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Skyview Charter Cruise Line Skyview Dive Preparation and Planning Guide By Tony Blusius

Name: _____________________________


Table of Contents Introduction …………................................ 2 Chapter 1 …………................................ 4 Outline the Safety Procedures Chapter 2 …………................................ 9 Evaluate the Buddy System Chapter 3 …………................................ 13 Compute the Bottom Time Chapter 4 …………................................ 20 Illustrate Underwater Communication Chapter 5 …………................................ 27 Assemble the Dive Gear Chapter 6 …………................................ 33 Prepare the Mask, Snorkel, and Fins Chapter 7 …………................................ 38 Complete the Final Gear Assembly Wrap Up

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A Scuba Story We went to Lana'i to the cathedrals. They are called the cathedrals as they are fabulous rock formations under water. Sun rays shine through the underwater holes and arches, which gives the effect of stained glass windows. The light looks transparent and it gives an extra magical dimension to the already magical underwater landscape. The other Lana'i dive was not so deep but really spectacular as we trailed through caves, holes, caverns with rays of light. Highlights were a swimming scorpion fish, two frog fishes and a group of spinner dolphins swimming overhead, their smooth, silvery blue silhouettes reflecting against the sunlight. Before We Begin Before beginning this guide you should make sure that you are capable of performing the following items on your own. Be able to swim comfortably. Be able to function in a group environment. Be able to follow instructions while in the group. Be able to open and close valves. Be able to breathe comfortable through a device without gagging. Have no medical conditions that would prevent them from diving. If you cannot perform any of these above mentioned items then you should contact your cruise director regarding these issues.

Introduction Welcome to the world of scuba diving at Skyview. We are so thrilled you decided to join us on this adventure. At the end of this guide you will have learned how to do the following. Outline the safety procedures Evaluate the Buddy system Compute the bottom time Illustrate underwater communication Assemble the dive gear Prepare the mask, snorkel, and fins Complete the final gear assembly


About This Guide This guide is designed to help prepare you for the world of scuba diving. Most people don’t know much about scuba diving. They know it looks cool and you get to see all kinds of fish or even sharks. All these things are exactly right about scuba diving. Just like all things scuba diving needs to be done safely. Think of it like driving a car but you are underwater with a tank of air on your back and not in a car at all. So sit back and relax as this guide will prepare you for your next adventure. There will be some questions you will have to answer along the way, but stay sharp and you will be jumping into the water in no time at all!

Indicators as You Explore As you explore this guide you will discover a few objects that will help you along. These objects are listed below. This one will let you know when you have reached a point where you should stop. This one will let you know that you can continue on to the next page.

This one will let you know what section you are one. If you look at the top of the page you will see that you are on the introduction.

Alright, when you are ready turn to the next page and get started!


Chapter 1: Outline the Safety Procedures Objectives Describe a safe decent rate Describe a safe ascent rate Describe the breathing technique Illustrate how to remain calm Describe never holding your breath Describe what to expect on the dive boat What is a Safe Decent Rate? Descending, or sinking to the bottom, is the first thing you will do once in the water. Most of the time you descend along a rope. It is much safer and allows you to control yourself. As for the rate it self there is no actual rate you must follow. Instead you descend at the pace the group is comfortable with. The slower the better is the way to proceed. Do not try to rush yourself or your fellow divers. Scuba diving is about getting there comfortably, not being the first one to the bottom.

What is a Safe Ascent Rate? Ascending from the bottom is different than descending to the bottom. When ascending to the water’s surface the key element is control. You must never ascend faster than 60 feet per minute. Doing so can cause physical damage to your body. Instead the best practice is slow. Ascending slowly will ensure that you do not suffer any ill effects from your ascent. This is one of the most important aspects of scuba diving.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


The Breathing Technique Every breath you take has oxygen in it. This is important for everything you do. Because of how scuba equipment works you are actually inhaling more carbon dioxide than you normally would. Follow these guidelines when breathing underwater: • • •

Breathe deeply. Inhale slower than you usually would. Exhale slower than you normally would.

Remaining Calm When diving remaining calm is one very important aspect. Being able to do so allow the diver to extend the dive since they use less air. Remaining calm is completely in your mind. Being prepared mentally for a dive will allow you to remain calm. If you are mentally prepared then you will be physically prepared. You can mentally prepare yourself by taking the following considerations into account before you dive. • • • •

You have a better chance of getting injured while driving to work than while scuba diving. Your dive instructor has been highly trained. You are going to see exciting things you have never seen before such as fish or reefs. If you see a shark remember they are just as afraid of you.

Keeping these items in mind will help

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


Never Hold Your Breath When scuba diving the most important aspect of diving is to not hold your breath. You should always follow this guideline. Failure to do so could result in serious physical injury. Below is an example that should help.

Example: Let’s say that you are at the bottom of the ocean at 60 feet. When you are at 60 feet your lungs hold twice what they normally do, since the air is twice as dense. Even though they are the same size there is now more air in them. If you old your breath and go from 60 feet to the surface, the air inside your lungs will expand as you go up. If you reach the surface while holding your breath your lungs will need to be twice their actual size in order to hold all that air. This could cause serious damage to your lungs if you allowed this to happen.

What to expect on a dive boat The setting in which you are reading this guide and where you will actually be preparing to dive are quite different. Below are some examples of what you will encounter on a dive boat. 1. There will not be as much free space; in fact space is very limited on the dive boat. 2. The boat will be pitching and rocking. 3. You should only stay in the designated areas you are allowed to stay in. 4. Be prepared to steady yourself on railings while walking.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: Using a complete sentence describe a safe decent rate in the space below: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Directions: List two ways how to remain calm in the space below: 1. ___________________________________________________ 2. ___________________________________________________ Directions: Using a complete sentence describe why you should never hold your breath in the space below: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: Using a complete sentence describe a safe decent rate in the space below: There is no exact decent rate, you descend at a rate the group is comfortable with and the slower it is the better. Directions: List two ways how to remain calm in the space below: 1. Be mentally prepared for the dive. 2. Be prepared to see exotic and exciting creatures. Directions: Using a complete sentence describe why you should never hold your breath in the space below: The deeper you go the denser the air becomes, holding your breath means that you could cause serious physical injury to yourself.

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 2.

Congratulations, you now understand how to keep yourself safe while diving! Let’s get ready for the next step!


Chapter 2: Evaluate the Buddy System Objectives Identify what is a buddy Illustrate why you have a buddy Evaluate what to do if separated What Exactly is Your Buddy? Once you start prepping for your scuba dive everyone will be assigned a buddy. Your buddy is another fellow scuba diver participating in the same dive that you are. This is known as the buddy system. They are your partner for everything you do. Wither you are on the dive boat prepping your gear or in the water your buddy is always right at your side. Always remember the most important fact of the buddy system. No matter where you go or what you do, your buddy is there with you.

Why Do You Have A Buddy? The buddy system is designed to help promote fun and keep each other safe at the same time. Below is a list of items you and your buddy will do together: • • • • •

Help each other put on your equipment Check one another’s equipment before diving Reminds you to check your dive time and air supply Provides emergency assistance in the unlikely event you need it. Points out fish, reefs or other interesting items to one another.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


If You and Your Buddy are Separated In the unlikely event that you become separated from your buddy or even the group you should be made aware of the safety procedures in place in the event that should ever happen. Below is the order of steps in which you would take: 1. Stop swimming and look around 360 degrees to see if you can find anyone. If you see your buddy or group swim over to them and continue the dive. 2. If you are unable to find anyone wait for 30 seconds and most importantly remain calm. Remember you are not in any danger. 3. If after waiting you still do not see anyone surface. Remember to surface nice and slowly, never going faster than 60 feet per minute. 4. Wait on the surface for your dive boat or group to appear. Always keep in mind that you will never be left behind.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is true about your “buddy� A. You watch football together. B. He is your partner for everything you do. C. He keeps you safe D. It is your best friend. Directions: Using a complete sentence illustrate why you have a buddy in the space below: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Directions: List the correct order of steps of what to do when you become separated from your buddy in the space below: ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is true about your “buddy” A. You watch football together. B. He is your partner for everything you do. C. He keeps you safe D. It is your best friend. Directions: Using a complete sentence illustrate why you have a buddy in the space below: The buddy system is designed to help promote fun and keep each other safe at the same time. Directions: List the correct order of steps of what to do when you become separated from your buddy in the space below: 1. Stop swimming and look around 360 degrees to see if you can find anyone. If you see your buddy or group swim over to them and continue the dive. 2. If you are unable to find anyone wait for 30 seconds and most importantly remain calm. Remember you are not in any danger. 3. If after waiting you still do not see anyone surface. Remember to surface nice and slowly, never going faster than 60 feet per minute. 4. Wait on the surface for your dive boat or group to appear. Always keep in mind that you will never be left behind.

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 3.

You now know why having a buddy is so important, good job with this section, let’s go on to the next chapter


Chapter 3: Compute the Bottom Time Objectives Determine the maximum depth Reference the Recreational Dive Planner Calculate the total possible bottom time How Deep Will My Dive Be? Before each dive there will be a pre dive briefing in which your dive instructor will walk everyone through the dive they are about to take. During the briefing the instructor will also layout the conditions of the dive. These conditions can include many factors but for this exercise we are talking about the depth of the dive. Depending on your dive you could be diving at multiple depths. The example below will illustrate: “For today’s dive we will begin our dive at 30 feet for roughly 15 minutes. After that we will encounter the wreck we are going to explore. We will then explore the wreck and dive down the 50 feet for 20 minutes before ascending back to 30 feet to return to the ship.” As you can see you are at several depths during that dive. You always use the deepest point of the dive when calculating your bottom time. So you calculate a dive for 50 minutes at 50 feet.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


PADI Recreational Dive Planner

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


Using the Dive Planner The Recreational Dive Planner from PADI is used by divers throughout the world for calculating their dive times. All you do is start on the first section of the planner were it states “START.” We will continue using the same example that we started earlier in chapter 3. Starting at the top right of page 1 of the planner you select a depth of 50 feet. The corresponding column below the depth is the amount of time at depth. As long as the time amount does not reach into the black box in the column you know you can safely dive at that depth. So diving at 50 feet for 50 minutes makes you a “P” pressure group diver. Pressure groups have to deal with the amount of nitrogen that builds up in your bloodstream and tissue. The deeper you dive the more that builds up in your system. Total Possible Bottom Time Now that you are aware of your pressure group and how much time you plan to spend, it is important to understand a few things when performing the final calculation. According to the dive planner you are a “P” diver but can spend a total of 80 minutes at 50 feet before you reach the no decompression limits. When figuring your total time you should always limit your dive time before you reach the no decompression limits.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


So let’s go back to your dive at 50 feet for 50 minutes. The reason the example used a time of 50 minutes was to show that extra time was already left in the dive plan for the event that everyone was having a good time or that you encountered something unexpected and needed to stay down longer. A good number of minutes to leave for unexpected situations are 15-20 minutes. Calculating a bottom time is an important step in preparing for your upcoming dive. Below are a few reasons why you must always make sure that you have extra bottom time. •

You never know what you may encounter on a dive.

In the event of an emergency it is better to have extra air and time just to be safe.

You many enjoy your dive and wish to spend a few extra minutes at some point in the dive.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: On a dive of 30 and 78 feet, please indicate the maximum depth in the space below. ______ Directions: On a dive of 65 feet what is your maximum bottom time, please indicate it on the space below. ______ Directions: What is your total possible safe bottom time, indicate it in the space below. ______

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: On a dive of 30 and 78 feet, please indicate the maximum depth in the space below. ____78__ Directions: On a dive of 65 feet what is your maximum bottom time, please indicate it on the space below. ____40__ Directions: What is your total possible safe bottom time, indicate it in the space below. ____20__

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 4.

Now that you know how long you can stay underwater you are ready to move on to the next chapter, nice job!


Chapter 4: Illustrate Underwater Communication Objectives Illustrate the “OK” signals Illustrate the experiencing problems signals Illustrate the air emergency signals Illustrate the “Distress/Help” signals Saying I am “OK” Depending on your conditions (above or under water) there are different signals you will need to use to signal that you are “OK.” •

Below Water

When stating you are ok under water, there are two different signals you can use. The list under each will explain when and how to use each hand signal.

Used when not wearing a glove under water.

Used when wearing a glove under water.

Normally positioned at the center of your chest.

Normally positioned at the center of your chest.

Used when asking and answering “OK.”

Used when asking and answering “OK.”

Remember that signaling that you are alright is an important part of a safe and successful scuba dive.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


Above Water

When stating you are ok above water, there are two different signals you can use. The list under each will explain when and how to use each hand signal.

Can be used at a distance or close up.

Hard to see from a distance only to be used close up.

Can be shown to anyone participating in the dive.

Can be shown to anyone participating in the dive.

Used at the beginning and end of each dive (before submerging and before boarding the dive boat after a dive).

Used at the beginning and end of each dive (before submerging and before boarding the dive boat after a dive).

Remember that signaling that you are alright is an important part of a safe and successful scuba dive.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


I Am Having Problems During My Dive When scuba diving, saying you are having problems is a key ingredient to diving. This next group of signals will tell you how to say that you are having problems and will alert the instructor as to what is going on.

This hand signal is used when you are unable to clear your ears while diving. Clearing your ears allows you to equalize your inner ear pressure so that your eardrums do not burst while diving. If you are unable to clear your ears then you should signal this to your dive instructor.

This signal is used when you are cold. Diving is about having fun, if you not comfortable while diving then you should abort your dive. Then same thing goes for when you are cold. Experiencing a loss of body temperature (being cold) can lead to a more serious condition such as hypothermia.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


This signal is used to indicate that something is wrong while underwater. This signal has no specific meaning except to indicate that you are experiencing some kind of issue while diving. You should signal this to your dive instructor and they will help you to determine what exactly is wrong.

Air Emergencies When diving there is always a chance that you could run out of air. The following signals will alert your instructor of the emergency. This signal will alert your instructor that you are low on air in your tank. Performing this signal will alert the instructor that you will need to share air with someone very shortly.

This signal is more emanate and illustrates that you are out of air, or that your indicator is in the red. This signal means that you must share air from someone immediately.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


This signal instructs a fellow diver that you must share their air. This is known as buddy breathing. This signal should be directed at the instructor. They will then swim along side you and share their air source with you. The most important thing to remember in this situation is to remain calm through this entire process. Signaling Distress

Distress should be considered a serious emergency only. An example of this would be trouble breathing. This signal will prompt the instructor to immediately end the dive and should only be used in the event of such an emergency.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following best matches an “OK� symbol? A. B. C. D.

Crisscrossing your arms over your chest Touching the top of your head. Both A and B None of the above

Directions: Circle the correct response, touching the top of your head is not a signal for when you are experiencing problems. True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, waving your arms wildly is a good way to signal for help/distress? True

False

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following best matches an “OK� symbol? A. B. C. D.

Crisscrossing your arms over your chest Touching the top of your head. Both A and B None of the above

Directions: Circle the correct response, touching the top of your head is not a signal for when you are experiencing problems. True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, waving your arms wildly is a good way to signal for help/distress? True

False

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 5.

Now that you have mastered communicating you are ready to assemble your gear, well done.


Chapter 5: Assemble the Dive Gear Objectives Assemble the air tank and BCD Determine if the belt is tight Reattach the tank belt Fit the regulator to the air tank and BCD Perform an operational check Arrange all the hoses correctly Assemble the weights on the weight belt Connect Air Tank and BCD 1. Slide the BCD (Buoyancy Control Device, this is the vest you wear) onto the standing tank from the top. 2. Turn the tank so that the valve opening faces toward the BCD (where your head will be). Do not make the opening too high above the BCD or you will hit your head off of the regulator while diving. (Figure A) 3. Secure the tank in place by tightening the tank belt as much as you can by hand. Then swing the locking mechanism over into place and Velcro it. (Figure B)

A

Is the Belt Tight? Now check that it is secure. See if the belt slides up or down on the tank. If it doesn’t slide around then you can lift the tank by the BCD and shake it to see if it move around at all. If the belt is tight you may proceed to “Attaching the Regulator” otherwise please continue to the next step “Reattaching the Tank Belt.”

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.

B


Reattaching the Tank Belt Since the air tank was not completely tight when it was attempted the first time there are several steps that can be attempted to insure a tighter fit. Below is a list of these steps that can help to ensure the tank strap is a tight fit. 1. Try wetting the strap and then reattaching the air tank, this will allow it to stretch as it would underwater. 2. Have a fellow diver squeeze the air tank and BCD together while you pull on the strap with your body weight. 3. If both of those fail have a fellow diver hold the BCD and air thank in place. Then have your instructor securely fasten the tank strap.

Attaching the Regulator Follow the corresponding steps to attach the regulator to the air tank. 1. If the tank valve is covered by a piece of tape or plastic cap remove the item. (Figure C) 2. Check the air tank valve opening for an O-ring. It should be clean and free of cuts or nicks. If this is not the case see your instructor for a new O-ring. (Figure D)

C

3. Open the tank valve slowly (just for a burst of air) to blow any accumulated water or dirt from the valve opening.

D

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


4. Remove the dust cap from the regulator by loosening the yoke screw. (Figure E) 5. Securing the air tank between your legs put the first stage on the tank valve so that the valve opening lines up with the tank valve. The side with the two hoses that does not contain the regulators (mouth pieces) should be located on the left side, when you are standing facing the BCD. (Figure F)

E

6. Tighten the yoke screw until it is finger tight.

F

7. Attach the low pressure hose from the regulator to the BCD low-pressure inflator. This is the only hose that does not have a breathing device on the end of it. (Figure G) G Check To See If It Works You should now be ready to turn the air on. Stand behind the BCD and air tank. Open the valve gently. If you hear a small leak of air the O-ring may be defective. Notify your instructor if you hear such a leak. If everything is ok, then perform the following steps. (Figure H) H

1. Check your pressure gauge. Insure that you are getting a reading that indicates the tank is full (2000 PSI or greater). If not alert your instructor. 2. Push the purge button on both breathers (mouth pieces). Air should flow freely while the button is depressed. If not alert your instructor. (Figure J)

J

3. Now try breathing normally into both regulators. You should be able to easily breathe. If not, alert your instructor. (Figure I)

I When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


Arrange All the Hoses Now that you know everything works correctly you can arrange and secure the hoses to the BCD. First you will notice Velcro next to the low-pressure inflator hose we attached earlier. Velcro both hoses in place together. (Figure J) J Next attach the depth gauge / pressure gauge to the BCD. There will be a plastic or metal D-ring on the BCD (left side) where the gauges will attach. It should attach so that the hose runs under your arm when you are wearing the BCD. Under where the gauges attach on the opposite side you will find a soft plastic loop. This is where the backup regulator will go. The backup regulator is located on the same side as the main regulator. The backup is easily distinguished from the main since its hose is much longer. Slip the backup into the ring so that the mouth piece is through the soft plastic loop. The main regulator will hang freely on the right side.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.

K


Assemble the Weights Assembling the weights is an easy task. Your dive instructor will determine the amount of weight you will require and provide you with the amount. You will also be given a belt to hold the weights. In the event that you do not require any weight please skip this step. First try the belt on to determine how much of it is required to fit securely at your waist. Take your weight belt and stretch it out on the ground. Then attach your weights to the belt according to the diagram below. Remember to shift your weights enough so that you can get the belt around your waist and secure it. Also be sure that the weights are distributed evenly along the belt.

Be sure that you can wrap the weight belt around your waist without any weights causing an obstruction. If needed, slide the weights around the belt until there are no obstructions.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: In the space below list the all the gear that needs to be assembled for a dive. 1. ____________ 2. ____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ Directions: Circle the correct response, the BCD is connected to the regulator? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response(s), which of the following are things you check for during an operational check. A. Air leaks B. If everything matches C. Air flow D. All of the above

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: In the space below list the all the gear that needs to be assembled for a dive. 1. _BCD ________ 2. _Regulator ____ 3. _Air Tank_____ 4. _Weight Belt___ 5. _Weights______ Directions: Circle the correct response, the BCD is connected to the regulator? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response(s), which of the following are things you check for during an operational check. A. Air leaks B. If everything matches C. Air flow D. All of the above

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 6.

Nice, you have all your gear assembled and ready to go. Lets move on to the next section and continue


Chapter 6: Prepare the Mask, Snorkel, and Fins Objectives Check how the mask fits Attach the snorkel to the mask Position the fins on their feet Remove all gear Fitting Your Mask The easiest way to tell if your mask fits is to place the mask up to your face and hold it in place. Next inhale with your nose causing a vacuum. Remove your hands and if your mask stays in place then you have a good fit. If the mask falls to the ground you should try a different mask. Once you have your mask selected, you should adjust the strap so that it fits comfortable above your ears (Figure L). Then adjust the tension on the straps so that it is snug.

L

Remember that you want it tight enough to stop the water from getting in, but not so tight that it hurts to wear the mask. Also it is possible that the mask will leave impressions on your face.

Attach the Snorkel The snorkel should always be placed on the left side of the head. This prevents it from interfering with the regulators. Slide one end of the snorkel strap on the mask and slide it down the snorkel. Loop the snorkel strap around the mask and attach the other end to the top of the snorkel. Slide it until you have a good fit. Try your mask on again and adjust the height of the snorkel as needed.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.

M


Try Your Fins On Types of Fins When trying on your fins there are two types, closed toe fins, these are similar to a loafer. The second type is open toe or adjustable fins. Below are some guidelines for obtaining a desirable fit. Open Toe • • •

Make sure that the fin is snug but not too tight. Tightening the fins so tight that they cause the feet to arch can lead to cramping. Make sure the strap is snug, otherwise it could slide around and cause chaffing.

Open Toe

Closed Toe • • •

Since these fins are not adjustable, a snug fit is important. Socks can be used as padding for a snugger fit or for comfort purposes to reduce chaffing. When moving the foot the fin should not wiggle more than a small amount.

Closed Toe

Remember that a snug fit is important and that if you have any questions ask your dive instructor.

Remove Your Gear Now that you have fitted all your gear remove it and place it carefully on the ground. Place it near your BCD and other equipment. You will need to be able to have easy access soon.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: Circle the correct response, you mask should be snug enough to possibly cause red impressions on your face? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, what is the most important factor when selecting your gear? A. B. C. D.

How it looks If your buddy likes how it looks How it fits on you None of the above

Directions: What are the two types of fins? _____________________ _____________________

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: Circle the correct response, you mask should be snug enough to possibly cause red impressions on your face? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, what is the most important factor when selecting your gear? A. B. C. D.

How it looks If your buddy likes how it looks How it fits on you None of the above

Directions: What are the two types of fins? __Open Toe______ __Closed Toe_____

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on to chapter 6.

Your gear is all fitted and ready to do, nice job, lets continue on to the next chapter.


Chapter 7: Complete the Final Gear Assembly Objectives Put the weight belt on Slide into the BCD and secure it Put the mask and snorkel on Slide the fins on Perform the final buddy check

Put On the Weight Belt Place your weight belt on your waist. You should install it so that you can release the clasp with the right hand. This is important because the right hand is always more free than the left.

Put On the BCD The BCD that was assembled earlier should be resting. Place it in the designated spot so that it sits as shown in figure N. Then sit in front of the BCD and place the arms through it. Strap the front Velcro strap in place and clip the emergency strap. Then tighten the emergency strap in place. Adjust the shoulder straps to your comfort.

N Put Mask and Snorkel On As instructed before place the mask and snorkel on and check your fit. Should any issues arise, alert your instructor.

When you are ready you may continue on to the next page.


Slide On the Fins As instructed before, place the fins on and check your fit. Remember that if you wish, socks can be used to prevent chaffing. Should any issues arise, alert your instructor.

Perform Final Equipment Check The last step is the final equipment check. The steps below are as follows. This is known as “Begin With Review and Friend.” Begin – B – BCD Check equipment operation and that tank is secure in place. With – W – Weights Check for proper weight placement and that the quick release is clear and accessible. Review – R – Releases Familiarize yourself with your buddy’s releases, check to make sure they are secure. And – A – Air Confirm that you both have ample air for the dive, that the valves are open, and that the regulators are working correctly. Also know where each other’s spare regulators are located. Friend – F – Final Okay Give each other a final inspection looking for anything out of place or missing.

It is time for a brief quiz to check your progress. When you are ready to begin proceed to the next page.


Quiz Yourself Directions: In the space below list the correct order in which you perform the final equipment check. 1. _____________________ 2. _____________________ 3. _____________________ 4. _____________________ 5. _____________________ Directions: When slipping into the BCD, what is the next thing you should do after securing the Velcro strap? _______________________________________________________________ Directions: What is the very first piece of equipment you should put on when preparing to enter the water? _________________________________

When you are ready turn to the next page to check your answers.


Answers Directions: In the space below list the correct order in which you perform the final equipment check. 1. _BCD________ 2. _Weights_____ 3. _Releases_____ 4. _Air_________ 5. _Final Okay___ Directions: When slipping into the BCD, what is the next thing you should do after securing the Velcro strap? Secure and clasp the safety strap. Directions: What is the very first piece of equipment you should put on when preparing to enter the water? The weight belt

If you answered any questions incorrectly please review the material before continuing on.

Well done you have completed every chapter successfully!


Wrap Up Congratulations on completing the materials! You should now be able to complete the following tasks: Outline the safety procedures Evaluate the Buddy system Compute the bottom time Illustrate underwater communication Assemble the dive gear Prepare the mask, snorkel, and fins Complete the final gear assembly

If you are unsure about any of these topics, please revisit the corresponding chapter before continuing.

Exam The following will be a brief exam of your knowledge. In order to pass you must score a 90% or better. After you have completed the exam you will have a chance to check your score and see how well you did.

Good luck and when you are ready proceed to the assessment.


Exam Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is correct regarding safety procedures. A. The just make everything more complicated. B. They insure that you will be able to dive without any incident. C. Give the dive master something to talk about.

Directions: Circle the correct response, the buddy system is an important aspect of successful scuba diving? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, knowing how long you can stay underwater for in important? True

False

Directions: You can always hold your breath while underwater? True

False

Directions: List two ways how to remain calm in the space below: 1. _______________________________ 2. _______________________________

Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is true about your “buddy.� A. B. C. D.

You watch football together. He is your partner for everything you do. He keeps you safe It is your best friend.

Directions: Fill in the blank, a safe __________ rate is no more than 60 feet per minute.

Directions: Fill in the blank, ____________________ is the final thing you should do if you become separated from your buddy. Directions: On a dive of 30 and 78 feet, please indicate the maximum depth in the space below. ___________


Directions: Fill in the blank, waving your arms wildly is a good way to signal for ___________________ ?

Directions: Circle the correct response(s), which of the following are things you check for during an operational check. A. Air leaks B. If everything matches C. Air flow D. All of the above

Directions: Fill in the blank, ____________ are used to prevent the dive weights from sliding around while diving.

Directions: Circle the correct response, what is the most important factor when selecting your gear? A. B. C. D.

How it looks If your buddy likes how it looks How it fits on you None of the above

Directions: In the space below, write the acronym for the Final Safety Check. _________________________________________

Directions: Circle the correct response, underwater communication is done by rapidly blinking your eyes True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, the tank belt should be completely removed and undone when reattaching? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, it is alright to allow water to get into the regulator tank assembly when attaching it to the tank? True

False

Directions: Please choose the correct answer, you should not have all your hoses crisscrossing your body. True

False


Directions: Fill in the blank, pointing at your ears while diving is a signal for what? ___________________________________

Directions: At any point while diving or preparing to dive you are unsure what to do, you should? ____________________________________

When you are ready you may continue to the next page and check your answers.


Exam Answers Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is correct regarding safety procedures. A. The just make everything more complicated. B. They insure that you will be able to dive without any incident. C. Give the dive master something to talk about.

Directions: Circle the correct response, the buddy system is an important aspect of successful scuba diving? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, knowing how long you can stay underwater for in important? True

False

Directions: You can always hold your breath while underwater? True

False

Directions: List two ways how to remain calm in the space below: 1. Be mentally prepared for the dive. 2. Be prepared to see exotic and exciting creatures.

Directions: Circle the correct response, which of the following is true about your “buddy.� A. B. C. D.

You watch football together. He is your partner for everything you do. He keeps you safe It is your best friend.

Directions: Fill in the blank, a safe ascent rate is no more than 60 feet per minute.

Directions: Fill in the blank, Wait on the surface is the final thing you should do if you become separated from your buddy. Directions: On a dive of 30 and 78 feet, please indicate the maximum depth in the space below. ____78__


Directions: Fill in the blank, waving your arms wildly is a good way to signal for _Help / Distress_?

Directions: Circle the correct response(s), which of the following are things you check for during an operational check. A. Air leaks B. If everything matches C. Air flow D. All of the above

Directions: Fill in the blank, _retainers_ are used to prevent the dive weights from sliding around while diving.

Directions: Circle the correct response, what is the most important factor when selecting your gear? A. B. C. D.

How it looks If your buddy likes how it looks How it fits on you None of the above

Directions: In the space below, write the acronym for the Final Safety Check. BWFAF or Begin With Review And Friend

Directions: Circle the correct response, underwater communication is done by rapidly blinking your eyes True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, the tank belt should be completely removed and undone when reattaching? True

False

Directions: Circle the correct response, it is alright to allow water to get into the regulator tank assembly when attaching it to the tank? True

False

Directions: Please choose the correct answer, you should not have all your hoses crisscrossing your body. True

False

Directions: Fill in the blank, pointing at your ears while diving is a signal for what? Unable to clear or equalize your ears


Directions: At any point while diving or preparing to dive you are unsure what to do, you should? Contact your instructor for help

If you scored a 90% or higher on this exam, congratulations you have successfully completed this training guide. If you have score lower than a 90% please review the material before diving.

Congratulations from the entire Skyview Charter Cruise Line team!


Skyview Drive Preperation and Planning Guide