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OUR FUTURE OUR PLAN


PREAMBLE TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA, 1996 We, the people of South Africa, Recognise the injustices of our past; Honour those who suffered for justice and freedom in our land; Respect those who have worked to build and develop our country; and Believe that South Africa belongs to all who live in it, united in our diversity. We therefore, through our freely elected representatives, adopt this Constitution as the supreme law of the Republic so as to • Heal the divisions of the past and establish a society based on democratic values, social justice and fundamental human rights; • Lay the foundations for a democratic and open society in which gover nment is based on the will of the people and every citizen is equally protected by law; • Improve the quality of life of all citizens and free the potential of each person; and • Build a united and democratic South Africa able to take its rightful place as a sovereign state in the family of nations. May God protect our people. Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika. Morena boloka setjhaba sa heso. God seën Suid-Afrika. God bless South Africa. Mudzimu fhatutshedza Afurika. Hosi katekisa Afrika.


CONTENTS AND CREDITS

CONTENTS

28

42

UPFRONT Adver tisers index

4

Editor’s letter

6

I N T E RV I E W S Tshediso Matona

8

Naledi Pandor

22

Rob Davies

28

Edna Molewa

36

2 | VISIO N 2030, O UR F UTUR E O UR P LAN ,V O L 3

12


CREDITS CEO Ralf Fletcher Project Director Roger Benns Head of Sales Clay Vengayi Tsapi

S E C TO R OV E RV I E W S

Key Account Managers Janine Jonas Munya Jani Bradley Greeff Richard Desha Phyllis Wasarirevu

Environment

34

Agriculture

42

Housing

48

Skills and training

52

Finance

64

Health

68

Safety and security

70

Education

74

Job creation

88

Marketing Manager Molengwa Rose Setshoge TOPCO STUDIO Editorial Director Ryland Fisher Group Editor Fiona Wakelin Managing Editor Olivia Main Features Editor Elske Joubert

ARTICLES Follow the blueprint

12

Operation Phakisa

44

Tomorrow’s digital technologies taking flight

58

Production Editor Anton Pretorius Senior Designer Fikile Lugogwana Tr a f f i c M a n a g e r Theleka Munyu Distribution & Subscriptions Ingrid Johnstone

AT T H E BAC K Sustainable development goals

96

Vision 2030 Summit repor t

100

Printers CTP Printers Images Shutterstock

44

Office Top Media & Communications (Pty) Ltd T/A Topco Media 21 Roodehek Street, Gardens, Cape Town, 8001 Tel: +27 86 000 9590 Fax: +27 21 423 7576 Email: info@topco.co.za Website: www.vision2030.co.za Disclaimer All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written consent of Top Media & Communications (Pty) Ltd T/A Topco Media. Reg. No. 2011/105655/07. While every care has been taken when compiling this publication, the publishers, editor and contributors accept no responsibility for any consequences arising from any errors or emissions. ISBN: 9780992177850


ADVERTISERS INDEX

ADVERTISERS INDEX ABSA

67

Ca p e Town I n te r n a t i o n a l Conve nti on Ce ntre ( CTICC)

5

Co l l e g e o f C a p e Town

8 4 – 85

Ch a n n e l A fr i c a

95

De p a r t me n t o f Tra d e a n d I ndu str y ( the dti )

9 0 – 91

E x xa ro

41

F ib re P ro c e ssi n g a n d M a nu factu ri ng ( F P& M) SE TA

8 6 – 87

Hu ma n R e sou rc e D eve l o p me nt Cou nci l ( H RDC)

55

I nd e p e n d e n t D eve l o p me n t Tru st

72

I nd i g o Ku l a n i G ro u p

40

J B M a r k s E d u c a t i on Tr u st Fund

8 2 – 83

Loc a l G ove r n me n t Se c tor Edu cati on and Trai ni ng Au thori ty ( L GSE TA)

7 6 – 81

M OT H E O C h a r te re d A c c ou ntants

66

M y l a n SA

73

N a t i on a l E l e c t ro n i c M e d i a Insti tu te of Sou th Af ri ca ( N EMISA)

62

N a t i on Bu i l d e r

63

S o u t h A fr i c a n Bro a d c a st i n g Corporati on ( SABC)

9 2 – 93

Te ch n o l og y I n n ova t i on A g e ncy ( TIA)

5 6 – 57

Tra n sp o r t E d u c a t i on Tra i n i ng Au thori ty ( TE TA)

5 0 – 51

Un i ve r si t y of K wa Zu l u - Na ta l

54

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Local Excellence Global Appeal

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EDITOR’S LETTER | RYLAND FISHER

VOTING FOR INNOVATION TO ADVANCE THE NDP After the recent Budget Vote speech of Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma – the new Minister in the Presidency responsible for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation – she showcased a few entrepreneurs who have produced innovations that could make a difference to our society. These included a rubbish bin that sends a message to your phone when it is full, a locally-produced stethoscope, safety suits for mines and construction sites, fire-retarded paint that could help stop shack fires, solar-charged backpacks, and bricks made out of scrap paper. The aim of showcasing these innovations was to show that South Africans were tapping into funds made possible because of the National Development Plan, something of which most South Africans remain unaware. It was also meant to show how business people, especially young entrepreneurs, are helping to advance the goals of the National

and acknowledge the good work that is being done by

Development Plan by trying to advance our economy.

government and the private sector.

The problem is that there are many people in South Africa who

In this publication, we reflect on the progress of the past

still see the NDP as a government plan and not a South African

year and what still needs to be done if we are going to reach

plan. This is a perception that needs to change if we are going to

the ambitious goals of the NDP by 2030, which is only 12

succeed as a country.

years away.

Since the election of Cyril Ramaphosa first as ANC President and

We hope to inspire others, especially those in the private

then as President of the country, there has been a renewed spirit

sector, to embrace our national plan and to look at ways in

of cooperation between government and business. But, as always,

which we can make it work. Ultimately, all of us will benefit if

more can be done.

our country grows in the way envisaged in the NDP.

This publication is part of our Vision 2030 project, a private sector initiative in which we try to facilitate better cooperation between government and business in order to achieve the NDP’s goals of significantly reducing poverty, inequality and unemployment. The Summit and Awards, which happen annually in June, is an

Ryland Fisher

important part of this project, because it is there that we talk about

Editor

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IN THE WORDS OF THE MINISTER | DR NKOSAZANA DLAMINI ZUMA

SOUTH AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE ARE BECOMING HEALTHIER An extract from the Budget Vote address by Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma, Minister in the Presidency: Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation In 2012, the people of South Africa, through Parliament, adopted the NDP as the overarching plan for the country to guide government and society, in addressing the challenges of poverty, unemployment and inequality. In 2014, Government translated the NDP into 14 outcomes in terms of the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTSF). We are guided by our conviction that democracy in our country cannot flourish if the people remain in abject poverty, without land and tangible prospects for a better life. Last year the DPME completed the Mid-Term Review of performance in implementing the NDP. The Review has highlighted several areas in which government efforts are making good progress. However, it also pointed out many areas of underperformance that require intervention, if we are to achieve significant progress towards the goals of the NDP on reducing poverty, inequality and unemployment. In health, steady but consistent progress is being made on a range of indicators. Evidence from Statistics South Africa points to the fact that the total Life Expectancy (LE) at birth has increased from 59.6 years in 2009 to 64 years in 2017 (Stats SA, 2017). The Maternal Mortality Ratio has improved from a baseline of 310 maternal deaths per 100 000 live births in 2009 to 135 deaths in 2016. Infant mortality rate improved from 42.8 deaths per 1000 live births in 2009 to 36.6 deaths in 2014, to 32.8 deaths per 1000 live births in 2017 (Stats SA, 2017). Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) increased from 2.9 million in 2014, to 4.0 million people living with HIV being retained on ART by 2017. A total of 17 million people benefit from social grants provided by government. Recent figures point to a rebound in the economy’s growth rate. The country’s GDP rebounded by 2.5% in Quarter 2 (Q2) of 2017 and subsequently to 2% in Quarter 3 of 2017. Both these figures reflect improvement compared to the 0.7% decline in Quarter 1 of 2017. More needs to be done to bring us closer to the achievement of the NDP GDP growth and employment targets. Other studies highlight a mixed scorecard of progress in some areas, and many remaining challenges. The World Bank’s report on Overcoming Poverty and Inequality in South Africa finds that although poverty substantially reduced from the year 2000 – thanks to redistributive policies of government – it remains far too high, and the country ranks as the most unequal, with the burden of these social ills born mainly by blacks and rural areas. According to Stats SA’s Quarterly Labour Force Survey, while overall unemployment was at 26.7% in quarter 4 of 2017, for those aged 15 to 24 who were not in school, the rate was 51%. No country can

develop without employing the most abundant of its human resources, the youth. Equitable distribution of land among all the people of South Africa will accelerate spatial transformation and ensure economic participation of all the citizens. We have not made the headway our country needs in this area if freedom and democracy are to have any meaning for the majority of our people. We therefore welcome the adoption of a motion by this parliament to expropriate land without compensation. Spatial transformation, particularly in metropolitan municipalities, could bring about fundamental change in the socio-economic conditions of the marginalised communities. We are also looking forward to the development of a National Spatial Development Framework, which is to ensure that national-level policies with a spatial impact are consistent and coherent, and that policy instruments across government support the overall spatial transformation agenda. This frank assessment of our performance and our challenges should not detract from the fact that South Africa is a better place to live and that the lives of the majority of ordinary South Africans are improving since the dawn of democracy. However, it is imperative that in the remainder of the years to the NDP’s Vision 2030, more work needs to be done to ensure that all the people of South Africa equitably share the benefits of our democracy.

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N AT I O N A L P L A N N I N G C O M M I S S I O N

SHINING A LIGHT ON THE NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN An interview with Tshediso Matona, Secretary for Planning in the Presidency by Ryland Fisher Tshediso Matona has been Secretary for Planning in the

“What we needed, in fact, was a new approach with a

Presidency for almost three years. A big part of his job

sense of urgency, focus and determination. For me, that

is to convene the National Planning Commission, which

constitutes the most fundamental problem. You don’t

is made up of 25 independent commissioners, chaired by

spend all this effort to generate a plan which, by many

the Minister of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation. The

accounts, is a good plan. It has good vision and covers

NPC is responsible for overseeing the implementation of

all the fault lines of our country and our economy. It can

the National Development Plan (NDP).

always be better here and there, but overall, in terms of the thrust, it is good. You don’t develop a plan like this

Matona’s educational background includes a degree

and then almost leave the implementation to chance.”

in Economics and Politics from the University of Cape Town and a Master’s in Development Economics from the

Matona said the plan has lacked a systematic,

University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom.

coordinated and clear approach to implementation.

In an interview after the DPME Budget Vote speech in

“And I can say this now with a greater sense of

Parliament recently, Matona admitted that his job has

confidence than I would have been before December, it

been tough, but he is seeing some light at the end of

has lacked leadership.

the tunnel. “I think that the current circumstances are good for the Matona said that more could have been done to

plan, the conditions have re-emerged for a recommitment

implement the National Development Plan.

and, hopefully, a more methodical way of reinforcing buyin, leadership and accountability to the nation.”

“In retrospect, the way we engaged with implementation as a country could have been better. We needed a sense

Matona said that, despite the problems, there had been

of common buy-in and cohesion in terms of our approach

progress in a number of areas, which were identified as

to implementation by government, which has to lead the

new initiatives of government inspired by the NDP.

implementation, but also by other social partners, such as organised business and labour. We did not have that.

“For example, the health sector has been performing very well. South Africans are healthier now. We are not

“There was almost an assumption that, because this was

doing too badly in education. It is a complex space, and

such a good thing, everybody would voluntarily fall in line

the legacy of apartheid is still very much inscribed in

with it. In government, we just got departments to sign

our education system, and it will take a while to undo

onto this in terms of the things that they were going to do

that legacy. But I think there has been a significant

which, in many cases, had been ongoing business, with

improvement in access. Now it is hard to find seven- to

no sense of an NDP approach.

15-year-olds not being in school anywhere in our country compared to the past.

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INTERVIEW | TSHEDISO MATONA

“I THINK THAT THE CURRENT CIRCUMSTANCES ARE GOOD FOR THE PLAN, THE CONDITIONS HAVE RE-EMERGED FOR A RECOMMITMENT AND, HOPEFULLY, A MORE METHODICAL WAY OF REINFORCING BUY-IN, LEADERSHIP AND ACCOUNTABILITY TO THE NATION”

V IS IO N 2 0 3 0, OUR FUT URE OUR P LA N,V OL 3 | 9


“We still have some way to go in terms of quality, but the trend

to look no further than the plan. There are many people who say

lines are pointing in the right direction in education.”

we don’t need any more plans, but we don’t have anything else like this: a cross-cutting, big picture plan.

Matona said the area that has been most challenging is the economy.

“The plan is there, so really it is about how we can improve its implementation. My perception and what I am hearing, is that

“The economy has been difficult. It started with external shocks

this is what the new regime is about.”

from the 2008 financial crisis, to largely internal shocks that are holding us back on the economy. We have been lagging

Matona said that it helped that Ramaphosa used to be the

significantly and quite starkly, with regards to factors such as

deputy chairperson of the National Planning Commission.

job creation and GDP growth. However, I think that what needs to be done in that space going forward is clear.”

“President Ramaphosa does not need the plan to be sold to him. He has no option but to push the plan to centre stage in a

Matona said another area of difficulty was the divisions that

way that no one else could.”

exist in society. The NDP is very broad, but Matona said that his priority would “The NDP envisaged a more socially-cohesive society, but

be to try and restore the economy.

divisions are still very much a part of our political reality, whether they are divisions according to race, gender, violence

“The plan covers pretty much the key challenges and problems

against women, or divisions between the rich and the poor.

of our country and proposes ways of addressing them. That’s the strength of the plan, no big problem is not addressed. But it

“We are divided. That has been a very interesting and intriguing

is also a weakness because, in a sense, it says that we need to

feature of our experience in this country in recent years and it

do all of these things simultaneously. We can see that this is

is a far cry from the euphoria and sense of unity that we had in

not possible.

1994, immediately after the elections, what was often referred to as Madiba Magic and the miracle of the rainbow nation.

“There are certain things that will not be done unless others are done. For me, restoring economic growth remains top of

“All of that seems to have completely evaporated and now

the list because it is only when the economy grows that we can

we are facing the harsh reality of a people who are still very

generate the resources to do the other stuff.

divided and held back by their history of divisions. The inequality and poverty are creating huge political and

“Free higher education is going to consume enormous

social stress in our country.”

resources, as will the national health insurance. The overriding priority, around which everyone must focus – government,

The answer, said Matona, was to reset ourselves politically,

organised labour and business – is getting the economy back to

economically and in terms of social engagement.

a growth trajectory.

“We have lost the sense of engagement between different

“But that growth has to be inclusive, because otherwise it is not

stakeholders. And that is where your (Vision 2030) Summit is

going to be sustainable. We must work towards getting growth

important. It offers us a platform, but we need many

that will have to be as inclusive as it can possibly be. I see that

more platforms that could be considered neutral to bring

space as a priority.

players together. We have always been good at engaging and looking for solutions together. It has always taken us forward

“We must raise the level of confidence so that investment can

as a country.”

come in, both domestic and foreign investment.

Matona said the new regime under President Cyril Ramaphosa

“We need to increase tourism, and if you are talking tourism,

has been good news for the National Development Plan.

you are immediately also dealing with crime and security. I can’t believe that tourists can be attacked in South Africa. How can

“The new regime has come in on the ticket of doing better,

a country that is such a magnificent tourism proposal, still have

doing more, being inclusive and consultative. It therefore needs

instances that undermine tourism?

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much scrutiny as government, so it is easy to look there.

that other tourists are also going to be scared to come here.

The bias of the NPC’s oversight has been towards

One tourist who gets robbed is one too many. There must be

government.

a deliberate focus to really deal with tourism-related crime. We have a fantastic offering in tourism that, with the exchange

“But there are other sectors of society that are equally critical,

rate being what it is, you can come to South Africa and have a

particularly organised labour and business, the private sector.

fantastic holiday which few places in the world can offer you.” “If we are talking about the economy, overwhelmingly our Matona dismissed suggestions that the plan would be revised

economy is in private hands. It is an economy based on

so that expectations can be lowered. The targets in the NDP

private enterprise, and until we have a good sense of the ways

are very ambitious.

in which the private sector can contribute to advancing the NDP, until we can get that sense of confidence that business

“The appropriate emphasis has to be placed on

is prepared to put its money where its mouth is and walk the

implementation, because we have not had enough of that.

talk, then I think we will not succeed.

If we implement properly, we will recognise that a number of areas need to be updated about the plan, but I would not

“It has been difficult monitoring what is happening in

advocate reviewing the plan in isolation.

business. However, there is a process now. For the past few years, the NPC has been doing some more research,

“There are many things in the NDP that are still as valid as

sharpening areas of the NDP, with a view to advising on much

when they were identified six years ago. We need to move

more effective implementation.

on those things. For example, professionalising the public service must be done. This is simple and straightforward.

“One strength of the NPC is that it is an independent body

The emphasis should not be on review, but on implementing,

that can convene stakeholders in a way that no other body

particularly those areas that are straightforward.

can do. That is a strength that the NPC needs to capitalise on to make sure that everybody has a place around the

“No plan can be cast in stone and not be adaptable to

implementation table.”

updates, particularly if we review performance and see that we have been overly ambitious.

Matona said that he would speak to both the private and public sector at the Vision 2030 Summit in June.

“Every review of the plan is meant to update it and make it realistic. We should not take away the ambitiousness of the

“I want to convey a message that there should be no barriers

plan, because if we are not ambitious, if we don’t stretch

between us. Business should be forthcoming and pronounce

ourselves, we could simply just float along when we should be

on what their concerns and hopes are and what they require to

advancing in leaps.

play their roles more effectively.

“Yes, we should have reviews, adjustments and updates where

“I want to appeal to my government colleagues to stop

new data and evidence are available, but the emphasis should

being so insular. There is a kind of a siege mentality

be on implementation. We cannot dilute the ambitiousness

among colleagues and when my colleagues, the leaders of

of the plan. We don’t have time, especially because of the

government, the leading technocrats, are insular and inward-

social problems and the extent of change that is required in

looking, then nothing is going to move because whatever

our country. Implementing the NDP requires a strong sense of

they are meant to offer to the economy, to society, will not be

courage and ambition.”

forthcoming. There are systematic failures in terms of service delivery in a number of areas. I want to reach out to our

Matona admitted that they do not really have proper

stakeholders, including business and citizens, and give them

monitoring mechanisms to oversee the implementation of

some direction.

the plan. “The summit happens a year before the elections and I think “The easy space to look for implementation is in government,

that all of us are challenged to give the electorate something

because you can see what government does and does not do.

to hope for, not in the same old style of promises, but in a

I don’t think there is any sector of our society that is under so

meaningful way, a sense of hope.”

V IS IO N 2 0 3 0 , OUR FUT URE OUR P LA N,V OL 3 | 1 1

INTERVIEW | TSHEDISO MATONA

“I read about German tourists being attacked. I can tell you


XX | VISION 2030 , O UR F UTUR E O UR P LAN ,V OL 3


FOLLOW THE BLUEPRINT N a t i o n a l D e ve l o p m e n t P l a n : N o w i s t h e t i m e to e x e c u te a n d i m p l e m e n t By Anton Pretorius and Elske Jouber t

The National Development Plan, a detailed blueprint of how South Af rica can eliminate poverty and reduce inequality by 2030, is less than 13 years away. However, everyone who attended last year’s Vision 2030 event agrees that there’s a burning need for faster progress, more action and better implementation. We spoke to delegates, thought leaders and role players f rom the private and public sector to f ind out how they are collaborating to make South Af rica a better place for all.

V IS IO N 2 0 3 0 , OUR FUT URE OUR P LA N,V OL 3 | 1 3


STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

Deputy Minister: Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services Q: HOW IS THE DEPARTMENT CONTRIBUTING TOWARDS MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL?

Q: HOW DOES THE DEPARTMENT PLAN TO BRIDGE THE DIGITAL DIVIDE?

We are presently running a programme called “Internet for All”. This

technologies. We want to inspire young and old alike to be innovative.

programme seeks to make sure that everybody from various different

Buying devices is all good and well, but we need to establish what kind

geographical areas has access to the Internet.

of value we can add in terms of software development and applications.

Currently, around 22 million people do not have access to the Internet;

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

this tells you that we have not yet unleashed the greatest potential of South Africans. As much as we would have loved to contribute to the

As South Africans, we are consumers of the Internet, including various

Vision 2030 is an exciting platform, but most importantly, it brings the

GDP, we have not managed to do that because there are people who

stakeholders together and that’s exactly what we’ve been campaigning

are still being discriminated against.

for as the South African government. An event like this encourages stakeholders to work together, share ideas and learn from each other.

Therefore, we are taking measures to make sure that we bridge that

South Africa will only become the best when we all work together.

digital divide. Yes, we are saying “Internet for All” because we want to build a competitive South Africa – we want to make sure that our people

It doesn’t matter if you come from business or government, in the end,

aren’t left behind in the digital era.

it’s the one person you are addressing; the person you call your customer and the person I call my voter. We have the same objective. If both customers and voters are happy, we all go home smiling.

HON. BUTI KGWARIDI MANAMELA Deputy Minister in the Presidency: Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation Q: WHAT’S THE CURRENT STATUS QUO WITH THE NDP?

Q: WHAT’S THE WAY FORWARD WITH THE NDP?

We believe that those underpinning principals that drove and guided

on a quarterly basis, provide reports about to the country, concerning what

The biggest challenge is unemployment – particularly among young people. the NDP still remain relevant. In the process of developing our annual performance and five-year plans, we’ll take into consideration all the other factors and challenges that arise and build those into the Plan. What is urgent now is how we get more South Africans to work; how we get most of

The National Development Plan is the only plan that South Africa has. It is the only plan that government is implementing. It is the only plan that we, the entire government has done to implement the NDP. I would really like to call on all South Africans to make it their business to know what is in the NDP and what its goals are. Some of the things we are looking at is how we simplify the many goals that have been set in the NDP and how we ensure

them involved in small businesses; how we lift most of them out of poverty;

that South Africans collectively own up to those goals.

and how we give all South Africans access to education and healthcare?

(Manamela was appointed Deputy Minister of Higher Education in February 2018.)

Those are some of the more pressing issues that government is taking into consideration as it relates to the NDP.

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Former Deputy Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, President of the African News Agency (ANA) Q: HOW DO WE MAKE SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE?

We make South Africa a better place by understanding the importance of a vision: vision on a personal level, vision at an institutional level and vision at a national level. The second point is the importance of strategy – the game plan. Once you have a vision, how do you get to that vision? You need a

than dreaming or planning. It’s better to have poor strategy that’s vigorously implemented than having a perfect strategy that isn’t implemented at all. Don’t fall victim to “paralysis by analysis”.

Q: VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE THIS?

The value that can be extracted from this environment is the sharing of

game plan. Number three: Execution. Execution. Execution.

best practice. There are so many companies with different experiences and

Q: WHAT’S MORE IMPORTANT, STRATEGY OR EXECUTION?

from each other. More importantly, there’s an opportunity to shape and share

It’s something that’s been debated among academics for a long time, but

exposures – so there’s an opportunity for companies and individuals to learn a common vision, a common understanding and a common strategy to achieve greatness for South Africa.

strategy IS execution! If you are not executing, you have no strategy. Whether you’re in government or business, actually doing things is more important

DR. MATHEWS PHOSA

Attorney, politician & former ANC Treasurer Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE THIS?

We are a Constitutional State and we support the rule of law in this country.

interrogate the topics at hand. In this case, it’s the NDP. The big issue here

the Constitutional Court as the final arbiter of decisions affecting all of us

I think an event like this holds tremendous value because it continues to is implementation. Everyone has a role to play, whether it’s government or business, to ensure that the goals and dreams outlined in the NDP are realised. In particular, the Plan must ensure that there is economic success; that everyone in this country feels secure; and that there’s enough work and respect for one another. This will go far in building our country and making

The Constitution remains the guarantor of our democracy. We must support and we are bound by the decisions of the Constitutional Court, whether we agree with them or not.

Q: ON YOUR PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN – WHAT DO YOU THINK ARE YOUR CHANCES?

it a better place.

My chances are as good as anyone who is running. South African people

Q: DO YOU SUPPORT THE SECRET BALLOT VOTE IN PARLIAMENT?

agenda. I’m saying we should put the following on the agenda: unite our

I support the secret ballot in Parliament because we select a president through secret ballot. It makes sense that if we want to remove him or

her, it should be via the same process. We should allow our conscience to prevail and impact on our decision-making. This should occur in a free environment where there’s no inhibition. When you become a Member of Parliament, you take an oath of loyalty to the Constitution. You’re not taking an oath of loyalty to a party – you take an oath of loyalty to the people. Why don’t you vote in the interest of the people?

drink from the same pool. For me, it depends on what you put on the people – black and white, respect the Constitution, build the nation, build an economy that serves all of our interests, make South Africa safe, fight corruption, and deliver services to our people in rural areas – let them experience freedom as well.

Q: MESSAGE TO ALL SOUTH AFRICANS?

All South Africans must unite. We are one nation; one flag; one national anthem; and we are one people. We must all work together towards the success of South Africa.

V IS IO N 2 0 3 0 , OUR FUT URE OUR P LA N,V OL 3 | 1 5

EDITORIAL | FOLLOW THE BLUEPRINT

PROF. ARTHUR MUTAMBARA


SABINE DALL’OMO

CEO, Siemens Southern and Eastern Africa Q: HOW IS SIEMENS SA MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE?

We have taken the NDP and its six elements, like job creation, driving the economy, transformation, improving lives, etc. and translated that into what Siemens is contributing to the individual measurement that government has set, for instance GDP contribution and job creation. We are also looking at what we can do, specifically in rural areas, to enable companies to be sustainable by themselves off the back of our project developments.

Q: VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

For us it’s about talking to people and demonstrating to them that the NDP is the way to go. Every citizen or company can make a contribution to the individual elements. The NDP ticks the boxes for everybody. It’s important for us to talk about it and also show what we can do and how we can contribute. When I said that we’re merely monitoring what our improvements are on the NDP, it’s important to show that we actually can improve. It’s not a statistic or static plan – you need to fill it with life and make it tangible for people to understand what it actually means to live the NDP.

ZWELAKHE NTSHEPE

Acting Group CEO, Denel SOC (PVT) Ltd Q: HOW IS DENEL MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL? Denel is a strategic partner to the South African National Defence Force. The security of the country – not only in terms of physical security but also cybersecurity – is one of our key pillars, whereby we have to make sure the country is protected. It helps with economic growth and people skills. Technology that we use now has to be future technology. It’s very important for Denel to be relevant to South African needs, the economy and the Defence Force.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

Defence in the future won’t necessarily be the same as it is now. Thus, this event makes us relevant; it makes us aware of what is going to happen in the future and that we have to be prepared. It includes skills transfer for our young engineers, for them to understand that things are not going to be the same as before. We are moving forward: there’s a need for new technology, the need to protect the country against any cyber attacks – those are our priorities. An event like this is very important in order for us to understand what is happening out there in the marketplace and also within South Africa.

PETER NDORO

TV/Radio Personality, News Anchor & Event Facilitator Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

I think the critical thing about Vision 2030 is that it’s not going to happen unless we keep talking about it and internalise it. Honestly, I don’t think there’s enough conversation happening around 2030. Every single citizen has to know what it is and what’s in there. The NDP is 444 pages. I’m not saying read the whole thing, but as a citizen, find the section that relates to you, and then go and make it happen in your area of work and in your personal life. Just get people excited and talking about “The Plan”. This here is an important aspect, getting people from all walks of life talking about the NDP. We need to get word out there because we’re running out of time.

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Q: KEY TAKEAWAYS FROM THE EVENT?

We wrote the NDP in 2011 – the tech that was available and the future we envisaged has changed completely. The key takeaway for me: while we have this wonderful document, we have to refine and revise it every year, because the future looks completely different. We need to create a sense of urgency and understand that although 2030 is still far off, we need to make changes every year to get there. The National Development Plan is our future – let’s go for it man!


CEO, South African National Blood Services Q: HOW IS SANBS MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL TO LIVE? At SANBS, we care about patients in South Africa and we want to save lives. That is the cornerstone of the healthcare sector. We’ve always felt passionate about creating a better tomorrow for South Africa. Our country needs medical expertise, it needs sufficient healthcare – the best the world can offer. We’ve often been the best before: the world’s first heart transplant, and the designing of the CT scanner, for example. Our vision is to remain the best in the world and to find solutions for our patients.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

An event like Vision 2030 promotes and engages discussions around the NDP. It’s an incredible plan. It’s a vision that everyone in South Africa is

striving towards, but we can only achieve it when we as a society work together. There is just no way that any one company or organisation in South Africa is able to do this on its own. It has to be a collaborative effort, and that’s exactly what the Vision 2030 Summit is about: sharing ideas and knowledge and collaborating towards a better future for South Africa.

Q: CHALLENGES OF THE SOUTH AFRICAN HEALTHCARE SECTOR?

From experience working in the public and private healthcare sector of South Africa, the problem is that many people don’t have access to proper healthcare. If we want to move forward as a country, we need better access to healthcare. I think it’s very possible for both sectors to work together to create that access and, ultimately, a better future for this country.

JUSTICE MALALA

Political Analyst & Newspaper Columnist Q: HOW CAN WE MAKE SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE?

We have to constantly redefine the message around South Africa, and what matters and what doesn’t matter. Employee wellness was a big talking point at one of the breakaway sessions, based on the topic around productivity and making South Africa work better. And we can do it! But, we need to focus. We need to work harder. We also need to do things a little bit better. We need to fix education because without that foundation we cannot achieve many of the things spoken about, whether it is in the NDP or in the greater South African society. We have to ask ourselves, how do we become more productive and prosperous citizens of the world?

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

The key thing for me was to get clarification on my own personal views. The great thing about an event like this is that there’s actual research and evidence put before you. It’s saying, “These are the facts and figures, go and have a debate.” I’m guilty of ignoring employee wellness within my own business in the past. What it means to the productivity of employees is something I haven’t really thought about. So, the breakaway session was enlightening and useful. I also found that I could actually be a better citizen because it’s not just about me. If everyone works together, the country will work better!

CHUPU STANLEY MATHABATHA Premier of Limpopo

Q: HOW IS YOUR OFFICE CONTRIBUTING TO MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL?

As public representatives our role is ensuring that we facilitate development in our spheres of operation. That is exactly what we are doing. We’re building and regulating policy.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

This is where you share ideas, this is where you craft very important plans and strategies can come out of this kind of interaction. This is an integrated, intellectual discourse that includes everyone. This is not an abstract, academic type of intellectual discourse, but an integrated intellectual discourse. As far as I’m concerned, that’s RDP in process.

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EDITORIAL | FOLLOW THE BLUEPRINT

DR. JACKIE THOMSON


MYMOENA ISMAIL & ALINA THANDIWE MFULO CEO & Non-executive board member, NEMISA Q: HOW IS NEMISA MAKING SOUTH AFRICA A BETTER PLACE FOR ALL? MI: Our organisation has got an expanded mandate of e-skilling South

Africa by 2030, and therefore it’s in line with the National Development Plan – especially when we talk about human capacity development and also utilising technology to build an inclusive society in South Africa.

AM: We are still lacking in terms of e-skilling. As a programme within

the organisation we e-skill the nation and make sure the Internet is free for all. It’s a vast programme, and we still struggle in terms of reaching communities. If we can make sure that by 2030, 90% of society is e-skilled, then we’d have succeeded.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030? MI: The most important aspect for us is the fact that the NDP is alive – this

event sees to that. It not only brings the ICT sector together (we report to the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services), we’re also seeing business, government and other departments participating.

For us, that is important. We’re quick to think that we’re doing the right thing – the proverbial “stovepipe mentality” – but an event like this breaks that notion. This event brings together the ethos of the NDP, which is about working together for a better future. That’s something that resonates throughout this event.

AM: Here, at this event, we learn from other people what they are doing. It adds value because everybody has to interact with each other. Leaving here, I never have to scratch my head wondering: What company does what? How do we partner with this company and how do we ensure that the network is there? An event like Vision 2030 addresses challenges like the level of education in South Africa. How do we ensure that communities can access basic education in their own languages? The event is also a great networking platform where attendees can tap into ideas, share information and knowledge and how we can do things better. No one is perfect, but when we work together, we can achieve so much.

MATSIETSI MOKHOLO

Deputy Director General: Legal Governance and Risk, Department of Public Enterprises Q: HOW IS YOUR DEPARTMENT CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

Q: PROJECTS THAT YOUR DEPARTMENT ARE CURRENTLY WORKING ON?

Our priority lies with creating jobs; making sure there is sufficient skills development; bridging the gap between the rich and the poor; but also to make sure that these state-owned companies remain sustainable operationally and financially, so that they can help us make South Africa better. You need strong, capable people but also those who share in the vision of the state.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

The Department of Public Enterprises currently looks after six state-owned companies, and the majority of them are infrastructure developers and advanced manufacturers. Part of the work that we do in contribution to Vision 2030 and the NDP is making South Africa an investment destination by using state-owned companies to grow the economy and address the socioeconomic challenges we are facing.

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There are a lot of good things coming from our state-owned companies. For example, through collaboration between Denel and Transnet, we’re developing the South African Regional Aircraft (SARA) – a project that we believe can create high-value jobs and develop the country’s industrial base. The same goes for Trans African Locomotive (TAL), a locomotive built for African infrastructure, and a great way to connect the continent. I told my colleagues that we need to diversify. Growth won’t only come from South Africa, but from the continent as well.

An event like this allows us the opportunity to implement and “do” while we are talking. While the year 2030 is a long-term vision, there are many things we can do now that will act as building blocks for the future. An event like this is great because we can talk, but also take stock of where we are and what needs to be done.


CEO, TechnoChange Solutions Q: HOW IS TECHNOCHANGE CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

As part of our CSI initiative, TechnoChange has employed four interns that we’re developing: supporting them to do future education; helping them with skills; partnering with other companies, like Microsoft, to get them certified. We have a big CSI component, working with schools for the disabled, assisting a school to establish a computer lab; a team member goes there on a weekly basis to train students and teachers on computer literacy.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

An event like this has a lot of value. When I told my colleagues that I’d be attending, they provided me with a long list of questions and issues to address regarding radical economic transformation and its role in the NDP. The feedback you’re able to generate from an event like this is that it needs to continue. I think it’s an event that needs more networking. I think another benefit of an event like this is its ability to bring business and government together to talk about their issues. So, an event like Vision 2030 has a very important role to play.

SIMPIWE SOMDYALA

General Manager, Old Mutual Corporate Affairs Q: HOW IS OLD MUTUAL CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

Old Mutual manages people’s pension funds, savings and investments. Responsible business is something that guides Old Mutual and our purpose is to enable a positive future for South Africans. There’s a connection – as we support individuals to invest and save, and make sure they have the right insurance and financial advice, we must also be interested in what the country does in terms of responsible business. What’s good for South Africa is good for Old Mutual and vice versa. The NDP resonates with us and we believe it’s a no-brainer. There’s a strategic fit. As it is with NDP, education, entrepreneurship and infrastructure development is part of our DNA – it’s not just an add-on.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

The most important thing with a summit like this is that everyone gets the opportunity to share experiences, and we get to learn from each other. As we do that, we will grow. People often forget that the more we talk and have these positive conversations – the lessons, the experiences, the failures, the wins – the more we grow as a team and we become better. For Old Mutual, those are the opportunities we’re after: to collaborate more and take some of the lessons and implement them into our plan.

LOUISE VAN RHYN

Founder, Partners for Possibility Q: HOW IS PARTNERS FOR POSSIBILITY CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

Partners for Possibility is a leadership development and principal support system where we partner business leaders and school principals to work together to improve capacity in schools. We’re reducing inequality by introducing skills that are easily available in the private sector like HR, IT and finance, into under-resourced schools, and we’re having a massive impact on the outcome of those schools.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

Our organisation is designed with the ultimate objective to achieve Vision 2030. So we want to be in rooms like these and have conversations with other organisations that have a shared commitment. There’s no doubt it’s about building relationships, talking with each other, and working together to develop the blueprint for a better South Africa.

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EDITORIAL | FOLLOW THE BLUEPRINT

NKOSANA MBOKANE


ERROL GRADWELL

CEO, Energy and Water SETA Q: YOUR THOUGHTS ON THE NDP?

The NDP is a document that, for the first time in the history of our country, puts together two major things. Firstly, a planning commission, under the current administration, whose work culminated in the NDP with the objective of “plan your work, and work your plan”. The second part of this historic intervention, at government level, is the implementation of a department in the Presidency called the “National Department of Planning, Evaluation and Monitoring”. That was groundbreaking work. We see the NDP as the vehicle for economic growth and development in Africa. At the core of the NDP is the issue of skills development, in order for us to feed into our economic sectors, to build our economy and create a better life for all.

Q: HOW IS THE ENERGY AND WATER SETA CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

What we do as Sector Education Training Authorities (SETAs) is respond to 21 sectors of the economy in South Africa. My job is to look after energy and water. In the energy sector, we have nuclear subsectors, oil and gas, electricity, and renewables with all its subsectors.

In the water space, we do water, waste management and sanitation. In order to respond to the skills needs of the sector, we first develop artisans, technologists, technicians, engineers, scientists and project managers. What you’ll find is that specifically identified institutions like TVET colleges focus on the artisans and shorter courses, whereas Universities of Technology do degrees up to doctoral level, but for the most part undergraduate courses develop hybrid engineers or technologists/technicians. At the level of universities, we’ve done some incredible work with engineers and researchers. Why do we develop them? Because there’s a serious need for skills in South Africa. Gone are the days of bringing in Chinese and Spanish engineers; we really need to start building our own crop. We’ve come a long way in doing that and refining them. We even need business and industry on board to dictate the curriculum. At the moment we have business and labour on board to assist in occupation, qualification and trade development. Our job is to make sure we address the supply and demand mismatches and supply the sector with the skills they need.

BRENDA NTOMBELA

Head of Secretariat, Human Resource Development Council (HRDC) Q: HRDC’S ROLE IN THE NDP?

For us to be able to develop, we need to skill people, talk to our people and

president, to address the issues around human resource development in our

capacity, especially within government.

The key for us is to advise government, through the office of the deputy country. What the council is doing is looking at priorities. People say that we

make them understand, and make them able to plan for their development

decided to come up with just five priorities.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

Q: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES?

in HRDC, we had a strategy that was crafted in 2010, but the NDP came

can’t address all the issues or challenges in the country, so the HRDC has

The first issue is about foundation education and the other is around creating more access to TVET colleges. We’re saying that there should be good access to TVET colleges, with the ultimate aim of obtaining the desired skills that the country requires. The third issue is innovation and research. It becomes difficult for us as a country to progress in terms of education and skills development if we don’t know what skills the country actually needs.

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The value is that all of us are reminded of what is on the NDP. For example, after 2010, so we’re reviewing the strategy. We’ve had to reconsider and review our strategy in line with the blueprint of the NDP and the country, and reinforce the issues created by the NDP.


CEO, Itataise Investments Q: HOW IS ITATAISE INVESTMENTS CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

Itataise Investments operates at a practical level. One of our companies, Perfect Stitch, is located in Diepkloof, Soweto. We located it there deliberately – we wanted to deal with the issue of people having to travel long distances to work every day, so we decided to bring work to the community instead. It makes it easier for our employees to get to work and we can now also stop being part of the cycle of creating employment opportunities away from where people live, which was a distinct feature of the apartheid regime. We’re active within the infrastructure sector and are specifically looking at water and new technology, to make water more cheaply available. There’s a serious water shortage in the country, and without sufficient water, we can’t practice agriculture, wash or use any of the industrial applications – water is a scarce and important resource. So, we’re active within that sector.

Q: HOW IS YOUR COMPANY CONTRIBUTING TO SOUTH AFRICA’S FOOD SECURITY?

We’re active within the agro-processing sector – we’re looking at getting cheaper and more effective sources of protein into the marketplace, like game meat, for example. Firstly, game meat would be more affordable as it has a lower cost input, and secondly, the meat is better for you. Our food security is declining as a country – nearly 40% of our beef is imported – which is not sustainable because that’s money we’re exporting to other

countries. Eventually, it’s our ambition to put that cheap, but high-quality protein into the schooling environment. Why is that important? Because our children need protein in their system so that they can grow and be effective in the classroom. There’s no point in giving people an education if they’re not in the position to engage with it properly, being either hungry or malnourished.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

Vision 2030 is important because it gives everyone a chance to reflect on their own business activity and its relevance to what’s good for the South African society. As business people, we’re often focused only on what’s good for the business, but that link can never be broken, because otherwise your business starts growing at the expense of society instead of contributing to society. One of the key things coming from this event was the attendees’ ability to reflect specifically and strategically about where the country needs to go and how their particular business activities can contribute to building a better country. We keep talking about wanting a better SA, but it’s not often enough that we link our particular business activities concretely to the role that we must play and can play in making better of what is to come. The event also connected a lot of people from both private and public sectors – that dialogue is important and it must be organic.

PETRUS DE KOCK

Head of Research, BrandSA Q: HOW IS BRANDSA CONTRIBUTING TO A BETTER SOUTH AFRICA?

At BrandSA, there’s a big focus on inter-Africa trade – a big issue in our long-term development. We tailor a lot of our research and international programmes to focus on peer African countries, to get an understanding of who we as South Africans are in the markets and how we establish better relationships, with the ultimate goal of deeper cultural contact. Other, more fundamental, things we look at are economic and human development. In many different ways, we articulate through our strategy and through trying to deliver a component of the bigger picture.

Q: WHAT IS THE VALUE OF AN EVENT LIKE VISION 2030?

The value of an event like this is for people to say, “let’s share our thoughts, let’s share our concerns, but also, let’s build on and work towards the bigger picture”. Let’s ask ourselves: What are the solutions? Ultimately, we need to get to the next phase of our development. Therein lies the value.

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EDITORIAL | FOLLOW THE BLUEPRINT

MOHALE RALEBITSO


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

NEXT-GENERATION HUMAN CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT An interview with Minister Naledi Pandor by Ryland Fisher The head office of the Department of Science and

the numbers set by the NDP we need to increase the

Technology is housed in a new-age glass building on

supervisory capacity. The post-docs are the potential

the grounds of the Council for Scientific and Industrial

supervisors of the increased numbers of PhD students.

Research in Pretoria. The CSIR is an important part of the

The DHET began a national programme for the next

work done by the Department as it seeks to implement the

generation of academics. It’s called NGAP (Next

goals of the National Development Plan.

Generation of Academics Programme).

The DST has set itself the goal of producing more

“It is trying to respond in terms of the NDP to the objective

doctoral graduates, promoting innovation and providing

that over 60% of academics in higher education should

opportunities for small- and medium-sized businesses to

have a PhD by 2030. The NGAP provides funding for

embrace technology, said the former Minister of Science

universities to allow lecturers who do not have PhDs to

and Technology, Naledi Pandor, in an interview in her office

have time off to pursue a PhD on an almost full-time basis.

in South Africa’s capital.

We have put some funding towards that.

Pandor, who was appointed Higher Education Minister after

It is a good programme because then you’re improving the

the interview, said her department was making progress in

potential pool of academics within higher education but

implementing the National Development Plan.

also, you’re allowing people to stay as lecturers and have someone replace them in terms of teaching time while

“We’ve taken the NDP very seriously as the Department

they pursue their PhDs on a fuller-time basis. Part of the

of Science and Technology. We have incorporated it into

problem with the PhD is that people stop because it is a lot

our long-term strategic plans and our annual performance

of work. This intervention of DHET, with DST support, is a

plan. The key focus area is human capital development,

very important one.”

especially expanding our PhD programme, because we were given a very tough objective of 6 000 PhDs annually

Pandor said that the 2 430 PhDs that are being produced

by 2030.

at the moment is a huge improvement on five years ago.

“We currently produce around 2 430 annually and we

“It is a substantial increase, but in terms of what is

want to significantly increase that number. Working with

required by the NDP, where you’re trying to ensure that

the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET),

you have a significant proportion of PhDs per million of

we’ve begun to implement a set of interventions that will

population, we need to ramp up the numbers significantly.”

help us to meet these objectives. She said that the Department has developed global “Fortunately, just before the crisis of the economy got

partnership programmes through a PhD placement

worse, we got some improved funding for PhD grants.

programme to get South African students to study in

We’ve also increased the number of grants available for

universities overseas.

post-doctoral candidates because, if we are to achieve

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INTERVIEW | NALEDI PANDOR

“WE’VE TAKEN THE NDP VERY SERIOUSLY AS THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. WE HAVE INCORPORATED IT INTO OUR LONG-TERM STRATEGIC PLANS AND OUR ANNUAL PERFORMANCE PLAN. THE KEY FOCUS AREA IS HUMAN CAPITAL DEVELOPMENT, ESPECIALLY EXPANDING OUR PHD PROGRAMME , BECAUSE WE WERE GIVEN A VERY TOUGH OBJECTIVE OF 6 000 PHD’S ANNUALLY BY 2030”

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“We don’t have the resources to fully fund all of these young people, so we’re talking to the UK and other governments. This partnership will allow South African students, partially supported by the partner country and ourselves, to study overseas.” The other area where the Department of Science and Technology is making a contribution to the NDP is in innovation. “The NDP says that by 2030 innovation should be pervasive in all economic and social activities in South Africa. This means that our creative abilities, imagination and technological strengths should be brought to bear on a wide range of sectors and opportunities in South Africa. “We are strengthening our interventions to enhance innovation, both in the public sector as well as within the private sector through improving the incentives we have available for business. We are pushing hard to promote innovation in a range of ways. We have the Research Tax Incentive Scheme for the private sector. If you are a private company that is investing in research and development and if what you do is innovative, you can claim 150% back of the funds you’ve invested in RND (research and development). It’s a very attractive scheme.” Pandor said that public sector research is primarily funded by the public purse, but private sector funding comes from the private sector. “In most countries they have a tax scheme to encourage the private sector to invest in research because then they are more innovative,

we needed to reduce the administrative burden and use electronic submission much more than we were doing at that time.

and companies invent new and exciting products.

“They also made recommendations to changes to the Tax Amendment

“We have developed this scheme with the support of the Treasury. It’s

at all of those proposals and discussing them with Treasury as well

been in existence since 2011 and it’s beginning to have an impact. It’s been difficult to administer because the law is quite strict given the generosity of the incentive, but it’s one of the ways in which we are

Act which is the Act from which this incentive comes. We’re looking as with the South African Revenue Service who are partners in administering the incentive.”

encouraging innovation.

The second area of innovation, where the Department has made

“I have to approve the applications or disapprove them. It’s one of the

“We feel we have too few. We’d like to see such technology hubs

things that give me sleepless nights. We have implemented a pre-approval process and two years ago, we established an advisory task team made up of business and ourselves to comment on the scheme and give us an indication of areas in which they felt we

progress, is the expansion of incubator hubs, said Pandor.

that support young people and businesses with innovation existing throughout the country. We have the Innovation Hub in Johannesburg and Cape Town. But we would like to see around 20, which is our plan for 2022, which is still too few, even though it would be a

should improve.

significant increase for us.

“One of the things they recommended was a greater outreach to

“Ensuring that you have technology hubs that provide support to

small- and medium-sized businesses, because it tends to be major corporates that take advantage of the incentive. They also felt that

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young people to pursue innovative ideas is an important part of the work that we are undertaking.”


INTERVIEW | NALEDI PANDOR

The NDP also proposes that the Department support small- and

products and to be competitive in terms of bidding for contracts

medium-sized businesses to use advanced technology in order

with some of our state-owned companies as well as with the

to make them more competitive, said Pandor.

private sector.

“For example, if you’re a company in the design industry but you

“For instance, a young design company, a small business led

don’t have any access to 3D printing technology, it reduces your

by a young black woman in Pietermaritzburg, was able to get a

edge as a competitor. We’ve established technology stations

contract with Transnet because they have the technology station

at universities and science councils throughout South Africa

support. They can make submissions to a big corporate like

and any small- or medium-sized business that needs help from

Transnet or Eskom or any other big business.

an engineer, a technologist or a chemist can approach these institutions and they can have access to the best world-class,

“Advanced technology and advanced manufacturing are

advanced machinery that they need.

increasingly important to businesses throughout the world.”

“We have these stations at universities such as Vaal University

Pandor said that her department has also established national

of Technology, Cape Peninsula University of Technology and the

facilities that can be utilised by small, medium and even large

University of the Western Cape.

businesses at our various science councils, with the main one being at the CSIR.

“All universities should host a technology station and small businesses could go there to get the assistance they require.

“If you want to produce products on a nanoscale, you can go to the CSIR. We have a national nanotechnology centre with the

“This has proven to be a really good intervention. Because what

best manufacturing capability that you can find in South Africa.

it has done is it has helped small businesses to develop the capability to use advanced technology to produce exciting new

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“If you want to do Nano research on minerals, you go to Mintech

Pandor said that the CSIR was a global science council which

where they have machinery we’ve provided. They have a Nano

supports industrial research.

innovation centre which is funded by the DST. Companies such as Angloplats go to Mintech. They have senior researchers and

“It is active in many areas. It also has a defence component, because

meteorologists, and they assist companies with the work they need

that’s what it was established for, and so they continue to do a lot of

to do with nanotechnology.

technology development, especially in radar technologies.

“We also have established a biorefinery centre at the CSIR. We

“They are doing quite significant work, to the degree that they have a

provide facilities through the CSIR in all sectors where business

spinoff company in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). These are now

needs technology support. We are currently discussing a long-term

used worldwide. They generate income as well through companies

expansion plan because the CSIR has been our largest science

that they have established.

council and it’s acquired sufficient experience, after 72 years, to be able to become a big innovation and technology hub.

“They have also developed a radar which can penetrate deep forests and they’re assisting SanParks with identifying poachers of rhinos

“In the next 10 to 15 years, South Africa’s going to see a major

in our parks. The DG (director general of the Department) was in a

development of the CSIR. It will be beyond my time, but it will be one

helicopter with a team where this radar was being exhibited to him

of the biggest improvements and modernisation of a science council

and he was absolutely fascinated at what it can do.

in South Africa.”

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BUSINESS CARDS ABSA

Exxaro Resources Stephen Seaka

Mxolisi Mgojo

Managing Principal, Head of Public Sector

Chief Executive Officer Roger Dyason Road, Pretoria West, 0183

Absa Capital Sandton North, 15 Alice Lane, 1st Floor, Sandton, 2196

Tel: 012 307 4314 Email: ceo@exxaro.com Website: www.exxaro.com

Tel & Fax: 011 895 6619 Email: stephen.seaka@absa.co.za Website: www.absacapital.com

CTICC

FP&M SETA

Julie-May Ellingson

Ms Felleng Yende

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive Officer

1 Lower Long Street Cape Town, 8001

1 Newtown Street, Killarney, Johannesburg, 2193

Tel: 021 410 5000 Fax: 021 410 5001 Email: i n f o @ c t i c c . c o . z a Website: w w w. c t i c c . c o . z a

Tel: (+27) 11 403 1700 Fax: (+27) 11 403 1718 Email: FellengY@fpmseta.org.za Website: www.fpmseta.org.za

College of Cape Town

HRDC Ms Brenda Ntombela

Louis Van Niekerk

Head of HRDC Secretariat

Principal, College of Cape Town for TVET 334 Albert Road, Saltriver

178 Francis Baard Street, 6th Floor Ndinaye House, Pretoria, 0001

Tel: 0214046700 Fax: 0214046701 Email: lvanniekerk@cct.edu.za Website: www.cct.edu.za

Tel: 012 943 3187/5 Fax: 086 298 3989 Email: Ntombela.b@dhet.gov.za Website: www.hrdcsa.org.za

Channel Africa Solly Phetoe General Manager Corner Henley & Artillery Roads Auckland Park, Johannesburg Tel: 011 714 4145 Fax: 011 714 2072 Email: phetoess@sabc.co.za Website: www.channelafrica.co.za

the dti

IDT Mr Butcher Matutle Acting CEO Corner Oberon & Sprite Street, Glenwood Office Park, IDT Building, Faerie Glen, 0043 Tel: (012) 845 2000 ext 2061 Email: butcherm@idt.org.za Website: www.idt.org.za

Indigo Kulani Group Lionel October Director General

the dti Campus, 77 Meintjies Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria, 0002 Tel: 012 394 3075 Email: LOctober@thedti.gov.za Website: www.thedti.gov.za

Vuyi Hlabangane

Group Chief Executive Officer Waverley Office Park, Building1, Ground Floor, 15 Forest Road, Bramley, Sandton, 2090 Tel: +27 (86) 111 2221 Fax: +27 (86) 690 6963 Email: info@indigo-group.co.za Website: www.indigo-group.co.za


JAM SA

Nation Builder Ann Pretorius

Keri-Leigh Paschal

Managing Director JAM SA

Executive Director of Nation Builder

Plot 123, Copperhouse Road, Nooitgedacht, Honeydew, Johannesburg

3rd Floor Mill Square Stellenbosch

Tel: 011 548 3943 Fax: 011 548 3948 Email: jamsa@jamint.com Website: www.jamsa.co.za

Tel: 021 816 1111 Email: nationbuilder@mergon.co.za Website: www.proudnationbuilder. co.za

JB Marks

SABC

Jako Mokgosi

Principal Officer

03 Rissik Street, 3rd Floor Alris Building, Johannesburg CBD, 2001 Tel: 011 492 0601 Fax: 011 492 0953 Email:Jako@jbmarksedutrust.co.za Website: www.jbmarksedutrust.co.za

LGSETA

N a d a Wo t s h e l a G ro u p E x e c u t i v e R a d i o S A B C R a d i o P a r k Au c k l a n d P a r k 6 t h fl o o r E m a i l : Wo t s h e l a N @ s a b c . c o . z a We b s i t e : w w w. S A B C . c o . z a

TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION AGENCY Barlow Manilal

Gugu Dlamini Chief Executive Officer

Chief Executive Officer

47 Van Buuren Road, Bedfordview, 2007

83 Lois Avenue, Cnr Lois Avenue & Atterbury Road, Menlyn P O Box 172, Pretoria, 0063

Tel & Fax: 011 456 8579 Email: GuguD@lgseta.org.za Website: www.lgseta.org.za

Tel: +27 12 472 2783 Email: barlow.manilal@tia.org.za Website: www.tia.org.za

Motheo Audit Services N i t h a D i r e - M o f o ke n g Director Ground Floor, Regus Business Centre, Sunninghill Te l : 011 236 8621 Cell: 076 417 1117 E m a i l : nitham@motheoca.co.za We b s i t e : www.motheoca.co.za

NEMISA

TETA Maphefo Anno-Frempong Chief Executive Officer TETA House, 344 Pretoria Avenue, Randburg, Gauteng Tel & Fax: 011 577 7000 Email:coms@teta.org.za Website:www.teta.org.za

UKZN D r A l b e r t va n J a a r s ve l d

Mymoena Ismail Chief Executive Officer 21 Girton Road, Parktown, 2196 Tel & Fax: 011 484 0583 Email: ceo@nemisa.co.za Website: www.nemisa.co.za

Vice-Chancellor and Principal U n i v e r s i t y o f K w a Z u l u - N a ta l , P r i v a te B a g X 5 4 0 0 1 , D u r b a n , 4001 Tel & Fax: 0 3 1 2 6 0 7 9 5 8 Email: Zondon1@ukzn.ac.za We b s i t e : w w w. u k z n . a c . z a


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