTE. WELCOME TO THE FOOD ISSUE. PRINT IS NOT DEAD. AND NEITHER IS GOOD TASTE. DIG IN.

.ca


CONTENTS SUMMER

2017

9. EDITOR’S LETTER: THE FOOD ISSUE 14. A SENTIMENTAL JOURNEY: COMING HOME TO ARABELLA PARK 24. MEET YOUR MAKER: ELORA BREAD TRADING CO. 26. FARM TO FORK (AND BACK AGAIN): THE NEIGHBOURHOOD GROUP OF RESTAURANTS’ LOCAL FOOD ECO-SYSTEM 32. DAYTRIPPIN’ WITH BECKY HOOD 36. SELLING COMMUNITY: BROKERAGE PROFILE – PLANET REALTY 38. UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY: TOP MARKET MEATS & MORE 42. EXPERT OPINION (REAL ESTATE): JEFF NEUMANN 47. MEET YOUR MAKER: KILLER CUPCAKES 48. SELLING COMMUNITY: REALTOR PROFILE – AARON ZUCCALA 53. DISCOVERING LOCAL: GOODFELLOWS FIELD TO FORK 58. EXPERT OPINION (WEALTH MANAGEMENT): WILL MACTAGGART 60. GETTING TO KNOW: AJOA MINTAH, FOUR ALL ICE CREAM 62. REDISCOVERING THE BOOKSHELF 64. SELLING COMMUNITY: REALTOR PROFILE – GIA LUCCHETTA 68. FOUR’S A CHARM: HOW TONY & ROB THEODOSIOU ARE PUTTING THEIR STAMP ON WATERLOO REGION’S COFFEE, BEER & CULINARY SCENE 74. GETTING TO KNOW: JARED FERRALL, CRAFTY RAMEN 76. EXPERT OPINION (LEARNING): MICHELLE FACH 77. OPEN WIDE: GLORIOUS BURGERS PHOTO SPREAD 82. SNEAK PEEK: KATHERINE GINGRICH’S BLACK WING 83. SELLING COMMUNITY: BROKERAGE PROFILE – ROYAL LEPAGE ROYAL CITY REALTY 88. THE ART OF COFFEE: BALZAC’S COFFEE ROASTERS 92. MEET YOUR MAKER: REVEL CIDER 96. EXPERT OPINION (PROPERTY MANAGEMENT): MARIA FINORO 98. ANATOMY OF A BRAND: ROYAL CITY BREWING CO. 100. E  LORA BREWING CO: FOR FRIENDS. FOR NEIGHBOURS. FOR EACH OTHER. 106. COMMUNITY BENEFITS: GUELPH Y 109. NEIGHBOURHOOD GROCERS & BUTCHERS PHOTO SPREAD 114. TABLED MORIES: BRYCE HILL’S THREECROW WOODWORKS 118. COMIC: GOOSE 122. COCKTAIL HOUR: THE DAIQUIRI

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A S EN T I MEN T AL J O U R NE Y :

COMING HOME TO ARABELLA PARK BY CHRIS TIESSEN

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B

.

BE

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IO

D LV

LM O

‘This is my happy place,’ I whisper to no one

soundtrack of classic hip hop. Gang Starr. Mos

in particular as Stephen Cleary pops the top

Def. Killah Priest. Tribe. The good stuff. And I’m

off an obscure Belgian lambic-style beer and

surrounded by great people. Awesome food.

pours it evenly into the five wine glasses he’s

And exceptional beer.

N

placed on the white-washed wood slab bar in

T AV E. W

BELMONT VILLAGE, KITCHENER

front of our intimate group. ‘I’m so happy right now,’ I exhale – quietly but exuberantly – into the beautifully-minimalist space that surrounds us. As though the grin plastered to my face isn’t proof enough.

As a Kitchener kid raised just down the street (before leaving for Guelph via Montreal and Toronto), I feel I’m uniquely qualified to revel in what Arabella co-owners Natalie and Bob Schnurr have accomplished here. This is not the Belmont Village of my youth, I think to myself as

It’s a Sunday evening in June. The sun’s just

I take a sip of the Belgian brew. The sourness of

gone down. I’m perched comfortably on a bar

the lambic – resulting from the style’s signature

stool at Arabella Park Beer Bar, located along

wild yeast, bacteria, and lengthy barrel-aging

the Belmont Village strip in the affluent Old

process – puckers my lips. This is a whole new

Westmount neighbourhood of Kitchener. And

era. Gone are the drab convenience stores

everything about this place, this time, feels

where my friends and I would grab afterschool

perfect.

snacks on our trek home from KCI. Gone, too,

The beer bar’s three large garage door-style window bays are rolled up, beckoning the outside in. Evening air cools the space. The faint hum of traffic and hints of acoustic guitar and laughter from a patio down the block mix with Arabella’s seeming-constant

is Vincenzo’s – the venerated Italian grocer that put Belmont Village on the map before relocating Uptown. And gone, especially, is the feeling of desolation that enveloped the strip every evening after the sun went down.


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‘BEER MAKES YOU FEEL THE WAY YOU OUGHT TO FEEL WITHOUT BEER.’ -HENRY LAWSON


Instead, today’s Belmont Village is teeming with terrific (and discernibly eclectic) culinary establishments. There’s Casa Rugantino. And Janet Lynn’s Bistro. The Belmont Bistro. The Culinary Studio. The Berlin Bicycle Café. Raja Fine Indian Cuisine. And, of course, the storied Big John’s Subs, where my dad concluded a long, nervous June evening in the late ‘70s, right after his youngest – me – was born just down the way, at St. Mary’s Hospital. But I digress. It’s Sunday night. At Arabella. And the place is almost empty. Which is how I like it. No, it’s how I love it. Wednesdays through Saturdays are a different story, as the stylish beer bar teems with young and not-so-young

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professionals either on their way home from any number of Kitchener-Waterloo’s tech companies and start-ups, or on their way out. Sundays, on the other hand, are intimate affairs when Stephen – Arabella’s distinguished Cellarman who cut his teeth at the legendary Stillwell Beer Bar in Halifax – can hold court. At the bar, I’m joined by Jordan of Willibald Farm Distillery (see TOQUE Issue 1), a couple of Jordan’s friends, and Arabella chef Byron, who’s taken it upon himself to stuff our bellies with delicious charcuterie. I gaze past pretty potted plants to the massive Arabella logo painted on the far wall – ‘an homage to Munich’s Mae West sculpture that abuts the Bavarian city’s Arabellapark district,’ Natalie remarked the first time we’d met. The reference to Munich – the capital of Oktoberfest – is clear. And significant, of course, since Kitchener is home to the world’s largest Oktoberfest outside Germany.

..CONTINUED PG. 21


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Q&A ARABELLA PARK CELLARMAN STEPHEN CLEARY

HOW WOULD YOU DEFINE ARABELLA PARK?

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT’S THE NEXT BIG BEER TREND?

A lot of work and thought has been put into all

I think we’re in a period of creativity and

aspects of our service, vibe and kitchen, but we

experimentation in Ontario in which focused

put the majority of our efforts into being a quality

breweries will be creating simple, balanced beers

beer bar in Ontario. We’re still figuring out what that

with deep traction. Square, Tooth + Nail, Godspeed

means.

are great examples of breweries doing this already.

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT’S THE BUSINESS’ MISSION? To present beer in the best possible way. Cleanliness,

YOU’VE BEGUN WORKING AT REVEL CIDER WITH TARIQ. WHERE DO CIDERS FIT IN RELATION TO BEER CULTURE?

temperature, gas blend, pouring technique, glass

Cider fermentation resembles wine more than beer,

care, knowledgeable bartenders, etc. I want brewers

but certain characteristics of ciders (like funk and

to feel that their beer is well cared for here.

ascetic) get embraced by the beer community. That’s my reason for carrying cider at Arabella.

NAME FOUR ONTARIO BREWERIES THAT ARE PUSHING THE LIMITS OF QUALITY, INNOVATION, EXPERIMENTATION, ETC.

WHEN YOU’RE NOT AT ARABELLA, WHERE ARE YOU EATING IN THE REGION?

Burdock, Half Hours on Earth, Bellwoods, Indie Ale

I go to the Apollo Cinema and sit near the back with

House.

my partner drinking better-than-it-needs-to-be beer watching whatever movie. I find it relaxing. It helps

ON YOUR DAY OFF, WHAT ARE YOU DRINKING?

that we live down the street. I also frequent Kenzo

I’m lucky to be surrounded by great beer and always

Lancaster Smokehouse.

Raman, Papuseria, Yeti Café, Jane Bond Café, and the

look to have a fresh pale ale and a dry farmhouse in the fridge (preferably low ABV). I’ve also become excited by funky cider and natural wine.

WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT BEING A ‘CELLARMAN’? Working with people who are passionate about their

WHAT’S THE CURRENT BIG BEER TREND IN ONTARIO? There are a lot of sassy things to say about beer trends in Ontario, but I mostly love them all. Fluffy IPAs, confectionery stouts, rustic pilsners, fruit taps, and magic taps. The current trends are making for a richer community by educating drinkers, which will help with the long-term development of the scene.

craft and then sharing that with drinkers. I’m really lucky.

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I ask Stephen why he’s chosen to bless us with a lambic – as opposed to, say, something brewed much closer to home. I gesture to the white crayon list featuring almost two dozen Ontario craft beers and ciders hand-scrawled on the gleaming bright blue wall behind the bar. On it, I see my all-time favourite – the super juicy Jutsu Pale Ale from Belwoods in Toronto – as well as choice brews from outfits like Burdock, Indie Ale House, Sawdust City and Half Hours On Earth. Stephen pulls me out of my reverie. ‘Without sounding hyperbolic,’ he says, ‘we’re striving to be one of the top beer bars in Canada, where, over the last few years, breweries have become better beer stations than bars.’ He pauses. ‘We carry imports mainly to show what’s possible in the brewing industry. While our focus remains the best and most innovative beers and ciders from Ontario, it’s important to be aware of global beer trends too. We want to curate what’s best around the province – and the world.’

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So far so good, I’d say. I finish the lambic. Jordan

.

orders pints of Jutsu for the five of us. Chef Byron brings out some more charcuterie. It’s well past midnight. And I’m utterly content

ARABELLA PARK 1P2, 740 BELMONT AVE W, KITCHENER

arabellaparkbar.com


23


MEET YOUR MAKER

ELORA BREAD TRADING CO.

‘ T H ER E I S N O T A T H I N G T H A T I S M OR E

73 METCALFE ST, ELORA

P O S I T I V E T H A N B R EA D , ’ N OT ED T H E G R E AT

HO U RS : Tues-Fri 10am-6pm,

R U S S I A N W R I T ER F Y O D OR D O S T O EV S KY. A

Saturday 10am-4pm 24

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Sunday 10am-3pm

elorabread.ca FAVE I T E M T O M AK E ( A N D E A T ) : Our

Breton cake. It's satisfying to make & perfect with a cup of coffee/tea INSP I RAT I ON : French bakeries,

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fresh everyday is the norm

T R A D I T I O N A L - MET H O D N A T U R A L L Y - L EA VENED

FAVE L OC AL S POT S : The Elora

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Brewing Co. and the Lost & Found Café

A R T I S A N L O A V ES A R E H A N D C R A F T ED F R OM S T A R T T O F I N I S H B Y C A L A N T H A EL S B Y & HER T EA M U S I N G QU A L I T Y O R G A N I C , N A T U RAL , A N D L OC A L I N G R ED I EN T S – A N D T A S T E D I V I N E. A V A R I ET Y OF B R EA D S R O T A T E T H R O U G H T H E W EEK – A S D O EM P A N A D AS, F OC A C C I A , B I A L Y S ( P OL I S H - J EW I S H B A G EL S), A N D S H OR T B R EA D C OO KI ES .


25

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F A R M T O FOR K (A ND B A C K A G A I N) :

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD GROUP OF RESTAURANTS’ LOCAL FOOD ECO-SYSTEM BY CHRIS TIESSEN It was an awe-inspiring experience: crouching

Because,’ he continues, ‘as long as I look after

in the cab of rancher Bryan Gilvesy's dusty

my grasses, the cattle will be fine.’

old pick-up, readying myself (and my trusty Nikon) for the amazing scene that was about to unfold. ‘What are we doing?,’ I ask TOQUE co-creator Cai Sepulis, seated next to me in the truck’s bed. My right eye closed, my left glued to the viewfinder trained on the scene ahead of us, I repeat myself with an air of incredulity: ‘Seriously – what are we doing?’

26

Fine is an understatement. During Bryan’s tenure the Ranch has been recognized with a range of awards, including the International Texas Longhorn Breeder of the Year Award, Premier’s Leadership Award for Agricultural Innovation and, most recently, Food Tank’s International Farmer Hero for Sustainability (2016), which identifies this remarkable local

What we were doing was, ostensibly,

rancher as one of seventeen farmer heroes

straightforward enough. We were on photo

from around the world working toward

assignment for The Neighbourhood Group of

sustainability, innovation and the local

Restaurants – The Wooly, Miijidaa, Borealis.

economy.

We’d been tasked with taking portraits of the Group’s suppliers: namely, those regional farmers who produce the quality meat, wine and cheese, vegetables, and beer for the restaurants. And on this particular day, we were in Tillsonburg at Bryan and Cathy Gilvesy’s storied YU Ranch – recognized by the United Nations for its sustainable farming model. YU Ranch was once a tobacco farm, but over the past number of years Bryan and Cathy have transformed the Canadian Carolinian landscape – wetland, forest, and grassland – into both a Texas Longhorn cattle ranch and a sanctuary for pollinators and endangered birds: a space where wild flowers (including alfalfa, clover, showy tick trefoil and echinacea) flourish, and a home for both European heritage and native tall grasses. As Bryan has let me know on more than one occasion: ‘When it comes down to it, I’m a grass farmer.

I could go on, but we’re here to see the YU Ranch Longhorns. Who are about to bear down on us from fifty yards. And I wonder again what we're doing. I train my autofocus on Bryan and Cathy, who have set up just a few feet from the truck. ‘Are you ready,’ Cai whispers to me, training the wide angle lens of her cell phone on me, Bryan and Cathy, and the near-one hundred Texas Longhorns Bryan is about to release from the adjacent field into ours. Before I can answer, Bryan opens the gate, lets out several yips and hollers, and then stands stoically with Cathy – their backs to the trampling herd – for our photo op. And I wonder again what we’re doing. I fire away

.


CATHY & BRYAN, YU RANCH YU Ranch has supplied Texas Longhorn cattle to The

‘ ME N A RE N O T S O M U C H T HE

Neighbourhood Group of Restaurants since 2007. In fact, Neighbourhood Group President Court Desautels takes his

KEE PE R S O F H E RDS AS H E RDS A RE

restaurant staff on field trips to the ranch at least twice a year

TH E K E E P E RS OF MEN . ’

comes from. ‘Bryan’s become more than one of our suppliers,’

-HE NR Y D A VI D T H O R E AU , W ALDEN

– so that staff know where the food they create and serve Court says. ‘He’s become a great family friend,’ Indeed, both Court and his father, Bob, have been known to babysit the ranch while Bryan and Cathy are away.


28


CAROLE, CHASSAGNE FARM

LOUISE, FEATHERSTONE ESTATES

Ever wonder who supplies The Neighbourhood Group with quail

When David Johnson and Louise Engel decided to move from

eggs and Cornish hens? Carole Precious – a rare breed herself.

Guelph – where they’d run the Guelph Poultry Market – to

Falconer. Painter. Sculptor. Calligrapher. Beekeeper. Zookeeper.

Niagara to found their own winery, Featherstone Estates, they

Champion carriage racer. And proprietor at Chassagne Farm in

wanted to create something truly sustainable. The result: a

Puslinch. ‘Carole’s an incredible farmer and conservationist,’ Court

winery founded on biodynamic practices – including sheep

tells me, ‘and a humanist. She is someone who has seen and done

in the vineyard that trim the grass, clip the brush and fertilize

it all’ – including raising birds of prey and husbanding the Dailley

the grapevines; and birds of prey that keep starlings and other

flock: officially Flock #1 in the North American Shetland Sheep

birds that threaten the grapes at bay. And the best part – David

Registry.

and Louise purchase both their sheep and birds of prey from Carole at Chassagne.


30

BETHANY & SEB, ZOCALO ORGANICS

STUART, ELMIRA'S OWN

Sebastian Ramirez and Bethany Klapwyk began living their

The greenhouses at Elmira's Own are truly awe-inspiring. Row

dream when, in 2014, they purchased Deerfields Nursery –

upon row of tomato plants – towering into the sky above – fill the

an eighty-three-acre organic farm located between Guelph

indoor growing space. When we toured the facility, owner Stuart

and Hillsburgh. A community hub that relies on the support

Horst used a small knife to trim a few leaves off a single plant:

of family, friends, neighbours and volunteers, the re-named

‘We regularly prune the plants by hand to ensure the perfect

Zocalo Organics supplies The Neighbourhood Group with

balance of fruit and leaf per stalk,’ he noted. The perfect balance,

seasonal salad mixes, cucumbers, herbs and other vegetables.

resulting in the perfect tomato – and served at Neighbourhood

And get this: Zocalo also provides restaurant staff with CSA

Group restaurants.

(Community Shared Agriculture) farm shares – delivered to the restaurants – so employees can enjoy fresh organic produce at home too.


31


DAYTRIPPIN’

ONE COMMUNIT Y LE ADE R . SH ARI NG A FAV OU R IT E DAY OU T AR OU N D OU R R E G ION .

BECKY HOOD, CHEF 39 CARDEN & STREET FOOD GUELPH As a full-time chef, Chef Becky Hood lives by the motto: ‘Wednesdays are my Saturdays!’ So here’s a tour of Becky’s perfect ‘weekend’ – a glorious Wednesday traversing the region – in her words:

BECKY

1. I begin the day with a walk through The ST . PATR IC K ’S W ARD SOUTHEAST OF DOWNTOWN

Ward – my Guelph ‘hood – with my dog and best bud, Lily. Century cottages dotting narrow streets. Eclectic homes that once housed butcher shops, grocers and cobblers. Craft breweries and ethnic restaurants – all of these make The Ward so special.

2. I drop Lily home and meander to my favourite coffee spot – The Common on Wilson in Downtown Guelph. I order an Americano. Kids play near the café’s massive

3232

windows while regulars chat with Kia – the

T H E C OMMO N

KIA

shop’s amazing owner. The music’s great. Everyone’s happily caffeinated. And the décor

36 WILSON ST, GUELPH

is light and whimsical – like a hipster cottage.

3. Americano in hand, I hit the streets on a quest for thrift. I pop into Take Time Vintage where I peruse pins, patches and prints. Then it’s on to Dis-A-Ray on Wyndham – a destination for those who appreciate vintage, bikes and taxidermy. I pick up a taxidermy bat for my beau Al before heading to his place – Al’s Sandwiches, located downtown in Trotters Butcher Shop. I’m biased, I know, but Al’s sandwiches are the best! I tear through

T A K E T IME VINT AGE & D I S -A - R AY ANT IQ UE S

a ham & cheese before deciding to tour into Cambridge for more antiquing!

18 WILSON ST & 3 WYNDHAM ST N, GUELPH

AL’S SANDWI CH ES 42 CORK ST E, GUELPH AL

(INSIDE TROTTERS BUTCHER SHOP)


S OU T H WO R K S ANT IQ UE S

4.

73 WATER ST N, CAMBRIDGE

I arrive at Southworks Antiques where I

grab some classic Jays’ paraphernalia. Thirsty, I drive to The Old Marina Restaurant on

T H E O L D MAR INA R E ST AUR A NT 1947 M C CLINTOCK DR, CAMBRIDGE

Puslinch Lake. The patio view has me convinced I’m in Muskoka. I sit in the sun with a cold pint and watch the water-skiers.

D E E ’ S B U T T E R TAR T S

5. I head from Cambridge to Waterloo’s Orange

118 ST ANDREWS ST, CAMBRIDGE

Monkey Music for vinyl. I stop on the way at Dee’s Butter Tarts where I grab treats for later. When I get to Orange Monkey, I smell deliciousness wafting from The Jane Bond Café’s kitchen next door. I grab some vinyl before heading back to Guelph for dinner with Al at Baker Street Station. I drop the car and walk to Baker where Al’s waiting.

OR A N G E MO NK E Y & J A N E BO ND 5 PRINCESS ST W, (UPSTAIRS & MAIN

6.

FLOOR) WAT ERLOO

patio, I ask Johnny what’s good to drink. I settle

Seated contently on Baker’s second-storey

on a ‘Cascade Black Raspberry’ from Portland while Al orders a ‘Lady Friend’ from Elora Brewing Co. We order Chef Heather’s beef tartare. Pure bliss.

7. There’s still light in the sky as Al and I walk back through The Ward toward Royal City Brewing Co where we grab some ‘Two Rivers’

JOHNNY

and a growler of ‘Hibiscus Saison.’ On our walk home from the brewery, we stop at Na Ha

B AK E R STR E E T STATI ON 76 BAKER ST, GUELPH

Thai’s Kitchen for take-out. Shrimp rolls, grilled beef salad and green curry!

.

We finish the night on our porch with neighbours. We eat, drink and laugh as the sun sets. The perfect ‘weekend'

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S E L L I N G CO MMU N IT Y : B RO K E R A G E PRO F ILE

PLAN ET R EALT Y :

AN UNCOMMON, EXCEPTIONAL APPROACH BY CHRIS TIESSEN

36


I once asked a real estate broker friend of mine to describe a typical relationship between brokers. He began with a question: ‘Do you remember Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog?’, he asked, alluding to the animated cartoon characters in the Warner Bros’ Looney Tunes series from the ‘50s and ‘60s. ‘Those animated shorts describe brokers’ relationships precisely. We punch in our time cards each morning and then proceed to attempt to beat up on each others’ business all day long. And when the day’s done,’ he continued, ‘we punch out and go our

the case of River Mill Condos, Karen and her team

separate ways ‘til the next morning when we do it all

managed to sell out the entire eighteen-storey

over again.’

building in less than a year.

It can be a cutthroat business for sure – running a real

Other developments that have been, or are being,

estate brokerage. And not one in which, over time,

marketed and sold by Planet Realty include Vista Hills

you can expect to make many close broker friends.

in Waterloo, Belmont Village Condos (by Tricar) in

And yet there are those few who manage to remain

Kitchener, Madison Lane Condos in Bowmanville and

not only respected but also well liked by colleagues

Coventry (by Earth Park Homes) in Stratford.

and competitors alike – even after many successes in the business. Karen Kessel, the founder and Broker of Record at Planet Realty Brokerage Inc, is one such individual. Over coffee at Robusta Café and Lounge (located on the ground floor of the River House luxury condo tower in downtown Guelph), our conversation casts light on why this is so.

‘I’m proud of what we’ve been able to accomplish,’ notes Karen, who has more than thirty years of diverse experience behind her – including proficiencies in legal, marketing, sales, advertising, public relations and customer service. ‘ And I’m especially proud of how we’ve been able to go about doing it.’ She continues: ‘In a region like ours, personal relationships

‘Over the past several years,’ notes Karen, ‘our team

mean a great deal. With developers. Builders. Clients.

has built the brokerage by focusing on relationship

And, I’d say, competitors. We’re all in this together,

building and collaboration. With only myself, Matthew

after all – connected by a shared passion for this

[LaFontaine] and Tyson [Hinschberger] working on the

region. And we all have important roles to play

front lines with developer stakeholders and clients,

to ensure that its continued growth is stewarded

our reputation and results are paramount.’ She takes

appropriately. And,' she adds, 'lovingly.'

a sip and says with a grin: ‘I think we’re doing a pretty good job.’

We’ve finished our coffees, but chat a little longer. I know she’s busy, and I need to get to a photo shoot

Pretty good might be a pretty substantial

across town. But I am so fond of her company, and

understatement. Consider this: since its inception

more so every time we meet – for interviews like

seven years ago, Planet Realty has successfully

these, photo shoots with her team, conversations

managed over three hundress million dollars in real

about marketing and strategy and real estate. I

estate sales. ‘Our formula is simple,’ Karen observes,

think back to how that area broker described his

casually. ‘We focus primarily on two distinct audiences

relationship with other brokers – of Ralph Wolf and

looking to buy or sell real estate – baby boomers

Sam Sheepdog – and wonder where Karen might fit

looking to downsize and those engaging in condo

into this analogy. But not for long, because I realize

lifestyle.' In Guelph, this has amounted to Karen’s team

she doesn’t. And she doesn’t have to. Because, as it

driving sales at Village by the Arboretum, a gorgeous

stands, what Karen – and Planet Realty – is doing is

55+ adult lifestyle community situated next to the

grounded in relationship building and collaboration.

University of Guelph, as well as at River House and

Which might be an uncommon, exceptional approach.

River Mill luxury condos (by The Tricar Group), located

It’s certainly highly successful

next to the Speed River in Guelph’s downtown. In

.

PLANET REALTY 33 BAYBERRY DR, GUELPH

planetrealty.ca

37


UNCOVERING WELLINGTON COUNTY

3838

TOP MARKET MEATS BY CHRIS TIESSEN

ARISS

When you first meet Leslie Zinger, you quickly

Indeed, Top Market Meats’ products are

understand how she has built a successful

literally flavoured by the County (including

farm business raising livestock. She cares

Taste Real partners). As Leslie notes: ‘We

deeply about the welfare of her animals, is

feed our pigs peelings from Country Flavour

passionate about a great product, and is a

Canning just down the road, spent grains from

natural when it comes to building strong

Innocente Brewing, and – at our annual post-

relationships with clients. Leslie and her

Halloween Pumpkin and Pig Party – pumpkins

family operate Top Market Meats – a fourth-

from all over the County.’

generation, eighty-acre rabbit, goat, pork and

To uncover more delicious local events, stories,

poultry farm located in Ariss, just outside of Guelph. Top Market Meats is but one of many farms and local food businesses in the Guelph and Wellington area that partner with Taste Real – a local food program by the County of Wellington that creates lasting and valuable connections among farmers, food businesses and consumers. A program that helps promote local food, make it more readily available and, often, even taste better.

.

farms and food businesses, check the Taste Real Local Food Map or visit tastereal.ca


RECIPE : D ’ E V E A N D O WE N’S W ED D IN G GO AT C UR R Y ( W / T O P MAR K E T GO AT )

T O P T EN T O U R A ND T A S T E A D VE N T U R E S IN W E L L I N G T O N C O UNT Y

(serves 4)

by Chef Ben Sachse (Elora Brewing Co)

1.

I N GR ED I EN T S : 2 lbs cubed goat shoulder or leg ( or 3 lbs of

2.

bone-in for better flavour)

3.

Marinade: 4 tbsp curry powder  1 tsp ginger, finely chopped

4.

1 tbsp vegetable oil  1 tsp salt  1 tsp pepper

5.

For the Curry:

6.

¼ vegetable oil  1 medium onion, chopped  4 cloves garlic, chopped 

7.

1 or 2 sprigs of thyme  3 cups water  6-8 allspice berries 

8.

1 tbsp jerk seasoning  2 large potatoes, cubed and peeled

Let rest at least 3-4 hours (even better overnight). In a large Dutch Oven, heat oil.

9. 10.

in pot for caramelization. Add scotch bonnet, allspice, jerk seasoning, and enough water to almost cover the goat meat. Let simmer until meat is tender (approx. 2 hours). Add potatoes in last 30 minutes and remaining thyme before serving.

S ER VI N G S UGG E S T I O N: Rice and beans; garnish with a handful of chopped scallions.

Dine ‘al fresco’ and soak up the rays on Enver’s of Morriston’s unique patio Extend BBQ season with fresh meats from Harriston Packers Find your way through Strom’s Farm’s corn maze Tune up your preserving skills with a Minga culinary workshop Pick your own pumpkins at Butt’s Berry and Flower Farm Get a glimpse of Old Order Mennonite culture at one of the many ‘Butter Tarts and Buggies’

39

Order local turkey for your Thanksgiving feast at Blue Haven Farm Indulge in a freshly baked pumpkin pie at Belwood Country Market Go for a drive and explore a different Wellington/Guelph farmers’ market each week

Sear marinated goat until browned. Add onion, garlic and half the thyme. Saute with meat and loosen up brown bits

Carrot Fest

locations

1 or ½ scotch bonnet 

METHOD: Mix marinade ingredients and toss with goat.

Dig your own carrots at Everdale Farm’s

U PC O M I N G T A ST E RE A L EV E N T S FALL RU RAL ROMP SEPTEMBER 30, 2017 SOUTHERN WELLINGTON COUNTY Explore local farms, taste the harvest and learn about local food and agriculture on this free, self-guided food and farm tour. Farm animals, barbeque lunches, tours, wagon rides, farm fresh food and more.

Learn more about finding local food, experiences and events in Wellington County/ Guelph at tastereal.ca


40

Pulling shots at The Common on Wilson St in downtown Guelph. Remember to support our regional small businesses who are suffering through road construction this Fall – from Wilson St in Guelph to King St in Uptown Waterloo and beyond.


‘COFFEE IS A LOT MORE THAN JUST A DRINK; IT’S SOMETHING HAPPENING. NOT AS IN HIP, BUT LIKE AN EVENT, A PLACE TO BE, BUT NOT LIKE A LOCATION, BUT LIKE SOMEWHERE WITHIN YOURSELF. IT GIVES YOU TIME, BUT NOT ACTUAL HOURS OR MINUTES, BUT A CHANCE TO BE, LIKE BE

Until January 7, 2018 | Guest curated by Lisa Hunter

YOURSELF, AND HAVE A SECOND CUP.’ -GERTRUDE STEIN

guelphmuseums.ca 41

Our next 11-week Intro to Derby Program (aka Fresh Meat) starts SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 23. Open to anyone 18+ who wants to play and/or referee.

JOIN THE

ROLLER DERBY

For more information, contact: freshmeat@royalcityrollergirls.com


MORE RESIDENTS = MORE PATIOS

A downtown neighbour of mine recently approached me with a request. He has been a good neighbour for almost 20 years now, never bothering me with noise, never interfering with the enjoyment of my property by either myself or my client residents. His request seemed simple enough and, furthermore, I supported his vision. His property is an old warehouse-type structure that has over the years housed small local businesses. It is not an eyesore. But no one would call it an architectural credit to the neighbourhood. It is the type of property that tends to be re-developed in progressive burgeoning communities. In struggling communities, they linger. (Suburban Buffalo is full of them.)

cbn.on.ca

42

EXPERT OPINION | REAL ESTATE

JEFF NEUMANN

His request: ‘Would I be willing to write a letter of support for his efforts to repurpose his property into a 14-storey condo complex?’ My unarticulated immediate thought, was: ‘Wait a minute - you want to remove this old

underdeveloped hodgepodge and replace it with 140 tax-paying families, within walking distance to downtown shops, restaurants, and the Go Station?’ That his plan should be in need of an extra shot of support frankly astounds me. There is no loser here. Downtown businesses will benefit. An additional 140 families will add to the burgeoning cultural mosaic of the downtown core. And, generally speaking, the metamorphosis that began to transform Downtown Guelph the instant the first highrise condo was announced will continue. For those of us who prefer a bustling boutique restaurant patio on a warm summer’s night to the downtown student bar scene, bringing in residents has been and will continue to be the solution. To those who would like to keep the 140 families out, I have a plea: we were all newcomers once; let’s embrace those who follow with open arms. Thanks for reading, Jeff Neumann


'AT SOME POINT IN LIFE, THE WORLD'S BEAUTY BECOMES ENOUGH.'

-TONI MORRISON

43


WE PRINT LOCALLY ON 100% POSTCONSUMER RECYCLED PAPER. 44


45

TOQUE SWAG. FOLLOW

@TOQUELTD FOR NEW RELEASES

OR VISIT US AT TOQUEMAGAZINE.COM


Build a house. Make it a home.

Roof

46

Solid line = cut

“Home is also where your hopes and dreams are. Dreaming about when you grow up. Being a spaceman or a firefighter. Sinking beneath the sea as a scuba diver. I couldn’t imagine living without my dreams.” Wynn, Grade 5

Dotted line = fold

What does home mean to you? Tell us by: Step 1: Drawing, sketching or writing your version of home in the cut-out above. It can be as simple as writing a few words, or colouring in the whole house! Step 2: Tearing out* the page and following the simple steps to build your home Step 3: Sharing a selfie of you and your home, tagging @HabitatWDG on Instagram & Twitter

Let’s build it together. #thisishome Learn more about our builds at habitatwdg.ca *We checked, and TOQUE MAGAZINE fully supports this activity. Let’s get building!


MEET YOUR MAKER

KILLER CUPCAKES W H AT DO YO U GE T W H E N Y O U MI X C U L T CL ASSI C MO V IE S , LAS V E G A S , RO C K ‘N ’ RO LL AN D A K NAC K F O R B A K IN G ? KI L L ER CUP CAK E S GO R E M E T , O F C O UR S E! T H E BRAI N CH I L D O F B US INE S S (A ND L I F E) PAR TN ER S NIC O LE AND S Y M O N W I L K, T H I S D OWN TOWN G U E LP H DE S T INA T I O N D O ES N ’T TAKE I TSELF T O O S E R IO U S LY . Y ET I T S B A KED GOODS – C UP C A K E S A ND DE S SER T C A KES – ARE SE R I O U S LY DE LIC IO US . A N D W I T H N AMES LI K E ‘ J O H NNY R O T T E N B A N A N A , ' ‘DOCTOR GO NZO ’ A ND ‘ LIL GO OD I E T W O SH OE S,' TH E Y ’ LL H AV E Y O U W A N T I N G T O T R Y EVER Y FEAT U R E O N T H E M E NU. J U S T B E S U R E TO VI SI T TH E P LAC E E A R LY O N A N Y G I V EN D AY – TH E S E T R E AT S T E ND T O S EL L OU T !

32A WILSON ST, DOWNTOWN GUELPH H OURS: W ed-Sun,

10am til SOLDOUT killercupcakes.ca IN S PIRATION : S e x, D rugs & Ro c k ‘ n’ Ro l l CUSTOM ER F AVES : ‘Truffle Shuffle’ (dark chocolate w/ caramel whipped cream filling) & ‘Bad Mother Fluffer’ (peanut butter, chocolate chip & marshmallow) W H AT’S N EXT: L as Ve gas

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47


S E L L I N G CO MMU N IT Y : R E A L TO R P R OF ILE

AARON ZUCCALA:

T HE MOS T AWES OME PER SON Y OU SH OU LD K N OW BY CHRIS TIESSEN

48

Aaron Zuccala is not a household name. Not yet,

It became evident immediately, though, that those who had

anyways.

already gathered not only knew who Aaron was, but were

For the past decade he has flown under the radar as part of a larger Guelph real estate team. Last November, though, this all changed when Aaron set out on his own.

keen to embrace him. ‘He’s the most charming fellow,’ noted Chef Becky Hood at the shoot. ‘He’s warm and supportive. Honestly, everyone loves Aaron.’

As an agent. A bold move, for sure. And, from what I

Which seems true enough. Indeed, Aaron’s real estate clients

experienced firsthand on an evening this past June, a

include everyone from first-time buyers to retirees looking

smart one too. Simply put: Aaron’s something of a rock

to downsize. ‘From 25 to 75,’ Aaron says. ‘Everyone’s looking

star. But I digress. On to the story.

for the same thing, after all – someone they can trust and

*** ‘Aaron Zuccala is the most awesome person I know!’

rely on. It may mean deliberately wearing long sleeves to

The shout seemed come out of nowhere – punctuating the still summer evening air with a real fervor. Seconds later, another voice: ‘He should run for mayor!’ Others

showings,’ he adds with a chuckle, referring to the tattoos he hides for particular clients, ‘but that’s fine! As long as I get the job done – and develop genuine relationships along the way!’

chimed in – each one-upping the last in a crescendo of

Later that June night, I text Aaron to let him know how

superlatives describing the man who had just driven

positively folks seemed to feel about him. ‘Well this means

away, down a laneway on a country estate somewhere

more than you know and warms my heart,’ he texted

in Wellington County.

back. ‘Also,’ he added, ‘thanks for inviting me as well as for

Some context. We’d just wrapped up a food truck shoot for this issue (see page 94), and I had invited Aaron to be one of the shoot’s models. His tattoos. Hip(ster)

producing the magazine; it’s a work of art that brings good people together.’ Pure Aaron – always working to shine a light on others.

moustache. Thick-rimmed specs. Infectious smile. He’d

Gosh, I’m beginning to think Aaron Zuccala is the most

be perfect, I’d thought when brainstorming a list of

awesome person I know, too!

people to invite. My one concern: that Aaron wouldn’t know anyone and might feel out of place. A concern that only increased when I saw him pulling up to the shoot alone.

AARON ZUCCALA, REALTOR

cbn.on.ca


WE SHAPE OUR BUILDINGS; THEREAFTER THEY SHAPE US. -WINSTON CHURCHILL 49


50

MARTINSIMMONS.C A


51


52

19. 7k m

FROM YOUR GLASS

wellington Brewery

Meet marvin. one of our brewers.


DISCOVERING LOCAL:

53

G O ODFEL L OWS F IE LD TO F ORK

M AI

BY CHRIS TIESSEN

N

beautifully-worn wood counter and see a

Parkdale,’ Ryan emphasizes several times –

sharpened four-inch butcher blade hovering

ended up on the main strip in Rockwood. And

inches from my face. ‘Go on,’ Chef Ryan

they’re offering me a wonderful espresso. And

coaxes. ‘Trust me.’ Then, ‘this one’ll blow your

cheese.

mind.’ On the end of his knife – a sizable chunk of heaven. I carefully remove the morsel and take a bite. Gooey pungent perfection. Cheese. Yep – this is my job. It’s a Tuesday morning in August. I’ve just dropped off the kids – one at daycare and one at summer camp. And now I’m hanging out at Rockwood’s Goodfellows Field to Fork. And the sun is streaming in through the massive front window emblazoned with the business’s logo. And I’m chatting with owners Ryan and Claudia Goodfellow about how in the world these two

‘From Rivers Edge Goat Dairy in Arthur,’ Ryan declares proudly, pointing at the remaining hunk. This will become a common theme throughout my visit; namely, Claudia and Ryan highlighting products from area farms. ‘Even the starter for our sourdough is derived of spent grains from Royal City Brewing Co, Wellington Brewery, and Stonehammer Brewing,’ Ryan offers. ‘And our gluten-free sourdough uses a starter that combines homemade kombucha with gluten-free flour from Flour Barrel in Guelph.’

AL

M

.

.S

successful Red Seal chefs from Toronto – ‘from

ST

ST

‘Try this.’ I look up from the bakery’s

S

ROCKWOOD


SOURCE: î ¢ @GOODFELLOWSF2F

54


55

I get the sense that these former Toronto chefs

banks of the mighty Eramosa in the township

simply can’t get enough of our area farms and

of Guelph/Eramosa.

local producers. ‘Each Wednesday afternoon, we buy enough meat and produce at the Rockwood farmers’ market to last us through Friday,’ Ryan boasts. ‘And then each Saturday morning, we’re off to Guelph [ten minutes by car; thirty by bike] to buy enough at the downtown market to last through Wednesday.’ Their affection for these communities is palpable. And what they have on offer at Goodfellows reflects this relationship, with menu items changing in response to what they can source locally. Delectable items like Focaccia Barese. Sususmelle cookies. Sweet and savory scones. Nutella Pockets. Vegan pizza with roasted asparagus. I could go on. But back to how these two ended up here in Rockwood – a small village nestled along the

‘Kijiji . We actually found the place on kijiji,’ notes Claudia with a chuckle. ‘Truth be told, we’d never even heard of Rockwood before we saw the online listing.’ But after checking out the tiny town and scouting the potential of the location – which involved stealthily parking across the road and counting how many cars drove past on a typical morning – Claudia and Ryan decided to take the plunge: ‘We thought if we got even a small fraction of the car and foot traffic that passes by the place, we’d manage to keep the lights [and oven] on.’ And so they dove in. During the winter of 2016 Claudia and Ryan decided to quit their jobs at The Tempered Room in Toronto. (One or the other of them had also worked at


56


The Intercontinental, Forno Cultura, The Healthy Butcher, Rowe Farms and others.) By the end of March they opened the doors of Goodfellows Field to Fork. ‘Back then,’ remarks Claudia, ‘we simply sold everything out of the basement kitchen.’ A kitchen that’s accessible only if you head outside and go around the corner, as I discovered when Ryan led me into that small space with a ceiling so low I couldn’t stand straight. ‘We started out with a single oven, a fridge we bought at the Habitat for Humanity ReStore, two metal shelving units, and a collapsible table where Claudia would knead the bread,’ Ryan recalls. ‘A table that kept collapsing almost every time I used it,’ adds Claudia. ‘It was enough to make me want to pack it all in.’ But they didn’t. Instead, the two chefs and life partners – determined to make things work – worked to make things work. At the beginning, money from catering helped them get established. By August 2016 they were finally able to open their ‘small artisanal Italian bakery’ upstairs. And since then, things have really taken off. Now, besides enticing and satisfying regulars and new converts at their shop in Rockwood, they distribute Goodfellows items to Top Market Meats (in Cambridge), Little Tree Garden Market (in Fergus), and The Stone Store, The Common and Rowe Farms (all in Guelph). Although I could chill at Goodfellows all day, by noon it’s time for me to go. Not before loading up on all sorts of goodies, though. On the short drive back to Guelph, I devour a gluten-free Toad in the

.

Hole with basil, juniper, pesto, cremini mushrooms and goat cheese. And my mind is blown. And I thank God for kijiji

GOODFELLOWS FIELD TO FORK 155 MAIN ST S, ROCKWOOD

goodfellowsf2f.ca

57


CHARITIES & CAKES – A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

58

I still remember the first time I baked a cake. It was for my mom’s birthday the summer I was thirteen. It was one of my earliest lessons in the importance of having a clear set of guidelines, a workable plan, a strong foundation: whether you’re talking about baking, investing, or even running a charity, it really comes down to following the right recipe. Building a good cake starts with a quality batter baked to perfection; then the layers, held together with a tasty filling that complements the texture and flavor of the batter for an irresistible final product. Even the fanciest decorating won’t make a poor batter taste better.

themactaggartteam.com

58

EXPERT OPINION | INVESTMENT

WILL MACTAGGART

A recent report published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review by Michael Etzel, a partner at Bridgespan, a nonprofit consultancy, and Hilary Pennington, a VP at the Ford Foundation, highlights the trap that many charities fall into when they are not built upon, and supported by, a strong recipe for success. To extend the metaphor, too often charities that lack a good foundation find themselves having to

MACT_OakTree_Toque_Ad_7.5x4.75_photo_SB_HR_Jun3017.pdf

1

focus on the ‘decorating’ rather than on a solid substructure to secure funding or support. Like the cake, charities need a quality foundation on which their programs are built. They need to assemble an appropriate proportion of ingredients that might include basic overhead, proper compensation and development for their people, and cash reserves to deal with unforeseen challenges. Without addressing these needs, how will they maximize their impact now, and in the future? Charities built on a solid base have the ability to innovate, the freedom to collaborate with others, and the capacity to build programs that increase their impact and support a more resilient community. As donors and community supporters, we have a responsibility to help them keep the lights on and the doors open. Food for thought as you think about your own charitable giving. Richardson is a trade-mark of James Richardson & Sons, Limited. GMP is a registered trade-mark of GMP Securities L.P. Both used under license by Richardson GMP Limited. 

2017-06-30

10:04 AM


GETTING TO KNOW:

AJOA MINTAH, FOUR ALL ICE CREAM INTERVIEW BY CHRIS TIESSEN 60

60

I C E CR E A M ’ S CERT AIN LY A WON D ERFUL T HI NG . I T R E MIN D S U S OF CH ILD HOOD. A N D I NN O C EN CE. AN D ALL T H AT IS G O O D I N THIS WO RLD . I RECEN T LY GOT T HE CH A N C E T O VISIT AJ OA MIN T AH, O W N E R & CH IEF ICE CREAM MAK E R AT K I TC H E N E R ’ S F OU R ALL ICE CREAM, T O CH A T A B O U T H ER BU SIN ESS, EN TR E P R E NEU RSH IP, AN D WH AT PAIRS B E S T WI TH I C E CREAM. H ERE’S WHAT SHE H A D TO S A Y :

FOUR ALL ICE CREAM 141 WHITNEY PL #105, KITCHENER

fourall.ca


WHY 'FOUR ALL'? Four All has two meanings. Firstly, I wanted to create ice cream that everyone can enjoy – regardless of dietary choices or issues. Secondly, I wanted our flavours to reflect my own family of four, where we each seek a different experience when choosing ice cream. I’m a ‘foodie’, my husband is ‘classic’, my youngest is ‘childhood’, and my oldest is ‘vegan/ dairy free’. WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR KEY COLLABORATORS? Eby Manor for milk, obviously. Herrle’s and The Good Peach have been amazing at getting us fresh produce. And companies like Descendants Beer & Beverage have helped us push the envelope in term of unusual ingredients for ice cream. Like-minded businesses such as Legacy Greens have also been instrumental in terms of helping us get our product to the community. WHERE CAN SOMEONE FIND FOUR ALL AROUND THE REGION? Scoops and pints are available at our tasting room and Legacy Greens, while pints are available at Dana Shortt Gourmet, Herrles, Descendants Brewery, Eco Café and more. WHAT'S THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE OF ENTREPRENEURSHIP? Everything is challenging! There is no rule book, there is no routine, and nothing goes to plan. You simply have to be all in, and willing to do what it takes for what you believe in. We just launched this May and I’m still waiting for a normal week where everything goes according to plan.

NAME SOME OF YOUR FAVOURITE LOCAL

WHAT'S THE MOST FUN PART OF YOUR WORK DAY?

RESTAURANTS / DESSERT PLACES IN THE

The best part for me is watching people eat our product.

REGION?

Some of our customers are people who’ve never had good ice

There are a lot of great choices in this area. For lunch,

cream before due to food sensitivities. I love seeing people

I love Bao Sandwich Bar and the Yeti. For dinner, Red

take that first taste – especially when they’re kids.

House and The Berlin are recent faves. As for desserts

WHAT ARE YOU DOING WHEN NOT MAKING ICE CREAM? My favourite thing to do is hanging out with my kiddos – ages 6 and 9 – doing whatever they want. WHAT PAIRS BEST WITH ICE CREAM? Everything! And, surprisingly, booze. Check out our Wicked Wednesday blog and Instagram posts (@fourallicecream) for ice cream and sorbet cocktail ideas. WHAT'S NEXT FOR THE BUSINESS? More learning and more growing.  We plan to continue making ice cream throughout the fall and winter.  And will expand our offerings to an online store and home/business delivery options.

– I feel like I don’t visit Ambrosia Pastry enough. I’ve never been disappointed by anything there!  


REDISCOVERING THE BOOKSHELF

THE BOOKSHELF’S CAFÉ PHILOSOPHIQUE: FOOD FOR THOUGHT

6262

BY CHRIS TIESSEN W YD H .H

EB

.

ST

U

ST

AM

Q

EC

DOWNTOWN GUELPH

Ask almost anyone in Guelph where the

of Arts, and the Eden Mills Writers’ Festival.

community’s cultural hub resides, and

The series has brought speakers from across

chances are a good number of folks will

North America to the city to share their ideas

answer quickly and succinctly: ‘The Bookshelf.’

and writings about a wide range of topics

Indeed, Guelph’s favourite bookstore, cinema,

from both fictional and non-fictional worlds.

restaurant and bar (which also functions as a

Past speakers include (but are far from limited

live music and performance venue and gallery)

to): Massey Lecturers Adam Gopnik and

nourishes mind, body and soul – all under one

Lawrence Hill, former Ontario Premier Bob

roof. Consider this: The Bookshelf has hosted

Rae, Lieutenant General Romeo Dallaire, and

Margaret Atwood each time she’s published a

novelists Yann Martel and Emma Donnohue.

major novel. Not small potatoes. As Bookshelf

This Fall, The Bookshelf continues to build

co-owner Ben Minett muses: ‘It’s hard to put parameters around what The Bookshelf does – and means – for Guelph. Our programing continues to expand as we attempt to satiate Guelph’s appetite for good books, movies, food, music and more.’ To be sure.

on the Café Philosophique brand with a presentation by 2017 Massey Lecturer Payam Akhavan, reading from and discussing his compelling new book, ‘In Search of a Better World: A Human Rights Odyssey.’ Be sure

.

not to miss this event – to be held October

Take Café Philosophique, for example – a

7th, 7pm at Knox Presbyterian Church in

collaborative lecture series put on by The

Guelph

Bookshelf, The University of Guelph College


M O V I E S:

5 UP CO MING FILMS NO T TO BE MIS S E D!

1. The Big Sick 2. Baby Driver 

‘…one of the most entertaining thrill rides of this

bookshelf.ca

DOWNTOWN GUELPH

year, this decade.’

–Richard Roeper, Chicago Sun-Times

3. Viceroy's House Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to 4. An Power

‘Throughout the film … the spectre of Trump

BOOK E VE NT S : Guelph author Greg Rhyno launches his debut novel, ‘To Me You Are Giant,' with the help of

looms ominously.’

– Matthew Turner, iNews.co.uk

5. Tulip Fever

1990s Canrock cover band 94FM

Check future listings at bookshelf.ca or in our

Sept 7, 8:30pm @ ebar

monthly newsletter, Off The Shelf. 

Eden Mills Writer's Festival (with support of The Bookshelf and U of Guelph) presents Naomi Klein Sept 9, 1pm @ War Memorial Hall, U of Guelph Karen Connolly launches her erotic new novel, ‘The Change Room,' in conversation with Professor of Feminist Thought, Karen Houle Sept 20, 7pm @ ebar Café Philosophique presents 2017 Massey Lecturer Payam Akhavan, to read from and discuss his compelling new book, ‘In Search of a Better World: A Human Rights Odyssey’  Oct 17, 7pm @ Knox United Church Authors and activists will be on hand to launch ‘Powered By Love: A Grandmother Movement to End AIDS in Africa,' in support of the Stephen

L I V E EN T ER T A I N M ENT: The Femmes Rebelles Sept 9 & Nov 4 Titillating burlesque show Fierce! Sept 15 & October 20, 10pm Guelph’s only queer monthly dance party Hip Hop/Grime Night Sept 16, 11pm  Proceeds from the door are donated to The Black Heritage Society Guelph Poetry Slam ft. Johnny Trinh October 20, 7:30pm

Lewis Foundation

Heroes & Villains Art Opening

Nov 7, 7pm @ War Memorial Hall, U of Guelph

October 25, 8pm ebar gallery exhibits are curated by artist Eric Allen Montgomery

Stay current with The Bookshelf news & events at bookshelf.ca @bookshelfnews @ebar_guelph


S ELLI N G CO M MU N IT Y : R EAL TO R P R O F ILE

GIA LUCCHETTA:

C OM M U NITY. FOOD. AN D R EA L EST A T E. ( N O T N EC ES SAR ILY IN THAT O R DER) BY CHRIS TIESSEN During one of several existential crises after graduate school and before ‘life,' I considered becoming a realtor. When I discussed this possibility with a local broker friend, he asked what was holding me back. ‘The

64

overabundance of realtors in the region, for starters,’ I answered. His response has stayed with me: ‘Don’t worry about that,’ he said. ‘There’s always room for the best.’

adding ‘I’ve learned from both over the past three decades.’ And it helps, she asserts, that she’s selling Guelph. ‘There’s nothing easier, in my opinion, than selling this community. Its character. Personality. History. Food.’ I sense her real passion for the Royal City and its heritage. Indeed, Gia’s historical stone house is evidence of this. The tongueand-groove pine soffets. Interior wood trim. The original

Words to live by, no doubt. And words that ring true

windows (lovingly restored). ‘I’m this house’s custodian –

when I encounter Guelph realtor Gia Lucchetta –

nothing more,’ she remarks.

unquestionably among ‘the best.’

‘What keeps this career especially exciting for me is helping

We are sitting in her beautifully-landscaped garden

clients connect with our community. Recommending

in the gorgeous historic neighbourhood sandwiched

dentists. Doctors. Schools. Restaurants.’ She smiles: ‘Always

between downtown Guelph and Exhibition Park. There’s

restaurants.’ Indeed, the foodie in Gia would have it no other

a vegetable garden not far from where we’re seated, and

way. ‘A perfect day for me,’ she continues, ‘would include

a massive stone wood-fired oven. Heavenly.

selling houses, making great food, and breaking bread with

‘It’s really incredible that I’ve been at this game for twenty-nine years now,’ Gia remarks. ‘And especially amazing,’ she adds, ‘that it’s been with the same brokerage all this time.’ What Gia – a fierce negotiator

others.’ It’s no surprise that all her business now comes from repeat referrals. Indeed, even folks whom Gia first dealt with as clients over two decades ago continue to use – and recommend – her.

who loves saving her clients money – neglects

Gia asks if I’d like to see her small vegetable garden. As

to mention is how she’s ranked in the top 3% of

she’s picking some grape tomatoes for that night’s dinner

approximately 18,000 Royal LePage agents nationally.

– with friends, of course – I ask Gia whether she sees any

Or how she’s one of a handful of Guelph agents who’s

pertinent connections between her two passions: food

respected by her peers and sought after by seeming

and real estate. After a moment, she answers: ‘They’re

everyone else.

both about community. About spending time with people.

It took a while for this not atypical ‘twenty-something’ to become fully invested in the business. ‘But time and experience are certainly the best teachers,’ she says,

About building relationships.’ As she passes me a bright red tomato, I nod in agreement. GIA LUCCHETTA, REALTOR

withgia.ca


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FOUR’S A CHARM:

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HOW TONY & R O B TH E O D O S I O U AR E PUTTIN G TH E I R S TA MP O N W A TER L OO R E GI O N’ S C O FFE E , B E ER & CUL IN A R Y S C E NE BY CHRIS TIESSEN

‘It’s been an absolutely insane ride,’ remarks

on King Uptown), a second ABE ERB location

Tony Theodosiou over pints of Buggywhip

(December 2016, in The Tannery in Downtown

IPA at ABE ERB in The Tannery. ‘But one that’s

Kitchener), and a second Settlement Co.

been as invigorating as it’s been exhausting.’

(March 2017, at King and Victoria Downtown).

Not quite as exhausting today as it was

Mind you, their plan wasn’t always about

when Tony and his brother Rob and their

diving into the restaurant business so deep,

phenomenal team opened their first ABE ERB,

and so soon. Indeed, Rob and Tony were quite

mind you. ‘I didn’t get a day off for the first

content to hold fast for a while, at least, with

four hundred days we were in business,’ Tony

their flagship (Waterloo) locations of ABE ERB

continues. ‘I’ve had a few since,’ he allows.

and Settlement Co. That is, until the landlord at

Then, after a pause: ‘albeit only a few.’

The Tannery came knocking.

Since launching their first ABE ERB Brewing

‘After we’d opened our Waterloo

Company location (on King Street in Uptown

establishments,’ Tony recalls, ‘we were content.

Waterloo) in November 2014, the brothers

The businesses were growing, and we were

Theodosiou have launched Settlement Co.

looking forward to reveling in them for at least

Eatery & Coffee Roaster (December 2015, also


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a few years before starting work on something

and Kitchener with wonderful culinary spaces

else.’ He continues: ‘We’d decided together

that befit the region’s evolving reputation as a

that the only way we were opening a new

world-leading community.

place in the twin cities was if we could get into The Tannery.’ He reaches for his Buggywhip, takes a prolonged sip, and concludes, grinning: ‘And then we were invited to open a second ABE ERB at The Tannery.’

It’s apparent as soon as you walk in the front door of either ABE ERB or Settlement Co. – at any of their locations – that you’ve entered an inspired space. ‘Both ABE ERB locations have been influenced by the look and feel of the

He looks right at me, a twinkle in his eye. ‘We

craft beer scene in Vancouver and Toronto,’

simply couldn’t say no.’

Tony says. ‘Breweries like Brass Neck out

And we should all thank our lucky stars they didn’t. Indeed, the Kitchener locations of ABE ERB and Settlement Co. are like the Waterloo locations – but on steroids. More spacious, and

West and Bellwoods much closer to home have guided our aesthetic, for sure.’ And while Settlement Co. is all about coffee, it seems to borrow from the same aesthetic handbook.

with the same luscious food and beer (at ABE

To be sure, while each location is unique, the

ERB) and lighter fare and coffee (at Settlement

similarities and cross-references in all four

Co.). Four locations from which to choose. To

establishments point to their shared DNA

eat. To hold meetings and hang with friends.

rooted in Toronto’s Prototype Design Lab (or

To feel satisfied. All grounded in Rob and

PD Lab) – an ‘anything is possible’ design firm

Tony’s shared vision of providing Waterloo

that executed the interiors of Tony and Rob’s


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businesses. The result: a sort of over-the-top steampunkmeets-advanced technology aesthetic that’s simply mesmerizing – and manages to represent both Waterloo Region’s nineteenth-century industrial roots as well as its emergent role as global innovation hotbed. And then there’s the businesses’ homage to the region’s rich Mennonite heritage. The name Settlement Co., for instance, that conjures up Waterloo’s first settlers – Mennonites who moved here from Pennsylvania in the early 1800s. And the beers at ABE ERB – most notably Buggywhip IPA – that invoke and reflect the heritage heart of the region. And, of course, the name ABE ERB

.

itself, that celebrates Abraham Erb, the first of these pioneers: founder and – like Tony and Rob themselves – entrepreneur

ABE ERB 15 KING ST S, WATERLOO & 151 CHARLES ST W, KITCHENER

abeerb.com

SETTLEMENT CO. 23 KING ST N, WATERLOO & 1 VICTORIA ST S, KITCHENER

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GETTING TO KNOW: JARED FERRALL, CRAFTY RAMEN 74

74 INTERVIEW BY EMMA ROGERS

W I TH L U NCH T IME QU EU ES T H AT REGUL ARL Y S PI L L O U T THE D OO R AN D WIN D ONTO MA CD O N E L L ST REET IN D O WN T OW N G UE L P H, CR A F T Y RAMEN ’S O WN ERS JARED F ER R A L L A N D H IS PART N ER MIK I HAVE W HAT A N Y R E S TA URAN T EU RS D REAM O F : EARL Y A N D D R A M A T IC SU CCESS. O U R REGION IS U ND E R GO I NG A CU LIN ARY REN AISSANC E, W I TH I ND E P E N D EN T ‘BO U T IQ U E’ ESTA B L I S HM E N T S LIK E ST ILL- N EWISH C RAFTY R A M E N L E A D IN G T H E WAY . IN LAT E AUGUST, G UE L P HI TE EMMA ROG ERS SAT D OW N W ITH J AR E D F O R S OME RAPID F IRE Q U E STIONS. H E R E ’ S WH A T H E H AD T O SAY :

Toque Ltd. Partner Cai Sepulis finding inspiration for this project somewhere in Northern Ontario, Spring 2016. Photo by Toque Ltd. Partner Chris Tiessen


WHAT BROUGHT YOU TO GUELPH? I grew up in South Essex, England, but kept returning to Guelph to visit my four brothers. Miki and I just fell in love with the city.

WHERE DID YOU LEARN TO MAKE RAMEN? In Japan – at the Yamato Ramen school.

WHAT MAKES IT SO GOOD? It’s the ultimate comfort food – like chicken noodle soup on steroids.

WHAT DIFFERENTIATES RAMEN PLACES? I’d say there are two different kinds of ramen places – artisanal spots that make their own broth and toppings, and those spots that don’t. We’re more artisanal.

WITH WHOM DO YOU COLLABORATE MOST LOCALLY? Trotters Butcher Shop. If it wasn’t for them, we couldn’t do what we do.

WHAT INGREDIENT COULD YOU NEVER DO WITHOUT? Flour. It’s the base for so many things.

WHAT KITCHEN UTENSIL IS THE MOST IMPORTANT? A knife – all day long.

OTHER THAN RAMEN, WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE MEAL? A full English breakfast.

CRAFTY RAMEN 17 MACDONELL ST, GUELPH

craftyramen.com

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O N L I N E C O U R SES: S U S T AIN ABL E AN D L O CAL L Y GRO WN

Have you ever thought about producing

Certificate program participants interested in

food in an urban environment? Have you

producing food in an urban environment can

ever wondered what urban agriculture might

learn both theory and practical skills that are

have to do with online learning? In the last

environmentally sound and productive, and

ten years, while there has been an increased

that have the potential of making a positive

awareness of urban agriculture, there has also

impact on their communities.

been an increased interest in online learning, courses.opened.uoguelph.ca or guelphhort.com

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EXPERT COLUMN | LEARNING

76

For more on the Sustainable Landscapes Certificate:

MICHELLE FACH

and the two themes are ideally combined in the Sustainable Urban Agriculture Certificate at the University of Guelph. Gavin Dandy, the co-founder of Everdale Organic Farm and Directing Coordinator of a Guelph community food project called The SEED, is the Program instructor. He explains that people are hungry for locally grown food, and that urban agriculture – the practice of growing food in or around cities – is flourishing in Ontario, where innovative projects include hydroponics (growing in nutrient-enriched water), for example, and vertical growing (growing in vertically stacked layers).

Moreover, online learning courses ‘allow for unique dialogue among students,’ says Dandy, and offer ‘fantastic networking opportunities.’ For individuals interested in exploring the possibilities of growing food in an urban setting, certificate courses being offered this fall include ‘Agricultural Plant Selection for Urban Gardeners’ and ‘Theory and Principles of Sustainable Urban Agriculture and Horticulture.’ For more information, see https://www. guelphhort.com/certificates/sustainableurban-agriculture

Going the extra mile.

Aaron Zuccala, Realtor 519-821-3600


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S N EA K P E E K

DEATH VALLEY’S LITTLE BROTHER OWNER KATHERINE GINGRICH TAKES A SECOND FOR HERSELF IN WHAT’S TO BECOME HER NEXT CHAPTER: BLACK WING. LOCATED IN DOWNTOWN GALT ALONG THE BANKS OF THE MIGHTY GRAND RIVER, THIS BREW BAR – SPECIALIZING IN CRAFT BEER AND SMILE TIGER COFFEE – WILL CONTINUE TO GROW CAMBRIDGE’S EMERGENT 82 REPUTATION AS A REGIONAL DESTINATION. WATCH THE STORY UNFOLD ON INSTAGRAM.  @BLACKWINGCOFFEE


S E L L I NG COMMU N IT Y : B R O K E R A G E PRO F ILE

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SUCCESSION SUCCESSES:

HA NDIN G OVE R TH E R E I NS A T ROYAL LEPAGE R O YAL CI T Y R EALT Y BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘When I began my career in real estate, I told

do with me than with the team of real estate

myself that I’d leave the business only after I’d

professionals who have represented the

completely figured it out,’ Robb Atkinson tells

brokerage all these years. And,’ Robb adds

me. We are sitting together in his boardroom

as he looks at the brokerage’s new owner,

on Speedvale. It’s been forty years since Robb

Desmond von Teichman (or Des, as folks

first became a realtor, and thirty-three since he

tend to call him), sitting across from us at the

started his first brokerage. And this year he’s

boardroom table, ‘our legacy now rests with

finally decided to work toward calling it quits

those who will lead the brokerage into the next

after selling the Royal LePage Royal City Realty

decades. With professionalism. Respect. And

brokerage he built over the past decades.

success.’ He chuckles. ‘Lots of success.’

I guess Robb’s finally got it figured out.

Something Des knows a lot about already.

I’d say. Consider this: Robb’s brokerages have held top market share in Guelph for more than two decades. I ask Robb how he’s managed to accomplish this. His reply: ‘It’s got less to

The owner of Royal LePage Locations North (including Collingwood, Blue Mountain, Thornbury, Meaford, Clearview, Grey Highlands, Creemore and Wasaga), Des was already deep in the real estate game when


Des & Robb

84

he and Robb began chatting in 2015 about Des

Robb is smiling, and I ask what he’s thinking about. ‘I’m

acquiring Guelph. Robb continues: ‘Des is what

remembering how little technology was used when I sold

this brokerage needs right now: someone who

the brokerage to Des,’ he says. Des grins and nods in

can drive the business forward with innovative

recognition as Robb continues: ‘Just paper and a pen. As I

methods grounded in online tools. Tools I know –

recall, the entire deal was scrawled on a paper napkin over

and care to know – little about at this stage in my

lunch at Buon Gusto [an Italian restaurant in downtown

career.’

Guelph].’

‘Robb has taught me so much during this

‘And signed there, too. Which is fitting, really,’ Des adds,

ownership transition,’ Des is quick to add. ‘About

‘because at the end of the day, transactions are about

managing people. And conflict resolution. And

people sitting down and reaching an agreement – together.

especially about the unique dynamics – social,

Technology isn’t replacing this fact – not yet, at least. It’s just

cultural, political – of the Guelph community. What

making some things easier. More efficient. Which, in turn,

I bring to the table,’ he adds, ‘is a firm grasp of the

leads to better value for everyone.’

use of technology in real estate to make it easier for our realtors to serve the community. After all, my primary role as a broker is to help my realtors do their jobs better and more efficiently so they, in turn, can help their clients buy and sell their homes.’

Robb leans back in his chair and exhales. I imagine he’s recalling his long career, and the brokerage he has nurtured and has now handed over to Des. Again I probe, ask him what he’s thinking. He pauses, and then replies: ‘It’s taken me a long time to figure this business out. And I’ve done it. And I’m content to be leaving all that I’ve built in Des’

.

Like building a much more robust, intuitive website,

capable hands.’ He smiles, again, nodding at his successor.

for example – user-friendly on the front and

‘Content because I’m pretty sure this guy’s got it figured out

back ends. And a more comprehensive, strategic

already.’

use of social media. ‘Brokerages are becoming increasingly adept at using social media to drive their brands,’ Des observes, ‘and encouraging their realtors to do the same. It’s not technology for technology’s sake,’ he adds. ‘It’s technology used strategically as a means to an end – as a tool to advance the realtors’ business and enhance their clients’ experience.’

ROYAL LEPAGE ROYAL CITY REALTY 201-848 GORDON ST, GUELPH ON

royalcity.com


‘Still Working To Serve You.’ -Frank Valeriote, Senior Counsel Business Law. Real Estate Purchase & Sales. Wills & Estate Planning Direct Line: 519-821-2238 Email: fvaleriote@smithvaleriote.com 86

NEW FOR SUMMER 2017

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Do you know what your donation looks like?

87

It looks like me.

Please give generously

Kyler & Sage, United Way program users

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TH E ART OF C OF F E E :

BALZAC’S COFFEE ROASTERS BY CHRIS TIESSEN

‘The story of my business is the story of coffee,’

floor, central harvest table, to the poster

notes Founder and President of Balzac’s Coffee

artwork created for this Guelph location.

Roasters, Diana Olsen. We are sitting at a

It’s been executed from the perspective of a

two-seater inside her Guelph location. It’s a

Balzac’s customer (tourist? Guelph resident?

favourite destination of mine: located at the

university student?) writing a postcard to

foot of downtown Guelph just across from

someone special. The cursive script on the

the farmers’ market to the east and Guelph’s

poster reads: ‘With love, for coffee, from

landmark basilica, the Church of Our Lady, to

the Royal City.’ The poster features local

the north. In the middle of it all. ‘Of course,’

landmarks. ‘I chose to include the Gryphon

I respond, while wondering how I’m going to

[a landmark sculpture located on the edge

focus this story on coffee when I’ve already

of campus at Gordon and Stone] because

planned to write about something else.

I absolutely adore it,’ Diana says. ‘And the

I know the coffee is great. Amazing, really. But I want to write about the posters – those distinct

beautiful church because it screams Guelph – and you can see it from this location.’

pieces of artwork created for each Balzac’s

‘After completing the poster, we actually tried

coffee shop, posters that help establish unique

to figure out how to perfect a latte art icon for

‘identities’ for every location while allowing the

the Guelph location – as a sort of signature,’

company’s overall aesthetic brand to remain

Diana says. Before me, on the table, waiting

consistent. And identifiable. Invoking the

to be enjoyed, is my freshly-brewed latte,

coffeehouses of nineteenth-century Paris.

inscribed in latte art with a crown representing

‘We’ll talk coffee, of course,’ I offer. ‘But first –

Guelph – the Royal City.

tell me about the posters.’ I’m looking across

Diana’s sense of history and place, along with

the beautifully-appointed space with its

her intricate attention to detail, runs through

massive wood counters, exquisitely-detailed

the Balzac’s business model. ‘I’ve always

89


collected vintage coffee ephemera – tins,

– the artist who has transformed all of Diana’s

advertisements, old coffee posters,’ she says.

poster ideas, sketches, into final artwork.

(Indeed, all Balzac’s locations feature original vintage coffee collectibles.) I turn our attention to the poster at Kitchener’s Tannery District location. It features a cow

90

(ostensibly) sitting outside The Tannery, drinking a steaming coffee, reading the newspaper. And sporting a scarf, beret and shades. I see the connection between cow and tannery easily enough. ‘But what’s up with his get-up?’ I ask. Without skipping a beat, Diana replies: ‘It’s John Mookovich.’ Then she explains: ‘A number of years ago, actor John Malkovich was filming in Toronto. Each day he’d visit our Distillery location dressed in a scarf, beret and shades. And he’d sit outside, read the paper and enjoy a Balzac’s coffee. When we were opening in The Tannery,’ she adds, ‘this image of John kept coming back to me. After all, The Tannery is in a sense Kitchener’s version of Toronto’s Distillery District. And so we had to put John Malkovich – as Mookovich – on the poster.’ Local. Specific. Playful. Yorick’s skull, held

I imagine gathering up these sketches to begin my own collection of coffee ephemera. But Diana changes the subject: ‘So let’s talk coffee.’ Talk turns to single origin beans as Balzac’s Director of Coffee, Will Thorburn, joins us. And blends. And experimenting with small quantities of fresh beans seasonally-sourced, from across the globe. And the business’s trademarked marble blend roasts, in which three different beans are roasted to three different darknesses and then blended together. Coffee and coffee lore. The fact that Balzac’s Blend was concocted based on the writings of Honore de Balzac, for example, who wrote down recipes reflecting his favourite – homemade – blends. It’s fascinating stuff. A peek into another small universe. What Diana and Will accomplish with Balzac’s coffee is luscious and artful. Still my

.

mind lingers on poster designs. And coffee

ephemera. And other categories that lend a whole new meaning to ‘the art of coffee.’

by Shakespeare’s Hamlet, dominates the Stratford poster, for example. And Waterloo. Well, this one, at time of publication, has yet to be finished. ‘I’ve brought a preliminary sketch with me, though,’ Diana notes. A sketch by her. Then a draft of the poster for her new Balzac’s Kingston location by Alayna Paquette

BALZAC'S COFFEE ROASTERS VISIT ONLINE TO SEE ALL 13 LOCATIONS

balzacs.com


91


MEET YOUR MAKER

92

92

REVEL CIDER VISIT REVEL ONLINE TO SEE WHERE YOU CAN FIND IT.

revelcider.ca VIS I ON ? To gr o w s o we c a n r e a c h

‘W E’R E MA KI N G A M I L KS H A KE C I D ER AT AN U P C O MI N G I P A F ES T I V A L , ’ N OT ES R E VEL C I D ER F OU N D ER T A R I Q A H MED W H E N I A S K H I M W H A T ’S U P . T H I S D O ES N ’T S U R P R I S E M E – N O R S H OU L D I T S U RPRI SE

lar ger au d i en c e s b y c o nt i nui ng

A N Y ON E W H O KN OW S T A R I Q . S I N C E

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S T A R T I N G R EV EL A F EW Y EA R S B A C K, HE’S

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B EEN P U S H I N G T H E L I M I T S OF W H A T

thr o u gh tr ial a nd e r r o r . A nd

C I D ER ’S A L L A B O U T . F R O M R EV EL ’S ‘ SPI RI T

c o l lab o r ati o n s , t o o

O F T H E W O O D S ’ C OL L A B W I T H D I L L O N’S

CU RRENT PROJ E CT ( S ) ?

D I S T I L L ER Y T O I T S ‘H OP X ’ T H A T ’S D RY

Inco r p o r atin g s p o nt a ne o us Cal ifo r n ian cul t ur e s f r o m 1 0 1

H O P P ED W I T H A N EW ON T A R I O H OP

Ci d er in to o n e o f o ur b a t c he s .

V A R I ET A L , T A R I Q ’S C O N C OC T I O N S

W e ’ ll f er men t i t i n t e q ui l a b a r r e l s w/ f r esh n e cta r i ne s

ARE ANYTHING BUT TRADITIONAL. I T ’S N O W O N D ER T H A T S U C H F I N E ES T A B L I S H M EN T S A S A R A B EL L A P A R K ( KI T C H EN ER ) , B R U X H OU S E ( H A MI L T ON) A N D B A KER S T R EET S T A T I ON ( G U EL PH) R EG U L A R L Y S ER V E R EV EL ON T A P .


SINCE

1976

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SATISFY YOUR HUNGER.

95


THE FUTURE’S LOOKING GRAND! MARIA FINORO RCM, ACCI, FCCI, PRESIDENT OF MF PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LTD & FIRST PRESIDENT OF CCI-GRAND RIVER CHAPTER

You have just purchased a condo and are excited to launch your maintenance-free lifestyle! You attend an owners’ meeting believing it would be a great opportunity to make new friends – and somehow you are elected to the Board of Directors! You accept the job, thinking it will help you make even more friends (and surely it won’t take that much time since the condo has a property manager who does all the work)!

mfproperty.com

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EXPERT OPINION | PROPERTY

How the newly launched Canadian Condominium Institute-Grand River Chapter will help your Condo Community stay afloat:

Fast forward to Fall 2018. There is new condo legislation that mandates that all directors take training courses and provide full disclosure prior to running for the board. In addition, every condo needs to provide regular Information Certificates to owners regarding finances, insurance, reserve fund and legal proceedings. Further, Property Managers need to be licensed to be allowed to manage a condo community. How are volunteer directors supposed to learn about all this new legislation and how it will impact their community? Most importantly, will condo fees increase as a result of these changes?

Fortunately, there is local support available through the Canadian Condominium Institute whose mandate is to provide education, information, awareness, and access to condo expertise by and for its members. On July 1st the local Grand River Chapter was created to service the Brant, Waterloo and Wellington regions so that courses, seminars, and conferences can be held in your neighborhoods. Check out the website cci-grc.ca and learn why 475 condos and professional, business, and service providers are already members. Learn how the new legislation will affect your community by attending upcoming seminars – including November bootcamp sessions that will focus on the new legislation. You do not need to be a member to receive e-blasts with updates, so register your email on the website. Check out the award-winning Condo News magazine online and the 2017 Professional & Business Partners directory listing local service providers. Now, as a member of this grassroots local organization, you can both ensure that your community is well managed and get to network and make new friends! The Future’s Looking Grand!

JOIN US AT THE FINALE! Thursday, September 21, 7pm • Art Gallery of Guelph

Celebrate all the Charities! Hear the pitches! Help choose a winner!

to register: theoaktreeproject.ca MACT_OakTree_Ad_Toque_finale_SB_.indd 1

2017-07-13 1:39 PM


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ANATO MY O F A B R A N D :

M O VI N G I NT O CA NS CLIENT: ROYAL CITY BREWING CO. DESIGNER: TOQUE LTD.’S CAI SEPULIS

THIS BRAND APPLICATION PROJECT WAS ALL ABOUT ADAPTING ROYAL CITY’S ICONIC BOTTLE DESIGNS ONTO 473ML SLEEVED CANS. AFTER PLAYING AROUND WITH COMPLEX PATTERNS AND COLOUR BREAKS, DESIGNER CAI SEPULIS DECIDED TO FOCUS ON CLEAN AND SIMPLE DESIGN. SHE MADE SURE THAT THE CAN DESIGNS REMAINED CONSISTENT WITH CURRENT PACKAGING AND RELATABLE TO ROYAL CITY ENTHUSIASTS BY INCORPORATING ONTO EACH CAN HER BELOVED HEX BADGE MOTIFS.

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CLEAN & SIMPLE SOLID COLOUR DRIVES ATTENTION TO LABEL

CONSISTENT TASTING NOTE DESIGN & HEX BADGE ROYAL CITY BREWING CO. 199 VICTORIA RD S, GUELPH

royalcitybrew.ca


Polar

Vortex Vanilla Bean Porter

Bamberg COMMUNITY

Brew

Smoked

Lager

Tripel entente

Eclipse Coffee kรถlsch

Lager

Polar

Vortex Vanilla Bean Porter


EL ORA BREW I N G CO :

FOR FRIENDS. FOR NEIGHBOURS. FOR EACH OTHER.

100

G ED

METC

BY CHRIS TIESSEN

D ES ST

ALFE

.

ST.

ELORA

There are times I wish I lived in Elora. Usually when I find myself swept up in the comfortable, generous ambience of Elora Brewing Co – a craft brewpub so agonizingly perfect that TOQUE partner-in-crime Cai Sepulis and I seem to find almost any excuse to make the trip from Guelph up Highway

good batch, every so often.’ For friends. For neighbours. For each other. ‘It was always about companionship and experimentation,’ Matt tells me while I sit with him at the end of the bar at the brewery.

6 and along Wellington Road 7 to what’s

Around us, groups of hungry – and thirsty –

become one of our favourite destinations. For

patrons begin filling the place for lunch. ‘It

lunch. Afternoon pints. Production meetings.

was about finding an excuse,’ he continues,

Brainstorms. For Whatever.

‘to enjoy each other’s company. Some folks

Indeed, the Brewing Co. has helped make Elora a destination for all kinds of folks. It wasn’t

devote garage time to tinkering on classic cars; we devoted it to working on developing beer.’

always this way, though. To be sure, when co-

And, it would seem, to brainstorming a

founders and neighbours Matt Lawson and Jim

shared future – one that involved co-owning

Murphy started home brewing several years

and operating a community brewpub. Matt

back in Jim’s garage on Melville Street (just off

continues: ‘We knew we were on to something

the main drag in this picturesque town) their

when Jim began fine-tuning an India Pale Ale

aspirations didn’t reach farther than creating ‘a

that had friends and neighbours clambering


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for more.’ A brew that’s since evolved into Elora Brewing’s Ladyfriend IPA – my go-to at the brewery and wherever else it’s available. ‘We also knew,’ adds Matt, ‘that if we wanted our dream to become a reality, we’d need company!’ Good company that materialized seemingly miraculously from a single chat back in 2013 between Jim and the crew from St. Jacob’s craft brewery, Block 3. ‘In those days,’ Jim recalls, ‘I relied on the folks from Block 3 for home brewing advice. When I let them know Matt and I were interested in opening a brewery, they told me that three other Elora residents – Jon Laurencic, Don Smith and former Beau’s brewer Alex Nichols – wanted to do the same. It didn’t take long for us to start something together.’ Indeed, within less than a year of meeting each

102

other for the first time, the five core partners founded the brewery, purchased a 150-yearold general store and pharmacy on Geddes Street, and began the building’s extensive transformation. ‘At first we weren’t sure what we wanted to do with the space,’ Alex recalls, ‘so we tore everything down to the studs. And before we started building it back, we realized that it looked best as it was.’ Rough. Naked. Open. All stone and wood and steel. A bountiful, stalwart, yet companionable space. ‘By tearing back what had been built up for over a century,’ Matt adds, ‘we revealed the heritage and integrity of the place. And, ultimately, we gave the community back its history.’ And offered the town a place for community. Indeed, since the brewery first opened its doors in 2014 it’s truly become a town ‘common’ – that is, a hub where seemingly all cross-sections of Elora residents meet to chat. About politics. And arts & culture. And town gossip. And, of course, beer. Over beer. And food. Fabulous food driven by the farm-to-table approach of Chef Ben Sachse and his partner, Sonia Cheng. ‘We use local ingredients as much as possible,’ Chef Ben


103


104

ELORA BREWING CO. 107 GEDDES ST, ELORA

elorabrewingcompany.ca


- E LO R A & FE R G US -

Studio Tour

Annual Art Show & Sale

105

notes, ‘and nurture lasting relationships with area farmers – many of whom are also customers.’ As if on cue, an older gentleman with a massive flowing white beard and personality to match – ‘we call him Santa,’ notes Matt – walks in the open bay door at the back of the brewery and pulls from a crisp bag he’s carrying the day’s foraged treasures. Edible wild flowers. Before long, he’s sitting at the bar with Matt and Chef Ben. Pint in hand and burger on order – made with bacon from Blackview Farm whose pigs are raised eating spent grain from the brewery – 'Santa' dives into some amusing tale about his life as a forager. Having finished my Lady Friend, I deftly point for another one and settle in to listen. This is what Matt and Jim envisioned, I think to myself, when they were brewing in Jim’s garage. A space for

.

friends. For neighbours. For each other. For everyone, really

Last weekend in September & First weekend in October Opening reception September 14th, 7-9pm at the Elora Centre for the Arts Free admission Free draws

elorafergusstudiotour.com


C O M M U NI TY BEN EF IT S

THE GUELPH Y:

FEEDING YOUNG MINDS & HAPPY BELLIES 106

BY CHRIS TIESSEN Anita Sweeney and I are chatting in the clean

all these children to entrust their kids to this

– and cozy – commercial kitchen at the Guelph

organization – which promises to feed them

Y, where she and a staff of three others cook

and take care of them through the week.’

for over eight hundred kids enrolled in Y daycare programs every day. ‘I feed these kids as though they’re my own – and certainly care for them as such,’ she tells me. Her voice cracks, and I see a tear making its way down her cheek. Erica Charlesworth, Supervisor of Development at the Guelph Y who’s joined us, rubs Anita’s back and continues for her. ‘Young minds need happy bellies,’ she says with a smile, ‘and Anita’s certainly up to this task.’ And it’s not a small task either. Anita has been working as Food Services Supervisor at the Guelph Y for sixteen years. A tenure long enough that she’s provided food for literally tens of thousands of children – including her own. ‘Having my own kids come through the Y daycare program really put this job in perspective,’ she says. ‘It helped me realize what it must be like for the parents of

Indeed, the Guelph Y is the largest childcare provider in Guelph, with six centres (the Guelph Y proper and five offsite locations) across the city. They feed 300 kids (aged 0-4) five days a week. And from September through June, the Guelph Y feeds an additional 550 kids at eighteen afterschool sites. ‘Since I began at the Y,’ Anita says, ‘the number of kids we feed has doubled. And the menus have become more complex.’ She continues: ‘We now operate on a sixteen-day rotation that has been approved by a Public Health dietitian.’ A rotation that includes gluten free options, that accounts for cultural diversity, and that sources local real whole foods as much as possible. ‘We use Kenny’s Produce for fresh in-season Ontario fruits and vegetables; the local Bunsmaster for flax bread, whole wheat


buns, cheese sticks and focaccia; and when we use Flanagan’s and Sysco we focus our orders on

GUELPH Y RECIPES

Ontario produce.’ Some of the meals Anita and her small but mighty team serve include Greek chicken with couscous or falafels with focaccia, cucumber and tzatziki. ‘It’s the most straightforward meals, though,’ Anita observes, ‘like meatballs, rice and corn, that remain the favourites.’ When I ask Anita what she sees as her biggest daily challenge, she replies succinctly: ‘Lack of space.’ She explains: ‘We place orders twice a week right now. And this,’ she says, motioning around the small kitchen, ‘is certainly not enough room to store food for 850 kids.’ And what does she love most about her job? Anita answers coyly: ‘It’s certainly not being at work by six each morning.’ We share a laugh and decry early mornings before she continues: ‘Of course I love the people I get to work with every day – the great staff, management and all the Childcare Supervisors.’ She pauses, before

BERRY BARLEY SMOOTHIE ½ cup plain yogurt ½ cup coconut milk (almond milk or soy beverage) ¾ cup of milk (almond milk or soy beverage) 1/3 cup of cooked barley ½ cup applesauce (sweetened) 1 cup of fresh or frozen mixed berries 1 banana 1 tsp vanilla Mix yogurt, coconut milk, milk and barley together in blender (pulse for about 1 minute). Add all remaining ingredients and puree for another minute. (Smoothie will have a bubbly texture.)

adding: ‘And I especially love seeing the kids eat. Together. Sharing conversations. And laughter. And friendship.’ Friendship between the children. Anita’s children.

.

Whose parents can count on this each morning

when they drop their kids off at the Guelph Y: that they’ll have happy bellies throughout the day

YMCA-YWCA OF GUELPH 130 WOODLAWN GLEN DR, GUELPH

guelphy.org

QUINOA BUTTERNUT SQUASH BAKE 1 butternut squash (approximately 4 lbs) diced and seeded ½ onion ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil Basil, garlic and pepper (to taste) ¾ cup of Italian bread crumbs 2 cups of cooked, whole grain quinoa Dab of butter ½ cup shredded cheese (goat cheese or blue cheese)

107

Preheat oven to 425 F. Toss squash, onion, olive oil, seasoning and ½ the bread crumbs into a large mixing bowl; mix well. Stir in cooked quinoa. Put mixture into baking dish. Mix remaining bread crumbs with a dab of butter, sprinkle over squash and quinoa. Bake in oven until a golden brown (35-40 min). Remove from oven, sprinkle shredded cheese and return to oven for 5 min or until cheese is melted. Enjoy.


109

WELCO M E T O T H E NEIGH B O U R H O O D T H ES E P A ST F EW MONTH S, W E C O NNEC T E D W ITH IND EPEND EN TLYO W NED L O CA L G RO CERS A ND BUTC HER S T O A S K T HEM ONE SIMPL E Q U E STION : ‘WH A T ’S T HE B EST PA RT OF TH E JOB?’ H ER E' S W H A T TH EY H A D TO SAY.

ROB ERT Mc GL AD RY - b u tch er A NG EL INO ' S F R ES H C H O IC E M A R K ET

1 6 ST EV EN SO N S T S , G U EL PH

‘Helping folks make their meal an experience.’


110

BRETT M a c D O NAL D - but cher / o w ner T ROTTERS BUTCHER SH OP & CHA RCUTE R I E

4 2 CO R K S T E , GUELPH

‘Providing our customers with the best Ontario has to offer – like this 40-day aged rib eye.’


111

‘Connecting our customers to local farmers.’

S UE D IC KIES ON - o w n er KIRS T EN HARB IN - lo n g- time emp lo yee MOSBOROUGH C O U NT R Y M A R K ET

5 2 8 4 W EL L IN G T O N RD 3 2 , G U EL PH


112

'Curating our inventory.'

JOHNNY KENT & S ARAH PEPPER o w n ers J& P G R O C ER Y

8 Q U EEN ST N , KIT C H EN ER


113

L ARRY VAL ERIOT E - o w n er B RIAN S C HMEL ER - p a rtn er & c hef V A L ER IO T E M A R K ET

2 0 4 Y O RK SHI RE S T N , G U EL PH

‘Finding new products for our regular customers.’


114

TA BL ED M E M ORIE S :

BRYCE HILL’S THREECROW WOODWORKS BY CHRIS TIESSEN ‘The dining room table is, arguably, the

Member of Parliament Lloyd Longfield several

most sacred space in any household,’ notes

years back, when he was my boss at the

ThreeCrow Woodworks’ Bryce Hill as we walk

Guelph Chamber of Commerce. We were on a

in a soft drizzle through a seeming ocean of

Porter Airlines flight on Chamber business, and

woodchips towards the sawmill he and his

Lloyd was reminiscing about his early years as

uncle built for themselves near the back of the

an entrepreneur. ‘In those days,’ he told me

large property. ‘It’s where family, friends and

above the low din of the turboprop, ‘the dining

neighbours come together,’ Bryce continues,

room table was my office. A space that would

‘to break bread, eat, drink, and take refuge

be cleared each evening of dinner dishes,

from the speed of life for a little while, at least.’

and then transformed until early morning for

A place for community, to be sure. And a space

business.’

for work too, I think to myself. To spread out

These thoughts about mere pragmatic function

documents during tax season. And to gather

are dispelled when we arrive at the mill – a

and fold clean laundry during the rest of the

sturdy post-and-beam structure held together

year – in my small house, at least. Briefly

by wooden dowels. The craftsmanship is

distracted, I recall a conversation with Guelph

impeccable. ‘We needed a place to keep dry,’


115


116

Bryce remarks, as the rain comes down a

destined for a client in Montreal. A rich client, I

little harder, ‘while we milled the logs.’ All

think to myself, imagining how large the dining

around us, mountains of uncut wood – some

room must be to house such an enormous

four feet in diameter – are carefully stacked.

piece of carpentry. I note the custom brass

A little further on, piles of milled timber are

bowtie inlays. The phenomenal wood grain

drying in tin-roofed sheds. ‘This is home,’ says

that Bryce has managed to highlight with

Bryce, nodding towards the wood and milling

finishing oils. And his masterful use of epoxy

equipment.

filler to create a natural, translucent ‘window’

Home, yes. Both literally and figuratively. Literally, because Bryce really did grow

in the tabletop where once there’d been a cavity in the wood.

up here – on this piece of land in Hornby

It’s a beautiful thing, really. How Bryce spends

(now Mississauga), where his dad has run a

his days building furniture that, in turn, builds

tree service company for many years. And

community. I think about all the memories

figuratively, because working with wood –

that will be made around this table. And about

everything from milling to creating the most

the history he has been able to showcase in

fabulous cabinetry, bartops, kitchen islands

the piece through his treatment of the wood’s

and, of course, dining room tables – is where

perfect imperfections.

Bryce feels most at home. My TOQUE Partner Cai Sepulis and I watch as he mills a thirty-inchwide trunk with an enormous handheld saw. Like butter, I think to myself in disbelief, as the massive saw blade glides through the even more massive tree – creating a slab that Bryce will most likely transform into a gorgeous table. Either meticulously finished or left as a live-edge masterpiece.

As though he’s read my thoughts, Bryce remarks: ‘It’s what I love doing best: building custom pieces that will be used for memorymaking. I’ve even had clients,’ he continues, ‘who have had us take a favourite tree down in their yard – one that’s sickly, or dying – and then turn that same tree into a dining room table, which becomes a kind of hallowed artifact. They’ll be able to look from that table

Later in the day we travel to Bryce’s workshop

to the stump and feel as though their beloved

in Milton where single slabs – some over forty

tree – with all the memories it invokes – is still

inches wide by eight feet long – are stacked

with them.’ And remains part of their family.

along the walls. We pull up chairs alongside

And their family’s story

his most recent project: an impeccable table

.


ANATOMY OF A B RAND:

117

SOURCE:  @3_CROW

C L IEN T : THREECROW WOODWORKS PRO JEC T : REBRANDING D ESIG N ER: CAI SEPULIS, TOQUE LTD. LOGO:

WE WANTED BRYCE’S LOGO TO BE – MUCH LIKE HIS FINISHED PIECES – STRONG, TIMELESS, ICONIC, AND UNDOUBTEDLY EPIC.

THREECROW WOODWORKS

threecrow.ca

a TOQUE project TM


G O O S E B Y CA i SE P U L iS

Book signing today!

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ab l i she d xx

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01

icon

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descriptor

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Cursive TIO

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TO BE CON TIN UE D..

119

01


COCKTAIL HOUR WITH KATIE SHEWEN, ASSISTANT GENERAL MANAGER BREAD BAR

THE DAIQUIRI IS A TRUE CLASSIC COCKTAIL. OVER THE YEARS, IT’S BEEN MIXED UP, DRESSED UP, TWISTED AND TOSSED IN COUNTLESS WAYS – EACH TIME UNIQUELY REFLECTING THE ERA IN WHICH IT WAS WHOLLY ENJOYED. HOWEVER, TO SU CCESSFULLY DRESS UP A DAIQUIRI YOU’LL FIRST NEED TO BE ABLE TO STRIP IT DOWN. AT ITS CORE, THE DAIQUIRI IS A SIMPLE, WELLBALANCED MASTERPIECE. IF YOU CAN MAKE ITS MOST SIMPLE VERSION WELL YOU CAN GET AS CREATIVE AS YOU WANT WITH VARIATIONS. EVEN ERNEST HEMINGWAY HAD HIS OWN VERSION.

CLASSIC DAIQUIRI METHOD: LONG SHAKE, FINE STRAIN

120

GLASS: COUPE In glass portion of shaker, add the following:

2 oz white rum

              

1 oz lime juice

              

½ oz sugar syrup

Add ice and *LONG* SHAKE. TASTE and modify if needed. (It’s easier to add sweet than take it away.) *FINE* STRAIN into COUPE glass. GARNISH: Lime Wedge A long shake stretches this cold drink out and helps create a very smooth (almost thick) texture. Fine straining your daiquiri is important, as it removes any ice chips that may float on its surface.  

EARTH TO TABLE BREAD BAR 105 GORDON ST, GUELPH

guelph.breadbar.ca

RIGHT NOW AT BREAD BAR WE’RE SERVING A DAIQUIRI WITH OUR UNIQUELY TART RASPBERRY BALSAMIC SYRUP AND FRESH RASPBERRIES FOR A PALATE-OPENING, THIRST-QUENCHING SLICE OF HEAVEN. IT’S SERVED FRAPPE OR OVER CRUSHED ICE (AS A LITTLE NOD TO THE 80’S BLENDED VERSIONS). FOR A RECIPE, VISIT BREADBAR.CA


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Serving Guelph and area See all of our inventory at

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*Price shown is for a 2018 Audi A5 Coupe 2.0T Quattro Komfort model. MSRP is $47,950, plus $2,095 Freight & PDI, $100 Air Tax, $17.75 Tire Stewardship Fee, $150 Audi Anti-Theft Registration, and $295 Dealer Administrative Fee. Licensing and HST are additional. Dealer may sell for less.


Toque Magazine - Issue 2 - The Food Issue  

Second issue of Toque, a regional lookbook for the Guelph, Kitchener-Waterloo & Cambridge region.