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Music to Their Ears

The Jobs Effect COMPUTING MOVIES MUSIC TELECOMMUNICATIONS

THOSE UBIQUITOUS WHITE EARBUDS ONLY HINT AT HOW PROFOUNDLY APPLE HAS CHANGED THE WAY WE HEAR, BUY, AND MAKE MUSIC.

2001, he bound it to iTunes, the first easy-to-use software for managing your digital music collection, which had debuted earlier that year. Yes, the iPod is pretty, but it’s iTunes that has fundamentally changed how we relate to music. When the iTunes store went live in 2003, paying for music seemed a quaint idea.

But pricing music at 99¢ a song and making it simple to acquire got some people back in the habit. iTunes may have killed the album, but today superbands are making fortunes selling music one song at a time (and sharing revenue with Apple). If you don’t think Apple means to do the same for all kinds of media—TV, movies, books, and beyond—you aren’t paying attention.

Street scene created and PHOTOGRAPHED BY JASON SCHMIDT in New York City on Oct. 25, 2009.

CASTING BY LL CASTING & PRODUCTION

STEVE JOBS DIDN’T JUST LAUNCH the iPod in October

THE GEAR

THE STORAGE

THE STORE

THE HOLDOUTS

Some 220 million: That’s the number of iPods sold worldwide as of September. Now 73% of all digital music players sold in the U.S. are iPods.

The first 5GB iPod promised to hold 1,000 songs and sold for $399. Today you can buy a 160GB iPod that holds 40,000 songs for $249.

Since it opened in 2003, more than 8.5 billion songs have been sold through the iTunes store, which has become the largest music retailer in the U.S.

Coldplay is the reigning iTunes download champ, but artists like Garth Brooks and AC/DC have resisted joining. (Rumor has it that the Beatles are coming soon.)

November 23, 2009 A 107


Apple_Music