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THE SOUTH A FRICA N FLAG BEARER FOR WOMEN R147.00

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UPFRONT

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14

Contributors and credits Featured clients Editor’s letter

CASTER SEMENYA

Foreword

THE FLAG-BEARER FOR ALL WOMEN

INTERVIEWS

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Caster Semenya

Ten years ago, at the age of 18 – when many teenagers were focused on partying – Caster Semenya won gold for the 800m at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin. In 2012 she won her first Olympic gold medal and then four years later brought home the second world championship.

Pindie Nyandoro Standard Bank

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Lindy-Lou Alexander Standard Bank

25

Itumaleng Monale Standard Bank

118

Nicola Cooper

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COVER STORY

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25

118

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EDITORIAL

38 44 52 64 74 80 88

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Empowering women in the digital age Business High yers in high heels Entrepreneurship Forging a path to entrepreneurship Finance Banking on Innovation Technology Getting Africa into top tech condition Energy Powering ahead Environment Green means go Tourism & hospitality Going places Education Back to basics

LIFESTYLE

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134

126 130 134 137 138

Safari for the soul Making tracks Daringly demure Quickfire Q&A with Kelly-Marie Jacobs A taste of Africa Siwela wines

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CR E DITS CEO R A L F FL E TC H E R

AT THE BACK

TO P CO S T U D I O

140 S tandard Bank Top Women

P R O D U C T I O N D I R E C TO R VA N FL E TC H E R

awards & conference

168 Top 100 gender empowered

G R O U P E D I TO R F I O N A WA K E L I N

companies

172

Index

AS S I S TA N T E D I TO R NICOLE FORREST F E AT U R E S E D I TO R ELSKE JOUBERT DESIGNERS CHRISTINE SILJEUR NABIEHL BESTER M E L I S SA C LO E T E

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T R A F F I C M A N AG E R DA N I E L B O U W E R R E S E A R C H M A N AG E R SA N D R A B O C K RESEARCHER TA R RY N JAC O B S

CONTRIBUTORS

SAL E S

Dr Audrey Verhaeghe

AS S O C I AT E P U B L I S H E R J U DY C H I L E S E

Audrey Verhaeghe, Pan African Tech start-up enthusiast and eco-system builder. Currently Chairperson at SA Innovation Summit and its Foundation

B U S I N E S S D E V E LO P M E N T M A N AG E R S C H A R LTO N M O U TO N JA N E T K A R O DZ A JA N I N E J O N AS

Mich Atagana Mich Atagana, tech journalist with a particular interest in startups and Africa’s tech space is Head of Communications and Public Affairs, South Africa at Google

PRINTERS CT P P R I N T E R S C OV E R P H OTO G R A P H E R K Y L E C E S TA R I PROOFREADER OLIVIA MAIN I M AG E S i S TO C K

DISCLAIMER All rights reser ved. No par t of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmit ted, in any form or by any means, electronic mechanical, photocopying, r e c o r d i n g o r o t h e r w i s e , w i t h o u t t h e p r i o r w r i t t e n c o n s e n t o f To p M e d i a & C o m m u n i c a t i o n s ( P t y) L t d T/A To p c o M e d i a . R e g . N o. 2 011/10 5 6 5 5/07. W h i l e e v e r y c a r e h a s b e e n t a ke n w h e n compiling this publication, the publishers, editor and contributors accept no responsibilit y f o r a n y c o n s e q u e n c e s a r i s i n g f r o m a n y e r r o r s o r e m i s s i o n s . I S B N : 978 0 62 0 5 0710 3

HEAD OFFICE TO P M E D I A & C O M M U N I CAT I O N S (P t y ) Lt d T/A To p c o M e d i a 2 n d F l o o r, E l ka y H o u s e 18 6 L o o p S t r e e t, C a p e Tow n , 8 0 01 Te l: +27 8 6 0 0 0 9 5 9 0 | F a x : +21 42 3 7576 E m a i l: i n f o @ t o p c o.c o. z a

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FEATURED CLIENTS African Extracts Rooibos 8 AVON Justine Barone, Budge & Dominick (BBD)

124 78

Cathsseta

115

Coca-Cola Beverages SA (CCBSA)

116

De Beers Group

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Dr Langa Kgolane Medical Spa

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Edcon Holdings

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Ekurhuleni West Tvet College

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Fempower Personnel

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Gauteng Provincial Legislature

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GEMS

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Illovo

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Impala Platinum Holdings

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Zamani Holdings

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KZN Convention Bureau

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Magethi Industrial Psychology Services

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Mahlako A Phahla Investments

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McDonalds

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Mdito

48

Motheo Tvet College

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MSINSI (SOC) LTD

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National Development Agency

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Nsovo Environmental Consulting

92

Ombudsman for Banking Services

62

PM Skillshouse

113

Professional Provident Society Insurance Company Limited (PPS)

72

PWC

99

SANBI

84

SASOL Mining

34

SEDA

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South Africa Post Office

162

Standard Bank IFC, IBC TUHF

143

University of Johannesburg

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Wits Business School 7

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Are you an ambitious, hard-working professional woman? Do you feel that you could be making more of an impact at work? How well do you know yourself and your potential? How well are you able to navigate the steps to success?

Wits Business School invites you to take some time out of your busy schedule to focus on something else for a change: You. Our WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP course is an exciting journey of self-discovery which will effectively help you: • Build your interpersonal and negotiation skills; • Better understand patriarchy, power and gender inequality; • Build your EQ and self-awareness; • Develop your confidence and decision-making capabilities, and; • Find your voice!

This part-time programme has changed the lives of many women. Is it your turn now?

Contact Sonia Newton for more details: 011-717-3511 or sonia.newton@wits.ac.za

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EDI TOR’S L ET T ER

editor’s INN OVAT I O N IN A FR I CA In 1935, anthropologist Margaret Mead wrote the important work Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies. In it she concludes that cultural conditioning is more important than biology in shaping people’s behaviour. Eighty-four years later our societies are still being rent asunder by genderbased violence. So what are we doing to ensure our cultures revere the feminine in all of us – both men and women? The Standard Bank Top Women publication celebrates gender empowerment, transformation and equity. According to the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) 2018 Global Gender Gap report, at the current rate of progress, the global gender gap will take 108 years to close and economic gender parity will take 202 years to achieve. We simply cannot afford to wait this long. And for meaningful, structural and cultural metamorphosis to take place, it requires all of us to lean in and be part of the change. Sometimes the simple things are the most profound – like the maxim: “Be kind to one another”. The theme of this 15th edition is ‘Innovation in Africa’ and our foreword ‘Don’t change your mission - change the world’ was penned by Dr Audrey Verhaeghe, chairperson of The SA Innovation Summit. To frame her content she invokes the saying: “If you want to run fast, run alone. If you want to run far, run together”.

Echoing the UN Women website: “When more women work, economies grow”, at Topco Media we believe that empowering women can accelerate growth in Africa and the article line-up investigates women innovating across sectors throughout the continent. We hope you enjoy this bumper edition, which would not have been possible without features editor, Elske Joubert, copy editor, Nicole Forrest, designers Christine Siljeur, Nabiehl Bester and Melissa Cloete; and traffic manager Daniel Bouwer. Wishing you an intriguing, abundant, and kind year. We look forward to seeing you in 2020.

Speaking of running, at the 2019 Top Women Awards and Conference, fearless Olympic gold medalist Caster Semenya inspired us with her indomitable spirit and capacity for love, truth and paying it forward – read more about her in this year’s lead article.

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WOMEN Don’t change your mission - change the world BY DR AUDREY VERHAEGHE, CHAIRPERSON OF THE SA INNOVATION SUMMIT

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WO M E N A R E T H E G L U E H O L D IN G IN N OVAT IO N TOG E T HE R

“If you want to run fast, run alone. If you want to run far, run together. Innovation is a game changer and it cannot be done alone”

Innovation is where creativity and implementation meet. The most defining feature of innovation is that it makes a difference in the world. It’s so in demand that each year, the SA Innovation Summit brings together over 1 500 entrepreneurs and 200 investors to facilitate R1-billion worth of dealmaking. Although women make up 51% of the global population, women business owner statistics do not match up. In Ghana, which far outstrips other countries with the highest percentage, female business owners are at a staggering 46.4%. Only 18.8% of business owners in South Africa are women. Women entrepreneurs who are entering the space still need to negotiate levels of male-dominated industries to bring their ideas to life. At the same time, there’s an appetite in the market for good female pitches. What the innovation space needs is collaboration. There are ideas and there is money. But there is also a wide gap between the two. The industry needs ‘glue-makers’ – players who facilitate networking opportunities between entrepreneurs and investors. This is one area in which women can make their mark. Women are naturally excellent collaborators. If we can bring people together around the dinner table, why not around the conference table?

FOREWORD

The challenge remains to encourage women to also take their seat at the table, not just bring others around it. Research by Statistics SA has shown that in the second quarter of 2018, just 32% of managers in South Africa were women; “domestic worker”, “clerk or technician” were the only fields dominated by women. If women aren’t stepping into leadership and decision-making positions, we’re depriving the world of a more connected, nurturing and collaborative way of thinking. We are powerful. Right now, connectivity is empowering us to build these better businesses. It allows us to work from anywhere, anytime – even while at home with children. There’s a phenomenal future for women on the horizon. To harness this future, we need to shape the perceptions of girls and young women, and empower them to lead at the edge of innovation. Young women need to see role models, and we need to teach girls to realise their purpose. That purpose is bigger than their circumstances and bigger than their family. My purpose is the thing that pushes me. My purpose is to help people get new ideas into the world and commercialise them. My mission is to create an innovation-mindset driven economy. There will be difficult days, and there will be times you don’t make targets. But don’t change your mission – change the world.

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D E B E E R S G R OUP

A DV ERTORI A L

BU I L D I N G O UR TO MORROW In my role as Managing Director of De Beers Group Managed Operations, I am consistently amazed by the progress we are making in contributing to a better, fairer future. As the world’s leading diamond company, we have a tremendous opportunity to be a force for good, and we are grasping this opportunity with genuine passion and commitment. Our Building Forever approach to sustainability unites and compels our people and partners to leave a positive, lasting legacy long after we recover our last diamond.

“W E ARE BENEFITING WHOLE COMMUNITIES AND HELPING TO STRENGTHEN AND DIVERSIFY LOCAL ECONOMIES” Just as a diamond is forever, we want the good work we do to stand the test of time, positively impacting people and the environment for generations to come. Indeed, Building Forever reflects our determination to live the values embodied in a diamond – strength, commitment, trust, permanence and to ensure that

the provenance, purity and authenticity of our products reinforce those values for our customers. Having laid strong foundations for our sustainability work in recent years, I’m very proud of our employees’ ongoing efforts to tackle the difficult issues we face with optimism and determination. As part of our journey to create a better future, we have continued to select the partners and projects that will help maximise our positive impact as an organisation. Our employees’ commitment to nurturing these relationships and delivering these projects is vital to the long-term success of Building Forever, which we continue to roll out across two key areas: Standing with Women and Girls, and Protecting the Natural World. We are making good progress toward an inclusive and diverse culture and are already seeing encouraging results. In just two years, for example, we have significantly improved our appointment rate of women into senior management roles. As well as working to ensure equal opportunities for the women in our own workforce, we are taking action to help women in our producer countries. I feel tremendously encouraged when I read the feedback from women microentrepreneurs who have attended our business training courses and I hear about their hope, energy and dreams for the future. By supporting women in

South Africa, Botswana and Namibia to gain the confidence and skills they need to maintain and grow successful businesses, we are benefiting whole communities and helping to strengthen and diversify local economies. I am also inspired when I see our commitment to the environment in action – from our efforts to reclaim and re-vegetate land at our Victor Mine in Canada, to our ambitious elephant translocation project moving hundreds of elephants from South Africa to Mozambique. Through projects large and small, we are supporting biodiversity, protecting vulnerable animal populations and protecting ecosystems for future generations. Step by step, we are transforming our role in society, making sure that each diamond we sell means just as much to the community in which it was found as it does to its ultimate owner. This should give us all hope for the future. It certainly does for me.

Mpumi Zikalala - Managing Director De Beers Group Managed Operations

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: De Beers Group, Cnr. Crownwood Road and Diamond Drive, Theta/Booysens Reserve Postal Address: Private Bag X01, Southdale 2135, Johannesburg Telephone: +27 (0)11 374 7173 | Email: Jackie.Mapiloko@debeersgroup.com Website: www.debeersgroup.com Twitter: @debeersgroup | Facebook: @DeBeersGroupOfCompanies | Instagram: @debeersgroup

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CA S TE R S E ME NYA

C OV ER S TORY

CASTER BY FIONA WAKELIN

“AS A CHILD I HAD NO FEAR AND CHASED MY DREAMS; I BELIEVED THAT EVERYTHING I TOUCHED WOULD TURN TO GOLD”

Ten years ago, at the age of 18 – when many teenagers were focused on partying – Caster Semenya won gold for the 800m at the World Athletics Championships in Berlin. In 2012 she won her first Olympic gold medal and then four years later brought home the second, confirming her place as the undisputed world champion. Not only is she dynamic on the track – her indomitable spirit and capacity for love, truth and paying it forward are truly inspirational. We caught up with Caster at the Standard Bank Top Women Awards and Conference where she was awarded the Sport Icon of the Year trophy to thunderous applause and a standing ovation.

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“I graduated recently and that has inspired the kids to want to study�

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CA S TE R S E ME NYA

C OV ER S TORY

What were some of the highlights on the journey from growing up in the village of Ga-Masehlong in Limpopo to competing on the global stage?

“As a child I competed against older children so as not to demoralise others in my age group. I used to be a sprinter – running on the sand in the bush prepared me well – and once I got onto a track I was unstoppable. I had no fear and chased my dreams; I believed that everything I touched would turn to gold. (True that – so many gold medals later! ) Athletics was my destiny – it fulfils me. When I run, I feel free. “My parents raised me well; they did not question how I see the world and that I preferred the garden to the kitchen. They helped me not to care what others think of me. The bullies soon realised I was a visionary and that their negativity did not matter to me. “My role model was Maria Mutola from Mozambique – the threetimes Olympic gold medalist in the 800m – I wanted to walk in her footsteps.” (She not only walked in them – she ran.)

The year 2009 was destined to be life-changing and while the world economy was reeling from the financial meltdown, Caster moved from village to city, from Limpopo to Pretoria, and enrolled at the University of Pretoria to study sports science. In the rural areas she had had her dreams but no coach to hone her skills. This changed when she moved to Pretoria and trained under Michael Seme. In July, at the African Junior Athletics Championships, Caster won both the 800m and 1 500m races with the times of 1:56:72 and 4:08:01, respectively. A month later she took home the gold at the World Championships. Three years later she powered through to receive her first Olympic gold on the London stage. And then again in 2016 in Rio with the record-smashing time of 1:55:28.

Apart from being internationally celebrated as a double Olympic gold medalist, you are renowned for being down to earth, humble, happy and at ease being yourself. What does it mean to be you, to be Caster Semenya?

“I am the engineer of my life and my career. I am a woman and an athlete. I work hard every day. Six days a week I get up at 5am and train twice a day. With things as they are, I will keep quiet, observe, then act, and only worry about those things I can control.” “I accept, love and appreciate myself – it is how I learned how to respect others. I do not respond to negativity or mediocrity. I am Caster – I am not selling anything fake or plastic. My life is not about someone else’s perceptions.

I live my life authentically and refuse to internalise oppression. “I set up the Semenya Foundation, based in Soweto, which empowers about 30 young girls and boys aged 12 years and older. At the Foundation we create a family – which is not only based on blood, but on those beside you. A lot of the kids have no families, no shelter, have been molested and abused. We teach them how to love and accept themselves and I try to make sure I understand their needs, not their wants, the basic needs of love and understanding.”

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“I am the engineer of my life and my career” Caster ’s message for young girls: “You can achieve anything. Have passion, love and respect for yourself. Build your own empire – then you can create opportunities for others.”

Caster graduated recently and that has inspired the kids to want to study. In 2019, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women set out guiding principles for South African businesses to empower women in the workplace, marketplace and community, reinforced by statistics that show only one in 40 JSE-listed companies have a woman CEO; and just 28% of senior management roles are held by women – a number that has barely shifted since 2004. And despite women filling 44% of skilled posts in the national workforce (a statistic that hasn’t changed since 2002), we earn on average 23% less than men.

What does leadership mean to you? “It means working with people. At the Foundation my vision is for people to do what they love without being told what to do. Leadership allows people to do what they do best – as long as there are results. Being controlling is being a boss, not a leader.”

Caster has shown unwavering courage in the pursuit of her dreams, sometimes against what, to others, would have seemed insurmountable odds. We asked her what she feel needs to happen to empower women to shift the needle and achieve equity: “If you want to empower women, start first among us. It starts with love. Just being on social media is not being supportive. First, we need a forum and to contribute whatever we have – we need to do, invest, focus on young girls and change their lives. “We need to ask the question: ‘Do the kids in the rural areas have what is necessary to fulfil their dreams?’ Only donating once a year is not support – real support needs to happen on a daily basis. “To succeed you need patience, to broaden the idea of what a business is and understand what you can do to change the environment, plough back into the community and create job opportunities.” In Greek mythology Nike was the goddess of victory, so it is only appropriate that Caster should star in the latest Nike ad, alongside icons like Serena Williams, gymnast Simone Biles and the US women’s national soccer team.Like Steve Jobs, the ad celebrates the importance of dreaming, of breaking boundaries, of what is called craziness in a rule-bound world. Called “Dream Crazier” the ad is narrated by Williams and has been viewed more than 2.6 million times on YouTube. “Here’s to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes... the ones who see things differently -- they’re not fond of rules... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things... they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.” – Steve Jobs (written by Rob Siltanen, Creative Director of Siltanen & Partners) Here’s to the sanity that craziness brings.

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CA S TE R S E ME NYA

C OV ER S TORY

Flag-bearer for all women

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THE NAT ION AL D EV E LO P M E N T AG E N CY

PU R SU ING PARITY CEO of the National Development Agency (NDA), Thamo Mzobe is also a social and community development activist. Mzobe had her start in education, first as a school teacher, following which she became a principal. She later moved into government, where she has occupied many and varied

are leading in terms of improved and impactful community development programmes. How has gender empowerment

strengthened your organisation?

Unit at the Department of Social

Women are empathetic. For them, people management is not just cut and dry. They are nurturers; this balances the masculine dominance in the running and managing of the organisation.

Mzobe has remained a committed servant,

What are the current and future

roles, including being the Deputy Director of the KwaZulu-Natal Legislature and the Director of the Non-profit Organisations Development. Throughout her career,

championing service delivery with humility. We chatted to this top woman about the NDA and the future of business in South Africa. How have you implemented gender-

driven development in the workplace? The NDA has appointed a high percentage of women in strategic leadership positions. This has encouraged women in the lower ranks to aspire to become leaders. I believe that we are all able to lead; the trick is to start leading from where you are, no matter your level in an organisation. Once you start there, you can see that it is doable. Provincial offices headed by women

GENDER EMPOWERMENT STATS More than 50.1% of the National Development Agency’s shareholders, executive directors and staff are female.

trends in your sector?

Recently, in government, more and more women are holding CEO, directorgeneral and deputy director-general positions. Although this still needs improvement, the UN’s Agenda 2063 aims to correct the imbalance when it comes to positions of power. What skills do you think leaders of the future are going to need? Trends of the future are indicating that leaders need to have strong criticalthinking and problem-solving abilities, coupled

MZOBE’S TOP FIVE TIPS FOR THRIVING IN BUSINESS • Be a good listener and learn from others • Be decisive and take the correct decisions, even if they are unpopular • Be true to yourself • Be committed and do everything to the best of your ability • Always be honest

THAMO MZOBE

National Development Agency CEO

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T H E N AT IO N A L D E V E LO PM E N T AG E NCY

I NT ERV I EW

“IT ALWAYS SEEMS IMPOSSIBLE UNTIL IT’S DONE” – N E LS O N M AN D E LA

with creativity, people-management skills and emotional intelligence. Leaders will need to be innovative,

visionary and able to challenge policies and express ideas. Communication is

important, as that is the glue that holds the organisation together.

I believe that Ubuntu is key in running any organisation that relies on human beings to implement successful

programmes. Leaders must allow the flow of ideas, values and ethics that brings everyone to the centre. No

one should be left on the periphery; everyone’s contribution should be

taken into account. Every voice in the organisation counts!

Leaders should also strive for leadership that is ethical, and

efficient, and embrace

intergenerational diversity in

ensuring that their organisation remains innovative.

Which female leaders inspire you the most, and why?

My late mother inspired me and

continues to do so even after her

passing. She impressed upon me that there are places where only

character could take you, regardless of education and looks. She encouraged me to never lose my sense of identity

and always know what I want out of life. Humility, respect and understanding

that people are not the same were some of the maxims that she instilled in me.

COMPANY INFORMATON The NDA is a government agency tasked with contributing towards poverty eradication in South Africa through strengthening civil society organisations that implement projects and programmes in poor communities through capacitybuilding, resource mobilisation and sustainable opportunities. Year founded: 1998 Number of employees: 192 Branches: National office, nine provincial and nine district offices Strategic partnerships: Government, private sector and civil society organisations 2019/20 annual allocation from government: R212-million Empowerment policies: Employee wellness policy and NDA framework (flexi-hours), employment equity plan and recruitment policy (EE targets) and leave policy (maternity leave, paternity leave) Empowerment-related CSI initiatives: The NDA has partnered with Gautrain, Rand Water and Nutriwell on female-centric CSI initiatives relating to infrastructure and nutrition.

CONTACT DETAILS: CEO: Thamo Mzobe COO: Susan Khumalo Corporate Services Executive: Mr Sugar Ngcobo CFO: Mr Solomon Shingange (Acting) Development Management & Research Executive: Mr Bongani Magongo Internal Audit Executive: Mrs Hajra Mansour Marketing & Communications Manager: Ms Makgodu Tsehloane Physical Address:

26 Wellington Road, Parktown, 2193 Postal Address: PO Box 31959, Braamfontein, 2017 Telephone: 011 018-5500 Email: info@nda.org.za Website: www.nda.org.za Twitter: @nda_rsa Facebook: National Development Agency Instagram: @nda_rsa

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Interview with PINDIE NYANDORO Regional Chief Executive at Standard Bank

BANKING ON THE FUTURE With more than two decades’ experience in international banking brands, Regional Chief Executive of Standard Bank Pindie Nyandoro, has seen plenty of trends come and go in the banking sector. One that she’s happy to say is sticking around for the long term is gender empowerment.

“I’m delighted that our Group Chief Executive has made gender empowerment part of his legacy. My own boss, the Africa Regions Chief Executive, Sola DavidBorha, is also extremely passionate about gender empowerment. This year, she started a programme called Last Mile, which is designed to make sure that we have more women within the Standard Bank Group leadership positions.” With such a wide array of barriers to women’s success in business, Nyandoro believes that the biggest obstacle is an attitudinal one. “We need a shift in mindset. Many people say that they support gender empowerment because that is what is topical right now, but their own mindset doesn’t speak to that, and they’re simply paying lip service to this challenging issue. So above all else, what we need to see is a shift in attitudes and mindsets of both men and women.” A great place to start is at home. “In the home, we need to look at little things like chores: what is the girl child expected to do

as opposed to what the boy child is asked to do? It seems small, but this affects attitudes and shapes mindsets and behaviours in our communities. It’s therefore important that we don’t just concentrate on what we do with women or the girl child, we also need to bring in the men because that’s a very important part of what we are trying to do with gender empowerment,” says Nyandoro. In the same vein, Nyandoro is proud that Standard Bank has chosen to support the United Nations’ HeForShe Initiative. “I think it’s incredibly important that the group is lending its support in terms of finances and time to this initiative. Like the name suggests, HeForShe also incorporates men because men play a pivotal role in ensuring that women take their rightful place in society at large and the workplace specifically.

“It’s pleasing to note that the Standard Bank Group in particular recognises that gender empowerment is such an important aspect of the bank’s well-being, because empowering women in the workforce can only have a ripple effect in the societies that they live in,” she says, adding that there is still a long way to go in creating gender equality. “I don’t think attitudes towards women in business have gotten worse during my career, but I really don’t think they have gotten any better either.” Despite this, Nyandoro is positive about the future. “Although I think we’ve failed to make game-changing strides in terms of gender empowerment, I do think that the groundwork is now set. Those who come after us will definitely take gender

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BA N K IN G O N T H E FUT URE

empowerment forward and the change will be that much more noticeable. There are strong foundations in place now, so the people to whom we pass the baton are going to find it easier to make huge changes. I think we are going to see big shifts in every industry in the future.” At this juncture in a very long and difficult game, Nyandoro believes we are in need of some conscious bias: “If you have a woman and a man applying for the same job and you genuinely believe that they can both do the job, I feel that there should be a conscious bias towards the woman. That’s not to exclude men, but at this stage, we need to push for women.” This, she believes, will serve men as well as women further down the road. “I think that corporates should also put their money where their mouth is. If you look at the education sector, we’re still producing more male graduates than female graduates, and part of the problem is the issue of finances. Whether we like it or not, in a lot of societies, people still think that the boy child should be educated before the girl and that’s where the efforts, inclusive of funding, should go. I think we need to come up with things like scholarships that are specifically tailor-made for women as a way of fast-tracking the pace of change in schools. Hopefully then we will be able to produce more female graduates than men. “At Standard Bank, when we talk about bringing women on to boards, we’re still saying, ‘In three to five years’ time, we want to have 20% or 30% women on the board.’ This speaks to how far behind we are as a society and

I NT ERV I EW

shows just how much more we still need do to find ways to quicken the pace of change,” she adds. When asked about her career milestones, Nyandoro says that every position she’s held has been a blessing – even when that blessing was initially in disguise. She’s also proud of having been the first woman at the helm of the Bankers Association of Zimbabwe. “I was the only woman in the association and the president for four years. It was fascinating to see how the men wanted to treat me; more like someone who was not their equal. I must say, if there was one thing I enjoyed, it was challenging those men. It was fascinating to watch their attitudes toward me.” Her biggest highlight, though, has been the friends she’s made along the way. “I think the most important thing we take from these jobs, which maybe most of us take for granted, are the friendships we form over the years. “There are many people who I’ve met over the years working for Standard Bank, Standard Chartered and Unilever who are now part of my extended family. It hasn’t been about the position, or being named businesswoman of the year, or any other accolade – it’s about the human factor. Who you meet, whom you make friends with, and whom you can call on. We spend eight hours each day with our colleagues, so these relationships become extremely important. Which is why I would say that the biggest highlight of my career is the people I’ve met along the way and the relationships I’ve formed.”

PERSONAL INSIGHTS Nyandoro is the Regional Chief Executive of Standard Bank and currently sits on the Boards of Standard Bank Eswatini, Stanbic Bank Zambia, Stanbic Bank Botswana, Standard Lesotho Bank, Standard Bank Namibia and Stanbic Bank Zimbabwe. She was also the first woman to hold the post of President at the Bankers Association of Zimbabwe. If she had an extra hour in her day, Nyandoro says that she would spend that time mindfully. “I want to learn how to relax. Whether it’s through meditation or yoga, or anything else. I just want to figure out what the best way is for me to have quiet time to reflect on things – to put in an extra hour that doesn’t have anything to do with anybody else except me.”

“WOMEN WHO SEEK TO BE EQUAL WITH MEN LACK AMBITION” – MARILYN MONROE

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INTERVIEW

A TO UR DE F O R CE F O R BU S IN E S S T R A N S F O R M AT IO N

Interview with LINDY-LOU ALEXANDER, Marketing Head of Personal and Business Banking at Standard Bank

GOOD TO GO

Just one year into her career at Standard Bank, Marketing Head of Personal and Business Banking Lindy-Lou Alexander had a fast start in the industry, supporting and deploying the marketing programmes for some of Standard Bank’s biggest innovations to date.

Speaking with Lindy-Lou Alexander in the few free minutes she has before heading off to host a workshop, one would never say that this accomplished woman has been in banking for only 12 months. “My first stint was launching our big repositioning campaign: You’re Good to Go. We’d been working with What’s Your Next for quite some time, and it felt like the right concept to follow on from that. We’d given our clients time to think about what they wanted, now we want to encourage them to take that step and do it,” she says. Being in the marketing division, Alexander has been involved with taking numerous innovations to market. “In my time at Standard Bank, we’ve launched a fantastic ecosystem called Standard Bank Home Services. This is an open platform that enables clients to apply for a loan, calculate the repayment and fundraise. There’s also the personal loan that may be approved within seconds via our online banking channels.” With the Fourth Industrial Revolution in full swing and major emphasis on convenience, banks are finding new and creative ways to keep their customers interested, says Alexander.

“Many of the innovations we’re pushing “A great leader needs to instil and out are digital that speak to convenience. inspire their team with purpose, and Customers want immediate responses give them a vision that will drive them to their requests. They also want to towards success. Leaders today must get something back, which is why be bold and brave, and must stand up we’re seeing many rewards and loyalty to inspire those who are entering the programmes emerge, with banks workforce.” hoping to use these programmes to retain On the topic of women “A GREAT LEADER clients in the long succeeding in the NEEDS TO INSTIL AND term.” workplace, Alexander advises that women INSPIRE THEIR TEAM These changes in how “focus, keep [their] WITH PURPOSE, AND banks – and many eye on the prize, find GIVE THEM A VISION other businesses THAT WILL DRIVE THEM a mentor and find – conduct their sponsors who can TOWARDS SUCCESS. operations have had a speak for you”. ripple effect, impacting leadership across industries. “Leadership In addition to this, she says women has changed,” says Alexander. “A great should focus on building credibility. And leader in this era is authentic and knows there’s no better way to do this than by how to inspire their followers to do sitting down and getting the job done. their best. With the democratisation of “Credibility comes from doing the work. knowledge, it’s not simply the person who Once you’ve established your credibility, is the most knowledgeable or educated then you can have conversations around who is the best leader. bigger issues,” she concludes.

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G O O D TO G O

I NT ERV I EW

Interview with ITUMELENG MONALE, Head of Information Management for Personal and Business Banking at Standard Bank

A TO UR D E F OR CE F O R BUSI N E SS TRA NSF O RMAT IO N Since the early days of ATMs – when clients were still hesitant to deposit cash without assistance from a human teller – Itumeleng Monale has seen major transformations in the banking sector. We chatted to her about some of the changes she’s witnessed (and influenced) in the industry.

Now the Head of Information Management for Personal and Business Banking at Standard Bank, Itumeleng Monale has been a driving force behind some of the most revolutionary changes in financial services over the past 15 years. “Luckily, I have found myself in the right circumstances where I’ve been matched with great people, and I’ve been able to be a part of the teams that have been able to influence strategic change at the bank. I was part of launching the programme for low-income and underbanked individuals, which is exciting because you’re able to help people live up to their aspirations. We also worked on a project that aimed to educate consumers about low-income housing and financial literacy. “One of my biggest highlights was being able to design capabilities and functions that enabled the bank to become futureoriented; for example, transforming the ATM fleet to accept deposits and creating the first digital banking app across the Standard Bank Group.” While new technologies have been introduced and adopted at breakneck speeds over the past two decades, Monale believes that there are bigger changes on the horizon in the banking sector. “Data and

information have always been the lifeblood of financial services, they’re at the heart of how you engage with your bank,” she says. “Today, though, everyone has a much higher level of technological proficiency than they did previously, because they’re exposed to this technology every day – regardless of socio-economic status.

“O NE OF MY BIGGEST HIGHLIGHTS WAS BEING ABLE TO DESIGN CAPABILITIES AND FUNCTIONS THAT ENABLED THE BANK TO BECOME FUTUREORIENTED” “There’s now a level of maturity about how you handle your privacy and information. Banks are built on trust, and people are willing to divulge their information to us. We’re now charged with the duty of protecting and upholding that privacy. At the same time, we need to use that information to speak to our clients as individuals, to give them the services that they want in the way that they want to receive them.”

There has also been a change in gender empowerment and transformation in financial services. “Phenomenal shifts have taken place over the past 15 years. When I first joined, transformation was in its infancy. Now, I find myself being the beneficiary of men opening the corporate doors and making space for women. ” When it comes to advice for other women in business, Monale recommends knowing your ‘why’. “Things can be challenging at times, so you need to know your ‘why’ to keep yourself motivated. You need to have something to keep going back to; a reason why you will persevere.” She adds that sponsorship and friendship are both incredibly important in ensuring that you’re able to keep your eye on the prize. Finally, she says, “Focus on the job at hand, think about your next step and ensure that you leave a legacy. There’s nothing better than this to build credibility and ensure people trust you.”

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ADWOA. Activist.

Let’s build the future, together.

ONLY AT

WWW.EDGARS.CO.ZA

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G E N D E R E Q U IT Y IS A F U N DA M E N TA L H U M AN RIG HT

EDI TORI A L

GENDER EQUITY

is a fundamental human right

At the core, gender equity is not about what it means to be a man or a woman; it’s a fundamental human right. We as Standard Bank are helping to shape the narrative on gender equity. In September 2018, we became a Thematic Champion of the HeForShe movement, which is a United Nations (UN) Women’s initiative aimed at creating a gender-equal world. Living in Africa, we have a deep and keen appreciation for the importance of the right to be treated equally and free from discrimination based on any characteristic. It’s a basic human right that should be inviolate in all contexts. And yet, we would acknowledge that it’s difficult to truly place ourselves in someone else’s shoes, and to try to see the world from their perspective. Women are still in the minority when it comes to South Africa’s entrepreneurial landscape. According to a survey conducted by Facebook in partnership with the World Bank and OECD, more than half of South Africa’s population are women, yet only 34% of SMEs are women-led. According to research by the United Nations, women-led SMEs are beginning to participate in both regional and international export markets, but marketaccess challenges still limit their effective participation. The Africa Continental FreeTrade Agreement is expected to directly address trade facilitation measures for small-scale traders. We need to ensure such measures specifically include an objective of supporting female traders in particular. Other nuances need to be considered in the pursuit of gender equity. For

instance, women in rural parts of Africa spend 40 billion hours a year collecting water. In rural parts of subSaharan Africa, a lack of services and infrastructure, combined with an expectation of household duties and limited employment opportunities for women, means they shoulder an unequal burden of gathering water and wood for their families. We can’t ever fully comprehend the complexity and diversity of another person’s lived experience – their unique personal history, their hopes, their sacrifices and compromises, the demands on their time and attention, and the often-invisible challenges that they face every day as a result of who they are, or where they’re from, or what they look like. To this extent, achieving gender equity is not only seen as a human right but a business imperative at Standard Bank Group. The bank has set itself goals to increase the representation of women in senior and leadership positions. Standard Bank’s gender targets are:

Meanwhile, we have been working to identify the barriers to the

advancement of women and how

these differ across business areas.

These insights will be used to inform

appropriate interventions. Being part of the HeForShe movement is not only about a focus on women, it’s

also about deliberately engaging men in the conversation about gender

equity and enrolling them as allies

and advocates for gender equity. To

this end, we are driving a range of

initiatives across the bank to involve men more actively in this endeavour. Looking specifically at the tech

sector, Standard Bank has a long-

standing partnership with Woema, an IT innovation programme aimed at

attracting women to the ICT industry. It’s not just about developing data and mathematical skills, it’s about encouraging young girls to dream big, develop critical thinking, use

their imagination, and come up with innovative ideas. As Africa’s largest bank by assets,

• Women on the board: 33% by 2021 (from 25% in 2018)

Standard Bank recognises that it plays an important role in the societies in

which it operates. Being a HeForShe

• Women in executive positions in South Africa: 40% from 2021 (from 35% in 2018)

champion, the group aims to play its part in driving gender equity across the African continent.

• Women in executive positions across the group: 40% by 2023 (from 32% in 2018) • Women chief executives in Africa Regions: 20% by 2021 (from 10% in 2018)

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EMPOWERING WOMEN in the South African mining industry

5

out of 13 board directors are women

23%

of middle management are women

56%

of our head office team are women

Women

make up 1/3 of our executive team

402%

more women employed today than 15 years ago

An inclusive culture and diversity of thought result in better decision making, stronger governance and improved economic performance.

Coole Adv 18367

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IM PA L A PL AT IN U M

T HOU GHT L EA DERS HI P

IMPALA PLATINUM

WOMEN IN MINING HOW CONSTANT INNOVATION HELPS BUSINESSES REMAIN RELEVANT

The mining industry is changing rapidly. As commodity prices fluctuate

percentage points to net margin. Innovation

and talk of the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) grows louder, mining

in mining can result in, among others,

companies are using data, analytics and connectivity to help them stay

increased health and safety, automation

competitive. The (plus) 100-year-old South African mining sector cannot be

of dangerous tasks, and predictive

left behind in this rapid technological revolution and must adapt with agility

maintenance, as well as time and costs

and innovation to survive – and thrive.

savings. For an industry that provides so many jobs, hosts so many communities and

The dominant sentiment towards South African mining over the past

contributes significantly to local economic

decade has been overwhelmingly negative, with phrases like “a sunset

development and national economic growth,

industry” bandied about. This was largely informed by South Africa’s larger

it is time to grab the opportunity and

mining houses facing multiple challenges, including ageing infrastructure,

determine the future trajectory of the sector.

the inherent difficulties of deep-level mining, escalating costs, falling commodity prices and a lack of meaningful exploration. But the cycle has

With the right support from the government,

shifted, and we are now seeing increased appetite for our commodities,

investors and the miners themselves, the

and the reappearance of research, development and innovation (RDI) on

South Africa mining sector could again

the national agenda, with the objective of embedding the 4IR in South

materially boost South Africa’s economic

African mining.

growth as it once did in the past.

Ongoing digitalisation, automation and artificial intelligence will also impact gender diversity in the future by shifting the type of work being done. For example, the changes allow for operating equipment remotely, away from mine sites, which may be attractive to people who had not previously considered mining due to the physical strength needed to perform some activities in traditional mining. Companies that promote inclusivity and foster cognitive diversity have been proven to outperform their peers and

Contact Details T: +27 11 731 9000 F: +27 11 731 9254 E: investor@implats.co.za A: 2 Fricker Road, Illovo, 2196 P/A: Private Bag X18, Northlands, 211

tend to be more creative, innovative and productive. There is a strong business case for gender diversity. A diverse workforce has been shown to create a more inclusive culture. Diverse people bring diversity of thought to organisations, which results in better decisionmaking, stronger governance and improved economic performance. A recent report from the Peterson Institute for International Economics found that 30% of female representation on boards could add up to six

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Adv 18367

8:00 AM

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P RO FILE

I M PALA P L ATI N UM

IMPALA PLATINUM

Meroonisha Kerber, Chief Financial Officer

“NO COUNTRY CAN EVER TRULY FLOURISH IF IT STIFLES THE POTENTIAL OF ITS WOMEN AND DEPRIVES ITSELF OF THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF HALF OF ITS CITIZENS” – MICHELLE OBAMA

I was appointed Chief Financial Officer at Impala Platinum

Implats operates according to a strict sustainable development

(Implats) in August 2018. Prior to joining Implats, I was

policy. The strategic choices we have made as a group, and

Senior Vice President at AngloGold Ashanti, Head of

the energy and purpose we put into caring for our people and

Financial Accounting and Senior Manager: Technical

building a high-performance culture, are delivering the desired

Accounting at Anglo American Platinum, as well as Audit

business outcomes and organisational culture. In becoming

Manager and Senior Audit Manager at Deloitte. I have

more agile and resilient as a business, we are creating greater

also served as a non-executive director at Rand Mutual

sustainable value, enhancing our role in society for the benefit of

Assurance for a period of eight years.

all our stakeholders.

I am a qualified Chartered Accountant and hold a Bachelor

As the world focuses on decarbonisation, we are excited

of Commerce degree as well as a higher diploma in

by the opportunity presented by fuel cells and a hydrogen

accountancy from Rhodes University. I am a member of the

economy, which is gaining recognition. The ability to provide

South African Institute of Chartered Accountants (SAICA)

zero-emitting, carbon-free energy through fuel cell technology

and have extensive and broad financial experience in

is now more widely accepted and took centre stage at the G20

large listed corporates ranging from financial accounting

Summit in June 2019.

and performance reporting to being actively involved in negotiating and implementing various corporate transactions.

At Implats, we have taken a major step forward in implementing our fuel cell development roadmap. A special

I have worked across various functions within organisations

economic zone (SEZ) for fuel cell development is being

and can contribute meaningfully to all areas of the business

developed under the auspices of the Gauteng Industrial

including human resources, governance, insurance, business

Development Zone initiative, situated on Implats land

development, legal and tax. I have coordinated cross-

adjacent to our refineries in Springs. We intend to use the

functional teams to get projects completed and to improve

SEZ platform to build on our current partnership initiatives,

processes and efficiencies in finance and other areas of the

develop skills capacity and leverage our infrastructure for

business. Over the years, I have had the privilege of leading

fuel cell manufacturing and deployment.

and managing strong finance teams. I believe my strong work ethic, integrity, drive for excellence and willingness to learn have resulted in me achieving my career aspirations.

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IM PA L A P LAT INUM

P ROFI L E

KIRTHANYA PILLAY, GROUP EXECUTIVE: CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT My career has taken quite a

industries to develop careers in as

deviation from my educational

a woman. Both industries are still

background. I was fortunate to be

largely male-dominated, and it is

awarded an Old Mutual bursary

with great pride that I see the strides

to study a Bachelor of Business

young women are making every day

Science in Actuarial Science at the

in breaking these barriers.

University of Cape Town. However, it was the finance and investments

I am involved in a mentoring

courses which formed part of my

programme for young people

degree that caught my interest and,

entering the working world and

following a short stint at Allan Gray,

informally mentor a few young

I decided to pursue a career in

women starting out in finance. When

investment banking.

time allows, I volunteer at Rise Against Hunger, an initiative that

I spent nearly 12 years as an

co-ordinates the distribution of food

investment banker, during which

packages globally.

time I was very fortunate to stumble into mining and to gain exposure to

Organisations all over the world

some of the most successful local

are under increased scrutiny from

and international mining companies.

the public and their stakeholders.

My time in banking grew my passion

Even the global investment banks

for the mining sector, which I believe

are recognising the broader social

is a fundamental driver of the South

role all companies have to play as

African economy. I was very excited

responsible citizens of the world.

to join Implats in May 2018 as Group

Companies today must combine

Executive: Corporate Development

generating profits with respect

to work directly in the mining

and support for their employees,

environment again. I thrive on the

customers and communities. At

intensity of working on corporate

Implats we call this our social

transactions and financing solutions

licence to operate. Leadership of

to help grow companies. I am really

the future will need to increasingly

fortunate to do this on a daily basis

reflect the values of diversity and

in my role at Implats.

transparency. Leaders will need to

PILLAY’S 5 TIPS FOR GROWING IN BUSINESS 1. B  e authentically yourself. Stay true to yourself and trust your gut. 2. E  mbrace the challenges – they help us grow and make us stronger. 3. B  e passionate about whatever you decided to do. It attracts others who share your passion and it never feels like work. 4. U  se your voice – your opinion and views are valuable. 5. S  upport and celebrate other women. We are all stronger together.

be more inclusive, constantly agile, My resilience and tenacity has

and connected – to the trends in the

stood me in good stead in both the

sector, and to the changing dynamics

investment banking and mining

of the company’s stakeholders.

sectors, which are challenging

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I M PALA P L ATI N UM

LEE-ANN SAMUEL, GROUP EXECUTIVE: PEOPLE Notable achievements include being

a noticeable socio-economic impact.

awarded HR Practitioner of the

The economic empowerment of

Year while at Nedbank, the South

women also has a positive impact on

African Reward Association (SARA)

their immediate families, as women

Practitioner of the Year while at Absa,

have historically been excluded from

and the SARA Strategist of the Year

fully participating in the country’s

while at Gold Fields. I hold a BA

economy, given the restrictive

Psychology degree and an Honours

and stereotypical roles they were

degree in Political Science, both from

subjected to.

the University of Johannesburg. Implats’ policies and procedures

“ALWAYS AIM HIGH, WORK HARD, AND CARE DEEPLY ABOUT WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN. AND, WHEN YOU STUMBLE, KEEP FAITH. AND, WHEN YOU’RE KNOCKED DOWN, GET RIGHT BACK UP AND NEVER LISTEN TO ANYONE WHO SAYS YOU CAN’T OR SHOULDN’T GO ON”

– HILLARY CLINTON

I support the Ebenezer Hannah

are aimed at contributing to sound

Home in Grasmere, Johannesburg.

employee relations, attracting

The Ebenezer Hannah Home is a

and retaining talent, and ensuring

non-profit organisation caring for

the continuous development of

underprivileged children and destitute

our employees, while offering

people. I regularly visit the home

opportunities for career progression

and spend time with the children.

with an emphasis on women. Implats

I also support the home financially

is committed to gender mainstreaming

and every Christmas we make Santa

and we have taken decisive steps

Shoeboxes for the kids and host a

to improve our approach to creating

Christmas party for the home.

an environment conducive to gender equality by addressing barriers

In addition, I’m a volunteer at KCC

to the employment, retention and

Kids Saturday School, a registered

advancement of women.

I joined Implats in 2017 as the Group Executive:

non-profit organisation focusing

People. I am a human resources (HR)

on the basic educational needs of

Our training programmes reflect a

professional with more than 18 years’ experience

children from impoverished areas of

significant increase in intakes of

working across a variety of industries, including

Rabie Ridge, Ivory Park and Tembisa.

women at tertiary education level, and

industrials and mining, telecommunications, and

We provide extra Maths and English

in-house training opportunities aim to

financial services. Prior to joining Implats, I held

lessons to the children.

create more opportunities for women in core and critical occupations. The

several senior HR management positions at Nedbank, Absa, Telkom and Gold Fields. I have a broad range of competencies including being an innovative, conceptual and analytical thinker who can resolve complex matters effectively and efficiently. I focus on achieving results to ensure the successful implementation of my human resource strategies.

Achieving gender equality is important

focus is on addressing areas where

for workplaces not only because it is

women are under-represented.

“fair” and “the right thing to do”, but because it is also linked to economic growth. Gender equity in the industry contributes to the available workforce, directly feeding the economy, and has

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IM PA L A P LAT INUM

P ROFI L E

THABILE MAKGALA, EXECUTIVE: MARULA AND TWO RIVERS I have often been the first woman in many of my roles and my grit and determination has resulted in me becoming someone to look up to. As the first female mining engineer graduate at Gold Fields Kloof-Driefontein division (now Sibanye Gold), I was not aware this bold move was paving the way for future mining engineers to follow, and would demystify the myth that women cannot succeed in the male-dominated mining industry. My extensive experience in the mining industry has provided me with insight into what is needed to ensure both women and men thrive in this industry. My strategic insights set me apart, together with my abilities to identify whether problems and challenges in business are process or operational issues that can be addressed tactically, or whether other fundamental changes are required. I am a member of the Southern African Institute of Mining and Metallurgy and the Institute of Directors in Southern Africa.

Thabile Makgala, Executive: Marula and Two Rivers

Selected as one of the “Top 100 Global Inspirational Women in Mining” by Women in Mining UK in 2018, I was also recently appointed to the position of Chairperson of Women in Mining South Africa. The organisation provides a free platform that encourages women in the industry to network, receive guidance and be mentored by other professionals in the industry so that they too can flourish.

MAKGALA’S 5 TIPS FOR MAKING IT IN MINING 1. B  e yourself. Find your space and make your voice heard. 2. T  ake charge of your own development and grasp opportunities that come your way, even when they take you out of your comfort zone. 3. D  o not be concerned about what others think of you and your abilities. With confidence, determination, the right support and mentorship, you can achieve the impossible. 4. S  upport other women, especially in the mining industry. Harness their potential and lift them up so they can also thrive, because when women thrive, you and the organisation also thrive.

We have various initiatives, including the promotion of science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) skills among female learners in high school and at tertiary institutions through our WiMSA career day workshops to promote careers in the mining industry. Through WiMSA, we also support the Frida Hartley Shelter for destitute women and children in Yeoville, Johannesburg. This initiative is very close to my heart as women should support and empower other women less fortunate than themselves. On a biannual basis we collect food, clothes, toys and books and donate them to the home. Future leaders need the requisite skills and qualities to lead organisations in a world disrupted by technology. They need to inspire, develop talent and drive innovation in their organisations. Future leaders need to be able to lead and motivate diverse teams with various generation gaps that result in complexities in the workplace. Future leaders also need to be agile and learn to base company decisions on facts and data as opposed to mostly relying on employee experience.

5. Never ever give up on your dreams.

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S A SO L M I NIN G

Sasol Mining operates one of the largest underground coal complexes in the world, comprising six coal mines that supply feedstock for our Secunda Synfuels operations and Sasolburg operations complexes in South Africa. While the coal that Sasol Mining supplies to the Secunda Synfuels operations is mainly used as gasification feedstock, some is used to generate electricity and steam. Sasol Mining also exports coal from the Twistdraai export plant to Europe and Asia. Sasol Mining Replacement Mines The mine replacement projects support Sasol’s strategy to operate its Southern African facilities until 2050. This ongoing project is being undertaken to replace 60% of Sasol Mining’s operations in Secunda by 2020. • The first of these new replacement mines was the Thubelisha shaft,

which was inaugurated in May 2012 at Twistdraai Colliery. The shaft supplies coal to both Secunda Synfuels operations and export customers. •

Impumelelo Colliery was inaugurated in April 2019, replacing the Brandspruit operation. This coal is used exclusively by Secunda Synfuels Operations.

An underground extension of the Middelbult mine with the main shaft and incline shaft was replaced by Shondoni Colliery.

The Tweedraai project at Syferfontein Colliery was completed in 2015. This included the shaft access developed with a continuous miner instead of the planned blasting operation, and was successfully completed ahead of schedule and within budget.

“T HE MINE REPLACEMENT PROJECTS SUPPORT SASOL’S STRATEGY TO OPERATE ITS SOUTHERN AFRICAN FACILITIES UNTIL 2050”

Empowerment-related CSI initiatives/ programmes Sasol Mining believes in bringing good corporate citizenship to life through its multi-pronged, continuous, integrated Social Investment approach in order to respond to the expectations of its neighbouring communities. Sasol Mining takes local economic developments very seriously as it affords the company an opportunity to promote economic growth, as well as employment, with the aim of advancing the social and economic welfare of all South Africans.

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S ASOL

Through its enviro-waste programme, 10 000 households in eMbalenhle and Leandra have been trained on waste management methods. In addition, ten vegetable gardens were established and individuals trained in manufacturing furniture out of waste materials.

socio-economic issues within the community through skills development in the recycling sector, a nutrition programme through establishment of vegetable gardens and enterprise development of business within the waste management sector. The envirocycle initiative affords work for the waste collectors, who are provided with training. Envirocycles have a load capacity of 100kgs and enviro-riders collect an average of 385kg per day. Sasol Mining’s social and labour plans (SLPs) are approved by the Department of Mineral Resources to address the social and economic impact that its operations have on surrounding communities. Sasol Mining in partnership with local government identifies projects and agrees on a programme of implementation. The organisation aligns its SLP initiatives to address the dire needs of surrounding communities and has implemented the following commitments: •

The programme has created employment opportunities for young people of eMbalenhle to be trained as enviro-waste ambassadors. To date about 2 768.3 tons of waste has been collected and processed in the region. The programme was not only designed for waste management, but to combat

• • •

Repaired the wastewater treatment plant in Greylingstad and is currently installing bulk sewer infrastructure and connections in Greylingstad, Willemsdal and Nthoroane. This includes the upgrading of the waste water treatment plant. This project is scheduled to be completed by June 2020. Constructed the Charl Cilliers multipurpose centre Constructed the Sakhisizwe Bridge in the Govan Mbeki municipality Completed electricity upgrades in Standerton

Sasol Mining home ownership Sasol Mining initiated its housing programme during 2015, with the

A DV ERTORI A L

first houses handed over to first-time homeowners on 1 February 2016 in eMbalenhle. The programme provides an opportunity for general workers, operators, miners and artisans who have previously not qualified for any government subsidy or mortgage bond to become homeowners. To date, Sasol Mining managed the construction of 231 houses in eMbalenhle, Secunda and Sasolburg. The promotion of homeownership forms part of Sasol Mining’s broader transformation goals to ensure that the areas in which the company operates benefit from its presence and that it leaves a positive legacy by fostering long-term, sustainable development. Sasol Mining recognises the importance of decent housing of adequate size with basic infrastructure such as water, sanitation and electricity for employees.

As a company, Sasol Mining prioritises safety and promotes ways to limit the environmental and social impacts of its activities, ensuring its presence results in positive benefits for stakeholders.

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: Sasol Place,50 Katherine Street, Sandton, South Africa 2196 Postal Address: PO Box 5486, Johannesburg, South Africa 2000 Telephone: +27 17 614 5124 | Email: thuli.mbuli@sasol.com | Website: www.sasol.com Twitter: @SasolSA | Facebook: @SasolSACareers | Instagram: sasolrandles

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P RO FILE

SASO L

YOUR TOP WOMAN QUALIFICATIONS BSC MINING ENGINEERING – WITS UNIVERSITY MINE MANAGER’S CERTIFICATE OF COMPETENCY MBA – GORDON INSTITUTE OF BUSINESS SCIENCE

Caroline Shirindza: VP Supply Chain

Born and bred in the small mining town of Phalaborwa in Limpopo, Caroline’s childhood dream was to be a decisionmaker and make a difference in the lives of mine workers and people living in mining areas. She started her career at the coalface as a miner and worked her way up to becoming a mine manager. A mining engineer by trade and currently working as a supply chain executive, Caroline continues to challenge the status quo in mining and uses her experience to bring about the much-needed transformation in gender, culture and economic participation. Her passion for transformation and developing others has allowed her to be the sponsor for the Women in Mining Forum, a culture ambassador, and a coach. She enjoys sharing her career journey and helping others navigate through the male-dominated industry. Five tips on thriving in business • Be yourself. Everyone else is taken anyway. • Know what you stand for. This will inform your decisions and the direction you want to take. • Make a decision. Indecision is like rocking a chair, it gets you nowhere. • You don’t have to be a jack-of-alltrades. It’s ok to ask for help.

Every day is a new day, it’s an opportunity to do better and be better.

“C AROLINE’S CHILDHOOD DREAM WAS TO BE A DECISIONMAKER AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE LIVES OF MINE WORKERS AND PEOPLE LIVING IN MINING AREAS” GENDER EMPOWERMENT AND CORPORATE SOCIAL INVESTMENT (CSI) Sasol Mining continues to invest in sponsored study and technical learning programmes, as well as leadership, career and succession development plans. To secure a pipeline of future talent, we invested significantly in skills development, ranging from basic literacy and school level programmes to technical training for professionals through some of the largest bursary, graduate development and internship programmes.

Women in mining is definitely a focus area at Sasol Mining, with a concerted drive from leadership to ensure that women are represented from the coalface up until the boardroom. (Sasol Mining is at 16.2% female staff overall.) CREATING A PLATFORM FOR WOMEN IN MINING Sasol Mining’s Women in Mining Forum was launched in 2015 and has made tremendous strides since then. The forum addresses matters specific to women such as personal protective equipment, underground ablution facilities, career development and wellness. One of the highlights from the forum is the boot camp that physically prepares women candidates from communities for employment at Sasol Mining.

CONTACT DETAILS T: +27 17 614 5124

E: Thuli.mbuli@sasol.com

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THE WORLD BELONGS TO THE DIGITALLY EMPOWERED BUT THERE IS ONE SURPRISING STUMBLING BLOCK, FACED PREDOMINANTLY BY WOMEN, WHICH IS SLOWING PROGRESS – AND IT IS NOT ONE FACED ONLY BY WOMEN IN LESS-DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; THIS IS A GLOBAL PHENOMENON.

BY MICH ATAGANA, HEAD OF COMMUNICATIONS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS AT GOOGLE SA

women in a DIGITAL

EMPOWERING

age

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E M POW E R IN G WO M E N IN A D IGITA L AG E

It’s an ordinary Monday and it’s tea time, so it’s

EDI TORI A L

WHEN WE WERE YOUNG

a good time to catch up on social media. An international group you follow (just for the laughs) features a meme you find interesting and you

The world has taken old ideas of playground bullying into a digital world

comment without much thought. Within moments,

where women are constantly targeted by people who are able to hide

several people, who aren’t friends of yours and

behind their social identities, saying whatever they want, whenever they

don’t know you or offer any connection to you in

want. These people think they have the right to tell you what your life

any way, have posted an onslaught of bitter and

should look like and they think they can tell you how to be better without

abusive responses – each further fuelled by the

context or even knowing a thing about you.

last – and none of it is pretty. In fact, in examples such as the one I mentioned earlier, they swan in, Cyberbullying is a real problem. The anonymity of

spew their vitriol, swim around gleefully in the chaos that ensues and

social media is enabling it and research is proving

move along as soon as they tire of the sport, personally untouched by the

it has a real, long-term and detrimental impact on

experience and certainly unfazed by the impact it has had on their target.

the growth and empowerment of women globally. I am not alone in my thinking, with many studies and survey results I recently talked about cyberbullying and the

available online that support my opinions. Cyberbullying may have

challenges it presents to women, in business

been limited to the young before but, fear not, it is ageing well.

particularly, during my opening keynote address at

Nobody, it seems, is safe.

the Standard Bank Top Women Conference hosted in August.

Digital spaces should be empowering places for the sharing of opinions, debate and the exchange of ideas and ideologies, but cyberbullying is

Along with the growth in adoption and use of social

killing the promise inherent in these platforms and research tells us that

media apps, cyberbullying is on the rise and I, as

people don’t even have to experience it themselves to be affected by it.

a digital native who was born into and has grown with the digital age, related today’s bullying to my

In fact, according to the European Institute for Gender Studies,

own experiences with bullies in my youth.

cyberbullies are restricting the opportunities offered by digitalisation with young women, most especially, being deterred from taking part in political discussion or online debates and often censoring themselves as a preventative measure. This study says that, after witnessing or experiencing online hate speech, harassment or abuse, one young woman out of two (50%) hesitates to engage in social media debates. Another study on closing the gender gap in ICT policy, says, “Women around the world report being bombarded by a culture of misogyny online, including aggressive, often sexualised hate speech, direct threats of violence, harassment, and revenge porn involving the use of personal and private information for defamation.” The real dangers posed by cyberbullying, as it relates directly to women, is having a far-reaching impact on female development, empowerment and growth. It does this by forcing women to retreat from the digital world and, in doing so, not only from opportunities to educate and learn from others but also from opportunities being offered to them in the general digital space – like support and inclusivity.

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The gender gap is real, even in the digital space, and closing this

WOMEN AND TECHNOLOGY

gap would disproportionately help women cement their positions in a global economy. In my view, there is a need for social media platforms to work at curbing cyberbullying while encouraging

We also need to make technology more inclusive. We’re using

women to stand together against it at the same time.

technology that is built by men, for men, for the most part. Where are the apps built by women? The apps that see women

Online platforms like Google, Facebook and Twitter need

proactively thinking about the way they use technology? Women

to be better at taking a firm stand and saying “enough is

are under-represented in the world of technology; this is not news.

enough” when people misbehave on their platforms. A PwC report notes that women currently hold 19% of tech-related Online bullies should be promptly removed from these spaces;

jobs at the top ten global tech companies, relative to men who

someone wouldn’t get away with behaviour like this in a public

hold 81%. It also states that the proportion of females to males who

space and we shouldn’t be making allowances for them in a

graduate with STEM-related (science, technology, engineering and

digital one either.

mathematics) degrees is out of kilter. Women are underrepresented in maths and statistics (four women for every five men), ICT and

If you walk into a bank and start hurling insults at people, you’re

technology (two women for every five men), as well as engineering,

going to be chucked out and this is as it should be on social media

manufacturing and construction (three women for every ten men),

platforms. We need to digitally escort people out when they behave

according to World Economic Forum statistics.

badly online. As a result, there is a significantly smaller pool of female STEM But it shouldn’t end there – there is a humane responsibility

talent, restricting the potential of South Africa’s technology

that lies with every human online who sees comments like

sector.At the same time, we see that women make up half of

these. Stand up, shake off your mouse, flex your typing fingers

the world’s working-age population but generate only 37%

and tell the bully that this behaviour is not okay.

of GDP.

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E M POW E R IN G WO M E N IN A D IGITA L AG E

EDI TORI A L

I believe that if we support the natural leaders and entrepreneurs in South Africa through upskilling them in better use of the internet, female business owners can and will have a great impact on the country as a whole, while forging a better future for themselves and their communities. The opportunities are boundless and I feel the world is finally waking up and realising that it makes sense to bring women into the workforce (and the digital space) in a real and powerful way. This thinking is again mirrored by a recent Harvard Business Review story, which details several interesting findings: 1. A n Accenture study suggests women derive greater value from “digital fluency” in the workplace than men do. 2. A study of Kenya’s popular M-Pesa mobile money service suggests that digital financial services can increase the participation of women in the workforce and create opportunities for women in the formal market economy. 3. A new generation of unlikely entrepreneurs can be found on Facebook-owned Instagram, hailing from socially conservative Saudi Arabia. A growing number of women are turning to the app to start businesses that can bypass both bureaucracies and social restrictions. Thousands of women have established Instagram businesses selling handicrafts, food, clothing and accessories. 4. W  omen tend to have a disproportionate influence on decisions around family, community and children. They tend to invest more of their earnings in their families than men do – almost ten times more.

If anything, statistics like these prove that closing the digital gender gap would likely have far-reaching benefits, not only for women but also for their dependents, families and communities.

ABOUT WOMENWILL In an effort to bridge the contribution gap, Google has introduced

“Statistics like these prove that closing the digital gender gap would likely have far-reaching benefits not only for women but for their dependents, families and communities”

Womenwill, a programme that provides on- and offline digital skills programmes and tools that support female-led businesses and opportunities for women to gain inspiration from (while connecting with) each other.

We also support women-led businesses through two of Google’s core products, Search and Maps, as well as our

Globally, Google offers female entrepreneurs opportunities to grow

“women-led” option on Google My Business, which female

their business acumen and digital skills through in-person events

business leaders can add to their listings to spotlight that

and online career and business training from Grow with Google, and

their business is proudly owned, led or founded by women.

business and digital marketing tutorials through the Primer app. To date, Google has helped 110 000 women across To scale our training further, we partner with Google Business

28 countries improve their digital skills through the

Groups (GBGs), which are independent, community-led groups

programme, but there is so much more we want to and will

formed by business owners to share knowledge about web

do to address the challenges faced by women every day –

technologies for local business success.

but we need to get them back online in order to do so.

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IT HU BA’S CH A RM AI N E MABU Z A:

A WOMAN WITH A CAUSE Charmaine Mabuza prefers to let her business talk for itself. However, when you become one of South Africa’s most prominent businesswomen and have an eye on Africa, keeping mum is not an option. Born and raised by her single mother in Empangeni in KwaZulu-Natal, Mabuza helped to care for her younger siblings after matriculating from Stanger High School, ensuring that there was money for their education. It is this necessity to provide for her family that has driven Mabuza to achieve throughout her career; she attributes much of her success to these foundations.

also managed multiple retail stores, including a butchery, a petrol station and a local supermarket.” Mabuza grew up watching her mother face the daily challenges of being a black woman in business. “My mother inspired me. Even at a young age, I believed in the power of women, that is why I am so passionate about gender parity,” she says. Mabuza rose to the top, juggling being an entrepreneur, a wife and a mother of three. But before building her own personal empire, she had established a name for herself as a director of

Wiphold, a R1.2-billion organisation that was the first women-owned company to list on the JSE in 1999. After resigning from Wiphold to focus on her family businesses, Mabuza and her husband, Advocate Eric Mabuza, launched Zamani Holdings in 2008. In 2013, ITHUBA was launched. The company aimed to provide a national service by operating the South African National Lottery. While a booming business might cause some to forget where they’ve come from, success has had the opposite effect on Mabuza. To honour the challenges

“I BELIEVE IT IS NEVER TOO LATE FOR ANYONE TO PURSUE THEIR DREAMS, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO EDUCATION. THAT IS WHY THE ERIC AND CHARMAINE MABUZA SCHOLARSHIP FOUNDATION IS SO CLOSE TO MY HEART” Mabuza also had the advantage of having a great role model. Her mother was, in Mabuza’s words, a “multipreneur”. “My mother ran a curio shop that sold traditional African leather products,” explains Mabuza. “But she

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ZA M A N I H O L D ING S

Mabuza believes education is the key to transforming the African continent and is herself currently studying towards a Harvard Business School qualification. “I believe it is never too late for anyone to pursue their dreams, especially when it comes to education. That is why the Eric and Charmaine Mabuza Scholarship Foundation is so close to my heart,” she says. But Mabuza’s goodwill doesn’t stop at education. She has taken her family values and implemented them in her company’s corporate social investment initiatives, which further highlight her passion for women and youth empowerment. These include: •

• faced by people from disadvantaged backgrounds, the entrepreneur makes sure that she always gives back. It is for this reason that the National Lottery is such an important endeavour for her. It is a way of ensuring that funds are raised to benefit the neediest in society. In addition to her passion for the lottery, Mabuza and her husband also set up the Eric and Charmaine Mabuza Scholarship Foundation. The foundation, established in 1999, provides tertiary education funding for deserving matriculants who come from disadvantaged communities. The foundation has funded many students who have gone on to qualify as doctors, chartered accountants, quantity surveyors and ICT specialists.

A women empowerment programme that identified 65 female retailers to develop, train and upskill in order to improve their business skills. A media initiative to raise awareness and instil a sense of responsibility around preventing violence against women, especially femicide. A youth employment initiative which placed 11 young graduates in various departments in the company on a 12-month internship programme. Developing the Mabuza Village housing project in Mpumalanga, which saw the company build ten houses for employees with over ten years of service to the company.

Women like Mabuza are the lynchpins of South African business, securing the future of both the country and continent. They are the role models that lead young people – and especially young women – to believe in themselves and their dreams.

CONTACT DETAILS:

A DV ERTORI A L

They are those who show these young people that, through excellence and hard work, they can make the change they want to see on the continent.

Mabuza’s success has hinged on three key principles, which she learnt from her mother and continues to honour to this day. 1.

Ubuntu: People are at the forefront of any business’ success. Says Mabuza: “It is vital that businesses always think about the best interest of their employees, their customers and the communities in which they operate. People must form part of every decision we make.”

2.

Excellence: Mabuza’s mother did not accept average performance when it came to her work. This ethic has been carried over into Mabuza’s personal business philosophy. “As a business leader, I expect all of those around me to deliver excellence at all times.” Mabuza takes the lead when it comes to this and is a great role model for those she works with.

3.

Consistency: Being excellent is not enough. Mabuza demands consistent excellence from those around her. “You are only as good as your last job,” she says.

Physical Address: 14A Charles Crescent, Eastgate Ext 4, Sandton, Johannesburg Website: www.nationallottery.co.za Twitter: @sa_lottery Facebook: @SouthAfricanNationalLottery Instagram: @sa_lottery

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High-fliers BY NICOLE FORREST

in high heels

While the slew of social issues faced in South Africa might seem insurmountable, the country’s businesswomen are using these problems as inspiration to produce innovations in their fields.

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H IG H - F L IE R S IN H IG H HE E LS

EDI TORI A L

Stacey Brewer COMPANY: SPARK Schools SECTOR: Education Identifying an opportunity to fix South Africa’s struggling education system through creativity and innovation, Stacey Brewer teamed up with Ryan Harrison to start SPARK Schools. A first in Africa, SPARK Schools is a network of primary schools that offers affordable, high-quality education using a combination of traditional classroom teaching and online learning. The method used by the schools enables education to be tailored to individual students while keeping costs relatively low.

Nadia & Zahra Rawjee COMPANY: Uzenzele Holdings SECTOR: Finance Realising the impact that government and development funding could have on SMMEs, the Rawjees launched Uzenzele Holdings to help these businesses navigate the application process for such funding. The company partners with developing businesses, providing specialist advice and facilitating access to grants, incentives and loans. With an additional focus on efficiency and increasing success, Uzenzele hopes to encourage growth in South Africa and other select African countries.

Leah Molatseli COMPANY: Lenoma Legal SECTOR: Law Having quit her corporate job as a legal practitioner and starting to work from home, Leah Molatseli realised that the traditional legal practice model was impossible to scale. Streamlining her offering using online platforms, Molatseli reduced the need to meet clients in person. This enabled her to increase her client base while keeping costs down. Today, Lenoma Legal provides legal services to SMMEs as well as offering legal advice online, making these services affordable and accessible to those who need them.

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Donna Silver & Elvira Riccardi COMPANY: Afrizan Personnel SECTOR: Business support services Recognising that transforming South Africa’s economy could only be done by transforming the workforce, Donna Silver and Elvira Riccardi set out to establish Afrizan Personnel.A permanent recruitment specialist, Afrizan specifically targets affirmative action placements. Silver and Riccardi have made understanding their clients’ business cultures, value propositions and unique needs a top priority, ensuring they place candidates who are able to thrive in their roles.

Boitumelo Ntsoane COMPANY: Afrilink HealthCare SECTOR: Healthcare Boitumelo Ntsoane claims she’s a “typical township girl”, but her success in business has shown she’s also an incredible innovator. After realising that a typical nine-to-five was at odds with her independent nature, Ntsoane purchased a mobile clinic under the name Afrilink HealthCare to take medical services to those who need them. Since then, she’s set up On Point Healthcare, which provides access to equitable, sustainable and quality healthcare services to domestic workers.

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H IG H - F L IE R S IN H IG H HE E LS

EDI TORI A L

Claire Reid COMPANY: Reel Gardening SECTOR: Agriculture What Claire Reid first started as a project to make extra pocket money is now a business that is contributing towards food security and healthy citizenry in South Africa. Using a simple design, Reel Gardening creates easy-to-use seed strips to enable South Africans of all ages and backgrounds to grow their own fruits and vegetables. The product not only impacts communities through its use but also in its creation, as Reel Gardening is designed to be handmade by previously unemployed mothers.

Rapelang Rabana COMPANY: Rekindle Learning SECTOR: Education Rapelang Rabana founded Rekindle Learning, a human development company that leverages technology to enable learning to help people improve their lives and economic prospects. The company provides readymade online courses built specifically for the African context. Rekindle aims to turn people’s compulsion to check their phones into an opportunity to learn by deploying a wide range of interactive content generated by local authors to individuals, businesses and educational institutions.

Matsi Modise COMPANY: Furaha Afrika Holdings SECTOR: Finance Matsi Modise established Furaha Afrika Holdings in 2013, with a vision to enable and leverage growth across Africa by unearthing opportunities for meaningful investments. Meaning “happy” in Swahili, Furaha was founded on the vision of a prosperous and progressive Africa. The company focuses on entrepreneurship development strategies and coaching. It provides support and assists with strategies for individuals who want to enter the market, as well as investing in business development technologies.

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M D ITO BUS I N ES S E NTERPRI S E Mdito Business Enterprise (MBE) is a black women-owned registered small/medium entity that was founded in 2004 by Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni (known to many as Sis Mavis). MBE currently specialises in cleaning and janitorial services.

Mine, where I rendered cleaning services of residential homes and hostels of the mining staff. Times were tough as work depended on the number of callouts there would be, and with only four casuals at the time, I could not have imagined that I would be where I am today.

Current and former clients include: • Eskom Arnot Power Station • E xxaro Arnot Coal • Thyssenkrupp Industrial Solutions • Roshcon Site Services • Eskom Kusile Power Station • Eskom Kendal/Wilge • Murray and Roberts • Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Africa • Transnet SOC Ltd • Eskom Hendrina Power Station • Eskom Komati Power Station • Eskom Grootvlei Power Station • Thermon South Africa • Eskom Kendal Power Station

“In 2009 I was awarded an opportunity to render my services to Roshcon, and little did I know that this was the beginning of a life-changing chapter in my business. It is at this phase that as a company we went through a drastic learning curve: I was trained and taught all the requirements with regards to safety and environmental policies, and at the time my staff capacity expanded from four to 14 employees. In the year 2010 I tendered, and was awarded, the opportunity to render my services to Eskom Kusile Power Station and through successful tendering and customer satisfaction I have been on the Kusile project to this very day.

From humble beginnings supplying stationery to Eskom Arnot Power Station, to cleaning and a small consignment shop at Exxaro Arnot Coal Mine, to where MDITO is today, the above-mentioned entities contributed profoundly to the growth of the business. “I appreciate the change and development that these companies have brought to my life, which in turn has allowed us to bring hope and change to many others.” - Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni “It all began in the year 2005 when I started working with Exxaro Arnot Coal

“The Kusile project has contributed significantly towards the growth and development of MBE by enrolling me in learning programmes such as Bridging the Gap (BTG) business management. I learned to tender efficiently, manage my business and to build and sustain new business relations, which has resulted in acquiring further tenders with Eskom, Hitachi Power Systems South Africa – now known as Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Africa (MHPSA)– Thermon South Africa and Thyssenkrupp Industrial Solutions. Currently we employ a total work force of 354 employees and have a net value of R45-million.

“IN 2009 I WAS AWARDED AN OPPORTUNITY TO RENDER MY SERVICES TO ROSHCON, AND LITTLE DID I KNOW THAT THIS WAS THE BEGINNING OF A LIFE-CHANGING CHAPTER IN MY BUSINESS”

Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni, Managing Director of Mdito Business Enterprise

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M D ITO BU S IN E S S E N T E R P RISE

A DV ERTORI A L

by Eskom to celebrate with them • Donated windows toward the building of the Delmas clinic • Cleaning of local schools and police stations “At MBE we believe that the employees are the fuel to the company’s success. They play a vital role in the upkeep of the standard of cleaning offered by the company. Our staff clean with a passion and they value and take pride in the service that they render. This is embodied and evident in the company slogan: WE LOVE WHAT WE DO.”

Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni of Mdito Business Enterprise, sponsor of the Top Women Energy and Utilities Award, hands over the accolade to Matleng Energy Solutions.

“Through partnerships with some of our clients we implement skills development of our employees via pilot programmes, whereby MBE cleaning staff are trained and evaluated on skills acquisition such as computer literacy and administration. Successful candidates are then interviewed and absorbed by the client and this then allows MBE to create employment opportunities for other local work seekers.” MDITO Business Enterprise has a tradition of giving back to its community: “We offer employment opportunities to local residents from surrounding areas and farms. We also provide transportation service opportunities that in turn aid/uplift the local taxi industries.

“The business has also assisted co-ops in the Nkangala District with financial services and startup capital as well as affording them business, i.e. supplying consumable products for MBE. “We partake in the enterprise development programmes led by our clients to assist other small and upcoming businesses.” CSI and community development initiatives include: • Building houses for destitute employees employed by MBE • Donations to local churches • Donations to the elderly who have turned 100 • Donations to fundraising for the needy and less fortunate • Contribute to clients commemorated

And it is through living this slogan that MBE won an SMME of the Year award at the Nkangala District Business Expo in 2014. Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni was recognised and nominated by Standard Bank and Topco Media as one of South Africa’s Top Women in Business in 2016 and MBE qualified as one of South Africa’s top gender empowerment companies in the years 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019. “Words alone cannot describe how humbled and grateful I am. The company has come a long way and still has a lot to accomplish. God has been faithful and we look forward to a big and brighter tomorrow. I would not have made it this far without the support and business acquired from my clients and core management team: HR/IR Manager - Mr Aaron Mbhele Operations Manager - Pamela Lekoma Senior Administration - Nomusa Sibanyoni Payroll Manager - Phila Veti.” - Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni

CONTACT DETAILS: Dorah Mavis Sibanyoni: 0832106365 Email: Mdito.business@gmail.com Website: www.m-dito.co.za

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MAGETHI INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY SERVICES ABOUT US OUR STORY Magethi Industrial Psychology Services was founded by Mirriam Magethi who has extensive experience as well as various qualifications in the industry. She is passionate about psychology and spreading the company’s services to outlying areas. Magethi Industrial Psychology Services is affiliated with various bodies in the industry, including the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the Society for Industrial and Organisational Psychology of South Africa (SIOPSA) and the South African Medico-Legal Association (SAMLA). We conduct ourselves within the best industry standards. THE COMPANY Magethi Industrial Psychology Services is a registered South African company with offices in Pretoria, Johannesburg and Nelspruit. We are staffed by a team of passionate people who are ready to assist you throughout all the services you require. Industrial psychologists contribute to an organisation’s success by improving performance, motivation, job satisfaction, occupational safety and health, as well as the overall health and well-being of its employees. An industrial psychologist conducts research on employee behaviour and attitudes, and how these can be improved through hiring practices, training programmes, feedback and management systems. Industrial psychologists also help organisations and their employees’ transition during periods of change and organisation development.

Mirriam Magethi, Managing Director of Magethi Industrial Psychology Services

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M AG E T H I IN D U S T R IA L PS Y C H O LO G Y S E R VICE S

CORPORATE SERVICE OFFERINGS PSYCHOMETRIC ASSESSMENT SERVICES We provide cutting-edge talent solutions through psychometric assessments. Our team collectively has substantial acumen and experience in psychometric assessments including ability assessments, personality assessments and simulation exercises. We can select appropriate assessment batteries and develop comprehensive integrated reports for recruitment and selection purposes, coaching, career guidance, team building, as well as training and development needs. Magethi Industrial Psychology Services has invested in both traditional paper and pencil assessments and cutting-edge online assessments for your convenience. Our specialised team handles bulk assessments from group apprentice level evaluations to individualised executive talent management solutions. ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT The 21st century workplace presents numerous dynamics and a generally young population filling our organisations with an enormous talent pool. We are driven by the need to harness such individual talent and align it with your organisational strategic plans and translate it into your vision. It provides us with great pleasure to see you flourish and benefit from tailor-made organisational development solutions that speak to your specific needs. We adopt satisfaction surveys, organisational climate surveys, employee wellness programmes, organisational citizenship behaviour surveys, succession planning

and training and development as part of our holistic organisational development interventions. This all contributes to employee wellness and an optimally performing workforce. CHANGE MANAGEMENT Organisational change is inevitable considering the strong need to adapt to the everchanging socio-economic, political and highly technological global village we live in today. We go the extra mile to prepare, support and help individuals, teams and organisations in making organisational changes. Our handpicked psychometric assessments will give us a deeper understanding of how your employees naturally cope or navigate structural changes − from which we devise informed stress management and countless coping techniques. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

A DV ERTORI A L

TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT We have a wide product offering including customised training and development solutions. There are numerous benefits to investing in employees, which is your biggest asset for sustainable business growth and success. The benefits are not limited to an increase in performance and profit, they also influence staff retention, employee wellness and general satisfaction, as well as organisational citizenship behaviour. CAREER EXPLORATION AND GUIDANCE Our career guidance facility is robustly guided and informed by aptitude, motivation, interest and personality assessments to give you a holistic profile of your cognitive capability and

personality preferences from which you can select the best career stream for you.

“A N INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGIST CONDUCTS RESEARCH ON EMPLOYEE BEHAVIOUR AND ATTITUDES, AND HOW THESE CAN BE IMPROVED THROUGH HIRING PRACTICES, TRAINING PROGRAMMES, FEEDBACK AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS”

Psychometric assessments are often used to identify high potential employees who possess hidden leadership behavioural traits and managerial skills beyond cognitive competence, enabling them to assume and excel in executive roles. Magethi Industrial Psychology Services also uses succession planning as part of leadership development.

RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION Guided by specific job descriptions (from entry level to senior management positions) we pride ourselves in our ability to select assessments suitable for a range of positions. We also prepare talent match reports, individual reports and managerial reports comprehensive enough to identify the best candidates, cognitively capable and culturally-suited to your environment.

CONTACT US Website: www.mmagethi.co.za | Tel: 012 942 8653 | Cell: 061 430 2608 Email: mirriam@mmagethi.co.za | admin@mmagethi.co.za

Physical address: 1059 Francis Baard Street, Hatfied, Pretoria Nelspruit: 8 Ehmke Street | Tel: 013 753 4124 West Rand: Willowbrook Office Park, Block B 14, Van Hoof Street | Tel: 011 958 0527 Johannesburg: Office 24, 17th floor, Marble Towers 208-212, Jeppe Street, Johannesburg Tel: 010 612 0370

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Forging a path to

entrepreneurship BY NICOLE FORREST

As the only region where more women than men are engaged in entrepreneurial activities, Africa could become the most enterprising continent in the world.

With roughly 50% of Africa’s burgeoning population being female, it should go without saying that empowering women is essential to unlocking the potential of the continent. Governmental organisations have taken notice of this, with the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) prioritising gender equality and the African Union’s Agenda 2063 prioritising the empowerment of women and girls. However, the number of unemployed women outweighs that of men in almost every African country. Statistics South Africa’s Quarterly Labour Force Survey for the second quarter of 2018 indicated that the rate of unemployment among women was 7.5% higher than among men. Adding to

this, women earn less than men and are relegated to lowerranking roles in a majority of companies. This, according to Allan Gray Orbis Foundation CEO Yogavelli Nambiar, is not due to a lack of research pointing to the significant socio-economic impact of women. “We find ourselves continuously pushing up against a narrative that requires the female to justify her contribution, to argue her value, to demand her right or to plead her case. This continued paradigm forces women into fight or flight, often having to revisit the same gender-related biases in everyday workplace situations – irrespective of what she has achieved.”

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F O RG I N G A PATH TO E N TRE P RE NE U RSHI P

It is a well-known fact that women’s economic empowerment has a direct, positive effect on poverty eradication and economic growth. “Economic access provides financial freedom, emboldening women with a higher level of choice,” says Nambiar. As the CEO at the helm of a foundation that aims to make a sustainable, longterm contribution to southern Africa by nurturing emerging entrepreneurial talent in the region, it’s unsurprising that Nambiar sees entrepreneurship as the greater enabler of such progress. The word entrepreneurship, Nambiar notes, originates from the French entreprendre, which means “to undertake”. “The undertaking of an endeavour speaks to having a growth mindset, recognising opportunity, displaying proactivity and taking on risk – and when indulged in, provides a sense of agency. “When women undertake the creation of an enterprise, it provides a sense of power over their futures and an agency that gives them confidence in their abilities.” It is this activity that must be encouraged not only to bring about women innovators on the African continent, but also to drive our economies into the innovation-driven stage. This will enable us to invest in advanced skills and the latest technologies, increasing productivity and leading global innovation.

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EDI TORI A L

THE MULTIPLIER EFFECT A Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) study estimates the rate of entrepreneurial activity among workingage women involved in businesses in existence for less than 42 months to be 24.1%. This number is significantly higher than most other places in the world – and it’s still on an upward trajectory, the report claims. Things look even better in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, entrepreneurial activity among women stands at 26%, with women in this region twice as likely to start businesses than those anywhere else. Numbers like these show how integral women entrepreneurs are for economic growth and development in Africa. Add to this the fact that entrepreneurship enables women to participate in the economy regardless of whether there are formal jobs available, or whether they have particular educational credentials, and it’s clear why it is fundamentally linked to empowerment. Think tank The Brookings Institution outlined the importance of entrepreneurship in 2016: “Investing in female entrepreneurs has a multiplier effect. Women often invest a higher proportion of their income back into their families and communities than men. Indeed, it is well-documented that when women control a greater portion of household resources, the family allocates more money to food and children’s education, and children that are healthier and more educated are better-prepared to contribute to a developing economy.”

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WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS AROUND THE WORLD % of women involved in entrepreneurship % of necessity-driven women entrepreneurs

25

20

15

10 Necessity- and

opportunity-driven total entrepreneurial

5

activity (TEA) around

the world in % of female

population aged 18 to 64

0

13% OF TEA

23% OF TEA

24% OF TEA

25% OF TEA

NORTH AMERICA

EAST & SOUTH ASIA & PACIFIC

MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA

EUROPE & CENTRAL ASIA

30% OF TEA LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN

36% OF TEA SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

WOMEN’S ESSENTIAL AND NON-ESSENTIAL INVOLVEMENT IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP PER GLOBAL REGION

Supporting this is information contained in a Goldman Sachs report on its 10 000 Women programme, which supports female entrepreneurship in 26 countries. The investment banking giant established that 90% of the beneficiaries go on to mentor others and support their communities. “The power of the collective generational learning and community value created by these entrepreneurs,” says Nambiar, “is not to be understated. Female leaders very rarely keep knowledge to themselves and are often reflective about how they can impact the next generation positively.”

UNLOCKING AFRICA’S POTENTIAL While the levels of involvement and their potential impact are impressive, of concern is the level of discontinuance among these women. Approximately 56% of female entrepreneurs in sub-Saharan Africa who close their businesses do so because of a lack of profitability and finance. In the face of often innumerable

difficulties, many women tend to be forced into necessitydriven entrepreneurship. This, in combination with starting from a lower base than men – with less startup capital, limited access to loans and exclusion from certain sectors – is a major impediment to women-owned businesses. A Women in Africa report sets entrepreneurship out as “a great opportunity that ought to be seized, a high potential that needs to be tapped”. Clearly, then, it is essential that we provide women with the tools necessary to start and run their own businesses, preventing discontinuance and ensuring prosperity. Global Entrepreneurship Monitor’s (GEM’s) Women’s Entrepreneurship Report found that the highest levels of discontinuance take place in the transition period between the factor-driven and efficiency-driven economies. At this stage, there are nearly six exits for every woman starting or running a new business in sub-Saharan Africa.

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F O RG I N G A PATH TO E N TRE P RE NE U RSHI P

EDI TORI A L

“A great opportunity that ought to be seized, a high potential that needs to be tapped”

This is related to the fact that women are starting more businesses in the region as well as the high rate of unprofitability and adverse economic conditions. Although this still affects women disproportionately. According to Nambiar, “female entrepreneurs often face augmented challenges in accessing finance or corporate supply chains.” The GEM’s report confirms this, indicating that finance problems account for 22% of discontinuations in women-run businesses at the factor-efficiency transition stage. This is the highest level among all of the economic development phases, and the one in which most women entrepreneurs in sub-Saharan Africa are operating. While exits for this reason were lower in the more advanced efficiency-innovation transition phase, women were still

28% likely to cite lack of funding as the reason for exiting the market. It is essential that Africa invests in uplifting women and girls to unlock the full potential of the continent. “The life of a female entrepreneur is riddled with the rhetoric of clichéd stereotypes, cultural demands and archaic entry barriers and challenges. To unlock the full potential women entrepreneurship can have, further support will need to be provided to break down the gender barriers that exist,” concludes Nambiar.

SOURCES Brookings Institution, Harvard Business School, Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, Women in Africa

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SUPPORTING WOMEN-OWNED ENTERPRISES C R U C I AL TO SOU TH AF RI CA’S E CONOMI C TURN-AR O U ND by Mandisa Tshikwatamba

Women entrepreneurs are one of

the targeted groups for the business

interventions of the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda), and over the last three years of being

given the responsibility of leading Seda, I have made promoting

and supporting women-owned

enterprises one of my key priorities.

The saying “If you educate a woman you educate a nation” rings true in many contexts, including entrepreneurship and economic empowerment. The World Bank Enterprise Survey shows that although women-owned businesses tend to be smaller in size and slower in growth, they are equally as efficient and growth-oriented as male-owned businesses. It is Seda’s aim to see people who have previously been unable to access adequate support be given the assistance, guidance and information they need to start and grow businesses. Over the past three years, we have intensified several of our programmes to ensure that women-run businesses receive the maximum value and support they need. We have found ways to ensure our SMMEs gain value from a multitude of our programmes, including introducing our Women Enterprise Coaching Programme (WECP) participants to our National Gazelles programme and the Technology Transfer Fund as well as our Quality and Standards Interventions. These

programmes all assist in the upscaling and acceleration of their enterprises. WECP has proven to be the best support offering we have towards empowering women-owned SMMEs, with numerous participants reporting significant improvements in their businesses in terms of employee numbers (which addresses the rising rate of unemployment here in South Africa) and an increase in annual revenue. The programme is aimed at providing value-added information, support and management competencies as well as a networking platform for participants. It has provided many women with the knowledge and skills needed to grow their businesses, implement strategic planning processes and acquire other resources that will facilitate the growth of the business as well as its owner. One of the core aspects of WECP is that it not only focuses on operational and strategic aspects of being a businesswoman, but also extends to the health and wellbeing of the participants in their roles as mothers, wives, daughters and other influential or leadership roles they play outside of running a business. Another programme that has been integral in strengthening our support for women entrepreneurs is our Technology Transfer Fund (TTF) in which Seda assists small enterprises in acquiring equipment or machinery. Fixtrade is one woman-owned business that has benefited from the programme. Fixtrade is a family business based in East London, owned and run by Lorraine Govender. The company manufactures built-in cupboards for

housing developments, as well as lowcost and high-end cabinetry. Through Seda’s TTF, the business has acquired an automatic single-sided edge bander, a sliding table panel saw, an edge milling mechanical profiler, TruCut software and a dust extractor. The acquisition of this equipment means the business no longer needs to outsource services such as cutting wood due to a lack of resources. The equipment also puts the business at a competitive advantage, enabling Fixtrade to offer its client base a broad range of services. Over and above providing cabinetry, the business is also gas-certified, meaning it can install gas equipment. The combination of these two offerings allows the company to offer a variety of services and increase their revenue stream. Fixtrade has established itself as a reputable brand and continues to grow and maintain a solid client base which includes multinational brands such as Siemens, Whirlpool, Samsung and Hisense in the East London region. Govender has since ventured further into executive mentoring and leadership consultancy establishing herself as a highly regarded businesswoman. There are currently four groups undergoing WECP coaching with two scheduled to graduate in September and the other two in October 2019. The Tshwane cohort of WECP participants who recently graduated from the programme recorded a combined increase of 43% in clients for their businesses, 130% increase in annual

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SE DA

A DV ERTORI A L

turnover, 48% increase in the value of their fixed assets, and a 14% increase in the number of employees. A third programme that we have used to intensify our focus on women-owned SMMEs is Pitch & Perfect, a competition with the key aim of facilitating improved access to finance for SMMEs and improved deal flow for investors – bridging the gap between entrepreneurs and investors. We have seen an increase in the number of women-owned startups participating in Pitch & Perfect in the last two years, and as a result we have gained further insight into the true extent of involvement as well as some of the major challenges faced particularly by women-owned enterprises. Pitch & Perfect provides SMMEs across the country – including those with support from Seda branches and our supported business incubators – with professional tools on how to present business cases effectively and efficiently; deliver persuasive pitches to potential funders; and improve access to markets, technology and finance. So far, womenowned enterprises such as Meqheleng Waste Management, Little Harvard, Mercia Ramagaga and Local Village have featured prominently in Pitch & Perfect pitching competitions. Local Village is an emerging health and natural food producer which was a runner-up walking away with R100 000 worth of TTF to acquire new equipment for the business.

Mandisa Tshikwatamba, CEO of Seda

As much as I feel passionate about women enterprise empowerment, our efforts to up the ante on the support provided to women-owned enterprises is based on statistics and data insights. Several Global Entrepreneurship Monitor reports have shown the consistent finding that men are more likely to be involved in entrepreneurial activity than women. Women face greater challenges, including social challenges over and above those commonly faced by their male counterparts. To become successful, female entrepreneurs have to overcome the following: lower educational and skills levels, a lack of businessoriented networks, access to funding and markets; lack of capital and assets, family responsibilities, cultural prejudices, and a general lack of confidence in their ability to successfully start and run a business. Our experience indicates that with targeted and well-constructed interventions, more women can start small enterprises and successfully run, sustain and grow existing ones. Entrepreneurship among women remains key to total economic transformation of the country.

SEDA NATIONAL OFFICE​CONTACT DETAILS: Telephone: +27 12 441 1000 | Fax: +27 12 441 2064 ​National Information Centre: Telephone: 0860 103 703 | Email: info@seda.org.za

Website: www.seda.org.za | Facebook: facebook.com/seda.dsbd National Anti-Corruption Hotline

Toll free number: 0800 701 701 | Fax: 0800 204 965 | SMS: 39772 Email: intergrity@publicservicecorruptionhotline.org.za

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McDONALD’S SO U T H A F R I CA It all began in 1955 in Maywood, Illinois. There our founder Ray Kroc sealed the deal with McDonald’s first beef supplier and received his first burger patties on credit. Since then, McDonald’s has opened restaurants all over the world, never forgetting our commitment to quality, service, cleanliness and value (QSC&V). At the heart of everything we prepare, every ingredient our suppliers provide, and every person that works with us, is our focus on delivering the high-quality meals our customers expect. McDonald’s SA opened our doors more than 24 years ago and since then, we have been proud to serve South Africans some of their favourite food, and along the way, we’ve managed not to just live history, but create it through innovations such as our Drive Thru, breakfast offering, McCafé, 24/7 and delivery. We will continue on this trajectory.

VISION, MISSION AND AMBITION We constantly envision a better McDonald’s where we create feel-good moments for everyone. Our mission goes beyond what we sell. We’re using our reach to be a positive force for our customers, our people, our communities and our world. We aim to be a modern

and progressive burger business that delivers great tasting, high-quality food to our customers, with a world-class experience that makes customers feel welcomed and valued.

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS McDonald’s SA has done a lot of work in the past two years around

environmental responsibility. We started with our new building design to make sure that natural light and heat from the sun would complement a minimum air-conditioning design. Our lighting has been designed to be more energy efficient as well as our new cooking equipment which consumes in some cases 20% less energy.

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Mc D O N A L D ’ S S O U T H A FRICA

to their market. The company also ensures that it nurtures talent from within through high-potential programmes that are wholly inclusive.

“W E CONSTANTLY ENVISION A BETTER McDONALD’S WHERE WE CREATE FEEL-GOOD MOMENTS FOR EVERYONE.”

We have also invested in self-filtration equipment which minimises the reheating of oil and controls the quality of food. Going forward, we are going to pilot Bio-Diesel which will take waste material from the restaurants and use it for the trucks that deliver our products. We have started with waste separation in our lobbies and lastly, we are trialling gas, diesel generators and water storage tanks to explore the optimum combination of energy usage and the costs thereof.

FUTURE-FIT BUSINESS McDonald’s SA uses many technological innovations to keep up with the changes brought about by the Fourth Industrial Revolution. These include: •

Self-ordering kiosks

Global McDonald’s app

Food delivery partnerships and apps

Digital menu boards

E-learning for restaurant crew and managers

A DV ERTORI A L

To ensure equity in promotion decisions, leadership discusses talent biannually, and a robust Performance Development System holds managers accountable for developing people and embracing diversity and inclusion.

In addition to this, the company is focusing on the emergence of the Fifth Industrial Revolution and the engagement with customers and staff. It’s also looking into unique brand/retail extensions, like the offering of speciality expresso-based coffee; food delivery; table service and hospitality. Another avenue McDonald’s SA is exploring is the facilitation of accredited courses at Hamburger University.

McDONALD’S OPERATIONS IN SOUTH AFRICA McDonald’s opened its first restaurant in South Africa in November 1995. Today, the business operates in 300 restaurants across SA’s nine provinces. McDonald’s is renowned for its training throughout the world. To date, the South African business has trained and employed over 12 000 South Africans at various levels, including franchisees, restaurant managers and crew. McDonald’s SA employees are educated continuously through diversity workshops tailored to meet their immediate needs as they relate

Currently more than 80% of all food served in McDonald’s South Africa restaurants is produced by local South African suppliers (according to our highest quality standards).

McDONALD’S GLOBAL WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP NETWORK The primary purpose of the Global Women’s Leadership Network (GWLN) is to promote gender balance and diversity and the advancement of women across the McDonald’s System and to facilitate a culture where women have the most opportunity to succeed and grow. At McDonald’s SA, a strong commitment to inclusion is embedded in the business plan and corporate values. Through initiatives such as the GWLN, women at all levels of the business have benefitted. The representation of women within the McDonald’s South Africa market now sits at 62%.

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: 85 on Grayston, Grayston Drive, Sandton Telephone: (+27) 11 236 2300 Website: www.mcdonalds.co.za Twitter: @McDonalds_SA | Facebook: @McDonalds.ZA | Instagram: mcdonalds_za

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Meet The Family Behind Our 100% Beef. Our family secret: We give the farm 100% of our love and it gives it back. Jans Fourie - Beef Farmer

Meet the experts behind our quality beef.

Visit: www.knowourfood.co.za

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2/04 16:48

Mc D O N A L D ’ S S O U T H A FRICA

I NT ERV I EW

J O - A N N D E W E T: CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER OF McDONALD’S SOUTH AFRICA YOUR TOP WOMAN Jo-Ann de Wet started her career at McDonald’s SA as a trainee manager in 1995. Over the years, she expanded her operational knowledge and exposure across different departments within the company. Today, Jo-Ann is McDonald’s Chief Operations Officer, responsible for overseeing Restaurant Support functions including field service (franchising), delivery, health and safety, risk and to ensure execution is safeguarded through outstanding processes, governance and systems. As a member of the McDonald’s Global Women’s Leadership Advisory Board, which aims to support the development and advancement of women, Jo-Ann was instrumental in developing the McDonalds Global Gender Balance and Diversity Strategy in 2019 and supporting local chapters throughout the world. Success has followed Jo-Ann throughout her time at McDonald’s. In 2008, she was named the first local female Operations Director at McDonald’s SA. In 2009, she was awarded the Global Circle of Excellence award for APMEA WLN and in 2016, she won the Global Women’s Leadership Network award. Jo-Ann was also part of the team that launched the McDonald’s breakfast offering in 2002

and, in 2015, the group that scaled the McDelivery offering within the business. Besides business, Jo-Ann also has a keen interest in social responsibility initiatives. She is involved in a number of initiatives, both professionally and personally, including: • RMHC – McDonald’s South Africa’s charity of choice • Boys’ Town • National Sea Rescue Institute • Financial aid and support of a local school from her hometown (Kairo SSS) As a business leader, Jo-Ann continues to advocate for the realisation of all human rights for all the people within the business. She is also a champion of gender empowerment, consistently taking positive measures to ensure the realisation of gender equity and equality. Accordingly, non-discrimination on the basis of sex is a fundamental principle to which she subscribes.

CONTACT INFORMATION Physical address: 85 Grayston Drive, Morningside, Sandton, Johannesburg Telephone: +27 11 236 2300 Website: www.mcdonalds.co.za Twitter: McDonalds_SA Facebook: McDonalds.ZA

Jo-Ann holds a Bachelor of Commerce degree in Business Economics and Industrial Psychology from the University of the Western Cape, and numerous operations and leadership qualifications from the McDonald’s Hamburger University. Jo-Ann is a wife, and mother to four sons.

Jo-Ann believes that future leaders will need to continue leveraging “common sense” and must have the ability to lead and inspire a diverse workforce in a dynamic working environment. She’s inspired by Michelle Obama. “She stood out as one of the most passionate and accomplished First Ladies in history because of her charisma, compassion and powerful speech-making. However, it is her ability to lead organically that I admire most. There is something to be said about a leader that doesn’t need to shout the loudest but is somehow heard through her silence and strength of character.”

JO-ANN DE WET

Chief Operations Officer

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Lawyer Reana Steyn Ombudsman Banking Services

THE OMBUDSMAN FOR BANKING SERVICES

Experienced lawyer Reana Steyn is the current Ombudsman

accessible as people think. That’s why we often need to

for Banking Services (OBS). Reana spent nine years at

assist consumers with lodging complaints. Without our help,

an international firm, specialising in matters as diverse as

they can feel overwhelmed and intimidated. We service both

aviation and medical negligence. This was followed by a

the poor and affluent. The difference between the two groups

further decade specialising in insurance law. Her introduction

is reflected in their comprehension and experience of the

to the credit and regulatory space came with the passing of

banking system.

the National Credit Act Regulations in 2006. Four years later, she began her work in the ombudsman sphere.

“It’s a privilege and an honour to be the first woman to hold the reins in this ombudsman’s office. It is also an immense

The Ombudsman for Banking Services was established in

responsibility. In a world traditionally dominated by men, my

1997 as a voluntary scheme. It was designed to provide

appointment was a bold move. I see it as a positive sign of

an independent system of checks and balances for bank

transformation in both the organisation and the wider banking

customers.

industry. It is also a source of hope for the future.”

The introduction of the Financial Service Regulation Act in

Women make up 62% of the total staff complement. In

2017 has served to strengthen the ombudsman’s position.

management positions, the ratio is 4:2 in favour of women.

“The existence of our office is based on the rule of law,

Even the independent board of executives of the OBS has a

and more importantly, the application of fairness in all

2:3 female composition.

circumstances. This allows us to assist consumers in ways that even our courts and regulators are not able to. This

“As a leader and a woman, I believe that only tangible

is the beauty of the ombudsman’s work. For people with

measures can make a real difference in the workplace. Talk

a passion for fairness, it provides an amazing feeling of

about work–life balance is not enough – we must drive this

accomplishment.”

from a policy level downwards. Implementing changes can

Registered as a non-profit, the ombudsman provides bank

help to inculcate a balanced work–life environment. We

customers in the South African market with a free alternative

have adopted a flexi-hours work policy, and empathy and

to formal legal processes.

compassion will always be valued in an office where family comes first. Our new paternity leave policy far exceeds the

“In a democracy with a history like ours, it is important to

legal prescripts and demonstrates our commitment to the

recognise that ‘complaining’ is not always as easy and

integrity of the family unit.”

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T H E O M BU D S M A N F O R BA N K IN G S E R V ICE S

A DV ERTORI A L

“Being an ombudsman is the most

For the last two years, complaints related

skills, we can transform the modern

fulfilling career I could have asked for.

to internet banking have been the most

workplace.

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common type of complaint received by

to help people in meaningful ways. My

our office. The common denominator in

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chosen career path lets me do this.

these complaints has been the lack of

of power and what it means to be

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a leader. In the process, we are

using this banking channel.

making our society more inclusive,

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compassionate and flexible, but still

and today she is a successful lawyer.

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focused on success. There is no

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greater pleasure as a leader than

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bank customers lack awareness of

to support and encourage others as

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the safe use of this mode of banking.

they ultimately surpass your own

her full staff benefits, she is finally

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achievements.”

able to take care of the needs of

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her extended family.

we are to fill the education gap.

“Empowerment initiatives such

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as these change lives. Through

is the hosting of targeted educational

education, training and support,

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as media engagement for enhanced

with hope.”

reach. We’ve increased our social media footprint to engage with more

New technology continues to play a

bank customers.

significant role in the banking sector, and the Office of the Ombudsman

“Creating engagement platforms

must keep abreast of these trends.

for the consumer is one of my

This applies both to the way the

priorities; social media lets us have

office functions, and the ways that

conversations with more consumers.”

technology impacts bank customers. “I was fortunate enough to have From an operational point of view,

strong female role models when I was

automated business systems now

growing up, as well as in the early

deliver high-quality outputs.

stages of my career. Women like my

“U NLESS YOU WALK OUT INTO THE UNKNOWN, THE ODDS OF MAKING A PROFOUND DIFFERENCE IN YOUR LIFE ARE PRETTY LOW” – TOM PETERS, IN SEARCH OF EXCELLENCE

grandmother, mother and mother-in-

CONTACT DETAILS:

“Technology is no longer a choice; we

law did not have the privilege of further

have to work with it to be sustainable and

education. Nevertheless, they made a

Physical Address: Ground Floor

relevant. Automating our case-processing

great success of their chosen careers

systems has enabled us to work smarter

through their intelligence, skills and

in the assessment and investigation

sheer determination.

34-36 Fricker Road, Illovo Johannesburg

Telephone: 0860 800 900 Email: info@obssa.co.za

of cases. We have also been able to increase staff efficiency. Despite

“They built a foundation for the

these improvements, we won’t become

next generation but were not able

complacent. We will continue to monitor

to achieve the equal status they

international complaints-handling trends

deserved. Now, things have changed.

so that we don’t fall behind.”

I believe that by employing ‘female’

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Banking on innovation BY NICOLE FORREST

More than 35 million women in sub-Saharan Africa are excluded from financial services. With rapid developments in technology driving change in the industry, the finance sector has the potential to yield significant results for Africa. According to the World Bank, financial inclusion is a key enabler in reducing poverty and boosting prosperity in any economy. “Financial inclusion, simply defined, means having access to financial products that are useful and affordable, and that enable people to better themselves, their lives and the lives of people in their communities,” says Charlene George, founder and CEO of Verve Digital, an IT solutions and skills development company. Being financially included increases the chance of asset ownership and can serve as a catalyst to increased economic empowerment for women. Adding to this, inaccessibility of financial services has been shown to be linked to underlying inequality and sluggish economic growth. In this vein, the World Bank notes that account holders “are more likely to use other financial services – such as credit and insurance – to start and expand businesses, invest in education or health, manage risk and weather financial shocks, which can improve the overall quality of their lives”.

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BA N K IN G O N IN N OVAT ION

“A bank account enables someone to make and receive payments, to plan their finances, to save money and to develop the record needed to access credit – any number of things that most of us with bank accounts take for granted,” adds George. While many avenues such as financial inclusion open up, the World Bank’s 2017 Global Findex report indicated that there were still approximately 1.7 billion adults globally without an account at a financial institution or through a mobile money provider. The proportion of unbanked adults is higher in the developing world, as account ownership is virtually universal in developed countries. It’s also skewed towards women, who make up 56% of all unbanked adults.

EDI TORI A L

“For women in particular, financial inclusion means they can control their financial lives, giving them increased independence and agency. With access to a secure means to store money, and a way to access credit, women can get better jobs, invest in their families’ education, become entrepreneurs, and drive positive changes in their communities. From the humble mobile phone, to the Internet and Blockchain, technology can help with this. But it’s an enabler only, not an instant cure-all.” With the relatively low cost of and ease of access to mobile phones, the answer to banking for the women of Africa likely lies in mobile money solutions.

In sub-Saharan Africa, more than 35 million women are excluded from financial services. According to a 2019 World Bank report, “Millions of unbanked women in subSaharan Africa receive routine payments in cash. These payments can be for wages, government social benefits or the sale of agricultural goods. Moving such payments into accounts can be an effective way to increase access to formal financial services.” Having access to financial services is closely linked to employment status. According to analytics and advisory company Gallup, 78% of adults who work for an employer have an account. This drops to just 53% for those who are unemployed. It follows then that women’s relatively low participation in the labour force (they are twice as likely as men to operate outside of the formal workforce) may be a contributing factor to their concentration among the unbanked. Participation in the labour force is not the only obstacle women face in accessing the formal financial sector. Gallup cites discriminatory laws and conservative social norms as two major barriers to inclusion. Financial services help to create new economic opportunities for women. A 2016 study found that access to financial services had the effect of decreasing poverty, increasing savings and encouraging women to seek higher-status employment. Some 185 000 women vacated agricultural jobs for positions in business and retail after becoming financially included. While researchers could not identify the precise reason for the shift, they surmised that it could have been as a result of greater access to funds, increased control and the reduction of financial constraints.

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ED ITO RIAL

BAN KI N G O N I N N OVATI O N

“Four in ten, or some 80 million, unbanked women in subSaharan Africa have mobile phones. Mobile money solutions – which allow people to store money on their phones and send it via text message – are both affordable and widespread enough to make a significant difference,” says George. This is not an unorthodox sentiment. The International Monetary Fund in early 2019 found that mobile money accounts had surpassed traditional bank accounts as the primary financial service in the region. The ease of access to these facilities has had the effect of benefiting a large portion of the population – including the poor, women and youth – that would otherwise be unbanked. Being easier to open and administer than traditional bank accounts, and having the added benefit of allowing women to transact from any location, mobile money accounts have the potential to not only provide a mechanical means to financially include women, but also thwart social barriers that might prevent them from becoming banked. The advantages of these accounts are even more apparent when considering statistics laid out in the World Bank’s 2017 Global Findex report. According to the report, of the eight economies where at least 20% of adults have only a mobile money account, there is no gender gap relating to account

holding in six of them. This stands in sharp contrast to the statistically significant gaps that exist between men and women in the share of traditional accounts and traditional/ mobile money accounts held. “While mobile money has seen a fair amount of success across the African continent, duplicating this effect in various regions is complicated,” says George. “In Kenya, M-Pesa has become ubiquitous since its launch. However, efforts to launch the offering in South Africa failed due to different levels of financial services and technological usage.” To ensure women are financially included, George notes that we will have to innovate in all spheres, not merely finance. “What this suggests is that while technology offers a viable means to help bridge the financial access divide, solutions need to be tailored. To this end, ensuring we have policymaking and product development is critical to ensure their needs are given equal priority and that solutions are tailored with both female and male users in mind.” SOURCES International Monetary Fund World Bank

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M A H L A KO A PH A H L A IN V E S T ME NT S

A DV ERTORI A L

E N T R E PR E N E U RSH I P A ND I NNOVATION Mahlako A Phahla Investments (Pty) Ltd, also known as “Mahlako”, is a South African advisory and investment holding company established and 100% owned by two dynamic African women, Makole Mupita and Meta Mhlarhi. The founders are not only chartered accountants, but have accumulated a wealth of diversified, in-depth and complementary skills gained through experiences in varied sectors. Since its inception, Mahlako has successfully invested in projects in excess of R5-billion and advised on mandates in excess of R500-billion.

FOCUS AREAS ENERGY Mahlako has a keen understanding of the energy value chain across different technologies. The company is invested in the renewable energy industry in solar and wind technologies and has advised in various other technologies such as coal, nuclear and gas. INFRASTRUCTURE Infrastructure development is critical for the growth of our continent; it is to this end that Mahlako invests and advises within the infrastructure development value chain. Mahlako consults clients from initiation

(feasibility studies) through procurement, development and implementation. TELECOMMUNICATIONS Entrepreneurship and innovation are at the forefront of Mahlako’s operations. It is therefore fitting that Mahlako invests in, and provides, clients with a range of innovative solutions in the telecommunications sector. Our solutions are tailored to each client’s needs for maximum benefits and sustainable results. ADVISORY Our professionals provide specialised advisory services to the private sector and all levels of the public sector. Our extensive experience in investments as well advising on various mandates gives us a deep understanding of the complex and diverse issues faced by our clients.

SPONSORING TOP WOMEN AWARDS

Executive Directors, Meta Mhlarhi (far left) and Makole Mupita (far right) hand over the “Top Gender Empowered Organisation: Construction and Infrastructure Development Award” to AV Light Steel

Mahlako A Phahla is proud to be one of the headline sponsors of the Standard Bank Top Women Awards, sponsoring the category “Top Gender Empowered Construction and Infrastructure Development Award” at the 2019 ceremony.

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: 345 Rivonia Blvd, Office Block A,1st Floor, Rivonia, 2191,Sandton, Gauteng Email: info@mahlako.co.za Telephone: +27 (0) 11 706 3902 Fax: +27 (0) 86 508 4158

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JUST WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED Handle pregnancy like a boss with the PPS Pregnancy-related Sick Pay Benefit From morning sickness and fatigue to haemorrhoids

employee, the unforeseen downtime and

and baby brain, pregnancy can be complicated. And

additional expenses can be really stressful. Simply

with every symptom comes a plethora of contradictions:

put, income protection is the last thing you should

things you need, but cannot have (coffee). Things you

be worried about.

don’t need, but are served up anyway (varicose veins, anyone?). Literally everyone has an opinion – parents, friends, neighbours and even random strangers you meet at the supermarket. Some of it is factual and some of it, well, less factual. The web is also full of advice: like eating crackers to avoid nausea, but to avoid spiking your blood sugar by eating crackers. Some bloggers advise to avoid strong flavours like ginger and peppermint, yet ginger tea and peppermint leaves for morning sickness are a firm favourite among the older generation. Add to this the pressure of preparing for your little sprout, juggling work responsibilities and eating six meals a day (even though you’d rather not), and you’ll only begin to understand the complications that come with growing a human. But not all complications are tied to unsolicited advice. As a mother, you may experience medical complications related to your pregnancy which can involve your health, your baby’s health, or both. Pregnancy complications can result in you being booked off work by your doctor. . If you are selfemployed or a professional in private practice, where no work means no pay, or even if you are a salaried

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PPS PREGNANCY-RELATED SICK PAY BENEFIT In order to simplify the sickness claims definition for expecting members, PPS has enhanced its pregnancy–related sick pay benefit to include all medically justified pregnancy complications, including medically induced and elective caesarean sections. Active from 1 Jun 2019, this breakthrough benefit for PPS members was born out of research and insight into the complications our members might face during their pregnancy. The standout factor is that, if a member is unable to attend to her usual duties due to sickness or a complication attributable to pregnancy, childbirth or miscarriage, PPS will pay this sickness benefit. This ensures that a member is not disadvantaged at a time when she is most vulnerable. This means that if your doctor advises that you take absence from work due to pregnancy complications or illness PPS Pregnancy-related Sick Pay Benefit ensures that you won’t miss out on your income. This leaves you with less stress about finances, and more time to enjoy your pregnancy.

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A DV E R TO R I A L

*Inner turmoil and “should I or shouldn’t I?” apply. Soft cheeses you shouldn’t eat during pregnancy include brie, camembert, feta and goat. Soft cheeses you can eat during pregnancy include brie, camembert, feta and goat. Cheeses that grate easily are advisable. Unless, they don’t grate that easily, then they’re not advisable. For contradictory advice pertaining to blue cheese see every pregnancy website, ever.

PREGNANCY CAN BE COMPLICATED,

our cover isn’t.

PPS Sickness and Partial Permanent Incapacity now covers ALL medically justified pregnancy complications*. This means that if your doctor recommends that you miss work, you won’t miss out on your income.

#PregnancyIs

*T’s & C’s apply For more information, please consult your PPS accredited adviser or visit www.pps.co.za PPS is an authorised Financial Services Provider.

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G ett ing

Africa tech

into top

BY NICOLE FORREST

condition

The effects of technology are ubiquitous. Internet access, automation and other tools of the digital age have especially helped remove the barriers that have previously kept women from participating in the broader economy.

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G E T T IN G A F R ICA IN TO TO P T E C H C OND IT ION

EDI TORI A L

When speaking about the far-reaching effects that these digital technologies have had, it’s important to remember that access remains a problem for those in rural and sometimes even low-income urban areas. These difficulties affect women disproportionately –especially women in Africa. With rapid technological developments taking place today, there is a certain level of concern around whether Africa will keep up and, if not, how this will affect women. Gabrielle Lobban, founder of health and wellness platform Zumbudda, is optimistic about the future of tech on the continent. “Despite a history of low tech capability, the past decade has seen Africa leapfrog over these challenges to become a highly connected region. “Instead of progressing from written communication to computer-driven communication, Africans have become citizens of a mobile technology ecosystem. From Fintech to health tech, Africans are solving local challenges and, in turn, galvanising others into designing new innovations that are uniquely African,” she says. Lobban believes that developments which are driven in this way are advantageous as they are suited to solving local problems. “One can only really understand the challenges of a particular community if one has either lived in or engaged with that community.” Because of this, locally-focused programmes have the potential to make massive impacts. One example of this is Taungana Africa, a programme that provides rural African girls in high school with the opportunity to access and explore science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) fields.

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“[Founder] Sandra Tererai is passionate about financial independence for women through STEM. Once a year, Taungana invites girls from rural communities in Zambia, Zimbabwe and South Africa to attend a one-week multiindustry immersion and entrepreneurship programme,” explains Lobban. “Taungana recently celebrated its five-year anniversary, and it was only then that I fully realised the programme’s impact on the lives of these young girls. Many are already well into their tertiary education and are studying finance and medicine, while some are studying engineering. “After speaking with the alumni, I was amazed by their drive to continue solving problems within their communities. These young women understand the daily challenges of water, electricity and sanitation first-hand and, through the Taungana programme, they have been given the opportunity to explore their ideas. This has provided them with the motivation to acquire the skills necessary to continue to create sustainable solutions.” Healthcare in Africa, Lobban says, is an area that is particularly ripe to benefit from technological developments. “Africa has some unique health challenges, including disease outbreaks, high incidences of maternal deaths and elevated risks of tuberculosis and HIV infection. These epidemics, as well as migration and disasters, have severely impacted communities – both economically and socially. “Traditionally, these communities have managed their own healthcare. But as they have become less self-reliant and more dependent on Western medicine, there has been a need to educate and provide more access to centres of knowledge and care, which are predominantly located in larger towns and cities.” This is where technology is a major asset; although remote care and telemedicine are not new phenomena, more recent developments have catapulted the health tech sector into new territory. “New technologies like apps, video and text consulting platforms can reduce the need for the community healthcare practitioner to travel to cities to receive ongoing training. Instead, they can receive training online to ensure continuity of healthcare services within their local community,” explains Lobban.

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EDI TORI A L

“From fintech to health tech, Africans are solving local challenges”

“The burden on city health centres is enormous and one of the ways to make healthcare more sustainable is to empower local caregivers within their communities using digital health innovations. Text-based information services like MomConnect and NurseConnect have had a positive impact on communities by bridging the knowledge gap in maternal healthcare in South Africa.”

Being a full-time working mother and having established Zumbudda out of her own need to balance priorities of work and home – especially when her daughters fell ill – Lobban is acutely aware of the need for health tech innovations in Africa. “As the primary decision-makers in most households, women are often burdened with the responsibility of care. Often this is financial, but also when it comes to making time to seek care,” she says.

As beneficial as internet-based healthcare services can be, connectivity is still often an issue. In areas where there is low connectivity, other solutions must be found to make the system sustainable for everyone – although this can prove difficult.

As with countless other issues, technological innovations that help women will help the world. Enabling women and girls to access this industry and filtering equal opportunities down the value chain in a field whose effects are so farreaching will have a significant impact on economic and innovative transformation.

Trust is another major challenge. A former ePatient, Vanessa Carter, has begun using social media to educate and communicate with the professional healthcare community around the challenges patients face. Since collaborating with Carter, who uses Twitter chats to take the temperature of civil society on healthcare issues, it has become clear that trust is an indispensable element to the relationship. “She and I agree that there needs to be more trust between clinicians and patients, and one of the ways to build trust is through the use of technology,” says Lobban.

What is key is that women themselves get involved in the technology sector. Driving innovation that is female-centric, Lobban believes, is the only way to ensure that Africa is able to fully embrace and take advantage of the opportunities technology presents. “Women are both the problem and the solution. The best way we can empower each other is by supporting one another and ensuring better outcomes for all.”

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Empowering innovative Empowering software innovative solutions software solutions

As a leading custom software development firm, BBD is committed to As a leading custom software

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PROUD SPONSOR OF THE

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TOP WOMAN IN ICT AWARD

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BBD

A DV ERTORI A L

PR OUDLY SUPPORTING THE TOP WOMEN IN ICT In an industry that has historically been dominated by men, seeing the skills development gap bridged, and star talent arise as a result, is always a proud moment for BBD and other ICT industry entities. As a key player in the ICT space, BBD is committed to transforming the landscape by empowering women to make their mark in the industry, through the development and upliftment of their skills. This year’s Standard Bank Top Women Awards nominees are all exemplary examples of the shifting landscape and BBD is proud to be a sponsor at such an event. A night studded with all the glitz and glamour befitting powerful and sophisticated women, the 16th annual Standard Bank Top Women Awards was a joyful and celebratory tip-of-thehat to some of the finest female talent our country has to offer. Platforms like this are important for recognising and commending those who have risen above industry and societal norms and expectations to forge their own destinies in an industry that shapes the way the world functions daily.

BBD presenting the Top Woman in ICT award

BBD CEO, Peter Searle, has the vision to develop the high-value skills of young women, which grow the industry and the local economy. This vision, and BBD’s commitment to supporting women in technology, was solidified through BBD’s sponsorship of the Top Woman in ICT award at the event. Not only was this

an opportunity to honour the top woman in our industry, it was also a chance for BBD to align with this important shift in the industry and visibly get behind all those spearheading the movement. With the keynote address given by Caster Semenya, and a moving and soulful dedication by Yvonne Chaka Chaka to Lifetime Achievement Award winner Mary Twala, the evening was a memorable and festive one. The Top Woman in ICT award was presented by BBD’s very own Patricia and awarded to Veronica Motloutsi from Smart Digital Solutions.

“BBD IS COMMITTED TO TRANSFORMING THE LANDSCAPE BY EMPOWERING WOMEN TO MAKE THEIR MARK IN THE INDUSTRY” Wholehearted congratulations go out to Veronica and all those nominated; BBD looks forward to seeing the impact each woman makes in the industry and supports every effort made in transforming the landscape and bridging the skills gap, making the ICT industry an accessible and rewarding one for anyone who wishes to be a part of it.

CONTACT DETAILS: Email: info@bbdsoftware.com | Website: www.bbdsoftware.com Twitter: @bbdsoftware | Facebook: @BBDsoftwaredevelopment | Instagram: @bbdsoftware

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Powering ahead OPPORTUNITES FOR SOUTH AFRICAN WOMEN ABOUND IN THE RENEWABLE ENERGY SECTOR.

BY NICOLE FORREST

In a time when climate change and the environmental effects of our actions are (or should be) at the forefront of everyone’s minds, the global coal industry is fast losing investment support. As outgoing Eskom CEO Phakami Hadebe said at this year’s African Utility Week in May, “If you want to build a coal power station in South Africa, no one will give you the money.” This is not ideal for a country that is heavily reliant on coal – not only for power production, but also for employment. Meagre funding, a beleagured energy utility and uncertainty around supply are the perfect ingredients for creating an energy crisis.

One that, as we have heard time and again over the past two years,has the potential to plunge our economy into darkness. Compounding the effects this would have on a struggling economy, are the massive problems such a crisis would create for women in our society. In its 2017 report Energizing Equality: The Importance of Integrating Gender Equality Principles in National Energy Policies and Frameworks, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) found that women are disproportionately and adversely affected by a lack of access to power. Women who do not have access to electricity are usually primarily responsible for obtaining or collecting biomass fuel. This is a time-consuming and often dangerous task, resulting in time to poverty and threats to their health and well-being. A viable strategy for overcoming all of these issues according to this report? Renewable energy.

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POW E R IN G A HE A D

EDI TORI A L

“Access to affordable, efficient, improved and renewable energy technology”, says the IUCN, has the effect of increasing energy security, reducing greenhouse emissions and lessening the risks posed to women’s safety and security. It also has the added benefits of providing “new economic and educational opportunities for women” by reducing the amount of time spent collecting fuel and “giving them the opportunity to pursue an education or other economic activities”. THE WELL-LIT PATH TO SUCCESS Wind and solar power alone have immense potential. The technical theoretical potential for wind power – if wind farms were to be installed across South Africa – would be enough to satisfy the entire world’s electricity demand. Adding to this, the country has one of the highest levels of solar irradiation in the world. We receive 4.5 to 6.5 kWh/m2 per day – double the amount that falls on countries in Europe and the United Kingdom (UK) that are using solar power to meet their growing energy needs. With a debt of R450-billion and growing, and the impending decommissioning of its ageing coal power stations, Eskom is currently one of the biggest threats to the South African economy. Add to this the fact that the mega-plants intended to replace the old stations limp along in the construction phase, struggling to produce even half of their promised capacity, and you have the perfect recipe for an energy crisis; or for South Africa to let go of its obsession with coal and move towards clean energy sources. A recent study from the University of Cape Town’s (UCT’s) Energy Research Centre (ERC) found that a diverse mix of energy solutions is the best way to ensure cheaper, cleaner energy and a more reliable supply of electricity. The study also highlighted the need to take climate change into account when planning how the energy sector will progress – something that women are instrumental in ensuring.The idea that women will be the key drivers of change in terms of climate change in the energy sector was echoed by African delegates of the United Nations (UN) at the 2018 UN Climate Change Conference. While discussing the implementation of the Paris Agreement, they expressed the view that women and girls need to be empowered in order for the continent to better fight climate change.

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1 7 B I G G E S T M A R K E T O P P O R T U N I T I E S R E L AT E D T O E N E R G Y

1

Circular models – automotive

2

Expansion of renewables

3

Circular models – appliances

4

Circular models – electronics

5

Energy efficiency-non-energy intensive industries

6

Energy storage systems

7

Resource recovery

8

End-use steel efficiency

9

Energy efficiency-energy intensive industries

10

Carbon capture and storage

11

Energy access

12

Green chemicals

13

Addictive manufacturing

14

Local content in extractives

15

Shared infrastructure

16

Mine rehabilitation

17

Grid interconnection

And there’s evidence to back this up. Mafalda Duarte, head of the Climate Investment Fund, says research shows that when women are involved in the decision-making process, agreements on the environment and projects involving natural resources are more likely to succeed. Adding to this, a report by the Business and Sustainable Development Commission titled Better World, Better Leadership: Women Leading for the Global Goals, indicates that companies whose boards have greater gender balance are more inclined to prioritise environmental issues. They are also more likely to “invest in renewable power, low-carbon products and energy efficiency”. Further supporting this is a study conducted at the Western Sydney University, which found that women were eight times more likely to think that climate change would affect their lives than men. According to Dana Elhassan, Senior Gender Expert at the African Development Bank, this is a major reason women need to be empowered in terms of climate change. “You cannot solve a problem with half the team. A lot of the unpaid work that women do, such as collecting firewood and water, and caring for the family are massively affected by climate change. So we have to make sure that adaptation initiatives address their needs, vulnerabilities and potential,” she said. WINDS OF CHANGE ARE BLOWING Unfortunately, the boards of South African energy companies don’t reflect this sentiment. According to Sharron McPherson, co-founder of the Women in Infrastructure Development and Energy Consortium, “Women do not even constitute half the team on boards of companies operating in the energy sector. And certainly do not constitute even one third of senior management.” She adds that sexist and outdated ideas persist in this environment – despite evidence showing that having women in these positions is beneficial. But while the doors of traditional energy companies’ boardrooms might be shut to women, the winds of renewable energy are blowing others wide open. A growing industry that many male-dominated companies are hesitant to dive into provides the perfect opportunity for women to step in and initiate meaningful change. As Brenda Martin, CEO of the South African Wind Energy Association, recently pointed out, the “renewable energy sector is currently four times more employment-intensive than the country’s coal and nuclear sectors, as confirmed by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy”.

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POW E R IN G A HE A D

EDI TORI A L

“Phasing out coal by 2040 would enable South Africa to meet the commitment it made in the Paris Agreement without having a significant impact on the economy”

KEEPING THE LIGHTS ON The UCT Research Office listed the following key findings from the ERC’s study into alternatives for the South African electricity system: • R enewable energy plus flexible generation or storage provides the least-cost pathway for the electricity sector. • N o new coal or nuclear power plants should feature in South Africa’s electricity future. • S outh Africa should pursue a large-scale procurement programme for battery technology to increase storage capabilities. • P ower stations should be retrofitted to ensure compliance with the minimum emission standards (MES) by 2025, as this is the least costly option for the electricity sector. • T he Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries should consider suspending compliance requirements for the bestperforming stations, with Eskom agreeing to retire the worstperforming stations by 2030 in exchange.

Combine this with the fact that all 17 of the global market opportunities currently relevant to the energy sector are related to renewable or sustainable energy, President Ramaphosa’s ostensible commitment of US$11-billion to a “climate fund” as well as the latest Integrated Resource Plan’s increased emphasis on renewables, and it’s clear that women have an opportunity to corner this very lucrative market.

Sources University of Cape Town International Union for Conservation of Nature Infrastructure News Business and Sustainable Development Commission

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Biodiversity Biodiversity Life Life Biodiversity for Life forfor Biodiversity Biodiversityfor forLife Life South South African African National National Biodiversity Biodiversity Institute Institute South African National Biodiversity Institute Biodiversity forAfrican Life South South African National NationalBiodiversity BiodiversityInstitute Institute South African National Biodiversity Institute

Biodiversity for Life South African National Bi

CELEBRATING CELEBRATING SANBIWOMEN WOMEN CELEBRATING SANBISANBI WOMEN

CELEBRATING SANBI WOMENSANBI CELEBRATING CELEBRATING SANBIWOMEN WOMEN

MEET SANBI’S NATIONAL BOTANICAL GARDEN CURATORS

MEET MEET SANBI’S SANBI’S NATIONAL NATIONAL BOTANICAL BOTANICAL GARDEN GARDEN CURATORS CURATORS MEET MEET SANBI’S SANBI’S NATIONAL NATIONAL BOTANICAL BOTANICAL GARDEN GARDEN CURATORS CURATORS MEET SANBI’S NATIONAL BOTANICAL GARDEN CURATORS

BERENICE CAROLUS, Curator of the Harold Porter National Botanical Garden (NBG) in Betty’s Bay, Western Cape

NOMAMA MEI, Curator of the Kwelera National Botanical Garden (NBG) in East London, Eastern Cape

STHEMBILE ZONDI, Curator of the KZN National Botanical Garden (NBG) in Pietermaritzburg, KZN

CEL MEET SANBI’S

XOLELWA MOKOENA, Curator of the Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden (NBG) in Roodepoort/Mogale City, Gauteng

Xolelwa started her position as Berenice has had the pleasure Sthembile started her position Nomama started her position of being the Curator of Harold a Curator in July 2015. as Curator in January 2018. as the Curator in November Porter NBG, one of the 11 2018. “What I love about my National Botanical Gardens Xolelwa’s roles include general Her roles include directing job is that while I get to do managed by SANBI, since her garden management and and managing the business appointment in 2011. The horticultural management, I administration to ensure that operations, ensuring that the NOMAMA NOMAMA MEI, MEI, XOLELWA XOLELWA MOKOENA, MOKOENA, garden is situated within the also get to do field work which the Annual PerformanceZONDI, Plan general administration and BERENICE BERENICE CAROLUS, CAROLUS, STHEMBILE STHEMBILE ZONDI, BERENICE CAROLUS, Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve, Curator Curatorof ofthe theKwelera Kwelera Curator Curator ofof the the Walter Walter Sisulu Sisulu allows me to get in touch with (APP) isCurator implemented and management of the centre is Curator Curator ofto of the the Harold Harold Porter Porter Curator ofof the the KZN KZN National National Curator of the Harold Porter stretches from mountain achieved. She is also in charge National National Botanical Botanical Garden Garden done at the utmost best level National National Botanical Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) (NBG) nature and biodiversity at sea and formsNational part of theBotanical Cape National Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) (NBG) Botanical Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) (NBG) in in National Botanical Garden (NBG) of marketing and tourism to achieve SANBI’s goals and large.” (NBG) (NBG)ininEast EastLondon, London,Eastern Eastern inin Roodepoort/Mogale Roodepoort/Mogale City, City, Floristic Region. inin Betty’s Betty’s Bay, Bay, Western Western Cape Cape Pietermaritzburg, Pietermaritzburg, KZN KZN in Betty’s Bay, Western Cape activities, and manages a mandate. Her job requires that Cape Cape NOMAMA Gauteng Gauteng NOMAMA MEI, MEI, XOLELWA XOLELWA MOKOENA, MOKOENA, “I manage a very unique Her job allows her to propagate sustainable tourism network she ensures environmental NOMAMA MEI, XOLELWA MOKOENA, NOMAMA MEI, XOLELWA MOKOENA, BERENICE BERENICE CAROLUS, STHEMBILE STHEMBILE ZONDI, ZONDI, BERENICEGarden. CAROLUS, ZONDI, We concentrate on CAROLUS, BERENICE CAROLUS, promote the garden as STHEMBILE ZONDI, sustainability while plants and see them growing. Curator Curator of the ofcreating the Kwelera KweleratoSTHEMBILE Curator Curator of the of Walter the Walter Sisulu Sisulu Curator of the Kwelera Curator of the Walter Sisulu Curator of the Kwelera Xolelwa Xolelwa started started her her position position as as Curator of the Walter Sisulu Berenice Berenice has has had had the the pleasure pleasure Berenice has had the pleasure Sthembile Sthembile started started her her position position growing the different types of Curator Curator of the of Harold the Harold Porter Porter Curator Curator of the of KZN the KZN National National a biodiversity hub where marketing opportunities that Nomama Nomamastarted startedher herposition position Furthermore, her job promotes Curator offynbos the found Harold Porter Curator of the KZN Nationalof the KZN National Curator ofCurator the Harold Porter Curator in these areas. ” Curator National National Botanical Botanical Garden National Botanical Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) people can relax, learn about educate the public about Garden National Garden ofofbeing being the the of of Harold Harold of(NBG) being the Curator of Harold National Botanical Garden (NBG) ainaCurator Curator July2015. 2015.National asas Curator Curator inin January January 2018. National Botanical Garden National Botanical Garden (NBG) biodiversity awareness to Botanical National National Botanical Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) (NBG) Botanical Botanical Garden Garden (NBG) (NBG) in ininJuly asasthe theCurator Curator in in November November National Botanical Garden (NBG) Botanical Garden (NBG) in2018. National Botanical Garden (NBG) Botanical Garden (NBG) in environmental conservation SANBI and the conservation (NBG) (NBG) in East in East London, London, Eastern Eastern in Roodepoort/Mogale in Roodepoort/Mogale City, City, Berenice’s job highlights: Porter Porter NBG, NBG, one one of of the the 11 11 Porter NBG, one of the 11 surrounding communities (NBG) London, Eastern in Roodepoort/Mogale City, (NBG) inabout East Eastern in Roodepoort/Mogale City, in in Betty’s Bay, Western Western Cape Cape in East Pietermaritzburg, Pietermaritzburg, KZN and become active citizens.KZN and sustainable use of London, South 2018. “What “What I love I love about my my in Betty’s Berenice’s Bay, Western Cape Pietermaritzburg, in Betty’s Betty’s Bay,Bay, Western Pietermaritzburg, KZNKZN through Cape platforms like radio2018. Cape Cape Gauteng Gauteng National National Botanical Botanical Gardens Gardens National Botanical Gardens career developed Xolelwa’s Xolelwa’s roles rolesinclude include general general Her Herroles rolesinclude include directing directing Africa’s biodiversity. Cape Gauteng Cape Gauteng and career exhibitions, from junior, senior, and then job jobisisthat thatwhile whileI get I gettotododo Xolelwa’s job highlights: managed managedbybySANBI, SANBI,since sinceher her managed by SANBI, since her garden gardenmanagement managementand and and andmanaging managing the thebusiness business Chief Horticulturist. She was educating the public about Sthembile’s job appointment appointment 2011. 2011. The The appointment in 2011. The horticultural horticultural management, management, I I one of the junior managers inin plant conservation and looking administration administrationtotoensure ensurethat that operations, operations, ensuring ensuringthat thatthe the Managing the construction highlights: within SANBI to do ais Junior garden garden issituated situatedwithin within the the garden is situated within the after our environment. and launch of the Sisulu Circle. also alsoget gettotododofield fieldwork workwhich which the theAnnual AnnualPerformance PerformancePlan Plan general generaladministration administrationand and Management Development Expanding garden offerings “My role at SANBI, means Kogelberg Kogelberg Biosphere BiosphereReserve, Reserve, Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve, Programme in 2008 before allows allowsme me totoget get inintouch touchwith with (APP) (APP)isisimplemented implementedand and management management ofofthe thecentre centreisis Nomama’s job highlights: and products that enhance growth, self-development, she embarked on a brand new stretches stretchesfrom frommountain mountaintoto stretches from mountain to the visitor experience. 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2019/12/19 4:19 PM


SA NBI

A DV ERTORI A L

CURATING SA’S BIODIVERSITY HISTORY OF SANBI

NBI

The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) was established on 1 September 2004 through the signing of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004 by President Thabo Mbeki.

The National Botanical Institute was an autonomous, statutory organisation formed by the amalgamation of the National Botanic Gardens and the Botanical Research Institute in 1989. Both these organisations were founded early in the 20th century to conserve and study the exceptionally rich southern African flora, and both were world-renowned for their endeavours in this field. This rich legacy passed on to the NBI. With its head office at Kirstenbosch in Cape Town, the institute had gardens and research centres throughout South Africa. It ran environmental education programmes and maintained databases and libraries specialising in information on the plant life of southern Africa.

The Act expanded the mandate of SANBI’s forerunner, the National Botanical Institute (NBI) to include responsibilities relating to the full diversity of South Africa’s fauna and flora, and built on the internationally respected programmes in conservation, research, education and visitor services developed over the past century by the NBI.

WHAT SANBI DOES The South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) leads and coordinates research, and monitors and reports on the state of biodiversity in South Africa. The institute provides knowledge and information, gives planning and policy advice and pilots best-practice management models in partnership with stakeholders. SANBI engages in ecosystem restoration and rehabilitation, leads the human capital development strategy of the sector and manages the National Botanical and Zoological Gardens as ‘windows’ to South Africa’s biodiversity for enjoyment and education.

SA’S VAST BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY South Africa is one of the most biologically diverse countries in the world, after Indonesia and Brazil. Our country is

surrounded by two oceans, occupies only about 2% of the world’s land area, but is home to nearly: 10% of the world’s plants; 7% of the reptiles, birds and mammals; and 15% of known coastal marine species. Our country is comprised of nine biomes (unique vegetation landscapes), three of which have been declared global biodiversity hotspots.

THE IMPORTANCE OF SA’S BIODIVERSITY Biodiversity richness is one of South Africa’s greatest assets. Biodiversity in terms of landscapes, ecosystems and species – the web of natural life – provides goods and services vital for human well-being and the survival of the planet. Goods and services such as water purification, grazing, eco-tourism, fisheries, sources of medicine, energy, food, healthy soils, pollination, carbon sinks, clean air and production of oxygen, etc. Unfortunately our biodiversity, as is the case in the rest of the globe, is under threat. Some of these threats include ecosystem destruction and accompanying species extinction through human activity, climate change and invasive alien species.

SANBI’S ROLE IN BIODIVERSITY EDUCATION Knowledge of biodiversity leads to better understanding, to better management, and thus to better conservation and protection of our biological resources. SANBI is a dedicated national biodiversity institution that bridges science, knowledge, policy and implementation – a unique entity considered to be global best practice.

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: 2 Cussonia Ave, Brummeria, Pretoria Postal Address: Private Bag X101, Silverton, 0184 Telephone: +27 (0)12 843 5000 | Fax: +27 (0)12 804 3211 Website: www.sanbi.org

Biodiversity for Life South African National Biodiversity Institute

CELEBRATING SANBI WOMEN

MEET SANBI’S NATIONAL BOTANICAL GARDEN C S TA N D A R D B A N K TOP WOM EN L EAD ER S 85

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M S IN S I H O L DING S

A DV ERTORI A L

WAT E R WI SE Msinsi Holdings (SOC) Ltd, trading as Msinsi Resorts and Game Reserves, was established in 1992. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of the South African state-owned entity, Umgeni Water, and is tasked with managing the water resources around the dams owned or managed by the entity. A water resource − as defined by the SA National Water

Act (No.36 of 1998) − includes dams, as well as their surrounding areas, surface water, wetlands and rivers. Msinsi’s water-resource management assists its parent company Umgeni Water in delivering on its mandate to provide innovative, sustainable, effective and affordable water, sanitation and related

services. These, in turn, must meet the South African National Development objectives as part of the Department of Water and Environmental Affairs National Water Resource Strategy.

“MANAGING WATER FOR AN EQUITABLE AND SUSTAINABLE FUTURE” Msinsi joins Umgeni Water in striving to fulfil the ultimate vision of the strategy: “Managing water for an equitable and sustainable future”. Msinsi’s strategic objectives and operations are derived from the National Water Act which states that the person who owns, controls, occupies or uses a water resource is responsible for: Protecting the aquatic and associated ecosystems and their biological diversity; Reducing and preventing pollution and degradation of the water resources; Allowing and controlling access to the dams for recreational purposes, and making reasonable charges for the entry and use of the water surface.

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: Msinsi Nature Reserve, Rick Turner Rd, Durban, 4001 Postal Address: Rick Turner Rd, Durban, 4001 Telephone: 078 103 5196 | Email: info@msinsi.co.za | Website: www.msinsi.co.za Twitter: @MsinsiResorts | Facebook: @msinsiresorts.co.za | Instagram: @msinsiresorts

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BY ELSKE JOUBERT

AS AWARENESS OF THE IMPLICATIONS OF OUR ACTIONS ON THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT − AND THE ROLE IT PLAYS IN OUR DAILY LIVES − INCREASES, THE ENVIRONMENTAL SECTOR IS RECEIVING ALL THE MORE ATTENTION IN SOUTH AFRICA.

This is the view of Karen King, Senior Associate, WSP, Environment and Energy, Africa. “I must note that there are still large parts of the country where this is not apparent, thus ongoing environmental education is essential.” According to Songo Didiza, Founding Director of Green Building Design Group (GreenBDG), the increase of global crises, such as rising humaninduced ocean pollution and our very own water and energy supply challenges, has resulted in societies becoming more aware of the need to change consumer decisions. “Educated consumers are now placing pressure on producers to change their badly designed products to more environmentally friendly ones. Examples of these are the zero-plastic movement and the push towards cleaner fuels in cars, homes and businesses. In short, thethe green economy is finally becoming an answer to many of the societal challenges we are currently facing thanks to technology platforms such as social media and internet access.”

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G RE E N M E ANS G O

THE (UN)NATURAL ORDER OF THINGS According to King, the presence of women in the environment sector compared to that of men depends largely on the sub-sector. “As an example, women are under-represented within hydrology, which is also one of the sectors with the largest job vacancy rate, but not within environmental management. Also, women are certainly better respresented within the environmental sector generally than within engineering, for example.” The hydrology expert also notes that to change the representation of women in the sector, we need to make girls and young women aware of the variety of options availabe to them. “This can be aided and driven through programmes like open days at schools and universities. The sciences also need to be given more emphasis at the grass-roots school level, especially for female students who are still less likely to study science than their male counterparts.” Didiza agrees with this assessment: “By empowering the girl child through education, I believe we can go far. Government can play a role in education and policy design, and industry can provide access to markets. There is a need for greater female presence in this sector. However, we need to raise strong young men too to ensure a balanced society.”

GO GREEN OR GO HOME “Early on in my journey, I recognised that there was an information gap between the public and private sectors’ green economic strategies and policies. There was little alignment between what government was saying and what industry was trying to do,” Didiza says. To fill this gap, she founded Green Building Design Group, as well as the Green Cafés – a platform that promotes inclusive economic growth within the green economy by sharing information. “As an organisation, we have successfully launched these Green Cafés throughout the major cities in South Africa.”

EDI TORI A L

KING’S TOP 5 TIPS FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE LIFE AND BUSINESS 1. This will be wildly unpopular, but stop eating beef. Beef requires about 28 times more land and 11 times more water to produce than chicken or pork, while emitting five times more climate-changing emissions. 2. Change your buying habits as far as possible. One of our real superpowers as consumers is our buying power. If there’s a market for food made with palm oil flown in from across the world in six layers of unrecyclable plastic and served in polystyrene, these practices will regrettably continue. 3. Use water as sustainably as possible. Water is limited, but under-priced and consequently under-valued. 4. Recycle. Our attitude towards waste needs to change so that we recognise that most products remain a potential resource post-use. 5. Further personal sustainability. Grow your own vegetables, compost, collect rainwater and use grey water for irrigation. Make use of landscaping and indigenous flora instead of hardscaping.

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DIDIZA’S TOP 5 TIPS TO FOR A MORE SUSTAINABLE LIFE AND BUSINESS

In 2017, Didiza was included in Mail & Guardian’s Top 200 Young South Africans publication in the environment category. “This year, we received news that we will be receiving an international Energy Innovator of the Year award for the Green Cafés for the entire subSaharan African category. The award ceremony took place in Washington DC, in September. We are quite thrilled with this.” King’s expertise, on the other hand, lies with hydrology. Innovations,

therefore, tend to centre on reduced 1. D efine what sustainability means to you and your business. Once this is clear to you, share this vision with your suppliers and customers. 2. K now the environment laws that impact your industry and operations. New legislation, such as carbon tax, not only impact the large businesses in South Africa, but also everyday consumers through the fuel price. 3. K now your own carbon footprint; share this with your clients/social network. There are apps that can help you with this. Some of these are free. 4. Reduce before you produce. It saves time and money.

use of water. This has received a fair amount of attention within the mining

sector in particular. Many of the large

mining houses are actively looking for ways to use less water to save costs.

King notes that they are also applying more sustainability-oriented solutions to key mining processes.

“Within all the mining hydrology studies my team and I work on,

optimising the site’s water balance is key. All opportunities for reuse of water are explored, including

separating water into not just clean

and dirty areas, but also intermediate areas in order to reuse as much water as possible.

“There is also a well-received move towards increased attenuation of

water on commercial and residential

sites, for both reuse purposes and to 5. S ource from local suppliers where possible. It not only reduces your carbon footprint, but also stimulates local businesses.

release this water into the surrounding environment in as least harmful

a manner as possible. My team’s

numerical modelling capabilities are always improving, enabling ways in which to combine data sources in innovative and useful ways.”

WHAT’S TRENDING Commenting on some trends to look out for in the next three to five years, King notes that innovative ideas will continue to surface in the green buildings space and will focus on water use, power efficiency, use of natural light and ventilation. She adds that as technology advances, numerical modelling will become more detailed, efficient and accurate. As a result, it will be able to account for data at a wider range of scales and work on different platforms. This, in turn, will enable more multidisciplinary approaches and drawing a better picture of how changes in the environment – including built projects – affect a range of environmental changes. Most excitingly from a research perspective, King predicts that unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and drones will change the way in which we undertake studies and collect data. Imagery will improve, and more cost-effective, accurate data will be available, she says. Echoing King’s sentiments around green buildings and cities, Didiza says there will be big talk around Industry 4.0 and how the entire world will be data-driven. She believes that human interactions will shape these developments, particularly the youth population. Didiza highlights that we are already seeing these needs being addressed through innovation. Think, for example, of internetbased education tools, e-hailing transportation applications, drone-

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G RE E N M E ANS G O

EDI TORI A L

“The green economy is finally becoming an answer to many of the societal challenges� based health technology and sharedliving urban spaces. According to Didiza, these new trends could be advanced further with technology and the smarter

educated youth population that is increasingly becoming environmentally conscious. This will increase the pressure on governments to keep

pace with the rising needs of citizens; education, healthcare, transportation, housing and most importantly, jobs, will be in focus.

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REMA R KA B L E A N D O U T S TA N DI N G Interview with MUNYADZIWA RIKHOTSO, FOUNDER AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, NSOVO ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING The heights by great men Reached and kept Were not attained by sudden flight But they, while their companion slept Were toiling upward in the night - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Please outline the company’s gender policies As a black woman-owned and managed company, the implementation of policies, procedures, and strategies towards gender empowerment comes instinctively, effortlessly, and it has thus become a norm. From infancy, Nsovo has strived to empower young qualified black women in the field of environmental sciences, and our very first staff intake comprised of two

MUNYADZIWA RIKHOTSO Founder and Executive Director.

women who today hold prominent positions in the industry. Nsovo empowers women by placing them at the forefront, and this is evident in the organisational structure where 100% of top management are women.

construction sites in Southern Africa – The Eskom Kusile Power Station. We managed to prove our ability and excellence, and we are currently serving our second term on the same project.

As a business, we seek to continually create an environment where both men and women enjoy the same opportunities, benefits, rewards, and resources regardless of gender, age, or orientation. Our policy is to hire, retain, and recognise the bestqualified and most dedicated professionals, and afford them opportunities for personal growth, professional development, and advancement.

We managed to build a reputable business with

We continue to build an organisation that

seeks to ensure maximum value for our clients, advocating for environmental sustainability and building meaningful relationships and partnerships with our clients. What have been your major achievements? The restructuring of the South African economy, support for emerging entrepreneurs as well as preferential procurement has set the impetus for the creation, growth, and emergence of a vibrant mix of various businesses across all industries. It is upon this background that Nsovo Environmental Consulting was founded to become a major player in this exciting time of our country’s history. The company’s ability to emerge and thrive in an industry that is racially imbalanced and to have claimed a share of the market in spite of the challenges is a great achievement. We can affirm that, amongst the many responsibilities that we have, one that we continue to accomplish is to convince the world that we are equally capable and competent. It is this spirit of endurance and sustained excellence that earned us our flagship project back in 2012. Nsovo was appointed to provide environmental control officer services over three years for one of the biggest

a national footprint and over 150 completed projects over the years. The growth of the company has also played a considerable role in addressing unemployment. We have inspired many black African women to find their niche and embark on their unique business ventures while we support them and build capacity where we can. We consider this a remarkable achievement. What are Nsovo’s social responsibility initiatives? We fully recognise that we have a role to play within the community - to impact, empower, influence and uplift the lives of those outside our workspace. Over the years, Nsovo has contributed to the community in the following ways: •Annual bursary for underprivileged university students. •Platinum sponsor of Vutivi I Ndzhaka (www.vutivi.org), an NGO based in Tzaneen that is focused on the mentorship of school pupils in the Mafarana circuit. •Financial support to upcoming companies owned by previously disadvantages individuals. We have seen a number of these businesses grow to become self-sufficient with multimillion-rand turnovers. •Support of The Samson and Mavis Makhado Foundation which continues the legacy that Dr. Samson Makhado built for over 45 years in the field of Christian education in Africa and the general community development in rural communities of Limpopo. •Donation of approximately 100 pairs of school shoes to pupils in different parts of South Africa and beyond.

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N S OVO E N V IR O N M E N TA L C O NSULT ING

About Nsovo Environmental Consulting Nsovo Environmental Consulting was registered in 2007 and has been in operation for 12 years. We are an independent environmental consulting firm that offers a broad range of environmental services to clients throughout South Africa and beyond, and provide advice and solutions to clients by focusing on their requirements, developing close working relationships and understanding their projects and businesses in today’s global environment. Our key role in the South African economy is to be advocates and ambassadors of sustainability and the green economy. Ownership Nsovo is 100% black women-owned and managed by Munyadziwa Rikhotso, a 37-year-old from rural Limpopo. Growth From humble beginnings, the company has grown into an integral part of the South African environmental consulting space and has claimed its fair share in the sustainability market.It has witnessed exponential growth in staff complement, assignments and turnover and today is recognised as a principal role player in the sustainability landscape of South Africa and remains one of the fastest growing and preferred consulting firms. Vision To be the preferred environmental consultancy that provides a vehicle to move from the world we live to the world we seek. Mission To provide environmental management services that offer innovative solutions, the highest calibre of services, the best quality products, efficiency, proficient technical expertise, and maximum value for our clients’ investment.

Which female leaders inspire you the most, and why? Indra Nooyi, the former CEO of PepsiCo from whom I have adopted the 5-C leadership approach, competency, courage, confidence, communication skills, and compass. I admire her leadership style, energy, work ethic, and, most importantly, her humble nature, which is also one of my mother’s characteristics. From these two souls I have learned the art of contentment and gratefulness and the art of remaining humble. They have brought me to the full realisation that you are blessed to be a blessing, and being a blessing is not merely giving material things but giving yourself for the benefit of others. Five tips on surviving and thriving in business Be the purple cow As a result of our stringent legislation the sustainability space has seen tremendous growth in the last few years. We have seen companies mushrooming and demanding their share in a price-driven market. Nonetheless, we chose not to compete on price, but continuously reaffirm clients of our highest calibre of service and product.

I NT ERV I EW

all that we do, and this alone is a powerful, inexpensive marketing tool as we get repeat clients all the time. Our work before reward policy It is a known fact that one of the key reasons for being in business is to make money, however, unlike many other companies, our focus is to deliver to the client the best quality product and ensure maximum value for their investment. We have a policy that says “work before the reward”, all our clients will bear testimony to that. We are fully aware that the difference between a good and bad business is the relationship with money. We, therefore, are steadfast and refuse to be money-driven. Passion and focus Both these drivers have allowed us to do business with ease. We have mastered our trade and continue to excel in what we do. We firmly believe and bear testimony to the ideology that says when you pursue the top virtue of excellence, it brings you to a new level of success. As a result, we are gradually becoming a category of one, which has earned us preferred supplier status and allowed us to retain our clients.

Our daily mojo is to be the purple cow; we seek to be remarkable and outstanding. Amongst other things this is what drives our business and separates us from the rest. Our organisational culture Who we are, what we are, and how we complete our tasks is our tie-breaker and our first point of difference. We continually nurture and nourish our culture, as it is the only aspect that drives our reason for being and forms the foundation of our success.

CONTACT DETAILS: Gauteng: 40 Lyncon Rd, Carlswald, Midrand Thohoyandou: 931 Block, Thohoyandou, 0950 Polokwane: 107 Eurasia Court Office Complex,

Our faith This strengthens our core values as a business and it allows us to build solid, meaningful, long-lasting relationships with our clients. Our values drive us to excel in

91 Hans Van Rensburg Street, Polokwane, 0699 Tel: 011 041 3689 Cell: 071 602 2369 Email: admin@nsovo.co.za Website: www.nsovo.co.za

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Going places BY ELSKE JOUBERT

It’s an exciting time for tourism in South Africa and with a woman at the helm of the country’s tourism industry, greater opportunities are available for other women to pursue leadership roles in this sector.

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G O IN G P LACE S

THE STATUS QUO OF WOMEN IN TOURISM

EDI TORI A L

progress has been made, more work must be done to eliminate gender stereotypes and norms that hinder women’s full participation in tourism.”

UN Women, in collaboration with United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and Amadeus, recently released a report which indicated that across the private and public sectors, women are harnessing the potential of tourism to become financially independent – challenging stereotypes and starting their own businesses.

The tourism sector in South Africa is booming, says Dr Nomvuselelo Songelwa, CEO of Jurni. “Increasingly, tourists worldwide are looking for undiscovered, unique and authentic tourism experiences. South Africa, as a destination, offers the perfect answer to this growing trend as the country has numerous ‘undiscovered’ experiences for travellers.”

The report also shows that the majority of the tourism workforce worldwide is female; the sector thus offers greater opportunities for women entrepreneurship than the wider economy, and tourism policies are increasingly addressing gender equality.

Unfortunately, however, it is currently still challenging for overseas tour operators and travellers to find our country’s “hidden gems”. “It is time for us to highlight our unique experiences – experiences beyond the major tourist attractions. We need to make it easier for the traveller, the tour operator and the travel agent to find what our country has to offer.”

In Morocco, for example, women can now become licensed tour guides – a first for the country. The Hotel Owners’ Association in Uganda is led by Jean Byamugisha – its first female CEO. In the United Kingdom, an airline doubled its number of women pilots. It is thus evident that society is making strides when it comes to the promotion of women in this sphere. Policymakers in the public arena are also cognisant of the importance of promoting gender equality in tourism and measures are being put in place to ensure the female workforce too can reap the benefits of tourism. Commenting on these achievements, Zurab Pololikashvili, UNWTO Secretary General, says, “Tourism is leading the charge for female empowerment all over the world.” Adding to this, he notes: “UNWTO is firmly committed to working towards UN Sustainable Development Goal 5 – the empowerment of women and girls – and ensuring that tourism continues to be at the forefront of gender equality efforts.” Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, UN Women Executive Director, echoes Pololikashvili when she says, “Gender equality in tourism must become the norm and not the exception. While the initial research results show that

To meet this need, the Department of Tourism launched Jurni – an innovative public–private venture that aims to revolutionise and transform South Africa’s travel and tourism industry. “As the first tourism data hub of its kind in South Africa, Jurni will equip businesses with valuable insights and accurate forecasts. We will also develop a booking tool and visitor portal that will showcase more tourism products to travellers,” Songelwa says.

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stereotypes and start their own businesses” HOW WOMEN ARE INNOVATING Commenting on how she has seen women innovating in the tourism space, Songelwa says that innovation comes in many different forms and shapes. “There are numerous women (and men) who have innovated our tourism landscape through technology or innovative ideas on a very high level. However, almost more exciting to see is the women entrepreneurs in rural areas who are innovating in their region by using technology to market their small tourism establishments and putting these on the international map.” This, she notes, is the kind of innovation that leads to true transformation – not only for the tourism sector, but for our country as a whole.

WHAT’S TRENDING Noting some trends to look out for in the next three to five years within the sector, Songelwa first relays the importance of authentic and unique experiences. “Market research performed by McCrindle on behalf of Contiki Australasia, a travel company targeting youth travellers, reveals that 79% of Gen Z first travelled overseas before the age of 15. This generation is better travelled than ever

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before. As such, they crave authentic experiences in unique destinations, as they want to feel that they are the first among their peers to discover new experiences.” Secondly, she says, technology will offer a one-stop-shop for travel. “Young people have grown up in a connected and instantaneous environment. They are turning to technological solutions to offer them a one-stop-shop for their travels. They want to be able to read reviews, be inspired and book everything on the same platform.” Lastly, data will help tourism SMMEs grow and find their space on the tourism map. “There are a great number of quaint South African villages that have tremendous tourism potential, but seldom make it onto a first-time international visitor’s itinerary.” One of the main reasons for the lack of exposure of these different products and places, she notes, is that South Africa doesn’t have the right data mechanisms in place to equip tourism businesses with the information they need to develop their business strategies and reach new markets. “As more reliable statistics and data become available in South Africa, through initiatives like Jurni, we’ll see more destinations and tourism products come to the fore as they will be able to design strategies to better market their products and offering to the world and increase their market share,” she concludes.

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SO M E O F SA’S H I DDEN GE M S

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SOME OF SA’S HIDDEN GEMS 1. LEKKERWATER is a seven room eco-lodge that has recently opened in the De Hoop Nature Reserve. Part of the Natural Selection portfolio, the lodge invites guests to enjoy an authentic beach and fynbos bush experience within a barefoot luxury setting. Perched on an enviable cliff location overlooking miles of beach, the secluded suites each have their own uninterrupted view over the dramatic sea-side location for whale and dolphin watching right from your bed. Guests are invited to unwind and delight in the experience with sundowners on the beach adding to the experience. “Arrive as fellow travellers, leave as friends” is the ethos of the lodge.

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2. KRUGER SHALATI is a showcase of African design set to make a great impact in the global luxury market. The word ‘unique’ is often bandied about to describe experiences that may not necessarily be so, particularly when it comes to the design of luxury accommodation. Add to that the offer of a ‘unique African experience’, and questioning eyebrows may indeed rise. Those three words, however, really do represent the Kruger Shalati Train on a Bridge luxury accommodation experience in the national park of the same name. It’s a concept that merges the venue’s historic past with contemporary African design to create an once-in-a-lifetime bucket-list experience.

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4.PORT EDWARD’S RED DESERT is the world’s smallest desert. It lies some 10km west of the town and is only 200m in diameter and 11 hectares in its entirety. Best described as a miniature version of the Arizona Desert, the man-high hills and valleys of naked red soil are a stark contrast to the surrounding lush and tropical vegetation. Archeological artefacts going back millions of years can be found and the locals are pleased this is now an internationally protected heritage site. 5. FAIRLAWNS BOUTIQUE HOTEL & SPA situated in Johannesburg offers the upmarket guest a delicate mix of luxury and convenience, whether the visit is for leisure or business. The stylish hotel, which has an air of eclectic sophistication, is considered a ‘home away from home’, where exceptional service and heartfelt hospitality can be soaked up like the African sun.

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PH OTO C R E DI T: K A R E N VA N R OOY E N – W I LD E HO N DE K LO O F I M AGE

3. WILDEHONDEKLOOF PRIVATE GAME RESERVE is a 4 000-hectare farm with a luxury game lodge, situated 50km from sister lodge De Zeekoe Guest Farm and 40km from Oudtshoorn, the ostrich capital of the world. The reserve offers nine luxurious bedrooms, all en-suite and air-conditioned, with stunning views of the mountain and river. Activities include guided game drives (see all types of buck species including wildebeest, nyala, eland, kudu and more).

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Reimagining the future Reimagining future Reimagining thethe future

“I also have a particular interest in how She was honoured by the South African business is led and organises itself Professional Services Awards as the within the context of what feels like ‘Big 4 Professional of the Year’, as “I also have a particular interest in how She was honoured by the South African “Icontinual also have achange,” particular she interest in how She was honoured by the named South African says. well as being the overall business is led organises Professional Services Awards as the business is led and and organises itself itself Professional Services Awards as the ‘Woman Professional of the Year’ in within the context of what feels like ‘Big 4 Professional ‘Big 4 Professional of the Year’, as within the context of what feels like of the Year’, as “Being appointed to the PwC Southern February 2018. She is also a nominee for continual change,” she says. wellnamed as being named the overall continual change,” she says. wellwas as being the “IAfrica also have a particular in how honoured theoverall South Women African of the Year’ CEO role is ainterest privilege, and I’m She the 2018 by ‘Business ‘Woman Professional of the Year’ in ‘Woman Professional of the Year’ in business is led organises itself Services Awards as the proudappointed of ourand partners’ confidence in Professional BWA award. The winner is to “Being to the Southern February 2018. She is also aShe nominee fordue “Being toPwC the February 2018. is also a nominee for within the appointed context of what feelsPwC like Southern ‘Big 4 Professional of the Year’, as me. CEO Our local part of the 2018 ‘Business be announced before the end of the Africa role is practice a privilege,forms and I’m Women of the Year’ continual change,” named the overall Women of the Year’ Africa CEO roleshe is asays. privilege, and I’m well as being the 2018 ‘Business proud of our partners’ confidence BWA award. The winner is due to in our wider Africa region, and in I work very calendar year. ‘Woman Professional of The the Year’ proud of our partners’ confidence in BWA award. winner due to me. Ourappointed local ofShango be of the is closely withpractice Africa CEO Dion to announced “Being to theforms PwCpart Southern February 2018.before She is the alsoend a nominee me. OurAfrica localregion, practice forms part of calendar be announced before thefor end of the our wider and I work very year. implement strategy.” “At PwC,Women our livelihood is dependent Africa CEO roleour is aAfrica privilege, and I’m the 2018 ‘Business of the Year’ closely Dion Shango to very our wider AfricaCEO region, and in I work calendar year.is due to proud ofwith ourAfrica partners’ confidence BWA award. Theawinner upon diverse set of talented people; implement our Africa PwC, our livelihood is dependent closely with Africastrategy.” CEO part DionofShango “At to announced me. be before with the end of the ideas are more “AsOur thelocal firstpractice femaleforms CEO of PwC six people different upon a diverse set of talented people; implement our Africa strategy.” our wider Africa region, and I work very calendar “At year.PwC, our livelihood is dependent Southern Africa, I believe to usideas thanare sixty people who “As the first female CEO of PwCthat I have six peoplevaluable with different more closely with Africa CEO Dion Shango to upon a diverse set of talented people; Southern Africa, I believe that I to have to us than the sixtysame. people who perspective is a personal responsibility grow our valuable all think This implement our Africa strategy.” “At PwC, our livelihood is dependent the first female CEO of our PwC sixsame. people with different are more a “As personal to grow all think the This perspective is ideas firm and responsibility ensure its diversity. This crucial, is behind our firm’s drive – a diverse set and of talented Southern Africa, I believe that I have upon valuable toour us firm’s thanpeople; sixty–people who firm and ensure its diversity. This crucial, and is behind drive “As the first female CEO of PwCforms, fromsix peopleglobally with different ideas are responsibility takes many and locally – more to ensure that our responsibility takes many that forms, from locally – tosame. ensure that a personal responsibility grow our globally allusthink the This perspective is Southern Africa, I believe I to have valuableand to thanhave sixty people whoour supporting the development of skills in people the opportunity to build a supporting the development of skills in people have the opportunity to build a firm’s and responsibility ensure its diversity. This crucial, and is behind our drive – a firm personal to grow our all think the same. This perspective is our youth, to our recruitment practicesrewardingrewarding career. Andthe we provide the our youth, to our recruitment practices career. And we provide responsibility many globally and – to ensure that our firm and ensure itstakes diversity. Thisforms, fromcrucial, and is behind ourlocally firm’s drive – and internal policies and procedures.”tools tools andto flexibility to make this a reality.” and internal policies and procedures.” andand flexibility make thisthat a reality.” responsibility many forms, from globally locallyhave – to ensure our supportingtakes the development of skills in people the opportunity to build a supporting thetodevelopment of skillspractices in people have the opportunity toAnd buildwe a provide the our youth, our recruitment rewarding career. Shirley has been a partner in PwC’s These include mentoring schemes, Shirley been a partner in PwC’s rewardingThese mentoring our youth,has to our recruitment practices career.include And we provide the schemes, and internal policies and tools and flexibility make this a reality.” Assurance services division forprocedures.” over programmes, flexibletoworking and internal policies and division procedures.” tools andnetworking flexibility to make this a reality.” Assurance services for over networking programmes, flexible working 15 years. She is a Chartered Accountant models and innovative developments 15 and years. She isDirector a Chartered Accountant models and innovative developments (CA) Chartered Southern such as reverse mentoring, bias Shirley been a partner in PwC’s These include These includeschemes, mentoring schemes, Shirley hashas been a partner in PwC’s mentoring (CA) (CD and Chartered Southern such as reverse mentoring, bias Africa (SA)), anddivision has Director overfor over training and coaching Assurance services networking programmes, flexible working Assurance services division for over awareness networking programmes, flexible working Africa (CD (SA)), and has over awareness training and coaching 26 years of internal and external audit, including executive coaching. 1515 years. SheShe is a is Chartered Accountant models and innovative years. a Chartered Accountant models anddevelopments innovative developments risk management, compliance and 26 and years of internal andSouthern external audit,such as reverse including executive coaching. (CA) Chartered Director mentoring, bias (CA) and Chartered Director Southern“My visionsuch reverse mentoring, bias governance experience within to as build the undisputed risk management, compliance and awareness istraining Africa (CD (SA)), and has over the private and coaching Africa (CD (SA)),across and has over awareness training and coaching and public all industries. number one professional services firm 26governance years of sectors internal and external audit,the private including “My executive coaching. experience within vision is to build the undisputed She also served as a member of the in the country in terms of quality clients 26 years of internal and external audit, including executive coaching. risk management, compliance and and public sectors across all as industries. number one professional firm PwC Governance Boardthe and I can achieve this,services I riskAfrica management, and and quality governance experiencecompliance private vision ispeople. to buildIf the undisputed She also served as within aSouth member of the “My in the country in terms of quality clients Chairperson of the PwC Africa will have succeeded in creating a legacy and public sectors across all industries. number one services firm undisputed governance experience within the private “Myprofessional vision is to build the Governing Board from OctoberBoard toand asof having and nurtured and people. developed aI can achieve this, I PwC Africa Governance quality She also served as a member of2012 theindustries. in the country in terms of quality Ifclients and public sectors across all number one professional services firm June 2018. Governance of will young, up Ifsucceeded and coming leaders Chairperson of the PwC South Africa cohort have inthis, creating a legacy PwC and asof quality I can I SheAfrica also served as aBoard member the and in people. the country inachieve terms of quality clients for the future – both male and female,” GoverningofBoard from October of having nurtured developed a Chairperson the PwC South Africa 2012 to will have succeeded in creating and a legacy PwC Africa Governance and quality people. If I can achieve this, I Machaba has received severalBoard and asshe concludes. Governing Board from October 2012 to of having cohort nurturedofand developed a coming leaders June 2018. young, up and accolades. Among are: InSouth 2013 Africa Chairperson of them the PwC have succeeded in creating a legacy June 2018. cohort of will young, up and coming leaders for the future – both male and female,” she was a finalist in the ‘Africa’s www.pwc.co.za Governing Board from October 2012 to of having nurtured and developed a for the future – both male and female,” Machaba has received several Most Influential Women in Business she concludes. Machaba has received several June 2018. cohort of young, up and coming leaders she concludes. and Government’ awards. SheInare: was accolades. Among accolades. Among themthem are: 2013In 2013 for the future – both male and female,” honoured Women she was a African finalist in‘Africa’s the Chartered ‘Africa’s she was a by finalist in the www.pwc.co.za www.pwc.co.za Machaba has received several Accountants as ‘Audit Partner of the she concludes. Most Influential Women in Business © 2019 PwC. All rights reserved Most Influential Women in Business Year’ in 2016. Among accolades. them In 2013 and Government’ awards. She are: was refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each and Government’ awards. She was PwC of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for she was a finalist in the ‘Africa’s honoured by African Women Chartered further details. (19-24654) www.pwc.co.za honoured by African Women Chartered Most Influential Women Accountants as ‘Audit Partnerin of Business the Accountants as ‘Audit Partner of the © 2019 PwC. All rights reserved Year’ 2016. andinGovernment’ awards. She was PwC refers to the ©PwC2019 PwC.and/or All rights network one orreserved more of its member firms, each Year’ in 2016. of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for honoured by African Women Chartered PwC refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each further details. (19-24654) of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for Accountants as ‘Audit Partner of the further details. (19-24654) 2019/11/01 09:47 © 2019 PwC. All rights reserved Year’ in 2016.

Reimagining the future

On 1 2019, OnJuly 1 July 2019, Shirley Machababecame became Shirley Machaba On 1 July 2019, female CEOof of the the first female On 1first July 2019,CEO PwC Southern Africa. Shirley Machaba became Shirley Machaba became PwC Southern Africa. In this role, diversity and the first female CEO the role, first female CEOof of In this diversity and inclusion are very close PwC SouthernAfrica. Africa. PwC Southern inclusion are very close to her heart, and sheand has In this role, diversity In this role, diversity and to her heart, and she has voiced her commitment inclusion are very close inclusion are very close to the numbers voiced her commitment to growing her heart, and she has to heart, and she has of female professionals to her growing the numbers voiced her commitment in firm and in the voiced her commitment to the growing the numbers of female professionals industry. to growing the numbers of female professionals in the firm and in the in the firm and in the of female professionals industry. industry. in the firm and in the industry.

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PwC refers to the PwC network and/or one or more of its member firms, each of which is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details. (19-24654)

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The word Zulu literally means ‘people of heaven’ and this is a word that is known throughout the world. We use this word to make potential tourists aware of the many heavenly attractions of our province and why Durban and KwaZulu-Natal is an ideal meeting venue for conventions, smaller meetings and incentive offerings. We can use these offerings to provide the overarching distinctive experience which so many conference delegates are now seeking, particularly through pre and post tours to KwaZulu-Natal 8 tourism regions namely the Battlefields; Drakensberg; Durban; Elephant Coast; Pietermaritzburg and Midlands; North Coast; South Coast and Zululand. These experiences are also ideal for the crafting of unique incentive tour offerings.

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DURBAN KWAZULU-NATAL CONVENTION BUREAU The Durban KwaZulu-Natal Convention Bureau is a partnership initiative of the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs and the EThekwini Municipality to promote the meeting or business tourism services of the South African province of KwaZulu-Natal and the metropolitan area of Durban. It operates as a special division of Tourism KwaZulu-Natal. This entity provides business tourism support services together with its partners. The Zulu Kingdom, through the Durban KZN Convention Bureau, provides a hub for business events to bring about tourism growth and socio-economic development. Across the province, a host of conference and events facilities are set against the backdrop of majestic mountains, sun kissed beaches or bush retreats Promotional materials Educational trips and site Inspections Supplier information and quotations Social programmes Pre and post tours and incentive packages Assistance with congress bids Convention publicity and delegate boosting Destination display and promotion Information kits and welcome packs for delegates Shuttle services Identification of professional conference organiser (PCO) services Contact 29 Signal Rd, Point, Durban, 4001 conventions@durbankzncb.co.za (031) 366 7580 www.zulu.org.za

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M OT H E O T V E T C O L LE G E

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U N I V ERSITY O F J O H A NNE SBURG ’S NOLWAZI MA M O R A R E :

TH E POW ER OF PURP O SE Nolwazi’s previous life at the Auditor General, and by turning to public sector entities with a mandate to ensure skills development. “We got a great deal from the SETAs, by taking the admin off of their hands and providing them with prequalified students with good academic results that were needy.” Nolwazi and her team also secured additional NSFAS funding by helping students to process their applications. When she joined, 10 000 students were NSFAS funded. After the first year of providing support to applicants, that number grew by an additional 5 000. “I am proud to have led a team that has raised all this funding without seeking additional resources. It was a project carried out with what we had, that had never been a function in the finance portfolio, and it contributed to the financial sustainability of the university,” she says.

During the 2015 #FeesMustFall student campaign, the University of Johannesburg (UJ) lost only one academic day to the protest. This was because UJ was ahead of the game in financially supporting its students, owing, in large part, to the efforts of the team lead by Nolwazi Mamorare, who is today the university’s CFO. She spoke to Georgina Guedes about the kind of difference that can be made if you have the will to do so. Nolwazi is a calm and thoughtful presence, but as soon as you start speaking to her, it becomes clear that she’ll do anything to achieve what she believes is right. It was this clarity of

thought and dogged determination that saw her raising R700-million for student fees from 2015 to 2019. “When I joined in 2014, part of my portfolio was student finance. At the time, we weren’t actively going out to seek funding to address the needs of the students. We were solely reliant on NSFAS, which wasn’t sufficiently funded at the time. I started a campaign for the missing middle – those that weren’t poor enough or rich enough to receive funding. I am proud of the R700 million we’ve managed to raise since that time.” This was achieved by knocking on the doors of partners and colleagues from

Entering accounting

Nolwazi never imagined she would end up being an accountant. When she was in high school, she and her classmates were taken to a career exhibition in Mthatha. “I thought a career in librarianship sounded nice, so when the time came, I went to register at Vista University in PE, and the people at the registration desk said to me that with my marks, I should get into a B.Com degree – so that’s how I ended up in the accounting line.” She started exploring what to do next, and realised that she could follow a CA path, which she couldn’t do at Vista, so she transferred to Rhodes.

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U N IV E R S IT Y O F JO H A N N E S BURG

“The rest is history. I haven’t looked at doing anything else. I can’t say it was an easy journey to get through my studies, but I haven’t wanted to do anything differently.” She completed her articles at Fisher Hoffman Sithole, now PKF, in Port Elizabeth. She stayed on for one year after completing her articles, then moved on to KMMT, which after two years, merged with KPMG. “Then, I’d had enough of auditing. I didn’t hate it, but didn’t want to be boxed into that role for the rest of my life. I wanted to see what was out there. So I joined an entity of Transnet called Protekon, which is now Transnet Rail Solutions, which works on the rail infrastructure. I joined as an accountant and got great hands-on accounting exposure. The scope was big in an interesting industry, with exposure to financial accounting and management accounting. I quite enjoyed it, but only stayed on for two years – I felt that was long enough for me.” The next move was to the Land Bank at a time when they were introducing IFRS standards, which she describes as exciting. “It wasn’t a routine financial manager, particularly the project introducing the standards, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was also a different sector, which had its challenges and was a steep learning curve for me.” She stayed there for three years, and would have loved to have stayed for longer, but towards the end of her tenure there, a number of irregularities emerged. “I didn’t like the manner in

which they were handled or responded to, so I started looking for different opportunities.” She moved on to Nedbank, which seemed like a natural transition in the finance space, but she soon realised something important about herself. “I quickly realised that I wasn’t excited about the idea of chasing profit. That on its own for me just didn’t excite me. I could have stayed on longer, but in three months, I decided that it just wasn’t for me, and I haven’t regretted the decision. I moved on to the Auditor General.”

“I AM PROUD TO HAVE LED A TEAM THAT HAS RAISED ALL THIS FUNDING WITHOUT SEEKING ADDITIONAL RESOURCES” There she stayed for seven years, and she says what really kept her going there, over and above the impact that she had on influencing the governance across a vast number of entities, was having a wide portfolio that included labour, agriculture and rural development, and higher education.

Moving into education

With one of her portfolios being universities, Nolwazi was involved with a project to address the fact that universities, which are excluded from

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the Public Finance Management Act to guarantee their academic freedom, still needed to have some level of accountability. “From the AG side, I led the team that worked on the new reporting regulations, in collaboration with the external auditors of all 26 South African universities and 50 TVET [then FETs] to ensure that they would audit the institutions in line with the requirements of the Auditor General.” Nolwazi didn’t want to leave the AG, but found the higher education sector fascinating, so when she was approached by UJ, she gave the idea due consideration. “I thought maybe it’s time. I’d been for seven years in one organisation and while I wasn’t itching to leave, it seemed like a natural progression for me.”

The UJ journey

Nolwazi joined the University of Johannesburg in 2015 as an executive director in charge of financial governance and revenue. “Has it been a smooth ride? Definitely not, but it’s been a very interesting and exciting journey. What makes universities special is that you are not going to find this kind of experience in the public sector or the private sector. It’s a combination of the two and more. It’s the kind of environment that really builds your resilience and stretches your outlook, because you have to ensure that the institution is financially sustainable. You do that by continuously pushing to generate revenue, but at the same time, ensuring that you fulfil the social imperative.”

CONTACT DETAILS: Telephone: +27 11 559 4555 | Email: mylife@uj.ac.za | Website: www.uj.ac.za Twitter: @go2uj | Facebook: @go2uj | Instagram: university_of_johannesburg

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Back to basics

BY ELSKE JOUBERT

EDUCATION IS AN ESSENTIAL TOOL IN LIFTING WOMEN – AND SOCIETY IN GENERAL – OUT OF POVERTY. IN A COUNTRY WHERE ECONOMIC GROWTH IS STUNTED AND UNEMPLOYMENT IS SOARING, WE NEED A SHIFT NOT ONLY IN THE SUBJECTS BEING TAUGHT AT OUR SCHOOLS, BUT ALSO THEIR SUBSTANCE. In their 2019 State of the Nation and Budget addresses, President Cyril Ramaphosa and Finance Minister Tito Mboweni demonstrated that education is a key priority for the government moving forward. As such, the bulk of government spending has been allocated to this sector. Prudence Louw, Chief Information Officer at IDEA Digital Education, believes that this move is very promising as “it shows a commitment to South Africa’s youth at a time of extreme difficulty in the economy and the job market.” She believes that we must focus on the foundations of education rather than quick-fix solutions, looking at the pockets of excellence that exist in the country, modelling these and replicating them.

Our approach has historically been average – and often surface-level – access to short-course education. “We should be focusing on improving our fundamental literacy and numeracy proficiencies for school students and adult education. These are the necessary pillars for us to be able to explore more innovative, entrepreneurial avenues.” The South African education sector is still struggling to deliver. This is owing, in no small part, to the education system that existed during the apartheid years, says Leigh Johnson, Programme Designer: Open Enrolment at University of Stellenbosch Business School Executive Development (USB-ED).

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“The realities are so diverse for children born into positions of privilege compared to those in disadvantaged communities. The pressure and increasingly intense red tape put on teachers – who in many cases are under-supported, -prepared and -educated themselves – has made their ability to offer the attention and care required by the children in their care incredibly difficult. We have not yet found or created the system that will adequately support our schools to transform.” The World Economic Forum’s (WEF) 2017/18 Global Competitiveness Index report ranked South Africa 114th out of 137 countries for the quality of its education system. “We not only need to make drastic changes to the quality of our education system and school syllabi, but we also need to shift from academic learning to technical and vocational studies. We need to reimagine learning for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” says Onyi Nwaneri, CEO of Afrika Tikkun Services. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is set to fundamentally change the way we live, work and relate to one another. Says Nwaneri, “Most notably, we need to respond comprehensively to the needs of a child’s full development by supporting their cognitive, intra-personal and emotional development – from early childhood to school-leaving age and beyond.

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We should not only be teaching for intelligence quotient (IQ), but also emotional quotient (EQ), which develops character, confidence, critical thinking and creativity.” Echoing this, Johnson notes: “We need to remove our focus on functional and technical skills and knowledge and instead focus on developing and growing the skills that are uniquely human and can’t easily be replaced by a machine. Developing emotional intelligence, collaboration and team skills, and systems thinking is far more important than remembering facts and figures.” The question then appears to be how we can best create opportunities for those children, especially girls, who are on the margins of society and who can’t afford quality education. “We can do this by creating an inclusive educational system that eliminates the barriers to entry in respect of quality standard education,” says Nwaneri. “We need to intentionally level the playing field, ensuring that the same or relative standard of education is provided to all South African children, irrespective of race, gender or financial pedigree. One way of doing this is a fundamental overhaul of our education system to meet best practice standards as well as simultaneous introduction of low-cost private schools.”

“ Gender stereotypes in employment opportunities need to shift urgently”

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Research has shown that girls in historically marginalised communities, or those where the focus was not on equitable education, have benefited enormously from informal and alternative education models. According to Louw, students will take responsibility for their own learning where technology is used to show them what is expected of them and how they can achieve this. Funding is also paramount, says Des Hugo, Academic Director: Elementary Education at Nova Pioneer. “We need investors who wish to focus on the support of all marginalised children. Schools should open up their spaces to wider communities to share best practices in new learning. Poverty is no reason for a different quality of education, and the stakeholders who manage government funds should realise the potential of public–private partnerships to build quality education opportunities for all.”

“Our next 25 years will see even greater progress in both recognition and advancement for women across this continent”

Commenting on how we can best build a sustainable science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) pipeline for girls, Hugo notes that “[we] need to celebrate our STEM female role models – both locally and globally. We need to encourage girls to enter the STEM space from an early age, and gender stereotypes in employment opportunities need to urgently shift. We need to educate parents on the opportunities for their daughters.” Adding to this, says Louw, “We shouldn’t be driving female STEM job creation as much as we should be developing more opportunities for girls to take on STEM education in both school-based and tertiary education. The industry will demand these skills because the digital economy already needs scientists, engineers, coders and programmers. Our role in the education sector is to ensure that there is greater gender balance in these subjects earlier on. Seventy-five percent of our IDEA STEM content team are women, and why wouldn’t that be the case? If corporations, institutions or departments find a gender imbalance in their teams, they need to ask themselves what they are doing to attract that imbalance. “There is no doubt that there is still more to be done to break down the stigma that surrounds women in STEM,” she continues, “but we shouldn’t ask the question as to what women in Africa are going to do in the future of innovation, we should rather be cognisant of the fact that we are already shaping and changing this future. Our next 25 years will see

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TOP 5 TRENDS IN THE NEXT 3–5 YEARS By Lisa Illingworth

1. Seeing education as a business Over the past few years, there has been a rise in the number of independent school groups whose core focus is creating citizens who are equipped for the challenges that lie outside of academia. These groups also use business models that make independent, private schooling accessible to lower income groups of the population. The number of these schools is predicted to increase for the foreseeable future.

2. Educational “niching”

“Poverty is no reason for a different quality of education” even greater progress in both recognition and advancement for women across this continent, and the world, in their roles in STEM innovation.” Considering the massive youth unemployment predicted for Africa by 2030, Hugo notes that the advancement of women to design and build a future in Africa for Africans is essential for growth and employment on the continent. “Many girls leave school at an early age. This needs to change to encourage women to enter the STEM space as ideators, designers and developers of new technologies and knowledge; as this is where the majority of opportunities lie, it is one of the most crucial aspects of the growth of women.” By increasing the opportunities for women, growth is exponentially enhanced, says Louw. “Research shows that it is largely through the lifting of women out of poverty that economic growth is achieved, as their reliability, persistence and success is far more prevalent than that of men. Additionally, women are more likely to plough their earnings back into their families and communities which, in turn, will elevate others and thereby facilitate growth,” she concludes.

Schools will begin “niching”, focusing on smaller, specific educational segments. This will not only include skills and knowledge segments, but also focus on the emotional well-being of the child. Leadership and stewardship will take centre stage followed closely by coding, entrepreneurship and design.

3. School “coaching” Schools and parents, particularly those dealing with children in high school, will invest in additional support in coaching and mentoring from professionals to equip themselves and teens with a toolbox of skills and coping mechanisms.

4. Re-thinking university Parents will begin to search for supplemental factors to the apparently ineffectual curriculum, institutional structure and teaching methodologies. Suits & Sneakers is an example of a revolutionary learning model, creating interpersonal teaching and learning channels hosted in a digital environment.

5. Mindfulness as part of the curriculum An increasing number of children are experiencing “burnout” and other behavioural and emotional issues. In response to this, some schools have begun to introduce mindfulness into the curriculum to increase calm and combat anxiety, as well as encourage focused and participatory learning. It’s likely that more South African schools will bring this teaching method into their classrooms.

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EK U R HULE N I WE ST T VET C O LLEGE PLACE O F

PEACE AND LEARNING

EKURHULENI WEST TVET COLLEGE South Africa is currently faced with challenges such as chronic unemployment, inequality, and poverty. When unemployment deepens it impacts the economic growth of the country, leading to lower output and incomes.

According to official statistics, 6.7-million people are unemployed in the country - which is 29% of everybody who could be working. Unemployment is a major contributing factor to poverty with one of the main causes being that the youth lack the necessary job-related skills and training needed by industry. This is compounded by a lack of entrepreneurial expertise.

In trying to curb this scourge of unemployment, government established TVET college with the purpose of providing the necessary human capital required. These colleges deliver skills and vocation-based training as well as developing skills for employability by preparing graduates to meet labour force requirements. The South African government has identified entrepreneurship and business

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development to promote economic growth as a critical output. Currently, South Africa needs to create more than six million jobs. It cannot rely on big businesses alone to create and provide jobs. The development of the SMME sector is therefore critical to economic development and the transformation of thecountry.

“I N SOUTH AFRICA THERE COULD BE MANY FACTORS THAT ARE CAUSING UNEMPLOYMENT TO SKY ROCKET, BUT ONE WILL REALISE THAT YOUNG PEOPLE IN OUR COUNTRY LACK THE NECESSARY AND JOB-RELATED SKILLS AND TRAINING NEEDED BY THE INDUSTRY”

Government has committed to make it easier for companies to grow and create more jobs for South Africans by way of a number of initiatives. One of them being the establishment of centres for entrepreneurship in all the provinces, where aspiring entrepreneurs are trained and mentored. Realising that education and training are central to the country’s long-term

A DV ERTORI A L

economic growth and development; the transition from the college to work. and reducing inequality, it is imperative This commitment is key to resolving the that TVET colleges shoulder their country’s challenge of addressing social responsibilities of training and skilling equity, skills gaps and poverty alleviation. students, and re-skilling workers whose skills are no To ensure that the longer relevant to college is playing its today’s working “R EALISING THAT part in addressing the world to enable them EDUCATION AND country’s challenges, to enter or re-enter and in response to the TRAINING ARE the workforce. National Development CENTRAL TO Plan’s Vision THE COUNTRY’S In the midst of 2030, the college LONG-TERM so many colleges established a Centre ECONOMIC in the country, for Entrepreneurship GROWTH AND Ekurhuleni West and Rapid Incubation TVET College (CfERI) which is DEVELOPMENT” is amongst the funded by SEDA. colleges that The centre is set to constantly provides broad-based establish an Enterprise Incubation Hub technical and vocational knowledge to strengthen its commitment to the and skills for different occupations, as notion of entrepreneurship training for well as continuing to provide vocational the youth. This initiative is aimed at training to students in preparing them producing, developing and nurturing for the world of work. entrepreneurs from the college, communities and small, medium and Ekurhuleni West TVET College micro enterprises (SMMEs) within its continues to facilitate economic growth borders. The centre is based at Kathorus by increasing the productivity of Campus in Katlehong township. workers through providing technical and vocational education. The realisation of Ekurhuleni West TVET College is situated this mission is enabled by the partnership in the Ekurhuleni metropolitan municipality that the college has with companies that in Gauteng province in South Africa and afford on the job training experience to operates within a broad band of diverse allow students to fully complete their communities through the provision of qualifications so that they may obtain training at the following six (6) campuses: their national diplomas as well as • Alberton exposing students to the real working world, as part of work based exposure • Boksburg . • Germiston The college is grateful that these companies are fully committed to the • Kathorus preparation of the marginalised groups • Kempton of youth with the adequate, job-related skills and knowledge, helping them make • Tembisa

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: Cnr. Driehoek and Sol Roads Germiston Postal Address: Private Bag X1030 Germiston 1400 Telephone: 011 323 1600 | Email: info@ewc.edu.za | Website: www.ewc.edu.za Twitter: @ewctvet | Facebook: @ewctvet

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CHANNEL CHANNEL AFRICA AFRICA THE THEAFRICAN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE PERSPECTIVE

Channel Channel Africa Africa is South is South Africa’s Africa’s international international public broadcast public broadcast radio radio station stationwhose whose primary primary audience audience is theisentire the entire African African continent. continent. Our secondary Our secondary audience audience is the is the rest rest of of the the world, world, where wewhere harvest we harvest our news our news and andinformation. information. As As an International an International PublicPublic Broadcaster, Broadcaster,our our core core values values subscribe to subscribe the highest to the highest journalistic journalistic ethics ethics which which find find expression expression in fairness, in fairness, accuracy, accuracy,and and impartiality. impartiality. Channel Africa ChannelisAfrica a platform is a platform through through which which Africa Africa is engaged is engaged in debate in debate withwith itself, itself,and and recognises recognises South Africa Southas Africa a role as a player role player inincontinental continental and and international international affaff airs. airs.

Vision: Vision: “The “The African African Perspective” Perspective” Mission: Mission: “to promote “to promote the theregeneration, regeneration, revival, revival, and and rejuvenation rejuvenation of ofAfrica, Africa, through through the production the productionand and broadcast broadcast of dynamic, of dynamic, stimulating, stimulating,and and interesting interesting programmes”. programmes”. Contact Contact Information: Information: Tel: Tel: 011 011 714 714 2997 2997 Fax: Fax: 011 011 714 714 2072 2072 Email: Email: info@channelafrica.co.za info@channelafrica.co.za Web:Web: www.channelafrica.co.za www.channelafrica.co.za Twitter: Twitter:channelafrica1 channelafrica1 Instagram: Instagram: channelafricaradio channelafricaradio DSTV:802 DSTV:802

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5

PM S K IL L S H OUSE

A DV ERTORI A L

W HAT WE BELIEVE At PM Skillshouse, we believe that training is a force for good and that by empowering individuals with practical knowledge and understanding, we can give them some of the tools they need to succeed. We build this vision every day; bringing it to life in auditoriums, boardrooms, training rooms, classrooms, community halls, churches and playgrounds so that we fundamentally touch and change the minds, hearts and lives of others in a real and practical way.

OUR JOURNEY Started in 2014 by our founder, entrepreneur and training activist Portia Malatji from Limpopo Maphalle Village, with a mere R30, PM Skillshouse is a dynamic, future-facing company. We aim to solve the issue of lack of financial education in communities and address the issue of unemployment.

We are driven to change lives through consumer financial education training that is meaningful, relevant and inspiring. We use local languages and stories to solve problems while creating jobs. To ensure we deliver on this big audacious goal, we have created our Vision 2020: training one million people by the end of 2020. We’re well on our way! We’ve trained 121 490 people to date and are adding to this number every day. We’ve also empowered 324 trainers across the country with the skills training and accreditation they need to start and grow their own training businesses. Website: www.pmskillshouse.com Facebook: PM Skillshouse Learning & Development Instagram: @pm_skillshouse Linkedin: PM Skillshouse

FOUNDER, PORTIA MALATJI

We are PM Skillshouse We are brave We are passionate We are ready We believe in data

FOUNDED IN 2014

121 490 PEOPLE TRAINED (JUNE 2019)

324 TRAINERS EMPOWERED ACROSS SOUTH AFRICA

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: Sovereign House, Office 2, 5th Floor, Cnr Mullins & Sovereign Street, Bedfordview, 2700 Email: info@pmskillshouse.co.za Tel: 010 035 0558

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GROWING SOUTH AFRICA TOGETHER THROUGH SKILLS DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES young, dynamic, result-orientated leader goes The The young, dynamic, result-orientated leader goes the motto of ‘doing things around’ with with the motto of ‘doing things rightright the the firstfirst timetime around’ and she this believes she believes is possible if one is determined and this is possible if one is determined to to and develop himself/herself to being a better person. learnlearn and develop himself/herself to being a better person.

employeesbeing beingdeveloped developedand and growing growing their their careers careers employees greaterheights. heights.Under Under her her leadership, leadership, CATHSSETA CATHSSETA to togreater pridesitself itselfforforappointing appointingmore morewomen women into into executive executive prides andmanagerial managerialpositions. positions.The Themajority majorityofof these these women women and have beencapacitated capacitatedthrough throughcourses coursessuch such as as Women Women have been Leaderstraining, training, a a Gordon Gordon Institute Institute of of Business Business asasLeaders Science (GIBS)training trainingaimed aimedatatbuilding buildingleadership leadership and and Science (GIBS) management competenciestotothrive thriveininaaworld worldof ofgender gender management competencies equity challenges. equity challenges.

Appointed CATHSSETA’s Chief Executive Officer Appointed CATHSSETA’s Chief Executive Officer by Minister the Minister of Higher Education Training (CEO)(CEO) by the of Higher Education andand Training in January Ms Keitumetse Lebaka occupied in January 2019,2019, Ms Keitumetse Lebaka has has occupied a a number of strategic roles at CATHSSETA leading to number of strategic roles at CATHSSETA leading to herher recent appointment as CEO. the CEO. recent appointment as the One of Ms Lebaka’s highlights for 2019 was being One of Ms Lebaka’s highlights for 2019 was being From Learning Programmes Manager, she progressed recognised by President Cyril Ramaphosa at the State of From Learning Programmes Manager, she progressed recognised by President Cyril Ramaphosa at the State of to climb the corporate ladder. In 2016 she was appointed the Nation Address (SONA) reply in May this year. In his to climb the corporate ladder. In 2016 she was appointed the Nation Address (SONA) reply in May this year. In his Executive Manager for Skills Development. She continued reply, the President congratulated Ms Lebaka for being Executive Manager for Skills Development. She continued reply, the President congratulated Ms Lebaka for being to oversee, give counsel and support the business unit by one of the finalists in the CEO of the Year Award category of the 2019 to oversee, give counsel and support the business unit by ensuring that CATHSSETA delivers quality service in accordance with one of the finalists in the CEO of the Year Award category of the 2019 Annual Future of HR Awards. Ms Lebaka was one of the two CEOs from the ensuring that CATHSSETA delivers quality service in accordance with Service Level Agreements and stakeholder expectations. At the time of her Annual Future of HR Awards. Ms Lebaka was one of the two CEOs from the state entities to have reached this level. The Future of HR Awards honours Service Level Agreements and stakeholder expectations. At the time of her appointment as Executive Manager for Skills Development, CATHSSETA state entities to have reached this level. The Future of HR Awards honours Southern Africa’s most outstanding, inspiring and effective leaders appointment as Executive Manager for Skills Development, CATHSSETA was undergoing significant changes but it was during this trying time that Southern Africa’s most outstanding, inspiring and effective leaders in human capital management, HR innovation and HR technology – was undergoing significant changes but it was during this trying time that Ms Lebaka thrived showing her resilience and strong leadership skills that in human capital management, HR innovation and HR technology – highlighting their achievements for local and international peers in moving Ms Lebaka thrived showing her resilience and strong leadership skills that made her to contribute towards CATHSSETA improving its performance to highlighting their achievements for local and international peers in moving the industry forward. madeobtain her toacontribute towards CATHSSETA improving its performance to clean audit – a first in the history of CATHSSETA. the industry forward. obtain a clean audit – a first in the history of CATHSSETA. Having successfully completed postgraduate courses in various fields, successfully completed postgraduate courseslife in various fields, Ms Lebaka continued earnestly to contribute towards skills develop- MsHaving Lebaka is currently enrolled for MBA. Her career spans over 17 Ms Lebaka continued earnestly to contribute towards skills development initiatives. During her tenure as CATHSSETA’s Acting CEO, a Msyears Lebaka currently gained enrolledfrom for both MBA.private Her career life spans 17 workisexperience and public sector. over She has mentposition initiatives. During her tenure as she CATHSSETA’s Acting partnership CEO, a years work experience gained from both private and public sector. She has she was appointed to in 2017, initiated a strategic developed leadership and strong people management skills which enable position she was appointed to in 2017, she initiated a strategic partnership between the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) and CATHSSETA. developed leadership and strong people management skills which enable her to relate well with people from all walks of life. between the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS) and CATHSSETA. Through this partnership a custom-made Global Executive Development her to relate well with people from all walks of life. “CATHSSETA is responding to the transformational needs of the Through this partnership a custom-made Global Executive Programme (GEDP) was developed for managers whoDevelopment fall under the “CATHSSETA is responding country”, concludes Ms Lebaka. to the transformational needs of the Programme (GEDP) was developed for managers who fall under the CATHSSETA subsectors. The aim of the programme was to upskill these country”, concludes Ms Lebaka. CATHSSETA subsectors. The aim of the programme was to upskill these managers and to support transformation within our subsectors. More and more opportunities are being strategically opened for the managers and to support transformation within our subsectors. More and more opportunities being strategically opened for the emancipation of women as a way are to respond to the call made by President The CATHSSETA/GIBS partnership inspired Ms Lebaka to do more in emancipation of women as a way to respond to the callplatforms made bywhere President Cyril Ramaphosa to recognise women and give them they skillsCATHSSETA/GIBS development by initiating theinspired CATHSSETA China to Work Integrated The partnership Ms Lebaka do more in can share their to skills to upliftwomen society.and give them platforms where they Cyril Ramaphosa recognise (WIL) by partnership a partnership with Work the Chinese Culture skills Learning development initiatingproject, the CATHSSETA China Integrated can share their skills to uplift society. and (WIL) International Exchange Throughwith this the partnership 120 TVET Learning partnership project,centre. a partnership Chinese Culture were Exchange placed oncentre. a 12 months China. and learners International ThroughWIL thisprogramme partnershipin120 TVETThe programme is aimed the skills and contributing positively learners were placed on ata bridging 12 months WIL gap programme in China. The towardsisthe growth and development thecontributing country. programme aimed at bridging the skills plan gap of and positively towards the growth plan of country. Under herand beltdevelopment of achievements, wethe can also count the Executive Development Programme for Women Tourism, a partnership between Under her belt of achievements, we incan also count the Executive CATHSSETA, UNISA Graduate of Business and the National Development Programme for WomenSchool in Tourism, a partnership between Department of Tourism aimedSchool at building leadership capacity for women CATHSSETA, UNISA Graduate of Business and the National in the Tourism and Hospitality sector. To date, 50 women have participated Department of Tourism aimed at building leadership capacity for women this programme and 20% haveTo been promoted to managerial positions in theinTourism and Hospitality sector. date, 50 women have participated in the Tourism industry. Initiated in 2016 this programme was designed in this programme and 20% have been promoted to managerial positions as a transformation intervention to capacitate black women for executive in the Tourism industry. Initiated in 2016 this programme was designed positions within the sector. as a transformation intervention to capacitate black women for executive is committed to skills development within our diverse positions “CATHSSETA within the sector. sectors. This also means empowering our own staff so that they excel “CATHSSETA is committed to skills development within our diverse in their respective roles in order to provide an excellent service to our sectors. This also means empowering our own staff so that they excel stakeholders,” says Ms Lebaka. She is dedicated to seeing CATHSSETA in their respective roles in order to provide an excellent service to our stakeholders,” says Ms Lebaka. She is dedicated to seeing CATHSSETA 147590 Cathsseta Standard Bank.indd 1

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Velaphi Ratshefola TITLE: Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, South Africa (CCBA SA) -

Velaphi Ratshefola

Managing Director

TITLE: Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, South Africa (CCBA SA) Managing Director RATSHEFOLA

VELAPHI EXECUTIVE BIOGRAPHY Velaphi Ratshefola MANAGING DIRECTOR - COCA-COLA BEVERAGES AFRICA, SOUTH AFRICA (CCBA SA) EXECUTIVE BIOGRAPHY

Velaphi was privileged to lead the integration of creating a new business from six different Velaphi was privileged to lead the integration of creating a new business from six different entities to build one. Until his recent appointment as CCBSA Managing Director, Velaphi wasentities to build one. Until his recent appointment as CCBSA Managing Director, Velaphi was MD of ABI Bottling PTY (LTD). He was instrumental in establishing the business' Route to MD of ABI Bottling PTY (LTD). He was instrumental in establishing the business' Route to Market plan which is globally renowned, leading to the creation of thousands of local jobs and double digit sales growth in the traditional market class of trade. A key component of Market plan which is globally renowned, leading to the creation of thousands of local jobs the CCBSA growth strategy the Local Distribution Partner It is a of partner Velaphi was isprivileged to lead theprogramme. integration creating a new digit business from six different entities to class buildof trade. A key component of and double sales growth in the traditional market programme under our Route To Market plan which connects CCBSA to its smaller theDirector, CCBSA growth strategy is the LocalBottling Distribution one. Until his recent appointment as CCBSA Managing Velaphi was MD of ABI PTYPartner (LTD). programme. It is a partner customers, especially in the townships. Under Velaphi's leradership, the LDP programme Velaphi was privileged to lead the integration of creating a new business from six different has doubled since the business was formed. This Velaphi did while also driving an programme under our Managing Route ToDirector, Market plan connects CCBSA to its smaller He was instrumental in establishingentities the business’ Route to Market plan which is globally renowned, leading to to build one. Until his recent appointment as CCBSA Velaphi was which optimised product and distribution network for CCBSA. He has also led business MD of ABI Bottling PTY (LTD). He was instrumental in establishing the business' RouteVelaphi's to especially the townships. Under leradership, the LDP programme optimisation revenue growth initiatives whichof saw the business operations. the and creation of thousands local jobs rationalise and double digitcustomers, sales growth in theintraditional market class of trade. Market which isaglobally renowned, leading to the creation of thousands of local jobs Passionate about transformation, under Velaphi's leadership, CCBSA is plan undergoing has doubled since the business was formed. This Velaphi did while also driving an A key component the CCBSA strategy is the Partner It is a of partner and doubleHe digit sales growthDistribution in the traditional market classprogramme. of trade. A key component preferential transformation journey to of transform procurementgrowth spend to black suppliers. was atLocal optimised product and distribution for CCBSA. He has also led business the CCBSA is the Local Distribution programme.network It is a partner the forefront of leading the fight against Health Promotions Levy asplan well aswhich mitigating its growth impact instrategy programme under ourtheRoute To Market connects CCBSA to its smallerPartner customers, especially in the programme under our Route To Market plan which connects CCBSA to its smaller the business by introducing new products and recipes. Velaphi has led the business to winning multipleoptimisation and revenue growth initiatives which saw the business rationalise operations. Under Velaphi’s the programme has doubled since theVelaphi's business was the formed. This Velaphi customers, especially in the townships. Under leradership, LDP programme global townships. and supplier awards. He is an inspirational leradership, and engaging leader whoLDP inspires loyalty and commitment Passionate about transformation, under Velaphi's leadership, CCBSA is undergoing a from those he leads. has doubled since the business was formed. This Velaphi did while also driving an

TITLE: Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, South Africa (CCBA SA) -

Managing Director

EXECUTIVE BIOGRAPHY

EXECUTIVE BIOGRAPHY

did while also driving an optimised product and distribution network for CCBSA. He has also led business optimisation and revenue growth preferential transformation to transform spend to black suppliers. He was at optimised product and distribution network for journey CCBSA. He has also ledprocurement business initiatives which saw the business rationalise operations. Passionate about transformation, under Velaphi’s leadership, CCBSA is undergoing a as well as mitigating its impact in optimisation and growth initiatives the which sawagainst the business operations. Levy therevenue forefront of leading fight therationalise Health Promotions Passionate Velaphi'sofleadership, CCBSA is undergoing preferential BACKGROUND: transformation journey to transform procurement spend to black suppliers. Hetransformation, wasbyatintroducing theunder forefront leadingand therecipes. fight against theabout business new products Velaphiathe has Health led the business to winning multiple EDUCATIONAL BOARD MEMBERSHIPS AND INDUSTRY BODY PARTICIPATION: preferential transformation journey to transform procurement spend to black suppliers. He was at to 2018 in the business by introducing December 1985 Levy as well as mitigating its2016 global and supplier awards. He is an inspirational and engaging leader who inspires loyalty and commitment Promotions impact new products and recipes. Velaphi has led the business to winning the forefront of leading the fight against the Health Promotions Levy as well as mitigating its impact in Chairperson Beverage Association of South Africa Bachelor of Law B. Juris, University of North West the business introducing new products andand recipes. Velaphi has led the business to winning multiple frombythose he leads. multiple global and supplier awards. He is an inspirational and engaging leader who inspires loyalty commitment from those he leads. 2016 to current Chairperson Appletiser

December 1988 Bachelor of Law LLB, University of North West

Velaphi Ratshefola

global and supplier awards. He is an inspirational and engaging leader who inspires loyalty and commitment from those he leads. 2010 Inaugural Chairperson – SAB Retailers Zenzele Empowerment Scheme

TITLE: Coca-Cola Beverages Africa, South Africa (CCBA SA) -

December 1990 Diploma in Labour Relations (DPLR), College April 1997 EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: Management Development Programme, University of Cape Town December 1985: Bachelor

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

2010 to current Member of the Coca-Cola Global Customer Directors Forum EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:

December 1985

December 1985 2008 to current

BOARD MEMBERSHIPS AND INDUSTRY BODY Director BOARD Managing MEMBERSHIPS AND INDUSTRY BODY PARTICIPATION:

BOARD MEMBERSHIPS AND INDUSTRY BODY PARTICIPATION: 2016 to 2018 PARTICIPATION: 2016 to 2018 EXECUTIVE Chairperson BIOGRAPHY Beverage Association of South Africa

of Law B.Bachelor Juris, University of North West Association of South Africa Non-Executive McCain SA of North Bachelor Law B. Juris, University West to Beverage of LawDirector B.ofJuris, University West of North Chairperson 2016 2018: Chairperson Association ofsix South Africa Velaphi was privileged to lead the Beverage integration of creating a new business from different one. Until his recent appointment as CCBSA Managing Director, Velaphi was 2016 to currententities to build December 1988: Bachelor of Law LLB, University of North West 2016 to current December 1988 December 1988 MD of ABI Bottling PTY (LTD). He was instrumental in establishing the business' Route to 2016 to current: Chairperson Appletiser Chairperson Appletiser WORK EXPERIENCE: Bachelor of Law LLB, University of North West Market plan which is globally renowned, leading to the creation of thousands of local jobs Chairperson Appletiser December College Bachelor(DPLR), of Law LLB, University of North West 2010 July 2016 to current1990: Diploma in Labour Relations and double digit sales growth in the market class of trade. A key component of 2010: Inaugural Chairperson - traditional SAB Retailers Zenzele December 1990 CCBSA: Managing Director Inaugural Chairperson – SAB Retailers Zenzele Empowerment Scheme 2010 the CCBSA growth strategy is the Local Distribution Partner programme. It is a partner ACHIEVEMENTS (E.G. AWARDS, RECOGNITION): April 1997: Management Development Programme, Diploma in Labour Relations December 1990 (DPLR), College programme under our Route To Market plan which connects CCBSA to its smaller Empowerment Scheme February 2015 - June 2016 Inaugural Chairperson – SAB Retailers Zenzele Empowerment Scheme 2010 to current customers, especially in the townships. Under Velaphi's leradership, the LDP programme ABI: Managing Director Universtiy of Cape Town 2019 April Diploma 1997 in Labour Relations (DPLR), CollegeMember of the Coca-Cola Global Directors Forum has doubled since Customer the business was formed. This Velaphi did while also driving an 2010 to current: Member of the Coca-Cola Global Women in Leadership Award for CCBA SA Management Development Programme, optimised 2010 product to and current distribution network for CCBSA. He has also led business October 2005 - February 2015 2008 to current optimisation and revenue growth initiatives which saw the business Customer rationalise operations. ABI: Commercial Director 2017of1997 April University Cape Town CustomerDirector Directors Forum Member Coca-Cola Global Directors Forum Non-Executive Passionate McCain SA of the CCBA Group CEO Award winner about transformation, under Velaphi's leadership, CCBSA is undergoing a WORK EXPERIENCE Management Development Programme, 2008 to preferential October 2005 - August 2006 transformation journey to transform procurement spend McCain to black suppliers. He was at current: Non-Executive Director SA 2012 2008 current ABI: Divisional S&D Director the forefront of leading the fightto against the Health Promotions Levy as well as mitigating its impact in University ofAfrica Cape Town First Coca-Cola bottler to sell 300 million unit cases WORK EXPERIENCE: July 2016 to current - CCBSA: Managing Director the business by introducing new products and recipes. Velaphi McCain has led the business Non-Executive Director SA to winning multiple Coca-Cola Global – RED execution January 2002 - September 2005 SAB: General Manager Central Region

global and supplier awards. He is an inspirational and engaging leader who inspires loyalty and commitment from those he leads.

July 2016 to current February 2015 - June 2016 - ABI: Managing Director CCBSA: Managing Director

January 1, 2000 - December 2001 SAB: Personnel 2005 Manager- February October

ACHIEVEMENTS (E.G. AWARDS, RECOGNITION):

ACHIEVEMENTS (E.G. AWARDS, RECOGNITION): 2016 to 2018 Chairperson Beverage Association of South Africa CCBSA: Managing Director 2019: Women in Leadership Award Bachelor of Law B. Juris, University of North West Director INTERESTS, 2017 ETC: December 1992 - November ACHIEVEMENTS (E.G. AWARDS, RECOGNITION): December 1994 - 1994 November 1996 ABI: CommercialHOBBIES, CCBA Group CEO2016 Award winner to current December 1988 Nampak (MB Glass): Divisional HR Director South Africa I escape to the Free State where I farm with cattle and maize. for CCBA SA February 2015 2006 - June Bachelor 2016 of Law LLB, University of North West 2005 - August Chairperson Appletiser - Nampak (Europak): Manufacturing October Manager February 2015 FAMILY - EXPERIENCE: June Director 2016 2015 - ABI: Commercial BACKGROUND: WORK

December 1994 - November 1996 October 2005 - August 2006 Nampak (Europak): Manufacturing Manager

ABI: Managing Director

2019 Married to Rose with three children; a son, Velaphi Junior and two

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND: - ABI: Divisional S&D Director July 2016 to current daughters, Mmamorwa and Rebaone. October 2005 - February 2015 December 1985

BOARD MEMBERSHIPS Women in Leadership Award for CCBA SA AND INDUSTRY BODY PARTICIPATION:

I amDirector also a spiritual person and participate in the church choir. 2012 ABI: Divisional S&D 2010 ABI: Managing DirectorDecember 1990 First Coca-Cola Africa bottler2019 to sell 300 million unit cases 2017: CCBA Group

CEO Award winner

Inaugural Chairperson – SAB Retailers Zenzele Empowerment Scheme KEY BUSINESS PROJECTS LED IN VARIOUS ROLES:January 2002 - September 2005Diploma in Labour Relations (DPLR), College December 1992 - November 1994 Coca-Cola Global – RED execution Women in Leadership Award for CCBA SA

October 2005Central - February 2015 General Manager Region April 1997 FAVOURITE BRAND: - Nampak (MB Glass): Divisional HRSAB: Director South Africa 2014 ABI: Commercial Director

Management Development Programme, Savannah ABI stakeholder engagement representation and Public Coke No Sugar 2001 January 1, 2000 - December University of Cape Town Interests and Operations Stream member SAB: Personnel Manager

January 2002 - September 2005 October 2005 - August 2006 - SAB: General Manager Central Region December 1994 - November 1996 2011 and 2014

ABI: Divisional S&D Director WORK EXPERIENCE:

Nampak (Europak): Manufacturing Manager ABI Regional Optimisation – reduced from 23 to 5 operations – improved July 2016 to current operational efficiencies and reduced product double handling through 1992 -2002 November 1994CCBSA: Managing January - September 2005Director introduction of direct shipment, setting up locally based miniDecember depots Nampak (MB Glass): Divisional HR South Africa February 2015 - June 2016 managed by local entrepreneurs and optimising warehouses. As a result, SAB: General ManagerDirector Central Region ABI: Managing Director logistics costs increases have been below inflation for the past 3 years.

January 2000 - December 2001 - SAB: Personnel Manager

2012: First Coca-Cola Africa bottler to

2010 to current Member of the Coca-Cola Global Customer Directors Forum

2017 2008 to current sellGroup 300 million unit cases Coca-Cola CCBA Award winner Director McCain SACEO FAMILYNon-Executive BACKGROUND:

Global RED execution Married to Rose with three children;–a son, Velaphi Junior and two 2012 daughters, Mmamorwa and Rebaone.

First Coca-Cola Africa bottler to sell 300 million unit cases Coca-Cola Global – RED execution HOBBIES,ACHIEVEMENTS INTERESTS, ETC: (E.G. AWARDS, RECOGNITION):

I escape to the Free State where I farm with cattle and maize. 2019 I am also a spiritual person and participate in the church choir.

FAMILY BACKGROUND: 2017 CCBA Group CEO AwardFAMILY winnerto Rose Married with three children; a BACKGROUND: 2014: Savannah ABI stakeholder engagement representation and Public Interests andFAVOURITE 2012BRAND: son, Velaphi Junior and two daughters, First Coca-Cola Africa bottler to sell 300 unitwith cases Married tomillion Rose three children; a son, Velaphi Junior and two Operations Stream member Coke No Sugar Coca-Cola Global – RED execution daughters,and Mmamorwa and Rebaone. Interests and Operations Stream member Nampak (Europak): Manufacturing Manager SAB: General Manager Central Region Mmamorwa Rebaone. 2008 December 2001 2011 and 2014 : ABI Regional Optimisation – reduced fromJanuary 23 1,to2000 5 -operations. 2011 December and 2014 HOBBIES, INTERESTS, ETC: SAB: Personnel Manager 1992 - November 1994 FAMILY BACKGROUND: ABI SAP SD Implementation – replaced old legacy system that was HOBBIES, INTERESTS: ABI reduced Regional Optimisation – reduced from 23handling to 5 operations – improved unreliable and replace with SAP SD. Theefficiencies system has since been enhanced improved operational and product double through Married to Rose with three children; a son, Velaphi Junior and two Nampak (MB Glass): Divisional HR- November Director South December 1994 1996 operational efficiencies and reduced product double handling throughAfrica I escape to the Free State where I farm with cattle and maize. daughters, Mmamorwa and Rebaone. with DSD3 and handhelds. This has led to a more reliable delivery system Nampak (Europak): Manufacturing Manager I escape to the Free State where I farm introduction of direct based shipment, mini setting depots up locally based mini depots introduction direct shipment, setting up locally managed by local and improved customerof service. I am alsoETC: a spiritual person and participate in the church choir. HOBBIES, INTERESTS, 1992 - November 1994 managed by local entrepreneurs andDecember optimising warehouses. As a result, Nampak (MB Glass): Divisional HR Director South Africa with cattle and maize. I am I escape to the Free State where I farm with cattle and maize.also a spiritual entrepreneurs and optimising warehouses. As a result, logistics costs increases have logistics costs increases have been below inflation for the past 3 years. 2007 I am also a spiritual person and participate in the church choir. KEY BUSINESS PROJECTS LED IN VARIOUS ROLES: SAB Regional Optimisation – realigned structures to removed overlapping person and participate in the church choir. been below inflation for the past 3 years. roles. Enhanced management capability and empowerment to make KEY BUSINESS PROJECTS LED IN VARIOUS ROLES: 2010 decisions quickly and efficiently. Centralisation of Customer Interaction Centre – moved from regional, nonFAVOURITE BRAND: FAVOURITE BRAND: 2014 customer call centres 2014 FAVOURITE BRAND: standardised Centre to centralised Customer Interaction 2010: Centralisation of Customer Interaction – moved from regional, nonSavannah ABI stakeholder engagement representation and Public Coke No Sugar Savannah stakeholder engagement representation and Public Coke No Sugar Centre. Call Centre ABI processes were automated optimised Interests and and Operations Streamresulting member in Coke No Sugar improved customer service and contained sales costs. Interests and Operations Stream member standardised customer call centres to centralised Customer Interaction Centre. Call 2011 and 2014 ABI Regional Optimisation – reduced from 23 to 5 operations – improved Centre processes were automated and optimised resulting in improved customer service 2008 operational efficiencies and reduced product double handling through 2011 2014 – replaced ABI SAP SD and Implementation old of legacy was introduction direct system shipment, that setting up locally based mini depots and contained sales costs. managed by local entrepreneurs and optimising warehouses. – As improved a result, unreliable and replace with SAP SD. The system has since been enhanced ABI Regional Optimisation – reduced from 23 to 5 operations KEY BUSINESS PROJECTS LED IN VARIOUS ROLES:

2010

Women in Leadership Award for CCBA SA

2000 - December 2001 KEY January BUSINESS1,PROJECTS

October 2005 - February 2015 ABI:IN Commercial Director LED VARIOUS ROLES:

SAB: Personnel Manager Centralisation of Customer Interaction Centre – moved from regional, nonOctober 2005 - August 2006 standardised customer call centres to centralised Customer Interaction 2014 ABI: Divisional S&D Director Centre. Call Centre processes were automated and optimised resulting in ABI stakeholder December 1994engagement - November 1996 and Public Savannah representation January 2002 - September 2005 improved customer service and contained sales costs.

logistics increases have been below inflation for the past 3 years. with DSD3 and handhelds. This has led to acosts more reliable delivery system

operational efficiencies and reduced product double handling through

improved customer service. 2010 2008: ABI SAP SD Implementation –and replaced oldoflegacy that wasupunreliable andmini depots introduction direct system shipment, setting locally based Centralisation of Customer Interaction Centre – moved from regional, nonstandardised customer call centres to centralised Customer Interaction 2007 managed by local entrepreneurs and optimising warehouses. As a result, replace with SAP SD. The system has since been enhanced with DSD3 and handhelds. Centre. Call Centre processes were automated and optimised resulting in SAB Regional Optimisation – realigned structures tobelow removed overlapping logistics costs increases have been inflation for the improved customer service and contained sales costs.past 3 years. roles. Enhanced management capability and empowerment to make This has led to a more reliable delivery system and improved customer service. decisions quickly and efficiently.

2008

ABI SAP SD Implementation – replaced old legacy system that was 2010 unreliable and replace with SAP SD. The system has since been enhanced 2007: SAB Regional Optimisation – realigned structures to removed overlapping roles. Centralisation of Customer Interaction Centre moved regional, with DSD3 and handhelds. This has–led to a more from reliable delivery system nonand improved customer service. standardised customer calldecisions centres to quickly centralised Customer Interaction Enhanced management capability and empowerment to make and 2007 were automated and optimised resulting in Centre. Call Centre processes efficiently. SAB Regional Optimisation – realigned structures to removed overlapping

improved customer service contained sales costs. roles.and Enhanced management capability and

empowerment to make

decisions quickly and efficiently.

2008

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ABI SAP SD Implementation – replaced old legacy system that was unreliable and replace with SAP SD. The system has since been enhanced with DSD3 and handhelds. This has led to a more reliable delivery system and improved customer service.

2019/12/19 4:21 PM


C O CA - C O LA BE VE RAG E S S A (C C BSA )

A DV ERTORI A L

six different Velaphi was ss' Route to of local jobs mponent of s a partner its smaller programme driving an d business operations. dergoing a s. He was at ts impact in ing multiple commitment

ATION: Mahlako Hiine - Stock Manager Mahlako Hiine - Stock Manager

Immaculate Makgae - Operations Manager Immaculate Makgae - Operations Manager

CCBSA CCBSA harnesses harnesses the the power power of of women women

The development of women is a collective effort which Women’s Month reminds us of. However, this important work needs to be carried through the entireof year as a is meaningful philosophy of social change. Coca-Cola Beverages Souththis Africa (CCBSA)’s commitment this The development women a collective effort which Women’s Month reminds us of. However, important work needs to betocarried philosophy yielded the years, particularly in these two top female achievers in South the company’s logisticscommitment division. through thehas entire yearfruit as aover meaningful philosophy of social change. Coca-Cola Beverages Africa (CCBSA)’s to this philosophy has yielded fruit over the years, particularly in these two top female achievers in the company’s logistics division. Immaculate Makgae, the Operations Manager at Midrand, says that the company provides an enabling environment for women to succeed. “One of the things I likethe most about CCBSA is thatatthe womensays buildthat each up, they are rooting for oneenvironment another. That’s notto true in society Immaculate Makgae, Operations Manager Midrand, theother company provides an enabling for often women succeed. generally, hereIthat’s veryabout much CCBSA the culture,” “Thebuild other big other factorup, is that develops its own. The company invests in its “One of thebut things like most is thatshe thesays. women each theyCCBSA are rooting for one another. That’s often not true in people, society especially andvery thatmuch kind of support has meant able buildisathat career.” generally, its butwomen, here that’s the culture,” she says.that “TheI am other bigtofactor CCBSA develops its own. The company invests in its people, Mahlako currently a Stock Manager with has CCBSA’s logistics division, agrees that the culture of CCBSA is supportive of women. She also observes that especiallyHiine, its women, and that kind of support meant that I am able to build a career.” the company’s support other.with Perhaps more remarkably, sheagrees says that extends to the men in the company, including that Mahlako Hiine,women currently a Stockeach Manager CCBSA’s logistics division, thatsupportive the cultureattitude of CCBSA is supportive of women. She also observes those who report in to her. the company’s women support each other. Perhaps more remarkably, she says that supportive attitude extends to the men in the company, including “Ithose havewho some 180 guys reporting to me, most of them older than I am, and I really anticipated that could be problematic—but it was quite the opposite. report in to her. I“Ithink if they you aretodedicated, respect areand doing,” sheanticipated says. “These experienced people and itthey good havethat some 180can guyssee reporting me, most they of them olderwhat thanyou I am, I really thatare could be problematic—but washave quitelots theofopposite. advice to contribute, highly appreciated. It’srespect like being part an doing,” extended family, someare ways. They’ll often tell me I’mthey spending tooof much I think that if they canand seeit’s you are dedicated, they what youofare she says.in “These experienced people and have lots goodtime working need to and get my work/ appreciated. life balance better advice toand contribute, it’s highly It’s likeadjusted!” being part of an extended family, in some ways. They’ll often tell me I’m spending too much time working and need to get my work/ life balance better adjusted!” The lure of logistics The lure of logistics For both women, logistics represents an opportunity to touch many people’s lives, and an exciting working environment. “Logistics touches logistics everything in work and life, because the many things people’s you needlives, had and to get says Mahlako. “Making that happen requires you to be a For both women, represents an opportunity to all touch anthere,” exciting working environment. problem-solver and a lateral thinker. a life, verybecause challenging discipline—no day is ever “Logistics touches everything in work It’s and all the things you need had to the get same.” there,” says Mahlako. “Making that happen requires you to be a She recalls beingand intrigued when one It’s of her university lecturers said that working in logistics would involve solving problems you didn’t know you even problem-solver a lateral thinker. a very challenging discipline—no day is ever the same.” had, in waysbeing you had neverwhen imagined. of lecturers continuous challenges andinthe opportunity solve them creatively appealed to her. The FMCG She recalls intrigued one ofThe herpromise university said that working logistics wouldtoinvolve solving problems you didn’t know you even environment which operates also makes for fast-pacedchallenges workplace.and the opportunity to solve them creatively appealed to her. The FMCG had, in ways in you had CCBSA never imagined. The promise ofacontinuous Immaculate that CCBSA because logisticsalso touches so for much, it providesworkplace. a great opportunity to learn a range of different skills, and thus provides space in environmentadds in which operates makes a fast-paced which an ambitious person can logistics grow. touches so much, it provides a great opportunity to learn a range of different skills, and thus provides space in Immaculate adds that because which an ambitious person can grow. Getting there Getting there Of course, building a great career and attaining one’s goals is never a solo venture. Mahlako says her mother played a huge role in showing her how a determined womanacould Of course, building greatsucceed. career and attaining one’s goals is never a solo venture. Mahlako says her mother played a huge role in showing her how a “As one of the first black female managers at IBM, my mother believed strongly in the power of education and the need to stand on one’s own two feet. determined woman could succeed. She came a difficult background, so nothing handedbelieved to her onstrongly a plate,”inshe also taught methe that the to fear of God is the own beginning of “As one offrom the first black female managers at IBM,was my mother the says. power“She of education and need stand on one’s two feet. wisdom. helped me so much, and so I will try to do thehanded same for the on generation afteralso me.” She cameShe from a difficult background, nothing was to her a plate,” that she comes says. “She taught me that the fear of God is the beginning of Immaculate thatme both parents committed developing people, andthat thecomes same idea her. Increasingly, she tends to see success wisdom. Shesays helped soher much, and were I will try to do thetosame for the generation after motivates me.” not solely in terms of promotions or financial but also in terms ofpeople, how much of an impact has made other people’s This philosophy Immaculate says that both her parents were reward committed to developing and the same ideashe motivates her.inIncreasingly, shelives. tends to see success ties withinher belief success or is linked to an individual’s and determination, qualifications or experience. not in solely terms of that promotions financial reward but alsodrive in terms of how much ofnot anher impact she has made in other people’s lives. This philosophy “If you passion then everything elsedrive will fall place,” she says. “You have to be hungry.” ties in have with her beliefand that self-motivation, success is linked to an individual’s andinto determination, not her qualifications or experience. “If you have passion and self-motivation, then everything else will fall into place,” she says. “You have to be hungry.”

nd two

ze. hoir.

Beverages South Africa

Beverages South Africa

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On

trend

NICOLA COOPER’S JOURNEY HAS BEEN A BROAD AND DIVERSE ONE, ACROSS A MULTITUDE OF DIFFERENT FIELDS. HOWEVER, THE GOLDEN THREAD THAT

TIES EVERYTHING TOGETHER IS THE QUEST TO UNDERSTAND HUMANS, CONSUMERS, IDENTITY FORMATION, AND SUB- AND COUNTERCULTURES.

BY ELSKE JOUBERT

“I have always been innately curious for as long as I can remember,” says Cooper. “I loved information and would always be immersed in a book. I started reading advanced content from a young age, often tapping into my father’s bookshelf.” As an adult, the term ‘forecaster’ didn’t really exist or, rather, not much was known about it. “It wasn’t until I was in my twenties that I knew that this is what I wanted to do. I had been doing it for most of my career, but there just wasn’t a name for it.” Cooper says it took some time – and a fair amount of hard work – to get to where she is today. “As an academic, I didn’t want to label myself until I knew I had the skills to back it up.”

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O N TRE ND

“If you don’t have a seat at the table, bring your own chair” When asked about what a typical day as a trend analyst looks like, Cooper’s response is that it’s “pretty unspectacular”. “I immerse myself in information from the time I wake up. I start my day with a reading and select a ‘morning mantra’ that resonates with me and then share it on social media.” With multiple projects on the go - running her own trend research, analysis and strategy firm Nicola Cooper & Associates and taking the role of in-house trend researcher at 99c - she is generally quite busy. “I’m usually researching, listening to music or a podcast. As an information junkie, this is heaven to me. I have a diverse list of clients and jobs, so I am constantly learning something new through research.” Having a client-facing role in her business, she also often attends meetings and makes time to meet new and interesting people. “I always make time for this,” she enthuses. When it comes to personal time, though, unwinding is the only forecast. “I go to dance classes most evenings. For me, it’s vital to have something that helps me to ‘not think’ for at least an hour a day. I also spend time with my dogs (Bowie and Jimi.Bear) and most nights I fall asleep to some form of documentary.” Weekends are rarely planned for this formidable female, unless it’s fashion week. “At present, I am tagging along with a few photographer friends to learn the technicalities of lighting. This also lets me explore a little more of Cape Town, since I am new to Western Cape.”

I NT ERV I EW

and impact this is having in marketing, advertising, product development and business as a whole.” While the internet and social media may have changed the game for gender empowerment, Cooper believes we are a far way off from equality or narrowing the pay gap. However, she notes that the lack of geographical boundaries, the offer of like-minded communities and the critical conversations that are beginning to happen are powerful. “The fact that we feel less alone in our journeys, that we have communities of individuals that support or listen is vital. Movements such as #TimesUp, #MuteRKelly and #NoMore, among many others, are indicating how tired women are with being silenced. From body issues, objectifying advertising to workplace discrimination, women are talking about it – loudly.” Her advice to other women takes the form of a quote by Midy Aponte, which likely referenced persons of colour or immigrants in America, but which Cooper finds incredibly applicable to women: “If you don’t have a seat at the table, bring your own chair.” “As a female in business or even in my personal life, I am constantly reminded of the far way that we still have to go. I think we need to accept that if we want change, we have to manifest it, we have to make it happen, and to use our smarts, skills, talents and intelligence to create it.”

“Movements such as #TimesUp,

A few years ago, Cooper fired her first client for creating a discriminatory environment in which they disempowered and insulted her in a way they would have never even entertained if she were a man. “I realised then what I would and would not tolerate for money, the damage aligning my business with theirs could bring and, if I accepted this behaviour, that I was enabling the continuation of it. It was a tough choice, but it would have come at a greater cost to me. It is not easy to do what is right, but sometimes, it just needs to be done.”

#MuteRKelly and

Commenting on any noticeable trends in terms of women innovating in Africa, Nicola says one of the most predominant trends she is seeing is the rise of women-owned businesses. “Forty percent of all small South African businesses are owned by women. Globally, women are opening five times the number of businesses than men. As a feminist who was raised by a female entrepreneur with a supportive husband, this is something that genuinely makes me happy. It indicates the drive and logical, creative and intellectual minds of females, not only in South Africa, but also the world.”

#NoMore, among many others, are indicating how tired women are with being silenced”

Being a woman in business in the current landscape of callout culture, the #MeToo movement and fourth-wave feminism is interesting to Cooper. “I’m really enjoying tracking the trajectory

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A HO LI S TIC A P P ROAC H

Dr Langa-Kgolane grew up in a village called Lotlhakane in North West Province. As a young girl she recalls the passion she had for helping people, especially the elderly – and she always knew she wanted to become a doctor. To confirm the reality of her dreams, she visited old-age homes and spent time at GP practices. After studying at Rapulane Primary School, Dudfield Farm School, she went to Bethel Girls High and qualified at the Medical University of South Africa at the age of 24.

“My motto has always been ‘To be at the top, you have to do more than the rest’. I was always called ‘the girl that likes books’, but what people didn’t understand was the motive and goal behind it.” Studying to become a doctor requires passion, motivation and a lot of sacrifice. Dr Langa-Kgolane is the owner of Dr Langa-Kgolane Medical Spa, established 1 September 2018, which has a holistic approach to health.

“The reason behind the opening of the spa is to have more time with patients, focus on teaching and the prevention of illnesses. “I believe that every individual is made up of inter-dependent parts and if one part is not functioning appropriately all other parts are affected. This means you need to consider the patient as a whole being. The holistic approach is the way to go – preventative medicine is best.”

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D R L A N GA - K G O L A N E M E D ICA L SPA

U P C OMI NG S ME

“O UR MISSION IS TO ENHANCE HEALTH, WELLNESS AND NATURAL BEAUTY BY FOCUSING ON THE PATIENT AS A WHOLE”

WHAT IS A MEDICAL SPA? A medical spa is a relaxed environment where you get focused corrective medical aesthetic procedures. A medical spa combines state-of-the-art procedures used in a doctor’s office with the relaxing experience of a day spa. Dr Langa-Kgolane Medical Spa is situated in Garsfontein Pretoria East. WHAT WE OFFER Chemical peels Microneedling Oxygen facial Medical weight loss Anti-wrinkle treatment Dermal fillers Excessive sweat treatment Gene testing

Consultations are crucial so that the correct kind of treatment is prescribed and the plan is followed accordingly; we place a great deal of emphasis on lifestyle modification and maintenance of treatment during our consultations. Most of the conditions that require our services are not only caused by external factors but internal factors such as hormonal imbalances and diet.

visit our office you will receive cuttingedge medical aesthetic treatments conducted by Dr Langa-Kgolane and her licensed staff. Our mission is to enhance the health, wellness and natural beauty of our clients by focusing on them as a whole.

For example, following a certain kind of diet or lifestyle may predispose one to hypertension and diabetes − as a result the client will need to change their lifestyle and even lose weight to gain control over a chronic illness. We are driven by our passion to offer the best in aesthetic medicine while providing maximum comfort. When you

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: 458 Falda Street, Garsfontein, Pretoria East Telephone: 012 003 6481 | Email: phemylang@gmail.com | Website: lkmedicalspa.co.za Twitter: @DrLanga_kgolane | Facebook: @drlangakmedicalspa | Instagram: drlangakmedicalspa

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INTERVIEW

DR L AN GA-KGO L AN E M ED ICA L S PA

D R L AN GA-KGO L AN E MED ICA L S PA Nothing that is valuable is obtained easily; you have to work hard to get to the top! How have you implemented gender-driven development in the workplace? We started as two women in the practice, currently we are five powerful women working at Dr Langa-Kgolane Medical Spa. How has gender empowerment strengthened your organisation? The ability to influence women to make the right decisions, increase self-confidence, and better their status has given me great fulfilment. What are the current and future trends in your sector? Aesthetic treatments. What technological innovations are you using in your organisation to keep in line with the Fourth Industrial Revolution? Social media.

How are you using social media to create more business? Teaching through Instagram and Facebook and also letting clients/patients understand the importance of consultation is our main goal. Once a week we post about a condition that mostly affects women. For us, service is top of the list so that no patient is left thinking she can’t get help. What skills do you think leaders of the future are going to need? • Committing to a clear vision

FIVE TIPS ON SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN BUSINESS: 1. UNDERSTAND THE VISION: The vision

in business is future focused – it is where you want to get to in, say, 10 or 20 years.

2. PLAN: Planning helps to achieve

objectives; planning is vital in business as

it helps to achieve goals in calculated time but also with some ease and promptness.

3. ACTION: What changes after you’ve read a particularly motivating piece of information with useful practical tips? Nothing! Unless

• Humility • Soft skills such as communication • Authenticity

you are able to use the information to make real, tangible changes.

4. STAY FOCUSED: The old saying, “Rome

• Leading through change

was not built in a day” applies here; it

Which female leaders inspire you the most, and why? First is my mother, Mmagauta Nkgodi, the strongest woman I know.

so stay focused on achieving your goal

takes time to let people know who you are,

Then Phuthi Mahanyele-Dabengwa inspires me. I like her calm personality and how she stands up to do more and bigger things as a woman.

and never lose sight of the vision.

5. BE CONSISTENT: You have to consistently keep on doing what is necessary to be successful day in and day out. Every

day is a challenge,

don’t stop learning.

DR LANGA-KGOLANE MEDICAL SPA Dr Langa - Kgolane Medical Spa opened doors on the 1st September 2018. Our mission is to enhance health, wellness and natural beauty by focusing on the patient as a whole. Achievements 2019 Top upcoming gender empowered SME in the medical/aesthetic treatment industry Social responsibility initiatives: Gold sponsorship for Mrs SA finalist

OMPHEMETSE LANGA-KGOLANE

Dr Langa-Kgolane Medical Spa Founder and CEO

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DR. LANGA-KGOLANE MEDICAL SPA Dr. Langa-Kgolane provides aesthetic treatments that result in natural, timeless beauty. When you visit our ofďŹ ce you will receive industry leading medical aesthetic treatments conducted by Dr. Langa-Kgolane and her licensed staff. We are driven by our passion to offer you the best in aesthetic medicine while providing maximum in comfort and privacy.

Physical Address: 458 Falda Street, Garsfontein, Pretoria East Telephone: 012 003 6481 | Email: phemylang@gmail.com Website: lkmedicalspa.co.za

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AVON J U ST IN E :

BAC K IN G WOMEN “The measure of any society is how it treats its women and girls.” These simple yet profound words by former United States First Lady, Michelle Obama, underpin Avon Justine’s ongoing quest to be a force for positive change, supporting initiatives aimed at uplifting women and contributing positively in the fight against misogyny and patriarchy.

AVON JUSTINE CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY PROGRAMME Corporate social responsibility is often seen as good deeds companies do just to tick the boxes and ensure compliance. At the heart of our corporate social responsibility programme is our commitment statement, which spells out our mission: This is the company that puts mascara on lashes and food on tables. That fights wrinkles with one hand and breast cancer with the other. That knows the value of a perfect lip, but still opens its mouth and speaks out against domestic violence and for women’s financial independence. We’re the company that not only brings beauty to doors, but also opens them. The company that supports six million independent Avon Sales Representatives in over 100 countries. The company that for more than 130 years has stood for beauty, innovation, optimism and, above all, for women. We are Avon. Avon Justine is not only about selling products that enhance women’s physical attributes, the company has a social conscience, and always endeavours to make a positive difference in the communities it operates in. Women are the bedrock of our business and our corporate social responsibility

programmes are therefore biased towards issues that affect women. We are excited about the programme we launched in 2019, which is aptly known as ‘stand4her’. This women empowerment initiative is a global plan that seeks to improve the lives of 100 million women a year by advancing their earning potential through the power of beauty. This programme is Avon’s global response to address the barriers that still hold women back and the potential that can be unlocked if women were freed from the shackles of patriarchy.

SPEAK OUT AGAINST DOMESTIC VIOLENCE South Africa is grappling with the scourge of gender-based violence. According to the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, one in four women in South Africa is in an abusive relationship. The figures released by The Medical Research Council (MRC) are more alarming. The MRC estimates that a woman is killed every eight hours in South Africa, and mostly at the hands of someone close to them. Avon Justine has pledged its support for the fight against women abuse by launching a programme called Speak Out Against Domestic Violence Programme in 2008. Our Speak Out Against Domestic Violence programme is a multi-pronged initiative that focuses on education, prevention and victim support programmes. South Africa is one of nearly 50 Avon markets around the world raising funds and awareness to support programmes aimed at ending gender-based violence. In South Africa Avon works with People Opposing Women

Abuse (POWA), the Transform Education About Rape and Sexual Abuse (TEARS) Foundation, Yokhuselo Haven and the Saartjie Baartman Centre for Women and Children. Avon raises funds and educates people through the sale of unique Speak Out Against Domestic Violence Empowerment fundraising products such as the Alaya bracelet. These products include jewellery that features the infinity symbol, which represents the unlimited possibilities for all women once they are free from the clutches of gender-based violence. This initiative has raised more than R7-million in South Africa and more than US$42-million globally to fund this noble cause.

ITHEMBA CRUSADE OF HOPE Millions of women around the world face the prospect of being diagnosed with breast cancer each year. According to the World Cancer Research Fund International, breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and the second most common cancer overall. It is a leading cause of cancer death in less developed countries. South Africa has not been spared from the ravages of this pandemic. According to statistics released by the Department of Health, breast cancer affects approximately 27 in 100 000 women in South Africa, and accounts for 16% of cancer deaths amongst women. The reality is that the incidence of cancer is becoming more commonplace among local women, as indicated by the growing number of cancer cases. In South Africa, Avon Justine launched the iThemba Crusade of Hope in 2001,

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AVO N JU S T INE

“M ORE THAN R500 000 HAS BEEN USED TOWARDS THE BUILDING OF A CRÈCHE FOR THE EMBO COMMUNITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL”

Wings of Hope as well as Look Good… Feel Better (LGFB) on this breast cancer awareness campaign. The company has also worked with the Cancer Association of Southern Africa (CANSA). Funds for the iThemba Crusade of Hope are raised through the sale of special pink iThemba products. For 2017, these products included a pink cap inscribed with the iThemba logo, as well as a new iThemba pins suitable for both men and women.

Beauty entrepreneurs

Avon Justine has given hundreds of thousands of South African women the opportunity to earn and supplement their income. The benefits of being able to generate an income has given many of these entrepreneurs a lifeline and secured their financial independence. These are the benefits that representatives have accrued from being part of the Avon Justine family: •

Avon representatives in South Africa who have experience of 16 months or more earned enough to cover a typical household’s expenditures for food, non-alcoholic beverages, clothing, shoes and healthcare.

The representatives’ income placed them in the top half of black females in their community and brought them in line with what a black South African man earns.

Seventy-five percent of the representatives reported that Avon had helped them achieve financial autonomy and nearly 90% said they had learned skills from Avon that could be transferred into other employment.

Respondents reported in very large numbers that working for Avon had given them confidence and social skills, as well as earning them respect from family and their community. This effect on their sense of empowerment seems to result from the supportive and gender-friendly network, as well as the formal recognition system that Avon employs to reward and inspire achievement.

JUSTINE THUTHUKISA TOGETHER Poverty remains one of the biggest challenges that plague many communities across South Africa. As part of its community upliftment drive, Avon Justine launched a programme called Thuthukisa, which translates to building together, to help develop, support and empower impoverished communities in South Africa. Since its launch in 2010, Thuthukisa has raised more than R3-million to fund this anti-poverty cause from the sale of A6 Thuthukisa Together notebooks which retail for R50. More than R500 000 has been used towards the building of a crèche for the Embo community of KwaZulu-Natal. The crèche, which will also serve as an afterhours crafts market for the women in the community, will enable members of the community to find employment or acquire new skills in an environment where their children are safe. In 2019 we provided R120 000 to the which has raised more than R23-million for breast cancer education and awareness. Avon Justine currently works closely with

New Jerusalem Children’s Home to complete the extension of their facilities to accommodate more children.

A DV ERTORI A L

CONTACT DETAILS: Physical Address: 148A kelvin Drive, Woodlands Ext 4 Sandton, Johannesburg, 2080 Switchboard: 010 205 5000

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S A FA R I F O R T H E S OUL

WOMEN OP PA D

for the BY ELSKE JOUBERT

Samara offers more than just a luxe escape. Spanning 70 000 acres of wilderness in South Africa’s Eastern Cape, this award-winning private game reserve has conservation at the heart of its existence. The balmy winter Karoo sun is behind us as we make our way on a stretch of gravel road towards one of Samara’s exclusive offerings: Karoo Lodge. Driving down the dirt track, we see a steenbok hiding behind a thicket. Despite already being late for check-in, we take an additional few minutes to sit in silence as we hold the little antelope’s gaze. As if to say hello, two warthogs on the other side of the road make their appearance but dash for cover as soon as we start the engine. Our destination is a beautifully renovated farmhouse; we are greeted by jovial staff in the spirit and warmth that so perfectly epitomises the Great Karoo. Lydia, our gregarious host, takes us on a mini tour around the lodge, with its unpretentious old-world charm, reminiscent of a bygone era, before we are shown to our suite. Here, heat emanating from a cosy fire acts as an antidote against the harsh Karoo cold. “Unpack and settle in. Supper will be served at 7pm,” Lydia informs us.

We explore our exquisite surroundings – an elegant yet unpretentious en-suite room consisting of a luxurious double bed, lounge chairs and a table upon which sits all the information we need for our stay. Everything in the room is complementary: bottled water, tea, coffee and a decanter of sherry to provide some much-needed insulation for chilly winter nights. Dinner is a delicious four-course affair: two entrées, a main course and scrumptious dessert. We also have our pick of some of South Africa’s finest wines. Dumisani, our game ranger, comes over to our table to inform us about the night’s game drive. Too beat to even breathe, we reluctantly decline. Tomorrow is another day. Early the next day, we are woken by a commotion. We draw the curtains and there, right on our front stoep, are a few

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mischievous vervet monkeys. They run away as soon as they spot us – little primate voyeurs, watching us from the nearby trees. Coffee in hand, we decide to make ourselves comfortable on the veranda. We’ve barely sat down when we spot eland at the watering hole mere metres from us. In the stillness, we count ourselves incredibly blessed to be in the company of these formidable creatures.

We linger a little longer before we make our way back to the vehicle. Dumisani finds the perfect spot for us to have drinks and we take in the serene silence that can only be found in the bush, before heading back to the lodge. After lunch, we have a few minutes to freshen up before we embark on our afternoon game drive, where we see a few more buck and giraffes before venturing off to find the elephants.

Around 9am, we head out for our first game drive. We spot a tower of giraffes grazing lazily en route, and I grin at their curious expressions. “Those are males right there,” Dumisani informs us. “You can tell by their cheezekops.” We encounter more eland and some kudu, gemsbok and springbok before we set out on our very daring excursion: tracking cheetah by foot. “I’m not going,” I tell the group. Dumisani smiles. “It’s safer with the group than sitting alone in the vehicle,” he says. I gather as much courage as possible, all the while committing to staying very close to him. Justa, Samara’s first female tracker, ushers us along. We find the cheetahs nonchalantly playing in the field: a mama and her five cubs. “Don’t be frightened when the cubs run up to you. They’re just coming to say hello,” Dumisani informs us. We stand in awe. “Who wants a picture of themselves with a cheetah in the background?” Dumisani asks. I eagerly volunteer, all prior inhibitions forgotten.

Just a short way on, we spot a parked vehicle, the silence interrupted only by the clicking of cameras. There, to our right, are two majestic elephant bulls standing side by side, the younger one now playfully running away in the other direction. The older bull ventures off to find the young one, and off they disappear into the thicket. By now, the sun is setting and the sky is bursting into hues of pink and orange, the silhouettes of the hills visible in the distance. We head back to the lodge and for bed. On our last day at Samara we embark on what feels like the groot trek up the mountains in hopes of encountering the reserve’s resident lions. The weather is gloomy, but our spirits are high. Dumisani takes us all the way to the top, where we are gifted with the most breathtaking sight: a herd of black wildebeest running freely across the plain.

SIBELLA, THE MIRACLE CHEETAH Sibella was released into Samara a few years ago after suffering terribly at the hands of humans. She made history by being the first cheetah back in the Karoo in 125 years. Sibella has produced and successfully raised three litters of cubs, thereby contributing a total of 17 cubs to the endangered cheetah population of South Africa. Sibella’s story is available on DVD. This is a lovingly told tale of her life and legacy. She lives on in spirit through her many descendants across subSaharan Africa and particularly through her daughter Chilli, who continues to amaze people with her temperament and mothering instincts – just like Sibella.

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S A FA R I F O R T H E S OUL

WOMEN OP PA D

“We are gifted with the most breathtaking sight: a herd of black wildebeest running freely across the plain” SAMARA’S CONSERVATION EFFORTS Samara’s vision is the co-creation of a living legacy in the Great Karoo, providing a winning plan for the people and wild places of this special landscape. Their vision is nothing less than a fullyrestored Great Karoo ecosystem, a haven for endangered species, a purveyor of ecosystem services and a tool for social upliftment in this hauntingly beautiful land. Samara is a lifelong project for the founders, the Tompkins family, and a stepping stone in the creation of South Africa’s third-largest protected area of 1.3 million acres.

After driving around for a few minutes, we spot something on our way down from the mountain. Barely visible, there on a rock between the bushes, with eyes transfixed on our vehicle, is one of the most beautiful lionesses I have ever seen. We sit in dead silence, scared to even twitch. She looks straight at us before making her way to the little dirt road. We follow suit, keeping at a safe distance. Before we know it, she jumps off into the thicket, heeding the call of her partner. We head back to the lodge, making a quick pit stop where we have our morning drinks. I breathe in the fresh Karoo air and

wish that I didn’t have to leave so soon. Back at the lodge, Lydia awaits with freshly warmed towels and I eagerly warm my hands and wipe the cold from my face. We head to breakfast before checking out. Our experience at Samara was remarkable, matched only by the hospitality and friendliness of the staff. We bid the Great Karoo farewell and head back to the hustle and bustle of city life, forever changed by the experience of this exquisite place in all its untouched and unfiltered glory.

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Making BY FIONA WAKELIN

BE TRANSPORTED TO A WORLD OF GRAND NOSTALGIA THE MOMENT YOU CLIMB ABOARD THE LUXURIOUS ROVOS RAIL

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M A K I N G TRACKS

WOMEN OP PA D

Stepping out of the hustle and bustle of Cape Town’s Adderley Street railway station and into the Rovos Rail (RR) lounge is like being transported across worlds. One minute you are navigating crowds and taxis and a wintry Cape morning and the next you are sipping bubbles, nibbling on novelty sandwiches and listening to a violin/guitar duet playing “Chattanooga Shoe Shine Boy”. The staff are all extremely welcoming and it is quite easy to sink into the grand sofas and become enveloped in the stately ambience. There were 23 people aboard this luxury train, “the pride of Africa”, plying its path from the Mother City to Pretoria; a large percentage were women, travelling in groups or alone and many were from Australia and the United Kingdom. Once aboard, you can choose to either be convivial in the lounge/observation deck or enjoy peace and quiet in the comfort of your suite – whichever suits your mood. Time shifts and you slip into a capsule that glides through the outside world and the shifting scenery. The majestically towering Swartberg and Matroosberg mountains reinforced, for those of us from Cape Town, the knowledge that we truly do live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. It is de rigueur to dress for dinner, which is all part of the out-of-world experience and the service, food and wine are all first class. Waking the following morning, opening the blinds and watching the dawn turn the Pierneef landscape from grey to pink and yellow and blue is a once-in-a-lifetime experience. It is hard to photograph the Karoo – which is basically made up of space, lined with tussocks of hardy scrub and laced with distant hillocks – a humbling expanse of minimalist magnificence.

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M A K I N G TRACKS

WOMEN OP PA D

“There is something deeply pacifying about being on a long train journey”

The tumbled-down, derelict sidings we chugged past were indicators of a changing economy, changing travel patterns and climate change. Deelfontein, Britsville, Hutchinson, Potfontein… places that I had not heard of and which time has forgotten. There is something deeply pacifying about being on a long train journey: the rhythm, the gliding, the clu-clunking at cruising speed all combine to lull one into a state of deep relaxation which easily translates into tranquility. If my house made the same noises at night I would not be able to sleep, but the motion of a train is almost a lullaby.

Occasionally a gymnogene or crow would keep us company for a few seconds and then suddenly we would slide past a lone steenbok standing stokstil in the expanse covering hundreds of acres it calls home. Herds of sheep graze peacefully in the watery early morning light, blissfully unaware of the connotations of the term “Karoo lamb”. Rovos Rail is a slow train, averaging 60km per hour and it is a Wi-Fi free zone, which is great for some rest and relaxation. Being disconnected digitally gives you a chance to connect with the landscape and the people on the journey – and to exhale.

One of my favourite moments was drinking champagne at sunset in the observation carriage, passing a vlei with hundreds of flamingoes glowing pinkly in the dusk – and all the while the Milky Way was slowly emerging in all its magnificence. Just awe-inspiring. On the final morning you awaken to the landscape having metamorphosised into dry, industrial Gauteng, the economic heartland of the country. Our schedule was intrinsically tied to that of Prasa and the state-run railways, so we opted to alight at Rhodesfield, 15 minutes away from OR Tambo airport – time to head back to reality, fully fortified to once again tackle the daily grind – thanks to Rovos Rail.

Rovos is a hybrid word made up of the first name and surname of the founder Rohan Vos. It is a family business and the fact that many of the staff have been with the company for more than 25 years of their 30-year history speaks volumes for the RR culture. The hostess responsible for our deluxe suite was one of the longstanding staff members and was able to put two sons through university: one a Master’s student and the other a medical doctor.

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Demure

BY ELSKE JOUBERT

Photographer: Marnus Meyer | MUAH: Suaad Jeppie | Stylist: Carla Vermaak

Phi Casa creates high-end, luxury modest wear inspired by art and history. Made by local women from previously disadvantaged backgrounds, the garments are the epitome of modesty and femininity. One of designer Aneeqah Stellenboom’s aims is to create not only beautifully crafted clothes, but also bonds between women through the construction of a garment.

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DA RI N G LY DE MU RE

L I FES T YL E

Modest fashion is a big trend at the moment. Why, in your opinion, has it become so popular?

I think we live in an age where it’s become a social norm for women to be in positions of power in virtually every aspect of life. Women are being recognised for contributing so much more to society and have a greater sense of self-worth than ever before. We’ve broken the mould and taken back power in choosing to dress more modestly, which makes it easier to display the many facets of a woman without placing a focus on her physical appearance. I feel that dressing modestly adds a bit of mystery – and who doesn’t find a bit of mystery intriguing?

Phi Casa has a passion for women empowerment, especially uplifting women from previously disadvantaged backgrounds. Where and when did this passion originate?

This particular passion is something that is really personal to me. My mother, who comes from a previously disadvantaged background, was a single parent who raised three kids. As children, we watched her struggle to provide for us. Even though it was post-apartheid, things were still not easy. I remember thinking at the time that one day when I make a success of myself, I would help women just like my mom so that the next generation might have a better shot at life.

Can you give us a brief overview of your ranges and the messages you wish to convey with each one?

Each collection I create has a different story to tell. All the collections convey the same message to the women who wear the garments – the message of hope, inspiration, grace, aspiration and individuality. Aesthetically, I try to have them as different from each other as I can, as they represent the many facets of vastly different women from around the world. No woman is the same and yet we all share similar characteristics. We might choose to display or communicate that uniquely, but we can all relate to one another on some level.

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LIFESTYLE

DA R INGLY D E M U R E

Give us an idea of the woman who wears a Phi Casa garment. Who is she? What does she like? Where does she travel? A Phi Casa woman is self-confident and knows her worth and value. She is curious about the world and eager to learn. Her optimistic mindset and feminine energy allow her to tap into her intuition. She is also a free spirit and finds courage in travelling to places that may seem like unchartered territory but feed her mind – she knows this is the only way to personal growth.

What is next for Phi Casa? Positioning our brand within the South African market as the goto modest luxury fashion house; creating more awareness around locally produced products and the importance of supporting locally; and ensuring we will be able to continue uplifting more women in underprivileged communities.

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QUI C K - F I RE Q& A W I TH K E LLY- M A RI E JACOBS

L I FES T YL E

Quick-fire Q&A with

Kelly-Marie

Jacobs BY ELSKE JOUBERT

Nominate your eighth wonder of the world (person, place or experience). My grandfather, who passed away at the age of 92. He was the

most hard-working man I have ever known, besides my Dad, of course! From a young age, he instilled so many core values and ethics into my life. He really believed in me and a lot of what he said about my future has surprisingly come true. He was just a truly wonderful man. What time do you wake up and what is the first thing you do? I wake up at 6am and the first thing that I do is snooze my alarm clock for another five minutes. When I am eventually out of bed, I usually check outside to see what the weather is like. Favourite getaway destination? My bedroom on a rainy day. If you could have dinner with any three people – alive or no longer here – who would they be and what would you serve? My late grandpa: he always had the most fascinating stories to

The young, creative and talented Kelly-Marie Jacobs has been appointed as Zonnebloem’s newest white winemaker. Her career to date has been paved by inspiring people and a natural affinity for making wines. Well-travelled, she has been to Burgundy, France, twice, did a harvest in the village of Pommard and travelled to Mendoza, Argentina to broaden her winemaking knowledge.

tell and of course enjoyed his wine. The wine writer and critic, Tim Atkin – I’ve tasted with him twice before and he is definitely someone who has a lot of anecdotes about the who’s who in the global wine industry – I could learn a few secrets. And Joe Bastianich – a MasterChef USA judge and very good chef. Someone else would have to prepare the dinner because although I am totally addicted to cooking shows, I am not much of a cook myself, but if Joe’s coming, then there will definitely be authentic Italian pasta dishes on the menu. What would you do with an extra hour in your day? Take that hour to treat myself, be it a nap, a TV show or a walk outside.

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LIFESTYLE

A TA ST E O F A F R ICA

A taste of Africa BY ELSKE JOUBERT

Hailing from Limpopo, Siwela Masoga is one of the youngest black female winemakers in the country. Her aim is to inspire other young people, especially women, to become active role players in South Africa’s wine industry.

Following her graduation, Masoga was fortunate enough to land an internship at a winery in Stellenbosch. There, she

says, she was exposed to vineyard practices and cellar processing, as well as the packaging and bottling of wine. “I realised just how passionate I was about winemaking and wanted to equip myself with as many skills as possible.” After her internship, she received an offer to work at one of the biggest wine and spirit producers in the world, focusing on the quality assurance and approval of wine and spirits – from primary to secondary production.

“I never thought I’d one day become a winemaker,” Masoga says enthusiastically. “My understanding of wine was close to non-existent. Where I come from, we don’t have vineyards – and we certainly don’t have any winemakers!” Masoga studied science as a subject in high school, which prompted her to pursue it while at university. “I completed my national diploma in Biotechnology at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology where I majored in fermentation – that was what piqued my interest.” She recalls sharing a thought with a good friend right before a lecture on fermentation back in 2012. “I told my friend that one day I would have my own winery and make my own wine.”

“At this point my skills and knowledge began to broaden as I spent six years in the winemaking industry. I also worked casually with various wine farms as a wine advisor to understand customers’ perspectives on and expectations of wine.” Masoga also completed additional courses in winemaking to understand the process better. “Understanding the capital and extensive pressure that the industry is under, my focus was on producing a product for the local market.” Even though the dream of having her own cellar and farm was far-fetched, she says she managed to subcontract

a cellar in Stellenbosch with the help of the farm as part of an incubation programme. “Not only did I gain access to the facilities to make and store my wine, but I also received a great amount of mentorship.”

THE ETHOS BEHIND THE BRAND Siwela means “crossing over” in isiZulu – it also portrays the courage that comes with venturing into an industry as challenging as the wine industry. Commenting on the ethos behind the brand, Masoga says her product aims to encourage wine enthusiasts to embrace our beautiful African culture, heritage and originality. “I have always wanted Siwela Wines to stand out. With the help of my designer, we managed to create something authentic, with a touch of Africa. If we can celebrate our culture and heritage through food, music and clothing, we can certainly do the same with our wines!” What differentiates Siwela from other wine on the market is the fact that the brand is meant to inspire a generation. “I believe Siwela is more than just a bottle of wine. I want to inspire young people to pursue their passions and to work on their dreams.”

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IL LOVO S U GA R S O U T H A FRICA

I NT ERV I EW

ILLOVO SUGAR SOUTH AFRICA YOUR TOP WOMAN Mamongae Mahlare joined Illovo Sugar South Africa as Managing Director on 1 March 2018. She holds an MBA from Harvard Business School and a BSc Chemical Engineering degree from the University of the Witwatersrand. Mahlare joined the Illovo Sugar South Africa team with a wealth of general management, commercial, operational and engineering experience, having previously worked for Coca Cola Beverages South Africa where she was a Channel Development Manager. Previously, Mahlare worked for SABMiller where she held position of Marketing Director for SABMiller Mozambique. Prior to this role she has held a number of executive positions in marketing and commercial in Tanzania & SADC region within the SABMiller group. Mahlare’s early career roles were within Bain & Company and Unilever. She is a Trustee of John Davidson Education Trust, a previous member of the Wits University Council (senior governing

body of the institution) and Chairperson of the Wits Empowerment Trust. PLEASE PROVIDE A BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF YOUR ORGANISATION. Illovo Sugar South Africa is an invested, long-term contributor to the South African economy and a committed partner to the continuing transformation of the agri-processing sector. Tracing back to 1891, the company’s activities are predominantly focused on sugar and syrup production, but also encompass opportunities in downstream industries. Today it is a Level 1 BEE contributor. Illovo Sugar South Africa has dedicated enterprise development initiatives, local supply and value chain-building, community development and local entrepreneur inclusion in its supply chain in order to ensure shared value / benefit within areas of its operation.

CONTACT DETAILS:

Physical address: 1 Nokwe Avenue Ridgeside Umhlanga Rocks, Durban

Postal address: PO Box 194, Durban, 4000 Telephone: 031 508 4300 Fax: 031 508 4493 Website: www.illovosugarafrica.com Facebook page: @IllovoSugar

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES. Key Elements Include: • • • • •

3 rainfed sugar cane estates 4 sugar factories, one including a refinery 3 downstream plants Central warehouse and distribution facility Internal electricity generation

Production of: • Sugar cane • Raw and refined sugar • Downstream products: ethanol, syrup, furfural, furfuryl alcohol, and other products.

MAMONGAE MAHLARE

Managing Director of Illovo Sugar South Africa S TA N D A R D B A N K TO P WOM EN L EAD ER S 139

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14–15 AUGUST 2019 E M P E R O R S PA L A C E

StandardBankTopWomen

Topcomedia_

Standard Bank Top Women

#SBTopWomen

SBTopWomen

TopcomediaTV

TOPBUSINESSWOMEN.CO.ZA

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“ TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS YOU NEED PATIENCE, TO UNDERSTAND YOUR MARKET AND PLOUGH BACK INTO THE COMMUNITY” - CASTER SEMENYA, SOUTH AFRICAN OLYMPIC GOLD MEDALLIST

“SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP IS NOT JUST TEACHING A MAN HOW TO FISH, BUT REVOLUTIONISING THE FISHING INDUSTRY” - DR SAUNDARYA RAJESH, FOUNDER-PRESIDENT - AVTAR CAREER CREATORS & FLEXI CAREERS, INDIA

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“ LET’S NOT UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER THAT EACH OF US HERE HAVE. WHAT ARE YOU DOING TO TAKE WOMEN TO THE TOP WITH YOU.” - CATHERINE MUNJOMA - EXECUTIVE HEAD: DIGITAL, E-COMMERCE & SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING

“WE MUST BE CRITICAL IN THE WAY WE CHAMPION WOMEN” - MICH ATAGANA, HEAD OF COMMUNICATIONS & PUBLIC AFFAIRS, GOOGLE SOUTH AFRICA

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I NT ERV I EW

T UHF

THE TUHF GROUP OF COMPANIES Interview with Lusanda Netshitenzhe, TUHF Development Impact Manager Please give a brief outline of the history of your organisation and the services you provide. Our vision: Impact through SCALE Who are we: We are leaders in specialised financial services and solutions to inner-city property entrepreneurs. We finance and support entrepreneurs to grow their business through our in-depth market knowledge, prudent risk appetite, and street-level approachability. Through our offering, entrepreneurs purchase, refurbish and convert property, providing quality, affordable and welllocated inner-city mixed-use rental spaces. We have consistently grown our book over 17 years successfully balancing profitability with development impact. I have worked for TUHF for the last 12-anda-half years, having started as a Portfolio Manager. At the time my role was to bring in new business and manage portfolios of funded transactions from 2007 to 2009. I then moved to Durban to set up the branch as a “one woman show” for six years with four staff members and a profitable book. I learnt many difficult lessons during that time and one of them was that if you are going to enter a new market such as opening an office in Durban – it is best to use local resources, local knowledge and local networks. Before joining TUHF I came from a background of affordable housing working with The Support Programme for Social Housing, a European Union funded initiative which provided funding and technical support to social housing institutions around the country. What have been your major milestones

and successful projects? Aside from opening the branch in Durban I would like to highlight a new programme called uMaStandi. With my extensive experience in financing entrepreneurs in inner-city spaces and learning how business

works in Johannesburg and Durban, we – as a team − used this expertise to shape the uMaStandi product. The intention was to develop a product that would de-risk markets and support property entrepreneurs in townships. This milestone resulted in the success of uMaStandi, as we have now financed over 30 people with R35-million in loans in township areas. How do you celebrate gender empowerment in your organisation? My belief for all women in the workplace is to stand your ground, be confident in what you are doing and believe that as a woman you are equal and you are bringing critical skills to the table, like empathy and the ability to nurture relationships. In business we often dismiss these as soft skills, but they are necessary for long-term and mutually beneficial business deals. At TUHF, we are deliberate about women empowerment with our training and mentorship programme specifically tailored to assist women to navigate property development and management in this traditionally male-dominated space. We are proud of our many successful female entrepreneurs who run well-managed properties in inner-city environments and these areas are especially challenging and management intensive given their high crime and grime levels.

the future? I am a housing professional and a development planner by profession. Whatever I do will likely remain in this space but we will have to see what the future holds.

CONTACT DETAILS: Telephone: 010 595 9000 Johannesburg: 12th Floor, West Wing, Libridge Building, 25 Ameshoff Street, Braamfontein Pretoria: 8th Floor, Olivetti House 100 Pretorius Street, Cnr Pretorius & Schubart Streets, Pretoria E-mail: info@tuhf.co.za | Website: www.tuhf.co.za Twitter: @TUHFLtd Facebook: @TUHFSA Linkedin: TUHF

What are your CSI policies? CSI is new to our organisation as we started in 2018 but our business model is inherently developmental. We support an inner-city school called Streetlight in Jeppestown. Personally, I come from a background where people battle and I believe that it is extremely important “to keep the heart” in all business transactions. We believe in giving back to society to build commercial sustainability and earn our licence to trade. What are your exciting plans for

LUSANDA NETSHITENZHE Development Impact Manager

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SPEAKERS

YOLWETHU BESE

Thulani Sibeko │Chief Marketing Officer

WWW.VDUBESE.COM

2019

Born and raised in Soweto, Thulani Sibeko is an en motivated and assertive marketer.

Since graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Bus in 1992, Thulani has held different marketing role over the past 25 years, including Gillette, Polaroid and Nedbank.

In 2011 Thulani was appointed Group Executive f Transformation and Corporate Affairs at Nedbank.

Since January 2018 Thulani has been the Chief Ma Group, leading the marketing and communication member of the Standard Bank Group Exco. 144 STANDARD BANK TO P W O M EN LEAD E R S

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Qualifications: Master in Business Administration (Henley) Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Ca Graduate Certificate in Business Studies (Harvard 2019/12/19 4:24 PM


CATHERINE MUNJOMA

FOLA OLATUNJI-DAVID

BRIDGET MOKWENA-HALALA

ANNE GITHUKU-SHONGWE

Executive Head Digital, e-Commerce & Social Media Marketing Standard Bank

Head of Startup Success and Services, Launchpad Africa Google Nigeria

CEO Assupol

Representative UN Women South Africa Multi-Country Office

LINAH MAIGURIRA

SHIRLEY MACHABA

ANGELA DICK

DR ACHIENG OJWANG

Industry Manager: Retail and eCommerce Google South Africa

CEO PwC Southern Africa

CEO Transman

Executive Director Global Compact Network South Africa

MPUMI ZIKALALA

MICH ATAGANA

KHENSANI MABUZA

LINDIWE MATLALI

Managing Director De Beers Group

Head of Communications and Public Affairs Google South Africa

Corporate Relations Executive Zamani

Founder and CEO Africa Teen Geeks

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SPEAKERS

NONYE OMOTOLA

DR MONICA STACH

TSHEPISO PHOSA

WENDY ORR

Managing Director Africa Communications Media Group

CEO Cotlands

Entrepreneur, Author DSAVG and Owner of Milviforce Puma N4 Nelspruit

Head: Group Inclusion Standard Bank

ELSIE PULE

GEORGIE MIDGLEY

KIARA NIRGHIN

CHARLENE GEORGE

Group Executive: Human Resources Eskom

CEO M4JAM

Winner 2016 Google Science Fair

Managing Director Verve Digital

VIDESHA PROOTHVEERAJH

SAMANTHA PERRY

LINDA SWART

LENA CHIRWA

Europe Middle East & Asia Strategic Growth Director Intel Corporation

Co-founder WomeninTechZA

Entrepreneur Development Standard Bank South Africa

Head of Legal & Corporate Affairs Enel Green Power South Africa

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ZANDILE KEEBINE

CATHERINE CONSTANTINIDES

VERONICA MOTLOUTSI

Founder GirlCodeZA

Director Miss Earth South Africa

Chief Executive SmartDigital Solutions

LISA ILLINGWORTH CEO & Co-founder FutureProof

HON. NTOMBI MEKGWE

ANDREA CAMPBELL

NIVANI GOVINDER

LINDIWE KWELE

Speaker Gauteng Provincial Legislature

Honorary Treasurer The Information Technology Association of South Africa

Head of Partner Marketing (Africa, Middle East & Turkey)Google Cloud

Chief Operations Officer South African Post Office

VERE SHABA

KAMENTHA PILLAY

CHRISTINE RAMON

ROSH BARDIEN

Founder & Director: Green Buildings and Engineering Shaba Africa

Founder STEM Moms

Chief Financial Officer Anglo Gold Ashanti

Women’s Empowerment Advocate and Thought Leader

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WHAT’S NEW FOR GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES MEDICAL SCHEME MEMBERS IN 2020

GREAT NEWS FOR GEMS MEMBERS Public service employees and their families can look forward to receiving enhanced healthcare coverage in 2020 as the Government Employees Medical Scheme (GEMS) has reinvested close to R1-billion towards benefits enhancement. For the second year in a row, GEMS has kept its contribution increase down to one of the lowest in the industry. South Africa’s largest restricted medical scheme has announced a weighted average contribution increase of 7.69% across all its benefit options. The scheme also announced a change in name of the Sapphire option which will now be called Tanzanite One with bigger, better and richer benefits. “The scheme endeavours to keep annual increases to a minimum without compromising members’ access to quality healthcare as we continue to prioritise the healthcare needs of over 720 000 principal members and 1.8 million beneficiaries entrusted to us,” said Dr Stan Moloabi, GEMS Chief Operations Officer. GEMS continues to make a significant contribution in providing access to quality healthcare to South Africans. As South Africa’s largest restricted scheme, GEMS has the lowest healthcare expenditure which means more benefits for members and their beneficiaries. “The enhanced benefits on Tanzanite One symbolise an evolution towards the Basic Benefit Package and transformation, which forms part of our business strategy that seeks to ensure more value for our members,” says Dr Moloabi.

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ew in 2019!

several – what’s new in 2019! GEMS

or all in- and s all GEMS

With GEMS, your health is taken care of – so that you have time to focus on what is important to you and your family. This year is no different! SUMMARY OF KEY BENEFIT ENHANCEMENTS

embers can look forward to several ON SPECIFIC BENEFIT OPTIONS FOR 2020 and Accessible: dwEVO – improved benefits

BENEFITS ENHANCEMENT ACROSS ALL OPTIONS

TANZANITE ONE

With the goal of universal health coverage inEach year medical scheme members are mind, our 2019 benefit enhancements place encouraged to review their healthcare needs has been renamed Tanzanite One, with improved greater focus on vulnerable groups – children,and make the decision of whether they wish to ned at a ts for our who will now have access With GEMS, your remain healthonistheir taken care oft –option so that you More cover – an increasebenefi of 5.4% formembers, all in- and current benefi or choose women and the elderly to a network of healthcare providers by nominating a have time to focus on what is important to you and out-of-hospital benefit limits across all GEMS to move to a different option. GEMS invitesyour GEMS provides greater access to quality referred generallpractitioner of their choice to coordinate their family. This year is different! benefit options. all no members of the scheme and prospective through a wide array of networks healthcare healthcare needs. From 2020, members on the Tanzanite members of the public service who qualify to l One option will have access to wide privatebeneficiary hospitals, subject Because of our definition, you Accessible:join GEMS to consider their family’s healthcare Extended benefits on Emerald and EVO – to utilising the GEMS private hospital can care for more ofnetwork. your family members needs for the year ahead and choose the – an extra l With the goal of universal health coverage in an additional R500 per beneficiary per year for: f-hospital they are likely to need. More importantly, EMERALD AND EMERALD VALUE OPTIONS l mind, ourcover 2019 benefit enhancements place Network GP consultations; Affordable: we would like to encourage public service Members on the Emerald Value Option (EVO) will l greater focus on vulnerable groups – children, Acute prescribed medicine obtained at a employees on employment levels one to five l experience the lowest monthly contributions increase, security for Our growing reserve ratio provides women and the elderly network pharmacy; and to take advantage of the enhanced Tanzanite which then makes sense for members on EVO to you and your family embers will l l GEMS provides greater access toforquality Pathology tests performed at a preferred One option as they may qualify a 100% remain lon this option.contribution Both EVO and increases Emerald offer Lowest keep us e for additional healthcare through widecover array ofcontributions. networks pathology laboratory. the same level of healthcare cover, however EVO is subsidy, whichacould their affordable. At 4.3%, EVO has experienced the more affordable because members make use of a l Because of our wide beneficiary definition, you For more information on the benefit lowest contribution increase for 2019. can careenhancement for more offoryour family members Extra value for membersnetwork on Ruby – an extra of healthcare providers having nominated a 2020, contact GEMS using l Members moving from the Emerald option to e and Beryl general practitioner of their choice to coordinate their R500 per year to extend your Out-of-hospital EVO will experience a discount of over 16% one of the following communication channels: y per year for healthcare needs. Members on Emerald who switch Affordable: Block Benefit. contributions before subsidy o R90 per event. to EVO canon experience around R600 worth of savings l Our growing reserve ratio provides security for on their monthly contribution, which would equate to you and your family Sapphire gets richer – Sapphire members will Richer benefits: R7200 money back in their pockets per annum. ntraceptive l Lowest contribution increases keep us have access to private hospital care for additional l GEMS has invested over three quarters of a r now available affordable. At 4.3%, EVO has experienced the procedures and treatments. billion rands in benefit enhancements for our lowest contribution increase for 2019. members l Members moving from the Emerald option to More for your medicines – CONTACT Sapphire DETAILS: and Beryl l GEMS has better and richer benefits – our lowbenefit options EVO will experience a discount of over 16% members have R250 per beneficiary per year for cost option, Sapphire is richer in benefits than ng services on contributions before subsidy over-the-counter medicine, limited to R90 per event. other similar-priced products in the market Physical address: y tests of Amarand Avenue & Mercy Avenue, Richer benefits: Family planning gets easierCorner – a contraceptive Waterkloof Glen Ext 2, Pretoria, 0181 l GEMS has invested over three quarters of a benefit of R2 822 per family per year now available Postal address: billion rands in benefit enhancements for our on Sapphire and Beryl. GEMS Private Bag X1, Hatfield, 0028 members nefits available on GEMS in0862019, l GEMS has better and richer benefits – our lowTelephone: 111 4367 Expanded screening services – all benefit options vailable communication channels. Fax: 012 362 6413 cost option, Sapphire is richer in benefits than will receive out-of-hospital screening services Website: www.gems.gov.za other similar-priced products in the market including: l Childhood hearing and optometry tests

per year for:

l

GEMS is excited to announce that the Sapphire option

r more detail on the rich benefits available on GEMS in 2019, ntact us using151one of our available communication channels. TW FINAL.indd

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SPONSORS AND PARTNERS

P L AT I N U M SP O N SO R

B REAK AWAY S PONS OR S

PAR T NE R

SP O N SO R S

ST R AT E G I C PA R T N E R S

M E D IA PA R TN E R

DI SP L AY PA R T N E R S

C O R P O R AT E TA B L E SP O N SO R S

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JUDGES

BALDWIN MATSIMELA

KEITUMETSE LEBAKA

PHILLIP TSHIKOTSHI

SHASHI HANSJEE

Government Employees Medical Scheme

Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sport SETA

Aegis Global

Entelect

INEELENG MOLETE

MOHALE RALEBITSO

ABIGAIL KHULUSE

TUMI MENYATSWE

Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority

Itataise Investments

Tushiyah

Openseed

NONKULULEKO GOBODO

BUYANI ZWANE

VINO GOVENDER

SIFISO FALALA

Nonkululeko Leadership Consulting

Gordon Institute of Business Science

LA Consulting Engineers

Plus 94 Research

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JUDGES AND SPEAKERS

TOLLO NKOSI

KATE MOODLEY

LAURIE LESS

TUMELO SEAKETSO

Umso Construction

Discovery Consulting Services

Film and Publication Board

Deloitte South Africa

MMASANE KUKAMA

MANDLAKAZI SIGCAWU

NTHABISENG MOLEKO

Gijima

British American Tobacco

Commission for Gender Equity

AWA RDS S PEA KERS

KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI

DR MATHEWS PHOSA

MAITE NKOANA-MASHABANE

MARILYN MAKI

Hon. Minister of Small Business Development

Attorney and politician

Hon. Minister of Women in the Presidency

Head of Trade Energy and Infrastructure, Standard Bank

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GENDER ICONS

DISTELL

ICT-WORKS

CASTER SIMENYA

PWC

OLD MUTUAL

SIBONGILE SECURITY SERVICES

VODACOM

BIGEN GROUP

SNG GRANT THORNTON

SOUTH AFRICAN CIVIL AVIATION AUTHORITY

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WINNERS

BUSINESSWOMAN OF THE YEAR – Sponsored by PSM

TOP ENTREPRENEUR OF 2019 – Sponsored by Standard Bank

TOP YOUNG ACHIEVER UNDER 40 – Sponsored by Standard Bank

Evelyn Vanassche – Fempower Personnel

Zeenat Ghoor – Aspire Consulting Engineers

Mariam Cassim – Vodacom

LIFETIME ACHIEVER – Sponsored by Standard Bank

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION FAST GROWTH WOMAN-OWNED SMME

Mary Twala

HR Company Solutions

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE – Sponsored by Magethi Industrial Psychology Services

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION PUBLIC SECTOR – Sponsored by GEMS Small Enterprise Development Agency

Ogilvy South Africa

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WINNERS

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: CORPORATE CITIZENSHIP – Sponsored by Zamani

TOP WOMAN IN PROPERTY

TOP WOMAN IN SCIENCE - Sponsored by PPS

Ulana van Biljon – Emira Property Fund

Keolebogile Shirley Motaung – Tshwane University of Technology

Cell C

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: TOURISM – Sponsored by Msinsi Resorts and Game Reserves uShaka Marine World

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED PUBLIC SECTOR LEADER – Sponsored by Motheo TVET College

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED: WOMAN IN TECH – Sponsored by BBD

Lentheng Mekgwe – Gauteng Provincial Legislature

Veronica Motloutsi – Smart Digital Solutions

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED: HEALTH & PHARMACEUTICAL

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: RESOURCES

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED: MALE DRIVING GENDER EMPOWERMENT

Clicks Group

Exxaro

Velaphi Ratshefola – Coca-Cola Beverages South Africa

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TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT – Sponsored by Ekurhuleni TVET

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: BIODIVERSITY, CONSERVATION & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – Sponsored by SANBI

De Beers

Nsovo Environmental Consulting

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED: REGIONAL ENTREPRENEUR OF THE YEAR

FedEx Express

Francine Zana – Exclusive Hospitality Concepts

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: ENERGY & UTILITIES – Sponsored by Mdito Business Enterprise

TOP GENDER EMPOWERED ORGANISATION: CONSTRUCTION & INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT – Sponsored by Mahlako a Phaphla

Matleng Energy Solutions

AV Light Steel

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SPONSORS AND PARTNERS TABLE SPONSORS VI P TA B L E S

S TA N D A R D TA BL E S

STRATEGIC PARTNERS

MEDIA PARTNER

LIFESTYLE PARTNERS

PLATINUM LIFESTYLE PARTNER

TRAVEL PARTNER

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THE SOUTH AFRICAN POST OFFICE

R E L EVANT, RE L IAB L E A N D RESI LE NT The South African Post Office SOC Limited was established on 1 October 1991 as a company in terms of the Companies Act, No. 61 of 1973 with The State (Republic of South Africa), represented by the Minister of Telecommunications and Postal Services, as the sole shareholder. The Post Office is mandated to provide postal services in accordance with the Postal Services Act of 1998. This Act provides for the regulation of postal services including its Universal Service Obligations (USO). The license to operate as South Africa’s postal services provider was issued by the regulator in August 2001. This license is valid for 25 years and is reviewed every three years in terms of targets and performance. It gives the SA Post Office a legislated monopoly over reserved services, and until the 2011 year received a government subsidy. The Postal Services Act of 1998 charges the regulator, Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), with protecting the provision of the universal service through the reserved postal services licensee, namely the SA Post Office. The Post Office complies with the protocols and legislation governing SOCs and is guided by various postal, courier and financial regulations laid down by the regulatory bodies such as ICASA, the Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC) and the Financial Services Board (FSB).

SA POST OFFICE VISION A leading provider of postal, logistics and financial services to the South African market.

The Group is required to comply with, inter alia, the following: • SA Post Office Act No. 22 of 2011 (as amended) • Postbank Act No. 9 of 2010 (as amended) • Postal Services Act No.124 of 1998 • Public Finance Management Act No.1 of 1999 (as amended) • Companies Act No.71 of 2008 (as amended) • Relevant legislation applicable to the postal sector and to SOCs • King IV Code on Good Corporate Governance • Other relevant local and international codes for the postal sector.

MISSION We leverage our established infrastructure and link goverment, business and consumers with each other locally and abroad. VALUES • We have a passion for our customers and will meet their specific needs through excellent service. • We aim to contribute positively to our communities and environment. • We treat each other with respect, dignity, honesty and integrity. • We recognise and reward individual contributions. • We embrace diversity and transformation in the way we conduct business.

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T H E S O U T H A F R ICA N PO S T O F FICE

A DV ERTORI A L

HIGHLIGHTS FOR 2019 FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS • Revenue increased 20% to R5.4-billion from the prior year • Motor vehicle licencing revenue increased by 5% to R308-million • R2.94- billion recapitalisation funds received in January 2019 • All loans settled during the year with no debt at yearend • Funding has been ring-fenced for investment in capital projects • Subsidy of R1.5-billion allocated over the medium term to fund the USO post offices in rural and underserviced areas

HR • Employee headcount reduced by 4% during the year • Nine critical senior appointments made • Branch manager positions 88% filled, chief tellers 85% and tellers 83% filled with a concurrent positive impact on morale • Creation of 3 000 temporary and 1 000 permanent jobs for the SASSA project • The labour environment remained stable during the year

GOVERNMENT PROJECTS • Over three million textbooks delivered to 3 659 schools in Northern Cape and Limpopo • Address verification project completed for the Independent Election Commission with 4.9 million geo-referenced addresses in rural areas • Total of 1 012 518 qualifying households registered for the DTT set-top box, thus exceeding the one million mark

OPERATIONAL HIGHLIGHTS • Improvement of 10% in the mail delivery standard from the prior year, to 76.4% • Mail carryovers reduced to less than one day’s volumes by end of financial year • The fleet increased to 1 280 vehicles, improving the capacity to 98% • Scope 1 carbon emissions 23% below target • Revenue from processing small foreign parcels and small packets increased by 60.2%. POST BANK • SASSA grants paid to beneficiaries in the National Payments System 1 from June 2018, a global industry record in terms of deploying a new product of this magnitude • By 31 March 2019 approximately • 8.3 million social grants were paid to over 7.7 million beneficiaries through the new SASSA card hosted on Postbank’s IT system • The Financial Matters Amendment Bill was approved, enabling the corporatisation of the Bank • The net profit increased to R496-million from R296-million in the prior year

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“ ...THE INTERVENTIONS BEING IMPLEMENTED WILL RESULT IN VALUE TO OUR CLIENTS WHILE ENSURING THAT THE POST OFFICE REMAINS RELEVANT...”

CUSTOMER SERVICE – SERVICE WITH A SMILE Customer complaints are the main barometer to determine the level of customer satisfaction and the quality of service provided. Remedial action is implemented considering the key principles of type of complaint and timeous resolution. The total annual complaints received for the year amounted to 1 833 compared to 2 130 complaints for the previous 2017/2018 financial year. This represents a 13.9% reduction year-onyear. Streamlining and improvement of processes have contributed to the scenario, and complaints are managed on a case-by-case basis, with the time sensitivity it requires.

THE SOUTH AFRICAN SOCIAL SECURITY AGENCY (SASSA) PROJECT

Customer services is striving to meet performance targets in terms of the SLA with ICASA of resolving complaints within 14 working days. This was achieved, and the seven working days SLA required by executive management will be met on the conclusion of the call centre upgrade project.

In line with the National Development Plan, SASSA grant beneficiaries are now part of the national payment system. Service levels are very high, and the focus has now shifted to improving internal controls and concluding an accurate billing platform. In addition, security is being improved with the introduction of cash protection devises, use of biometric ID verification and implementation of the new card inventory management module.

The team is optimistic that the interventions being implemented will result in value to our clients while ensuring that the Post Office remains relevant in the supply chains and infrastructure of the country as a capable enabler for business and national economic growth.

The grant payment system was implemented successfully, with the provision of banking services and cash payment solutions. Approximately 7.7 beneficiaries were serviced through the Post Office network by the end of the financial year.

TEXTBOOK DELIVERY The mandate to deliver textbooks on behalf of the Department of Education to schools was concluded successfully in 2019. Over three million textbooks were delivered to no less than 3 659 schools in the Northern Cape and Limpopo. This project also contributed to the revenue and service delivery to citizens.

INTERNATIONAL SERVICES The successful piloting of the customs declaration system for countries such as Uganda, eSwatini and Russia was completed and the network speed was increased with the migration from analogue to fibre, which provided more capacity.

E-COMMERCE e-Commerce is one of the new products and services that has been identified to diversify revenue. A website (eMall) was

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T H E S O U T H A F R ICA N PO S T O F FICE

built to facilitate the online trading for the SMMEs and other brands, and is currently being refined.

CARBON MANAGEMENT Carbon management is divided into two sections:

The Post Office has also defined three levels of warehousing which will act as a storage facilities for the traders’ products, and also bring products closer to the customers to minimise delivery time. The warehouses fit in with the zoning strategy of Post Office Logistics, and warehouses will be set up based on customer requirements. The distribution solution was mapped at the end of March 2019.

Scope 1 emissions (direct emissions), are the annual emissions of the transport fleet. The target for scope 1 emissions was met. The company emitted 8 702 tons for the year under review. This was 23% below the target of 11 344 tons.

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY The goal of the Environmental Sustainability programme is to promote systems that support the three pillars of sustainability: people, planet and profits. Sustainability seeks to balance society’s needs against the need for ecological protection and stable economic conditions. The Post Office provides physical delivery services using vehicles, and that has an impact on the environment. Its buildings use electricity and water and its operations use paper and other resources.

A DV ERTORI A L

Scope 2 carbon emissions (indirect emissions) are derived from the electricity used by the Post Office. The target is to reduce energy use by 2.5% per year. The scope 2 target was not met during the year under review. The organisation emitted 33 236 tons of carbon emissions; this exceeded the threshold of 33 094 tons by 0.42%. Energy consumption was 0.81% better than the 2018 year and the Post Office saved 17% in electricity cost compared to the previous year. WASTE MANAGEMENT The target for paper consumption is a reduction of 2.5% compared to the year before, and for 95% of all paper to be recycled. The paper recycling target was to recycle 76 tons of paper, with 54 tons being recycled.

“The Post Office has established firm ground to advance into a relevant, reliable and resilient organisation that is capable of taking advantage of the reach of its nation-wide physical infrastructure. The new frontier is to enhance our digital transformation journey” – Lindiwe Kwele, Chief Operations Officer and Acting Group Chief Executive Officer

CONTACT DETAILS: HEAD OFFICE: Physical Address: NPC Building, South African Post Office, c/o Jeff Masemola and Sophie de Bruyn Strs, Pretoria, 0001 (Entrance from Jeff Masemola Street) Postal Address: PO Box 10000, Pretoria, 0001 | Telephone: +27 12 407 7000 Customer Services - Tel: 0860 111 502 | Email: customer.services@postoffice.co.za Website: www.postoffice.co.za

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WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP IN THE

GAUTENG PROVINCIAL LEGISLATURE Honourable Speaker of the Gauteng Provincial Legislature (GPL), Lentheng Ntombi Mekgwe, presents the GPL Multi-Party Women’s Caucus (MPCW), a team of dynamic women legislators from all the GPL political parties that have women leadership in their structures, united by a common goal to advocate for gender equality and women’s empowerment. Honourable Mekgwe was named the Top Woman Public Sector Leader in the 2019 Standard Bank Top Women Awards.

Hon. Mekgwe receiving the Top Gender Empowered Public Sector Leader Award at the 2019 Standard Bank Top Women Awards

Women’s leadership in the Gauteng Provincial Legislature has evolved gradually since 1994, where women’s

representation in leadership positions

has increased from 28% in the first term of the legislature, to 36% in the second term, then 45% in the third term, 49%

in the fourth term, falling to 40% in the fifth term and currently sitting at 42%

in the sixth term of the legislature. The

regression in terms five and six resulted

from political parties that ceased to have women in their leadership structures or

do not prioritise the elevation of women to their leadership structures.

THE GPL MULTI-PARTY WOMEN’S CAUCUS MEANS BUSINESS The GPL MPWC is in the business of driving the post-2015 transformation agenda to “leave no one behind” in our socio-economic development efforts. The GPL women leaders are painfully aware that, 25 years into democracy, poverty, unemployment and inequality is still defined by differences based on gender, race, age and disability. They are cognisant of the fact that excluding women in the mainstream economy of Gauteng and the country at large, is detrimental to our gross domestic productivity, mainly because we are effectively excluding the majority of our human capital from the economic enterprises of our nation.

Nevertheless, women’s leadership roles in the legislature have throughout the years

The caucus is aware of the gender

such as speakers, presiding officers, party

gains accomplished after the democratic

and standing committees, and members

of departure in our advocacy is to revive

In the current term of the legislature,

equality and non-discrimination for the

advocacy for gender-responsive

budgeting and overall working to improve strategic and operational efficiencies of

the legislature, with the ultimate goal of contributing to equitable and inclusive service delivery.

“ Gender equality, women’s empowerment and women’s leadership is a pre-condition for economic growth and inclusive sustainable development” - UN Post-2015 Development Goals

mainstreaming recession that has hit

included top decision-making positions

the country in recent years, reversing

leaders, whips, chairpersons of portfolio

elections of 1994. Therefore, the point

of the provincial legislature (MPLs).

and accelerate efforts to advance gender

the top decision-making structure of presiding officers comprises 75% women representation. The significance of this is that the gender equality and women’s empowerment agenda is given high priority, and sustainable strategies for mainstreaming gender are gradually infused into the work of the legislature.

greater good of our country. Our approach is that of refocusing our interventions

to address identified limitations to the

achievement of our goals of a non-sexist and a non-racist society. This includes capacity-development for the GPL to

mainstream gender, race, disability and

youth, providing tools for mainstreaming,

Ms Mary Phalane (middle), a supercentenarian at 110 years of age, being honoured by the Speaker at the 5th GPL-MPWC Annual Vita Basadi Awards.

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GAU T E N G PR OV IN C IA L L E G IS L AT URE

A DV ERTORI A L

GPL MULTI-PARTY WOMEN’S CAUCUS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Hon. Mekgwe Speaker

Hon. Magagula Chairperson: MPWC

Hon. Mazibuko MEC: Community Safety

Hon. Nkomo-Ralehoko MEC: Finance

Hon. Mhlakaza-Manamela Deputy Speaker

Hon. Randall MPL

Hon. Ledwaba MPL

Hon. Nkabinde-Khawe Late MEC: Social Development

Hon. Hlophe MEC: SRAC

Hon. Motara MEC: Infrastructure Dev.

Hon. Molapo MPL

Hon. Lasindwa Committee Chairperson: GDARD & GDED

Hon. Nkosi-Malobane Chairperson of Committees

Hon. De Lange MPL

Hon. Mashego Party Leader: EFF

Hon. Badenhorst MPL

MEMBERS OF THE GPL MULTI-PARTY WOMEN’S CAUCUS

Hon. Phaladi-Digamela MPL

Hon. Mosupyoe MEC: Economic Development

Hon. Mokgethi MPL

Hon. Tong MPL

Hon. Cilliers MPL

Hon. Ntsekhe MPL

Hon. Hassan MPL

Hon. Ndlovana MPL

Hon. Masemola MPL

Hon. Kekana Committee Chairperson: Social Development

Hon. Lorimer MPL

Hon. Mofama MPL

Hon. Radebe MPL

Hon. Bosch MPL

Hon. Diale MPL

CONTACT DETAILS Physical Address: 43 Rissik Street, Johannesburg, 2001 Postal Address: Private Bag X52, Johannesburg, 2000 Telephone: 011 498 5816 | Fax: 011 498 5999 Website: www.gpl.gov.za Social Media: @GPLegislature

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S AV E T H E D AT E 12–13 AUGUST 2020

ENTRIES CLOSE APRIL 2020 SPEAKER ENQUIRIES MARCH 2020 SPONSORSHIP ENQUIRIES 2020

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