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The Betta simplex is a good introduction in mouthbrooding betta behavior.

Seig & Judy Illig are the 2013 IBC Grand Champions.

Photograph by Zhou Hang

SHOWING 30 Be the Judge

Do you have what it takes to become an IBC judge?

32 Show Year Changes

A summary of the changes for the 2013-2014 show year.

34 2013 JB Minutes 35 IBC Trial Class Standards 40 Introducing IBC Area 7 2013 IBC Convention Show Best of Show Male Photograph by Christine Tanner

41 IBC Show Schedule 42 IBC Class Lists

CONVENTION

IBC

4 President’s Letter

12 2013 IBC Convention

46 Victoria Betta

6 Judging Board News

18 Grand Champion

48 Convention Report

8 SMP Species Spotlight

Breeder 20 New Kayla Griffin wins the 2013 New

53 2013 EB Meeting Minutes

22 Year-End Awards

42 2013 General Membership Meeting Minutes

COLUMNS There are many new faces in IBC leadership.

The lines of communication are always open.

Betta simplex is an interesting species that deserves more attention.

10 Bettaese

Start listening to what your betta is “telling” you.

BETTA CARE 11 Home Alone

Betta are stronger than we give them credit for.

Betta breeders make a big splash in Texas.

Seig and Judy Illig earn the title of 2013 Grand Champion.

Breeder of the Year award.

The birth of a new IBC chapter in the new Area 7.

Peter Baerwald gives a German perspective on the 2013 IBC Convention.

The Top 20 breeders of 2013.

26 Special Awards

IBC members are recognized for their services.

28 One-Time Awards

Gene Lucas is honored with Lifetime Achievement award.

On the Cover: Outgoing President Joe Beccera awards Sieg and Judy Illig the 2013 IBC Grand Champion award. Photograph by Christine Tanner


Volume 47, Issue 1

hello members! This will be my last issue as editor of FLARE! magazine. I want to thank everyone who has supported me in this position over the past two years. I would also like to thank the awesome group of volunteers who have helped me take this newsletter in a new direction. I am proud to say FLARE! is now a true online magazine. This achievement would not have been accomplished without the continued support of those dedicated volunteers. I encourage anyone who’d like to help to contact the new editor about joining the team. Taking my place as editor is our very own Tonya Garrison of Texas (Lone Star Betta Club, South Central United Betta Alliance). Tonya joined the IBC a short time ago but she has jumped in head first and offered help every way she can. She and her husband Robin have helped with this past season’s SCUBA shows, convention, as well as her outstanding work on the FLARE! committee. Tonya serves as Editor-in-Chief of Chrome, a new equestrian lifestyle magazine produced by the American Paint Horse Association in Fort Worth, Texas. Tonya was a newspaper journalist and editor for almost 20 years before she began writing for the American Quarter Horse Journal. She has also shown and raised reining horses for nearly 20 years. I have no doubt Tonya will continue the path she’s helped pave as a valued member of the FLARE! committee. Her talent and experience will vastly improve the content and presentation of the magazine and continue to better the reader experience. Now that that’s out of the way, we have a very exciting issue for you! We have articles from several members detailing their experience at convention as well as articles from our top breeders: Sieg and Judy Illig (Grand Champions) and Kayla Griffin (New Breeder Grand Champion). We have some exciting announcements from the judging board including the announcement of a new Area of the IBC! Sherolyn Craig also walks you through the process of becoming an IBC certified judge. I hope you all enjoy this issue and it’s been a pleasure bringing it to you for the last two years. Thank you,

Jeremy Waugh editor, flareeditor@ibcbettas.org

FLARE! is the official bimonthly publication of the International Betta Congress (IBC), a non-profit organization. The views and opinions contained within are not necessarily those of the editors and/or the officers and members of the IBC. FLARE! Editor: Jeremy Waugh FlareEditor@ibcbettas.org

FLARE! Submission Guidelines Articles:

Please submit all articles in electronic form. We can accept most popular software formats and fonts. Email to FlareEditor@ibcbettas.org. Photos and graphics are encouraged with your articles! Please remember to include the photo/graphic credits. Graphics and photo files may be submitted in any format; however uncompressed TIFF, JPEG or vector format is preferred, at the highest resolution/file size possible. If you need help with graphics files or your file is too large to email, please contact me for alternative submission info. FTP is available.

Chapter Reports:

All Chapters are encouraged to submit news and chapter items. It is a great opportunity to attract new club members in your area. If you are a new chapter, we will also highlight you in the Welcome to the IBC section. Photos and graphics are encouraged with your articles! Please remember to include the photo/graphic credits. Graphics and photo files may be submitted in any format. However, uncompressed TIFF, JPEG or vector formats are preferred. Please submit the highest resolution and file size possible. If you need help with graphics files or your file is too large to email, please contact me for alternative submission info. FTP is available.

Show Information:

Show Chairs are responsible for submitting Show Information. Show Chairs are responsible for submitting Show Results. Please submit results in the electronic format approved by the Judging Board Registrar. Show Ads cannot exceed ½ pages in length. The IBC Convention ad cannot exceed two pages in length. If you need help creating an ad, please contact the editor at FlareEditor@IBCBettas.org

Art Submission:

Graphics and photo files may be submitted in any format. However, uncompressed TIFF, JPEG or vector formats are preferred. Please submit the highest resolution and file size possible. If you need help with graphics files or your file is too large to email, please contact me for alternative submission info. FTP is available.

Next deadline … SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 COPYRIGHT NOTICE

All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted, distributed, sold, or publicly displayed in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, except for fair use, without the explicit permission of the International Betta Congress (IBC), Syracuse, NY, USA.


President’s Letter

new faces B Gerald Griffin IBC President

So many new and wonderful things are coming. so stay tuned ... same betta place, same betta channel!

4 FLARE!

y the time you read this, you will have noticed your new copy of FLARE!. You have also probably noticed the new FLARE! format. This new format is the creation of Tonya Garrison, who comes to us on the FLARE! Committee with actual magazine experience. Tonya has taken FLARE! to a new level. I would also like to commend the FLARE! committee ,which is one of the hardest working committees I have seen in years, and they have become a quite cohesive unit. The committee consists of Tonya Garrison, Sherolyn Craig, Linda Olson, Richard Atwood, Mike McBrien, Jamie Stine, Angelique Vassiliou, Claire Pavia, Christine Tanner, Larissa Williams, Kayla Griffin, myself and its brilliant editor Jeremy Waugh. If you are still reading this, you have probably realized that Joe Becerra is not writing this! I know Joe will be missed as president and he did a great job keeping the IBC going and growing. The other person we will miss in IBC leadership is the Queen of the IBC, Karen MacAuley. What can we say other than she was a whirlwind and a breath of fresh air for the IBC. From New Breeder Champion to Grand Champion of the IBC to its vice president, Karen has brought a lot of good things to the IBC, including the media outreach of the Facebook page, which brought in new members. She also was very generous with the Betta Pals program. Other changes that might be hard to handle are that Connie Emory and Sieg Illig have left the Judging Board to finally earn some relaxation they so deserve. Both will be missed on the Judging Board however neither of them are leaving the betta scene so when do see them be sure to thank them for all of their hard work and many years they have put into the IBC. Larissa Williams is stepping in to fill Connie’s position. She is without a doubt more than qualified and will bring many good things to the future of the IBC.

As with all things, change is a part of life. With that change, this new Executive Board and Judging Board have hit the ground running with no post-Convention break. South East Asia has proven to be an interesting situation, and we have spent a lot of time working on problems in that area. Out of those problems, we have formed a new Area, which is Area 7 and includes Australia and New Zealand. It was obvious that these areas should have been separated originally due to the seasons forcing their show year to be opposite of Area 1. In addition, the two Areas are separate in many other ways such as importation laws and political idealisms. The importation laws make it very difficult to move fish into and out of Australia to the rest of South East Asia. This change will allow Australia and New Zealand to function much like Area 1, and Area 6 will be able to focus on those countries that make it up, which are much more similar to each other than any of them are to Australia. As many of you also know, Kayla and I were the Convention chairs this year and we had received many numerous compliments on how great this Convention was! Ironically, we were on the other end, so we saw one catastrophe after another and would deal with each problem as it reared its ugly head, and all of this on just two hours of sleep per night. Surprisingly, very few other people had any clue of anything that went wrong. After Convention was over and we discussed with various other previous Convention show chairs that everything we encountered was totally normal and we did such a good job at it no one knew of any problems and all had fun! We were happy that everyone in attendance enjoyed the experience! Also in the midst of all this fun! Kayla and I found time to take our Judging Certification Tests and became totally Certifiable! So we just might be coming to a Betta Show near you!


FLARE! 5


Judging Board News

open lines Larissa Williams JB Chair

We’re dedicated to helping the IBC and betta enthusiasts to have a great experience at all IBC betta shows, and we want to be Sure that you know that you can come to us at any time. 6 FLARE!

Hi all, Thank you to everybody who voted for me on the Board, and to my fellow JB members for electing me to the chair position. We’re all going to miss Connie and her strong guiding hands for the Judging Board. It’s very strange to be writing in the spot where Connie should be. I’ll do my very best to continue her good service to the IBC. On Page 30, I’ve written a summary of the major changes that we’ve made for the 2013-2014 Show Year. The actual Standards themselves (the Judging Manual) will be published soon. It is currently going through a formatting update and we’re getting new pictures for the classes. There won’t be any substantive changes to it other than what we’ve listed in the summary. We hope the new look and feel of it will assist in helping to understand the show system and how we evaluate the fish when judging. I want to give a warm welcome to our new judges this year: Paul Ogles (recertifying); Gerald Griffin and Kayla Griffin in Area 1; Florent Philipot, Yvan Perré and Rajiv Masillamoni in Area 2; and Todd Knight (recertifying), Michael Chang, Jessica Leign, Paul Yeo, and Vanessa Flett in Area 6 and the new Area 7. We also welcome to the Apprentice Program Gianne Souza, Joe Green, Lori Green, Rick Mallett, Cecilia Mallet, Stacy Fenhaus and Sherolyn Craig in Area 1, and Jimmy Nallas and Piwi Huang in Area 6. Please ask me if you have any questions at all during this show year. We’re dedicated to helping the IBC and betta enthusiasts to have a great experience at all IBC betta shows, and we want to be sure that you know that you can come to us at any time. If you’re in a chapter that has been thinking about holding a show but needs a little help to get up and running; if you’re a breeder who wants to start showing but isn’t quite sure about sending your fish into the wild blue yonder; if you’re a person who loves bettas but doesn’t breed them and wonders what part shows have for you … we can help in all that. We’re here for you. Email me personally at jbchair@ibcbettas.org or all of the Judging Board at jbmembers@ibcbettas.org.

Smiles,

Larissa


IBC Judges Area Judges Name

State/Country

1

Amit Pandya

US, California

1

Christine Tanner

US, California

1

Gilbert Limhengco

US, California

1

Larissa Williams

US, California

1

Linda Olson

US, Colorado

1

Phil Dorr

US, Colorado

1

Leo Buss

US, Connecticut

1

Rich Creighton

US, Connecticut

1

Amy Becerra

US, Florida

1

Connie Emery

US, Florida

1

Joe Becerra

US, Florida

1

Paul Ogles

US, Florida

1

Kendra Watson

US, Georgia

1

Kurt Bihlmayer

US, Illinois

1

Dan Young

US, Indiana

1

Gene Lucas

US, Iowa

1

Jeff Hiller

US, Kansas

6

Martinus Johan Mosi

Indonesia

6

Onnys F. Sundaka

Indonesia

6

Hermanus Haryanto

Indonesia*

6

Hiroki Ishizu

Japan**

6

Bobby Chua

Malaysia

6

Emerson Sy

Philippines

6

Eric Tiu

Philippines

6

Gary Ching

Philippines

6

Mark Lester Hao

Philippines

6

David Poh Bun Chuan

Singapore

6

Dr. Hsu Li Chieh

Singapore

6

Edwin Lim

Singapore

6

Joseph Ong

Singapore

6

Robin Wong Chi Wah

Singapore

6

Thomas Lim

Singapore

6

Widy Kiswanto

Singapore

6

Jesda Attavichitchanyarak

Thailand

7

Jessica Leign

Australia***

7

Jodi Lea-Matheson

Australia***

7

Michael Chang

Australia***

7

Paul Yeo

Australia***

1

Damian Garcia

US, Nevada

1

J. D. Ewtuch

US, New Jersey

1

Joe Cooper

US, New Mexico

1

Rich Christman

US, New York

1

Robert Plenge

US, New York

*For all areas certified

1

Carolyn Hanlon

US, Ohio

**certified areas 3 & 6

1

Gerald Griffin

US, Oklahoma

*** certified areas 6 & 7

1

Kayla Griffin

US, Oklahoma

1

Siegbert Illig

US, Pennsylvania

1

Eryn Rosenbaum

US, Texas

1

Igor Prpic

US, Texas

1

Walden Nida

US, Texas

1

Bob Dozier

US, Virginia

1

David Spector

US, Washington

2

Josip Kevari

Austria

2

Charles Baille

France

2

Florent Philipot

France

2

Yvan Perre`

France

2

Manuela Baerwald

Germany

2

Patrick Hans

Germany

2

Joachim Menz

Germany*

2

Peter Baerwald

Germany*

2

Claire Pavia

Switzerland*

2

Jean-Michel Jeannerat

Switzerland*

2

Rajiv Masillamoni

Switzerland*

2

Sabrina Dichne

Switzerland*

6

Ferdinand Dominikus

Idnonesia

6

Jeanine Heisye (Eto) Atmadjaja

Indonesia

6

Joty Atmadjaja

Indonesia

7

Todd Knight

Australia***

7

Vanessa Flett

Australia***

IBC Apprentices Area

Apprentice Name

State/Country

1

Jonathan Limhemgco

US, California

1

Gianne Souza

US, California

1

Joe Green

US, Texas

1

Lori Green

US, Texas

1

Rick Mallett

US, Florida

1

Cecilia Mallett

US, Florida

1

Stacy Fenhaus (nĂŠe Deaton)

US, Arizona

1

Sherolyn Craig

US, Texas

2

Eugenio Fornasiero

Italy

2

Alberto Montalbetti

Italy

2

James King

Czech

2

Sven Wagner

Germany

6

Elmer Manansala

Philippines

6

Sahal Abdul

Indonesia

6

Jimmy Nallas

Indonesia

6

Piwi Huang

Indonesia

FLARE! 7


SMP Species Spotlight

by Gerald Griffin

Photographs by Atison Phumchoorsi

A typical male Betta simplex on the left and a typical female on the right.

betta simplex B etta simplex is an interesting species that deserves more attention than it already receives. For many, it is a good introductory mouthbrooder that is not overly aggressive and can be housed in small tanks.

This species is also not overly demanding and does not require special care. For these reasons it is the perfect way to start one in breeding and caring for mouthbrooding Bettas. In the wild Betta simplex can be found around the areas of Krabi Province and in and around Lake Ao. This is one of the few species that actually come from alkaline waters that are naturally high in limestone deposits. Their habitat has decreased so much that they are now considered critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List. IUCN has the most comprehensive inventory of global biological species on record and is considered the main authority in the world for the status of biological organisms. This species can be found in two distinctive populations that have ironically been called simplex 1 and simplex 2—the type 8 FLARE!

1 having very little iridescence and type 2 having a lot more iridescence. Ironically, when spawned in captivity, type 1 to type 1 and type 2 to type 2 produce a virtually equal distribution of both types. Betta simplex is sexually dimorphic with the males having a bright blue stripe in the anal fin and to just over half of the caudal fin. Females may have a faint blue stripe and it might be possible to see an ovipositor during spawning. The male’s head also tends to be flatter. Males can also have longer pelvic fins, however, pelvic fins are not a good indicator in this species. Spawning Betta simplex is an easy task. They spawn in the typical Betta mouthbrooder fashion by circling each other until they close the circle and embrace on the bottom of the tank. The female then picks up the eggs in her mouth and spits them at the male until he takes up all of the eggs. After he has all of the eggs in his mouth, the pair will then embrace again and repeat this process until the male has all of the eggs from the spawning. The male will then typically incubate for nine to 12 days with 10 days being typically consistent incubation duration. One problem with this species is that the female replenish their egg supply every seven days and can trigger a respawning of the male. When this happens, he typically will swallow the brood he is currently tending. To prevent this it is best to remove the female


Habitat of Betta simplex, Krabi Province, Thailand. Photograph by Eric Bourdier

and let the male incubate alone. Keeping Betta simplex in the aquarium is a very easy feat as this species is not demanding at all and will tolerate most conditions from acidic to alkaline waters. The most important thing about their water is to keep it clean and well-filtered in the low to mid-70s F. Being a mouthbrooder they prefer water movement unlike the bubblenesters. Pairs should be kept in 10-gallon aquariums with groups of six being kept in a 30-gallon tank. Also, do not forget in all wild betta species to keep the tank tightly covered. No hole or gap is too small for them to jump out of. Although this species is considered to be a small species, typically 2½ inches like splendens. I have personally witnessed this species reaching lengths of up to 4 inches. These 4-inch simplex were at the Monterey Bay Aquarium and were descendants from a line that I provided from the typical 2½-inch parents that were wild caught. The population from Lake Ao also are larger than the typical pond caught inhabitants around Krabi. Betta simplex is an easy to keep mouthbrooder that is in need of preservation. Its peaceful demeanor and tolerance of varied water conditions make it an ideal addition to any fish room. Betta simplex is also a good introduction in mouthbrooding betta behavior.

Photograph by Zhou Hang

Comparison of Type 1 to Type 2 Betta simplex. FLARE! 9


Bettaese

by Linda Olson

betta psychology 101 part one

When we have been in the hobby for awhile, we all have a list of FAQs ... and number one on my list has always been, “When will I know when it is time for fill in the blank for my fish?” That can be “How long do I have to condition my fish before setting them up to spawn?” or “How long do I have to condition my fish after they arrive from the seller?” or “How do I know when my fish are ready to be put together?” My answer is always the same for all related questions: ASK YOUR FISH! THEY WILL TELL YOU. Oh, now she’s really lost it ... she’s “talking to her fish.” Actually, if you are listening, they are “talking” to you. If they are hanging limp and taking little interest in life, then there’s something wrong that you need to diagnose and solve. If they are flaring at each other when their jars are side by side, and he has a bubble nest, they are “telling” you they are ready to spawn. If they are eating well, flaring and active, especially if he has a nest and she obviously has eggs, they are “telling” you they are ready to go into the spawning tank with each other. Often, when you have a male you want to spawn, and you have a couple of females that would be good partners, you can set them up side by side with him in the middle and he will choose one over the other. They do have their own personal likes and dislikes, and those will not necessarily agree with yours. If you start “listening” to what your fish are trying to “tell” you, you will find greater satisfaction in the hobby and will definitely achieve much greater success. You will also find that many of the things you read on the Internet are just NOT TRUE. Let’s just take a look at a few: POPULAR PIECE OF BAD ADVICE #1: “You should NEVER feed the pair once they are in the spawning tank or you will foul the water and lead the fish to associate the babies with food and then they will eat them.” Oh, really? Who do you think might be most likely to see the kids as lunch; a well-fed male or a male that has been STARVED?! These little guys are incredibly prolific in the wild. Now, in their native canals and ponds, do they fast for several days while spawning? No, they have all their most favorite foods swimming all around them (daphnia, mosquito larvae, etc.) and they are gobbling them down as they are tending to their business. You can avoid fouling the water by not OVER-feeding. I like to use live white worms when the pair is together, as those stay 10 FLARE!

alive on the bottom until the fish are ready to eat them, and do not foul the water at all. POPULAR PIECE OF BAD ADVICE #2: “You should always keep all of your fish “carded” on your shelves, as they can damage their tails, wear themselves out by flaring, and then not want to display when they go to a show.” This is incredibly harmful advice. Isolation and sensory deprivation are devastating to any creature. When it is done to a human, it is considered “cruel and unusual punishment.” We are faced with it out of necessity for our bettas since males cannot be kept together. We should be doing our best to minimize this instead of aggravating it. When they can see each other though their jars and flare, it’s not only good physical exercise, but also invaluable mental stimulation. Females CAN be kept together, and will probably exhibit far less femaleon-male aggression once they are set up to spawn if they are kept in a common tank. In my work in psychology, I have studied the isolation experiments done mostly with apes. The deprived individual exhibits self-destructive behavior (sound familiar?), and among the first instincts to be lost or confused are the abilities to mate and parent. These, of course, are the most common complaints from people trying to spawn their bettas. When I first started keeping these fish in the 1970s in Toronto, one of my “mentors” told me that you really had to spawn a male before he was 6 months old or he would lose his spawning instincts with age. That just did not ring true to me. He said there was one male in particular he really wanted to spawn, but he just hung in his jar like a zombie, never building a nest, flaring, or taking any interest in life at all. Actually most of his fish acted like that. I asked if I could borrow him for a while. I took him home and set him up in a fry tank with 1-inch long babies. No matter what leaf he tried to hide under, someone was always swimming up to check him out. Within several weeks he started moving around like a normal fish, and in three months I actually spawned him. This experiment was modeled after remedial techniques that the ape experimenters had used successfully. Ideally, if we only had the room and equipment, we could set up each male in his own mini-tank of maybe 3 gallons with an undergravel filter, plants and “friends”—maybe a couple of danios, an otocinclus, a small corydorus, or other betta-safe fish. Kept like this, he would be WAY less likely to “lose” his instincts “with age.” To be continued ...


Home Alone

by Cecilia Bailey Mallett

In preparation for this year’s Convention, for the first time I realized that I also had to consider making necessary plans for my one-month-old fry of several spawns. I would be gone for a solid week and to be honest I was contemplating of bagging them all up and taking them with me. I had anther tank in our spare bedroom, which had younger fry of three weeks old. I moved them into a bigger tank in the fish room, two weeks before our departure. With ž of the store packed and the thought of bagging and carrying my juveniles I knew that this would be impossible, so I came to the conclusion to leave them behind. The thought of them being so young left me frantic about leaving them home alone, especially with no food since they were so young. If they were adults I would not have been so concerned. I began asking some of our members as to what they would recommend that I do and I manage to get some feedback as well from others. Larissa Williams gave me a tip by suggesting that I should load the tanks up with numerous live plants, which I had already done. I had some large weekend betta feeders, which I had never used before and really had no use for them up until now. I decided to place one weekend feeder in each of the tanks. I also had some Repashy gel (spawn and grow) food, which I thought would also be good to use but sparingly. I also had a few older bettas, which were definitely not big enough to show (because they were only an inch long) so I left them in their containers. On Tuesday, June 18, at 9 am, we loaded up the van and left for Convention. The van was packed with store sales, fish and our belongings. It was a 17-hour drive from Florida to Irving, Texas. After returning back to Florida (a week later), the first thing I did after we unloaded the vehicle was go straight to my fish room. I looked at every tank and every jar and every single fish was not only healthy but also happy that someone was going to feed them now. Remember the one tank in the spare bedroom that I had pulled fish from prior two weeks before leaving for the convention? No plants were in the tank or food was in the tank. Well, when I went to pull the tank to clean it and saw that there was a survivor still left in the tank and he was still alive. I was thrilled and amazed! These little fish are even stronger than what we give them credit for.

FLARE! 11


Illustration by Tonya Garrison

by Lori Green

12 FLARE!


2013 For me, Convention is the most stressful, the most exhausting, the most exciting and the most social show of the entire show season. I LOVE IT and I am addicted!!!! I have only been lucky enough to have attended three Conventions so far. In 2009, Texas Betta Society hosted the “Going Wild in Texas” Convention. That was the very first show I had ever attended and my first Convention. In 2011, I got to attend the California Betta Society’s Convention in San Francisco. That was awesome!!! I got to see some old friends that I hadn’t seen since I met them in 2009. Then this past Convention here in Texas again. When SCUBA (South Central United Betta Alliance) decided to put in a bid for 2013, I was sooooo excited. After a year-long prep, I for one didn’t feel totally ready. I was asked to do a seminar on live food cultures, OK, not a problem … until my laptop decided to die and take all my work with it about a week before Convention! I was able to throw it back together, and with the help of Tonya Garrison, got it all printed and ready. The week before Convention was hard for me—hard waiting to get to the hotel and start benching the fish. As usual, there were boxes of fish that we were still waiting on. So my husband Joe stayed behind to wait for the missing boxes, while I drove the Beanies, stands and fish to the hotel to be benched. Once I got there, I met Gianne, who is absolutely wonderful. Eventually, Igor got there and helped unload the stands and Beanies, but I honestly don’t remember who was there also helping with benching (anyone other than the SCUBA crew). Poor Gianne was dressed in jeans, and was complaining

that it was hot. I think it was like 87 degrees F … we had a cool front come through, so it was NOT hot! I sent her to her room to change into shorts and didn’t see her again for a couple of hours. Benching takes a lot of time, but I wouldn’t miss it for the world. I think I’m a bit weird because I absolutely LOVE putting on a betta show. We got the tables arranged, the stands on the tables, the black plastic drop cloth stapled to the stands, the bowls and Beanies taped (we use clear box tape on the containers so that it is easy to remove the stickers), labeled and filled. Fish got put into the water, sorted, released and carded. We had all hands on deck for this … and this is what I LOVE about betta people … those who could were in the show room helping in any way they could. Once the fish were benched, the fun began. We all went to Golden Corral for dinner. If you know me, then you know that my SUV tends to have issues JUST when I need it NOT TOO. In 2009, the AC went out … this time, the rear passenger door quit unlocking and opening. Well, we got it “fixed” just in time. Jeremy, Christine, and Phil Dorr rode with me. The group had an entire room to ourselves. Dinner and conversation was great. My group had to leave early because Larissa was finally getting to the hotel. If I remember correctly, her luggage got on the plane, but she was bumped from the plane. Not knowing the area, we got to take the scenic route back to the hotel. I don’t remember much about being in the hospitality suite on Thursday … not that I had a lot to drink. I was in the show room for most of the evening because we could not lock the doors ourselves and had to wait on

‘‘You always develop lasting friendships with people at Convention ... it is a bond that time cannot break.’’

Story continues on page 14 FLARE! 13


continued from page 13

2013

the hotel staff to come and lock it. I think I finally made it to the suite at around 11 pm and was totally exhausted, but everyone else seemed to be having a great time. Friday was also busy, with attending the judging seminar and apprentice judging and all that goes with it. It was a lot of fun and I actually surprised myself by how many of the standards I really knew. I had the pleasure of apprenticing under Eryn Rosenbaum and Jeff Hiller. Stacy Fenhaus was also apprenticing with me, so I got the pleasure of working with her too. Judging Best of Variety, Best of Show and Reserve Best of Show was pretty awesome! Watching the pros in action! Once the Judging was completed, we had a Mexican buffet dinner by the pool. I got to sit with Dr. and Mrs. Lucas and several other older members. It was so much fun for them to talk about “the good old days”, everything from Betta to riding a motorcycle cross-country (per Dr. Lucas). I didn’t go back for seconds because I didn’t want to miss ANYTHING that was being said at our table. Eventually my Joe joined us for dinner. I actually got up to the hospitality suite “early”, about 10 p.m. I had a glass of red wine, but Tonya cut me off after that because I had the early seminar on live/first foods and she is an awesome friend. We got out of the hospitality suite around midnight, I think. Saturday morning, the alarm didn’t get set, so I woke up at 8:30 a.m. and my seminar started at 9:00 a.m.!!! I got dressed and ran downstairs. Gerald and Kayla were taking their exam, so I waited to get set up until after they were finished. I got started late and didn’t think it would take me 30 minutes to do the entire thing. Everyone had different questions on each of the cultures and it took me an entire hour to get through all of the different cultures I brought….which was totally awesome!!! I’m glad that there were

14 FLARE!

questions, and even Jean-Michele had some suggestions on how to NOT have stinky micro type worms. I recorded the seminar but I’m not happy with how it turned out, so I plan on doing another video. Saturday afternoon was spent counting the ballot, which was an honor!!! I didn’t mind too much until we realized that we had not had lunch. After we ate, we all were in a much better mood. It took us a couple hours to count all the ballots. After the ballots were counted, we had the JB meeting and the winning candidates were announced as were the proposed changes that passed. JB business was handled and we adjourned to allow the new board to have a quick meeting. We again got together to have the members meeting and listen to the proposal bids for Convention 2014. Saturday evening, Banquet Time!!! I asked if I could do the announcing for Banquet. I had two agendas for this request. First was to wish some of my very best friends (Gerald and Kayla Griffin) a happy 4 year anniversary. They had no idea I had planned on toasting them, so I hope they were not too mad. The second thing was to redeem myself from the 2009

Photographs by Christine Tanner

IBC CONVENTION


Convention where I announced the awards. I was scared to be up in front of all those scary people that I had no idea who they were, and trying to pronounce names I had not heard before. Now all those scary people are my friends whom I have come to know and love dearly. It was my pleasure to announce as winners, some/most of my best friends. I think those that won BOV, BOS, and RBOS were already celebrating at this point. After banquet we bagged fish to get ready for the Auction Sunday morning. We had pretty close too, if not over 500 fish. We had all hands on deck for the bagging. Dr. Lucas even helped. He is an incredible man! SCUBA Team started off by putting fish back in numerical order, as we always do at our local show. Each breeder bagged their own fish as those that didn’t have fish, pulled the Auction fish and set them aside. Some of SCUBA also helped other SCUBA members bag their fish. As the stands were cleared of fish, those were torn down. I don’t recall who was there, but I do recall seeing Jean-Michele and Peter drying beanies and putting them away. With all the help, fish were bagged and boxed, auction fish were double checked, stands and beanies were reloaded into the truck for transporting back. I was handed a very warm….no it was hot….glass of red wine. By the time we had finished tearing down the show room, the wine had cooled to the perfect drinking temperature…time for me to enjoy!!! We got the show room locked up and went to enjoy a job well done in the hospitality suite. There was a lot of celebrating going on! Sunday morning was setting up for the auction. I don’t think I was late getting to the show room, but by the time I got down, Paul and several others were already setting the chairs up for the auction. Kayla was behind the computer (I really think she sneaks down with a pallet and sleeps in the show room!!!) getting the program ready and getting auction card numbers assigned. Once the auction started, we got really busy. I think the auction went pretty well (I do have to admit that I spent some time talking with Cecilia). I loved Michael Randall and the way he took over the drawing portion of the auc-

tion, he is so animated. I laughed all weekend at him. To sum up my experience at Convention, I got to see friends that I haven’t seen in several years. You always develop lasting friendships with people at Convention. When you do get to see them face to face again, or even for the first time, it is a bond that time cannot break. I don’t know if it is just me, or if other people feel the same way. I don’t know a lot of you guys as well as I would like too, and I look forward to the chance to get to know you better. I got to get to know Claire, Jean-Michele and Peter a little better, and got to talk with other friends that I hadn’t seen in 2 years. I may not get to go to every convention, but the ones I do get to attend are wonderful. It may be stressful, but it is always the best time I’ve ever had. I suggest that each and every one that reads this, start saving to attend at least one convention, it is worth every penny spent!!!

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16 FLARE!


FLARE! 17

Photographs by Christine Tanner


2013 YEAR

betta person of the

by Seig Illig

My wife and I always feel sad to leave an IBC Convention, old friends and new ones we just met and already look forward for the year ahead. The 2013 was a very good, well-organized, Dallas convention that was no exception being #20 for us and winning Grand Champion it’s something we always will remember. Being asked to write an article for Flare I will start with a little history about me and finding the IBC. Before moving to the US from Germany in 1986 I was explicitly involved in breeding and showing Australian Finches for many years with success. Plans to continue with the same goal in mind failed, because the lack of quality birds and clubs available in PA. After raising fancy goldfish and koi, I came across some articles in magazines written by Dr. Gene Lucas mentioning the IBC and its show system. I knew about pet shop bettas, but never heard about showing them little fish. Visiting the fish room of Don McCooey I was amazed about the variety of colors especially the solid ones. My mind made up I took a plane to New Orleans for my first IBC convention in 1994. There I was able to purchase about 10 Bettas at the auction Sunday morning. 2 blue STF from Annette Lurton and 1 Cambodian blue STM from Norm Fickeisen were my starter stock for our iridescent Betta breeding project and today all our turquoise HM’s, DT or ST can be traced back to those 3 fish. Finely, I found an animal I had fun in raising and showing, and so in 1995 our career in the IBC shows circuit could start.

As the grizzle and pastel showed up in our spawns we made it one of our goals to establish good grizzle and adding those and PK’s we could expand the number of show classes. Being members for 20 years our highlights were Grand Champions for 2013 & 2004, 5 times Reserve Grand Champion, 4 times Warren Young Award, 4 times Presidents Award and finished 12 times in the top 10.

‘‘To be continuously succesSful in shows means being dedicated to the hobby.’’

18 FLARE!

Other surprising awards included my Fellow of the Congress in 2002, Betta Person in 2009 & 2013 and Judy’s Gene Lucas Memorial Award in 2007. To be continuously successful in shows means being dedicated to the hobby and involves spending many hours in picking breeders, raising, separating and jarring show fish. Also, there are some things too that are not so fun, as cleaning jars, tanks, taking care of sick fish and organizing the fish room. I’m very thankful having the help and understanding of my dear wife, Judy. As for the future, we are still planning to keep busy in the hobby, concentrating on our turquoise HM and red show PKs. We will also try to establish a grizzled line again after we lost them. It seems like there is a growing number of IBC members in all areas taking a stab at showing. There Story continues on page 23

Betta Person of the Year 2009 & 2013

Fellow of the Congress 2002

Gene Lucas Award [Judy] 2007

Grand Champion 2004 & 2013

Res. Grand Champion 5 times

Warren Young Award 4 times

President’s Award 4 times


Photograph by Christine Tanner

2013 IBC Convention BOS Female

2013 IBC GRAND CHAMPIONS Seig & Judy Illig


Photograph by Christine Tanner

I

n order for me to explain my quest and how I managed to reach this goal, I will need to go back a few years to the beginning of my journey. Gerald and I attended the IBC Convention in 2009 just one week after we got married. This was not where I would have originally chosen for my honeymoon, but it is funny how things change. Gerald was always talking about bettas and he had tanks with different wild betta species, but I was not impressed. To me, they just looked like brown fish. The only domestic bettas that I had ever seen were the sad little fishes in the cups at the local pet shop. The moment I walked into the show room at that first convention, I was

20 FLARE!

captivated. The beauty of these beings literally took my breath away. I leaned over and whispered in Gerald’s ear, “They look like butterflies in jars!” I was like a child in a candy store and I wanted them all. I knew at that very moment that I wanted to create these beautiful colors and forms. I followed Gerald around listening to all of the chatter about bettas and breeding. This was when I met some of the greatest people in the world. It was a fun filled weekend; I bought supplies that I was going to need in the swap shop, as well as several fish. I bid on many pairs of wilds in the silent auction as well. I was sure Gerald was going to divorce me when he found out what I spent in the swap shop. Well, that was until Sunday at the auction. I wanted them all and I had to have them.

Unfortunately, I did not get them all, but I did spend roughly $600 at the auction alone. Then we headed home so I could begin my adventure. An adventure it was. I had cut down 2 L coke bottles all over the kitchen cabinets with my new jewels. Who needs rubies, emeralds, and diamonds when you have bettas! I made my first cardinal mistake with this group of fish. We built a barracks system for my breeders and I immediately put them all into the system. Everything was going great and I was conditioning them for spawning. I found a betta online that I felt would be a much better female for the male I wanted to spawn, so I bought her. This is where I made my first huge mistake. I put the new fish directly into the barracks. The fish I had bought


new breeder of the

YEAR 2013 by Kalya Griffin

had Costia and infected my entire stock. All of my fish had died within one week. I was devastated and I was never going to breed bettas again. That is, until the next time. Fast forward to IBC Convention 2010 in Indianapolis, I walked into the show room and it started all over again. I was walking through, making notes of the fish that were up for auction and making comments about the form and color. Gerald told me that I really had an eye for this and suggested that we become judges. I thought maybe if I was a judge, then I would know better of what I wanted to breed for show. I also spent a little bit of money in the swap shop again. We began our judging apprenticeship that weekend. This really helped me in deciding which bettas that I would then bid on in the auc-

tion. I decided I was going to breed bettas and become a judge. At the auction I won a few of the fish that I was wanting. I came home with 17 pairs and 3 more females. This time I did things differently and everyone went into a ½ gallon glass jar. I set up three spawns in our bedroom. My cedar chest will hold exactly three 7 gallon Kritter Keepers so this is what I chose to spawn in. I put in a pair of red crowntails, a turquoise marble plakat pair, and a red marble halfmoon pair. The red crowntails ate their babies, the turquoise female killed the male and the red marbles spawned. I was so excited. I dripped green water into the tank to feed the infusoria on the java moss. Next I started feeding vinegar eels followed by BBS. They were growing superbly. I then moved the fry to a planted 30 gallon in our

living room to grow out. This was my second huge mistake. I was also aquascaping this tank. I had a huge mat of riccia which obstructed the light and the substrate developed an anaerobic pocket. When I came home and was almost knocked down by the smell of sulfur coming from the tank I went into full speed pulling all of the fish from the tank. Only two of the juveniles survived, so they got moved into their own jars to finish growing. One was a very nice female with awesome form but her colored was not what I wanted, so I did not have anything for that show season. But I continued to breed and backcross. I was seeing the fish in my room as paints on a pallet. I knew what I was trying to create but it just wasn’t there yet. Story continues on page 23

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2013 YEAR-END AWARDS

Sieg & Judy Illig Total Division Points 4345 22 FLARE!

Warren Young Points 1430

Total Show Year Points 5775

President’s Award Totals Rank 1

1st 7 BOS 2

2nd 6 Total 835

3rd 6 RBOV 1

BOV 3 RBOS 0

Photographs by Christine Tanner

Grand Champion, Warren Young Memorial Award and President’s Award


2

3

Stacy Fenhaus

4

John Leach

Yvonne Chaban

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

2160

240

2400

1550

280

1830

1245

560

1805

6

5 Sherolyn Craig

7

Karen MacAuley

Igor Prpic

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

1375

160

1535

1060

280

1340

1230

80

1310 FLARE! 23


8. Winston Limhengco

9. Elizabeth Hahn

10. Patrick Henry

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

1170

100

1270

995

200

1195

895

0

895

11. Gianne Souza

12. Richard Laughery

13. Phil Dorr

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

645

100

745

685

0

685

505

0

505

14. Jimmy Nallas

15. Cecilia Mallet

16. Larissa Williams

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

190

80

270

240

0

240

210

0

210

17. Dick Houston

18. John Metzger

19. Bobbi Walters

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

190

0

190

160

0

160

120

0

120

19. Joanna Taylor Total Division Points

Warren Young Points

Total Show Year Points

120

0

120

13

11 Photographs by Christine Tanner

24 FLARE!

15

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BETTA PERSON OF THE YEAR continued from page 17

are many knowledgeable young breeders keeping the show circuit going and time for us older ones (me and Judy) to step back a notch. My advice for new ones is following: l Start small with maybe two colors or variations. Wait and see and if you can handle more. There is always time to add more later. This way you avoid a burn out and lose interest in the hobby. l I know it’s hard to keep it small with all the varieties we have today. Therefore, pick what you like most and go from there. l Set yourself a goal to work on and don’t get sidetracked. l Difficulties will arise, however I think it makes our hobby more interesting. In conclusion, we want to thank all the hard-working chapters by organizing shows and making it possible to exhibit our fish, compare with other competitors fish and work on improving our lines. Only with strong chapters will we have a strong IBC organization.

2013 IBC Convention BOS Male

NEW BREEDER

continued from page 19

I had actually given up on breeding to show by 2012 but I was still working towards becoming certified as a judge. Then it happened again. OBBA hosted an IBC show in April of 2012. The beautiful creatures in the little square jars started pulling me in once again. I bought 25 bettas at the auction from that show. I was going to breed and I was going to show in the very next show season. Even if I did not have fry from these new breeders, I still had a number of bettas from my experimental spawns. We went to the IBC Convention in 2012 in Jacksonville, Florida. I was eager to get busy on my project once more. In Jacksonville, I was able to sit down and talk to one of my main mentors, Sieg Illig. I have been enthralled by his fish from the very beginning, and I had to know how to breed bettas as beautiful as his. We had some great discussions that weekend. I apprenticed during the judging with Rich Creighton and Rob Plenge. I learned so much that day from these guys and I also learned not to second guess my instincts. After we finished judging I turned to Rich and said, “I’m going to be New Breeder of the Year

next year.” I’m not sure if he believed me, but it was decided then at that moment. I once again decided what lines I wanted to work on. I had a 2 week old spawn of red plakats, from the master himself, growing up at home. I bought a few more fish, but nothing like I had done in the past. But I was now on a mission. As soon as we got home from Jacksonville, it got real. I told Gerald I was going to need more room. He told me it was already done. We spent the next week redesigning his fish room to house my betta adventure. We began spawning and crossing this to that and that to this. He would sometimes look at my juveniles and say, “Oh my, what have you done?” I would just smile and say, “That’s a pastel plakat, or that’s a grizzle crowntail. Don’t they look good?” I was anxiously awaiting my first show, measuring the bettas daily for growth. I was even giving them pep talks hoping it would make them want to grow that last ¼ of an inch I needed in order to send them to a show. Well, the pep talks did not work and I missed the first show of the 2012 fall season. But by the second show, I had some fish to send. I had been researching what was needed in order for me to win New Breeder. I

knew with one show behind me, it might be tough. So I sent in every new breeder class to the next show. I did not win New Breeder Best of Show or Reserve Best of Show at that show, but I did get some points. I placed first, second, and third in crowntails, doubletail male and doubletail female. So I continued to send fish in each class to every single show for the rest of the year. I had done it. I won New Breeder of the Year for 2013. I also got the division awards for all six New Breeder classes. The journey has been a wonderful one. There were many ups and so, so many downs. Even though I brought home the awards, the credit for this achievement goes to so many. Sieg and Judy Illig, Phil Dorr, Yvonne Chaban, Stacy Fenhaus, and Karen Mac Auley for making it possible for me to have quality show breeders. But the biggest part in this was played by my husband Gerald who never lost faith in me. He is the one who kept me going when I was afraid I couldn’t do it. This has brought me to a place within the IBC and within myself. I now know that there is nothing that I can’t do as long as I give 100 percent. The outcome may not be as expected, but just like these wondrous fish, it will be great. FLARE! 25


2013 Chapter of the Year South Central United Betta Alliance (SCUBA) 26 FLARE!

Photographs by Christine Tanner

SPECIAL AWARDS


Judging Board Award Fellow of the Congress

Claire Pavia

Karen MacAuley

Peter Baerwald

Gene Lucas Award

Walt Maurus Award

FLARE! Awards

Connie Emery

Cecilia Bailey-Mallett

Karen MacAuley

(Also given to Richard Atwood)

Outstanding Service Awards

Connie Emery

Peter Barwald

(Also given to Sally Van Camp)

Cecilia Bailey-Mallet

Joe Becerra

Jeremy Waugh FLARE! 27


2013 Special Lifetime Achievement for Excellence in Writing Gene Lucas 28 FLARE!

Photographs by Christine Tanner

ONE-TIME AWARDS


Special SCUBA Certificates

Stacy Deaton Fenhaus

Tonya Garrison

Gerald Griffin

Kayla Griffin

Joe Green

Lori Green FLARE! 29


BE THE

judge Do you have what it takes to become an IBC judge?

by Sherolyn Craig

“D

o you think you‘ll ever want to be a judge?” Here I was, standing at my first show with some of the all-time great breeders in the hobby, and they were asking me, if I wanted to be a judge.  I admit I was pretty thrilled my first spawn had produced some really nice fish that placed in the regular classes.  It was even more exciting since I never started in New Breeders, choosing instead to go head to head with the big boys. Placing in that company made all those water changes worthwhile and got me hooked on showing. But judging?  As I stood there contemplating the question, I reflected on the terms like broad dorsal base and sharp edges that I had just learned the meaning of. I quickly went over in my mind to where my fish were placed next to other fish, some better and others worse, and the differences were pointed out to me. It all made sense but yet, still didn’t. I had been at the show all day and was on information overload.  And I wondered how long it would take me to develop my eye to the point I could see the champion in my own fish room, let alone one at a show.  As exciting as becoming a judge sounded at the time, I replied I thought it best to breed winning fish for a few years, and then consider it. I figured if I could not evaluate and judge my own fish to produce winners, what right did I have to judge someone else’s. “Good answer,” I was told. Fast forward a few years and we have produced many class winners and even some Best of Varieties and Best of Shows. Every year we have also been in the Top Ten in the final point standings. To start the Apprentice Judge program the rules state, in a two year time frame, I had to have had fish place in the open classes in at least two IBC sanctioned shows with three total places earned or be in the top 20 during any show year.  This year, having met those qualifications and with Convention practically in my back yard, I once again faced the question, “Do you think you’ll ever want to be a judge?” This time I felt qualified and my answer was a resounding yes. Once at this year’s Convention, I filled out the application form [IBC form 10] and got a signature from a member of the Judging Board. The official start date for me would be the first show I apprenticed at. I would then have three years from this official start date to complete my training. I then had to attend the Judging Seminars being presented at Convention. The first group of seminars are in a class room and cover general anatomy, nomenclature, and characteristics of a betta. It also includes an explanation  of  the leastfaults  judging  system we use to find the winners.  These seminars emphasizes the General Standards. 

30 FLARE!

 The second seminar is conducted in the show room during the actual judging of Convention fish.  As an apprentice I was assigned to and accompanied judges Sieg Illieg and Peter Baerald to observe and participate in the judging of the fish. Our team also had Gianne as another apprentice judge, and there were many lively discussions as we discussed the good and not so good  points of the fish entered in the classes. I got to hear different perspectives as we evaluated faults. In time we managed to select the winners of the classes we were assigned to judge. Now that I am officially an apprentice,


Photograph by Christine Tanner

I must serve as a student under different Certified Judges at three International or District shows. Once that is completed, I then will finish up where I started, judging at Convention. During Convention, I will have to pass a final visual test. For the visual Judging Test I must judge four classes and I must demonstrate the ability to properly disqualify when the need arises. I should also be able to demonstrate the ability to discern subtle color differences as well as demonstrate the ability to properly reclassify entries. I will be expected to rank the top three fish (from actual show results) in

three out of the first four places (1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th) for a minimum of three of the four classes I am asked to judge to successfully pass the test.  The final step to becoming a Certified Judge will be to take a written judging exam. An hour is given for taking the open book test, and a grade of 70% must be attained to pass. With the start of the upcoming show season fast approaching, I am busy breeding and getting my show fish ready to go. I am also spending a bit more time in the standards looking over colors and types I am not familiar with, as well as taking more

note of the faults in the classes I show. As much as I enjoy showing my fish, I’m more excited about Apprenticing and learning the finer points of judging this season. My trip next June to the Convention in San Jose, California, will be even more exciting as I finish up and get my certification. Then it will be my turn to ask the newer breeders, “Do you think you’ll ever want to be a judge?” If you enjoy breeding bettas, I can think of no better way to teach and encourage others and give back to the hobby then by taking the time to become a Certified Judge. FLARE! 31


2013-2014

show year changes by Larissa Williams

The executive AND judging boardS would like to see more chapters holding shows and more breeders entering shows.

32 FLARE!

Standards Changes The IBC Judging Board has been working hard on improving and updating our show standards in order to meet membership needs this year, the following changes have been made: l Updated Multicolor standards. This includes allowing the pattern of slender trim bands to be shown and not moved to butterfly, and changes to the fault guides. All judges and entrants should read over the new standards to understand what the ideal multicolor should represent. l New trial classes for “Large Pectoral Form” (Areas 2 & 6), “Veiltail Form” (Area 2), and “Giant Bettas” (Areas 6 & 7). Another trial class for “Crowntail Plakats” (Area 2) is currently under review by the Judging Board. l Areas without the additional trial classes should show fish matching these standards in Variations for the year. If there are enough entries and entrants showing these types, they will be added to Trial classes for that area the following show season. l Formation of Area 7, splitting Australia and New Zealand off from Area 6. More details about this in the article in this Flare! l Clarification on measuring ventral lengths for Traditional Plakats and how body length is measured. Ideal ventral length in Traditional plakats is 2/3 of the distance from the base of the ventral fin to the caudal peduncle or longer. Body length is the distance from the nose to the caudal peduncle. l Allowing Team entries to enter “unknown” for the breeder if the breeder is unknown. (All effort should be made, however, to ascertain the breeder’s identity for proper credit. We do recognize, however, that this is not always possible.) l Clarification of Best of Show judging. While there is a weight in BOV and BOS towards general form (the traits all classes have in common), the judging for BOV and BOS should not

be reduced purely to a form-and-finnage judging. All faults must be considered, and the question asked, “Is this fish the best representative of its class that it can be?” All fish should be given equal consideration, even if some of the fish are less vibrantly spectacular than their fellows. (i.e. A multicolor should not win over a cellophane simply because the multicolor is prettier.) Detail on the fault levels is key at this stage of judging. l Clarification of judging of the Form and Finnage class when the judging moves on to BOV and BOS. While color faults are disregarded in judging Form and Finnage, they will be considered at the next level of awards. When moving to BOV and BOS, the fish should be judged by the regular classes that it best fits into, including the color-fault classifications. There is already a weight in BOV and BOS towards general form (the traits all classes have in common), and we believe that placing Form and Finnage by this additional categorization evens out the judging field for the higher awards. l Clarification on judging of Variation fish. Written descriptions of variations should be clear and not simply refer to a tradename (such as “fusetail” or “panda”). Also, Variation fish going on to BOV and BOS should disregard the specific variation and use the standard that applies to the rest of the fish based on color/pattern and tail type. l Clarification on what parts of the show judges and apprentices having fish in the show can assist with, and which they cannot. Expansion of the details of the apprenticeship program with what is expected as the apprentice goes through the stages and approaches their final tests. In addition to these changes, the Judging Board chair will be sending out emails to all Show Chairs and Head Judges before every show reminding them of the changes, and warning them to be alert for certain trends that we’ve seen happening. When in doubt, read the Standards. When something needs a clarification, ask the Judging Board.


Photograph by Christine Tanner

The MAP program will continue as a regular program. Entries for MAP will be entitled to the normal auction split as the regular class fish, and not be required to be donated entries. Area 2 has changed their show calendar year to a January through December schedule. The 20132014 year will be from July 2013 thru December 2014 for this first year. Area 2 will have their Convention show in March of each year. Revised class lists have been completed for Areas 1, 2, 6, and 7. They are listed on page ?? FLARE! and will also be posted to the files in BetterBettas and the IBC website. The Judging Manual is currently undergoing a formatting update, and will be posted on the IBC website. When it is complete and posted, it will be announced in the BetterBettas mailing list, the judge’s mailing list, and the IBC Facebook page. If you have any questions about the changes, please send an email to the JB Chair at jbchair@ ibcbettas.org.

Financial Incentives In order to promote betta showing among participants and chapters, the IBC Executive Board has authorized certain incentives for IBC International Shows. Chapters incur great expenses holding a show, particularly when they’re first

starting out, including buying show bowls/beanies, building stands, renting show space, obtaining supplies, buying awards, etc. We hope that this assistance will make it easier for chapters to hold shows and entrants to participate. l Continuation of the sliding scale for entry fees for Area 1. (Areas 2, 6, and 7 have the option to use if they want.) l If a chapter uses the sliding scale, IBC will reimburse the difference based on a standard $2/entry fee. l All chapters will receive a reimbursement of their US$25 Sanction Fee after the successful completion of their show and submittal of the formal IBC Show Results form. l All chapters holding a show during the 2013-2014 show season will receive US$200. This is applicable for all chapters, in all areas. It is only applicable to one show per chapter in a season. (i.e. if a chapter holds two or three shows in a season, they will only receive the US$200 for the first show, and not the others.) These incentives are authorized for the 20132014 show season only. They will be reviewed next year to see if they have helped the IBC Show Circuit.

IF YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR HOW TO PROMOTE BETTA SHOWING, OR ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT CHANGES, PLEASE SEND AN EMAIL TO THE JB CHAIR AT JBCHAIR@ IBCBETTAS.ORG.

FLARE! 33


2013 IBC JUDGING BOARD MINUTES June 20, 2013

June 22, 2013

Judging Board Members present: Sieg Illig, Phil Dorr, Connie Emery, Christine Tanner and Claire Pavia (as approved Area 2 representative for Sabrina Dichne). Committee reports to membership were given on Standards, Training, Certification and Registrar.

Judging Board Members present: Sieg Illig (past), Connie Emery (past), Phil Dorr, Christine Tanner, Claire Pavia (as approved Area 2 representative for Sabrina Dichne), Larissa Williams (new), Wally Nida (new), Igor Prpic (new) and Rich Creighton (new).

OLD BUSINESS The MAP Committee report was given by Gerald Griffin and the results of the trial program warrant establishing it as a permanent program in the Show Class System for Area 1. The program will continue as a regular program and entries will be entitled to the normal auction split as the regular class fish and will not be required to be donated entries. NEW BUSINESS Area 2 Trial Class—Veiltail Standard Area 2 had sufficient numbers of entries to support their proposed Veiltail Standard and the class was approved . Area 1 Trial Class—Veiltail Standard There is a request for an Area 1 Veiltail class, and after much discussion the Judging Board outlined the requirements for establishing such a class and informed the membership that the proper procedure for establishing such a class was to begin showing them in the variations class and a formal request for the class should be sent to the Judging Board. This request was tabled and passed on to the incoming Judging Board. Multicolor Standard The Judging Board presented the revised changes to the Multicolor standards, which involve changes to the fault guide for this class. The changes were accepted. Area 2 Show Calendar Change A request from Area 2 to change their show calendar year was approved by the Judging Board. The show year for Area 2 for the 2013-2014 year will be from July 2013 through December 2014 for this first year. Thereafter, the show year will be January through December. Area 2 will have their year-end Convention show in March of each year. Other Area 2 requests for proposed standards on Big Pectorals were passed to the incoming Judging Board for review. I personally thank all the members of the Judging Board whom I have had the pleasure of working with over the years and all the great members who supported me over the years. Meeting was adjourned. Respectfully, Connie Emery Past Judging Board Chair

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ELECTIONS The IBC election results were tabulated and the new members of the Judging Board were Larissa Williams, Wally Nida, and Igor Prpic. The new Executive Board met and reappointed Christine Tanner as the EB representative to the Judging Board. The new Judging Board met and appointed Rich Creighton to serve the reminder of Damian Garcia’s term. MEETING The new Judging Board met and made the following appointments for the 2013-2014 show year : Chair/EB Rep: Larissa Williams Vice Chair: Rich Creighton Registrar: Christine Tanner Judges Training: Phil Dorr Certification: Wally Nida Standards: Dan Young Member-at-Large: Igor Prpic Area 2 Representative: Sabrina Dichne Area 6 Representative: Hermanus Haryanto The JB decided to move discussions over to the IBC Forum for new topics, and hold the Yahoo group as an archive of the old information. The new business topics that the previous JB held for the new JB were to be discussed after Convention on the IBC Forum. Meeting was adjourned. Larissa Williams New Judging Board Chair


2013 IBC TRIAL CLASS STANDARDS Giant Plakat Trial Standard

Photograph by Bobby Chua

Photograph by Mr. Piboonchai ChuanChuen

Ventral Fins: As in other show bettas. Dorsal Fin: As in other show bettas. Caudal Fin: As in other show bettas. Pectoral Fins: As in other show bettas. Body length = A Body thickness = B Stout and heavy at the proportion around A:B = 1:2.5 Giant Form & Finnage Faults Body is not stout and heavy at body length and thickness proportion around 1:3 (major fault) Slender body at body length and thickness proportion more than 1:3 (severe fault) Body length less than 2.5 inches for male (disqualifying fault) Body length less than 2 inches for female (disqualifying fault)

ALL OTHER APPRORIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY

Photograph by Bobby Chua

FLARE! 35


2013 IBC TRIAL CLASS STANDARDS Veiltail Trial Standard

Description

Beschreibung

The Veiltail is the oldest form of long finned show betta (Betta splendens) that has no symmetry. The ideal Veiltail has an asymmetrical appearance with a long caudal fin, narrow dorsal and an anal in the form of a trapezoid. The rays in all fins must be evenly curved. The body should be strong and not too skinny.

Der Veiltail ist die älteste Form des langflossigen Show Betta (Betta splen dens), welche keine Symmetrie aufweist, sondern ein asymmetrisches Erscheinungsbild hat. Der ideale Veiltail hat eine asymmetrische Optik mit langer Kaudale, schm ler Dorsale und einer Anale in Form eines Trapezes. Die Flossenstrahlen i allen Flossen müssen gleichmäßig gebogen sein. Der Körper sollte leicht stämmig und nicht zu dünn sein.

Caudal Fin

Kaudale

The caudal fin has a broad base at the caudal peduncle, where the outer fin rays right at the peduncle must spread no less than 165°, ideally 180°. The rays climb up steeply from the caudal peduncle and then, after reaching the highest point at about 20% of the entire fin, bend round in a long, smooth arc to the end of the fin. The individual fin rays are ending staggered step by step becoming longer from the outside to the middle of the caudal, so that a kind of tip is formed, whereby the caudal fin looks like a brush in the form of a cat’s tongue or a round shape with a flat tip. At the base of the caudal peduncle, the rays should emerge out of the entire caudal peduncle symmetrically to an imaginary center line from the head to the caudal peduncle. The length of the caudal fin should be one (1) body length. If it is 25% longer or more, it is considered a major fault. When flared, the caudal must be spread out over its entire length, alt- hough it should not be symmetrical based on a center line from head to tail, but must drop down. The fin rays should not have more than primary branching, ending in not more than 2 branches per ray. The margin of the fin should be smooth and unbroken and without any extended rays.

Die Kaudale beginnt mit einer breiten Basis an der Schwanzwurzel, wobei die äußeren Flossenstrahlen direkt an der Schwanzwurzel eine Spreizung von über 165° Grad aufweisen müssen. Ideal sind 180° Grad. Die Strahlen treten steil ansteigend aus der Schwanzwurzel aus und verlaufen dann, nach Erreichen der höchsten Stelle bei ca. 20% der gesamten Flosse, in einem gleichmäßigen Bogen nach hinten lang ausgezogen. Die einzelnen Flossenstrahlen enden dabei im Versatz nach und nach zur Mitte der Kaudale von außen nach innen länger werdend, sodass eine Art Spitze entsteht, wodurch die Kaudale wie ein Pinsel in Form einer Katzenzunge oder eine Rundform mit flacher Spitze wirkt. Im Ansatz, an der Schwanzwurzel, sollten die Flossenstrahlen bei einer gedachten Mittellinie vom Kopf durch die Schwanzwurzel symmetrisch aus der gesamten Breite der Schwanzwurzel hervortreten. Die Länge der Kaudale sollte eine Körperlänge betragen. Eine Kaudale, welche um 1/4 tel oder mehr länger ist, ist ein bedeutender Fehler (Majo Fault). Beim Spreizen soll die Kaudale über ihre ganze Länge ausge- breitet werden können, wobei sie allerdings nicht symmetrisch anhand einer gedachten Mittellinie vom Kopf durch die Schwanzwurzel sein darf, sondern nach unten abfallen muss. Die Flossenstrahlen sollen sich nicht mehr als ein Mal aufteilen. Der Flossensaum soll glatt und ohne Aus- oder Einbuchtungen sein.

Dorsal Fin

Dorsale

The dorsal should not be too broad at its base, but extend in the shape of a sickle to end up in a pointy tip. The width of the

Die Dorsale soll im Ansatz nicht zu breit sein, sondern lang ausgezoge die Form einer Sichel haben und in einer Spitze

36 FLARE!

 


base of the Dorsal should not be broader than half of the width of the anal, because otherwise the sickle shape is no longer given. If it is broader, it’s a severe fault. 1/3 of the width of the anal is ideal, if it is less, it’s a severe fault. The length of the dorsal fin should be at least ¾ of body length, but not longer than one (1) body length. The margin of the fin should be smooth and without any extended rays. The dorsal should be spread upright at the base and extend toward the caudal. Overlapping of the dorsal and caudal is permitted and de- sirable. Any ray splitting is undesirable. Anal Fin

enden. Die Breite des Ansatzes der Dorsale darf höchsten ½ der Breite der Anale betragen, d ansonsten die Sichelform nicht mehr gegeben ist. Ideal ist 1/3 der Breite der Anale. Ist sie breiter als ½ oder schmaler als 2/3, ist dies ein schwerwiegender Fehler (severe fault). Die Länge der Dorsale soll mindestens ¾ der Kör- perlänge betragen, jedoch nicht länger als die Körperlänge sein. Der Flossensaum sollte glatt und ohne Aus- und Einbuchtungen sein. Die Dorsale muss beim Spreizen aufgespannt werden können, dabei muss sie im Ansatz aufrecht stehen und zur Kaudale hin lang ausge- zogen sein. Ein Überlappen der Dorsale über die Kaudale ist erlaubt und erstrebenswert. Ein Aufspalten der einzelnen Flossenstrahlen ist nicht erwünscht. Anale

Ventral Fins

Die Anale soll die Form eines Trapezes mit am Ansatz zum Körper zwei annähernd gleichen, fast rechten Winkeln haben, wobei die kür- zere Seite des Trapezes zum Kopf des Fisches hin gelegen sein muss. Sie beginnt kurz hinter den Ventralen und soll nach hinten schräg abfallend verlaufen. Die vorderen Flossenstrahlen sollen mindestens 1/5 und nicht länger als ¾ der Körperlänge sein; die letzten Flossenstrahlen sollen nicht länger als eine Körperlänge, gemessen vom Maul bis zum Ende der Schwanzwurzel, und nicht kürzer als 90% der Körperlänge sein. Der Flossenverlauf ist weich und soll im vorderen Bereich rund ver- laufen, nach hinten in den Flossenstrahlen länger werden und am En- de in einer (1) Spitze enden, wobei ein Aufspalten der einzelnen Flos- senstrahlen nicht erwünscht ist. Ein Überlappen der Anale zur Kauda- le ist nicht erwünscht, solange nur geringfügig aber kein Fehler.

Shaped like the blade of a knife with the cutting edge to the rear. They are narrow at their base and should not be voluminous, which means they should not be wider than 1/5 of the width of the anal fin at its base. They must end in one (1) point. Both fins are to be of equal length and should not cross each other. They should be about ¾ of the length of one (1) body length.

Ventralen Die Form der Ventralen sollte einer nach hinten gerichteten Messer- klinge entsprechen. Sie sind schmal im Ansatz und sollen kein großes Volumen aufweisen, also nicht breiter als 1/5 der Breite der Anale am Körperansatz sein. Sie müssen in einer (1) Spitze enden. Beide Flossen sollen gleich lang sein und dürfen sich nicht kreuzen. Ihre Länge soll in etwa ¾ der Körperlänge betragen.

Veiltail Traditional Longfin Form and Finnage Faults

Veiltail Traditional Longfin Form and Finnage Faults

1. Body too stout or too narrow (minor fault) 2. Less than 180 ° but more than 165 ° caudal spread (minor fault) 3. Less than 150 ° spread of the caudal (severe fault) 4. Dorsal fin not sickle-shaped (minor fault) 5. Branching of caudal rays > 1 (major fault) 6. Branching of the dorsal OR the anal fin rays (major fault) 7. Branching of the dorsal AND the anal fin rays (severe fault)

1. Körper zu stämmig oder zu schmal (geringfügiger Fehler) (minor fault) 2. Kaudalenspreizung < 180° aber > 165° (geringfügiger Fehler) (minor fault) 3. Spreizung der Kaudale < 150° (schwerer Fehler) (severe fault) 4. Dorsale nicht sichelförmig (geringfügiger Fehler) (minor fault) 5. Kaudalstrahlen Verzweigungen > 1 (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault)

The anal fin should have the shape of a trapezoid with two approxi- mately equal 90° angles at the base near the body, whereby the short- er side of the trapezoid must be located toward the head of the fish. It begins shortly behind the ventral fins and drops toward the caudal fin. The front fin rays should be at least 2/3 but not more than ¾ of the body length; the last fin rays should be no longer than a body length, measured from the mouth to the caudal peduncle, and not less than 90% of the body length. The outline of the fin is smooth and softly rounded in the front area, the rays should get longer toward the back, ending in one (1) point, whereby a splitting of the fin rays is undesirable. Overlapping of the anal and caudal fin is not desired, but not considered a fault if over- lapping only slightly.

FLARE! 37


8. Caudal fin ≥25% longer than one (1) body length (major fault) 9. Width of dorsal fin > 1/3 but < ½ of width of anal fin (minor fault) 10. Width of dorsal fin > half of the width of anal fin (severe fault) 11. Fin margin not smooth in one of the unpaired fins (slight fault) 12. Fin margin not smooth in two or more unpaired fins (minor fault) 13. Front anal fin rays < 2/3 of the body length (major fault) 14. Rear anal fin rays longer than one (1) body length (major fault) 15. Rear anal fin rays shorter than 90% of the body length (major fault) 16. Width of ventral fins > 1/5 of the width of anal fin (major fault) 17. Crossing ventral fins (slight fault) 18. More than one tip at the end of ventral fins (slight fault) 19. Ventral fins less than ¾ but more than ½ of body length (major fault) 20. Symmetrical appearance of one or more unpaired fins (disqualification) 21. Stubby ventral fins (less than ½ of body length) (disqualification) 22. One of the unpaired fins more than ¼ too short or too long (disqualification) ALL OTHER APPROPRIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY AND ARE TO BE USED.

6. Verzweigungen der Flossenstrahlen in Dorsale ODER Anale (bedeuten der Fehler) (major fault) 7. Verzweigungen der Flossenstrahlen in Dorsale UND Anale (schwerwie gender Fehler) (severe fault) 8. Kaudale ≥ 25% länger als Körperlänge (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault) 9. Breite der Dorsale > ½ der Breite der Analen (schwerwiegender Fehler) (severe fault) 10. Breite der Dorsale > 1/3 aber < ½ der Breite der Anale (geringfügiger Fehler) (minor fault) 11. Kein glatter Flossensaum an einer der unpaarigen Flossen (leichter Fehler) (slight fault) 12. Kein glatter Flossensaum an zwei oder mehr der unpaarigen Flossen (geringfügiger Fehler) (minor fault) 13. Vordere Flossenstrahlen der Anale < 2/3 der Körperlänge (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault) 14. Hintere Flossenstrahlen der Anale länger als eine (1) Körperlänge (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault) 15. Hintere Flossenstrahlen kürzer als 90% der Körperlänge (bedeuten- der Fehler) (major fault) 16. Breite der Ventralen > 1/5 der Breite der Analen (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault) 17. Sich überkreuzende Ventralen (leichter Fehler) (slight fault) 18. Ventralen haben mehr als eine Spitze (leichter Fehler) (slight fault) 19. Ventralen kürzer als ¾ aber länger als ½ der Körperlänge (bedeutender Fehler) (major fault) 20. Symmetrisches Erscheinungsbild einer oder mehrerer der unpaarigen Flossen (Disqualifikation) 21. Stummelige Ventralen (kürzer als ½ Körperlänge) (Disqualifikation) 22. Eine der unpaarigen Flossen um mehr als ¼ zu kurz oder zu lang (Disqualifikation) ALLE ANDEREN ZUTREFFENDEN GENERELLEN FEHLER HABEN GÜLTIGKEIT UND SIND ANZUWENDEN.

 

Veiltail—Traditional Longfinned Females Veiltail females have shorter fins than males. The dorsal and anal fin are not to exceed half a body length. The caudal has a symmetrical oval shape with the longest fin rays in the middle (on an imaginary line from the head to peduncle). The anal drops from front to rear at a slight angle and ends in a tip. The ventral fins should be as long as the longest ray of the anal and be narrow and end in a single tip. The dorsal has a narrow base and shouldn’t be longer than the maximum body width (height). The same faults apply as described for the males, but for shorter fins, as mentioned above.

38 FLARE!

Veiltail—Traditional Longfinned Females Veiltail Weibchen haben kürzere Flossen als die Männchen. Die Dorsale und Anale sind höchstens so lang wie eine halbe Körperlänge. Die Kaudale weist eine symmetrische, ovale Form auf mit den längsten Flossenstrahlen in der Mitte (auf einer gedachten Linie vom Kopf durch die Schwanzwurzel). Die Anale verläuft von vorne nach hinten leicht schräg abfallend undendet in einer Spitze. Die Ventralen sollen schmal und so lang wie der längste Flossenstrahl der Anale sein und in einer einzigen Spitze enden. Die Dorsale ist schmal im Ansatz und höchstens so lang wie der Körper breit (hoch) ist. Es gelten dieselben Fehler wie bei den Männchen, allerdings für die kürzeren Flossen, wie beschrieben.


2013 IBC TRIAL CLASS STANDARDS Large Pectorals Form

 

Ventral Fins: As in other show bettas. Dorsal Fin: As in other show bettas. Caudal Fin: As in other show bettas. Pectoral Fins: The pectoral fins should be in balance and equal in size. Big and round is desirable. However, pectoral fins with minor protruding rays are not considered a fault. The length should extend to 1/2 of the body length. Top view is strongly recommended.

 

Photographs by Bobby Chua

 

Big Pectorals—Form & Finnage Faults 1. Pectoral fins - less than ½ of the body length (minor fault) 2. Pectoral fins - uneven outer edge (minor fault) 3. Pectoral fins - less than 1/3 of the body length (major fault) 4. Pectoral fins- irregular shape (major fault) 5. Pectoral fins - unbalance shape (major fault) 6. Pectoral fins- Long but not broad (major fault) 7. Pectoral fins - more than 2/3 body length (major fault) 8. Pectoral fins - unequal size, size difference less than 1/3 at one side to another (major fault) 9. Pectoral fins - unequal size, size difference of 1/3 at one side to another (severe fault) 10. Pectoral fins - unequal size, size difference of 1/2 at one side to another (disqualifying fault)

 

 

ALL OTHER APPRORIATE GENERAL FAULTS APPLY  

Specimen of irregular shaped pectoral fins.

 

 

FLARE! 39


Introducing IBC Area 7 By Larissa Williams The IBC Executive and Judging Boards congratulate our newest area, Area 7, encompassing Australia and New Zealand! Welcome to your very own area; we look forward to working with you in the IBC. Australia and New Zealand used to be part of Area 6, which had the southern part of Asia (including Indonesia, Phillipines, Singapore, and Malaysia, with current IBC chapters), and Australia. Currently, the IBC JB is reviewing the standards and judging across all of the IBC. While looking at Area 6, we determined that there were several logistical and practical problems between Australia and New Zealand and the rest of Area 6—namely their shipping quarantine regulations, the climate differences between seasons of the hemispheres, a huge cost issue in traveling, a difference in what types of fish are kept and bred (and shown!), and other issues. IBC decided that making a separate Area 7 would promote continued growth and a focus of the bettas and communities in both the original Area 6 and the new Area 7. Area 7 has a wealth of betta hobbyists, and three official IBC Chapters (with more to come). l Victoria Betta: Their next show will be in Melborne, Australia on September 29. They can be found at http://www.victoriabetta.com and https://www.facebook.com/victoriabetta. See their article on Page 44 to learn more about them. l Betta Australis: Their next show will be in Brisbane, Australia on October 13. They can be found at http://bettaaustralis.com and https://www.facebook.com/BettaAustralis. l Sydney Splendens Society: They are currently holding table shows at their meetings. They can be found at http://sydneysplendens.org. As the newest chapter, Sydney Spendens Society wanted to introduce themselves in FLARE!. “We are glad to become an official chapter. Our current committee members are President David Lo, Treasurer Mel Wozniak, Secretary and Chairperson Lulu Stewart and Fundraiser/Promotions Greg Holder. David Lo is also heading up the Betta’s in Schools program for Area 7 and we are just about to get our first school Burwood Public School to join very soon to get things started. We are looking forward to joining the International team of Betta enthusiasts that is the IBC.” Congratulations to Area 7!

40 FLARE!


IBC 2013-2014 SHOW SCHEDULE— AUGUST-DECEMBER Area 1—North America Date

Chapter

Show Chair

Location

Website

September 28

California Betta Society (CBS)

Jeremy Waugh Christine Tanner

Santa Clara, California

http://cbsbettas.org/shows.html

October 12

Midwest Betta Club (MBC)

Tracy Benson

Chesterfield, Indiana

www.facebook.com/ groups/196564643823976

October 26

SCUBA

TBD

TBD (possibly Houston)

Date

Chapter

Show Chair

Location

Website

September 6-8

Italian Betta Association

Roberto Silveril

Piacenza, Italy

www.ambibetta.it/show/

September 27-28

Associazione Mediterranea Bettofili Italiani (AMBI)

TBA

Napoli, Italy

www.ambibetta.it

October 4-6

Betta Svijet

Josip Kevari

Zagreb, Croatia

www.bettasvijet.com

Area 2—Europe

Area 6—Southern Asia Date

Chapter

Show Chair

Location

Website

August 16-18

Asian Betta Alliance (ABA)

Jansie Uy

Davao City, Phillipines

http://asianbetta.com

September 14

Team Betta Buddies

TBA

Penang, Malaysia

www.aquafairmalaysia.com.my/

Melaka November 21-24

Team Betta Buddies

Colin Chin

International Trade Centre,

www.facebook.com/Betta.N.Me

Melaka, Malaysia

Area 7—Australia & New Zealand Date

Chapter

Show Chair

Location

Website

September 29

Victoria Betta

Michael Chang

Melborne, Australia

www.victoriabetta.com/tableshows.html

October 20

Betta Australis

Jodi-Lea Matheson

Brisbane, Australia

http://bettaaustralis.com

Please email jbchair@ibcbettas.org if your chapter would like any of the open dates. FLARE! 41


AREA 1 IBC 2013-2014 SHOW CLASS LIST Group A: Regular Classes Division A1: Halfmoon ST Solid Color A1. Red STM A2. Black STM A3. Red or Black STF A4. Blue STM A5. Steel STM A6. Green / Turquoise STM A7. Blue STF A8. Steel STF A9. Green / Turquoise STF A10. Clear / Yellow / Orange STM A11. Clear / Yellow / Orange STF A12. Opaque / Pastel STM A13. Opaque / Pastel STF A14. Metallic Solid STM (dark and light) A15. Dark Metallic Solid STF A16. Light Metallic Solid STF Division A2: Halfmoon ST Patterned A17. Multicolor STM A18. Multicolor STF A19. BiColor STM A20. BiColor STF A21. Butterfly STM A22. Butterfly STF A23. Marble / Grizzle STM A24. Marble / Grizzle STF Division B: Halfmoon Doubletail B1. Dark Solid DTM B2. Light Solid DTM B3. Dark or Light Solid Color DTF B4. Patterned DTM B5. Patterned DTF Division C: Crowntail C1. Dark Solid Male C2. Light Solid Male C3. Dark or Light Solid Color Female C4. Patterned Male C5. Patterned Female

42 FLARE!

Division D: Shortfin D1. Traditional Plakat Male D2. Dark Show Plakat Male D3. Light Show Plakat Male D4. Show Plakat Patterned Male D5. Show Plakat Multicolor Male D6. Halfmoon Shortfin Male D7. Traditional Form Plakat Female D8. Show Plakat Female D9. Doubletail Plakat Male Division E: Breeders Division E1. Color or Form Variations E2. Form and Finnage E3. Pairs Division F: Wild Type Betta Pairs F1 Small / Large Bubblenesters F2 Small / Large Mouthbrooders Division G: Optional Classes G1 Photography G2 Illustration G3 Crafts

Group B: New Breeder Classes NB-1 Singletail Male NB-2 Doubletail Male NB-3 Crowntail Male NB-4 Plakat Male NB-5 Singletail Female NB-6 Doubletail Female Regular Classes: 46 Trial Classes: 0 Wild Classes: 2 Optional Classes: 3 New Breeder Classes: 6 57 Total Classes


AREA 2 IBC 2013-2014 SHOW CLASS LIST Group A: Regular Classes Division A1: Veiltail ST A1. Veiltail Males (TRIAL CLASS) A2. Veiltail Females (TRIAL CLASS) Division A2: Halfmoon Non-Iridescent Dark Solid ST A3. Red or Black STM A4. Red or Black STF Division A3: Halfmoon Iridescent Dark Solid ST A5. Blue or Green/Turquoise or Steel STM A6. Blue or Green/Turquoise or Steel STF Division A4: Halfmoon Light Solid ST A7. Clear, Yellow, Orange, Opaque or Pastel STM A8. Clear, Yellow, Orange, Opaque or Pastel STF Division A5: Halfmoon Metallic Solid ST A9. Metallic Solid STM A10. Metallic Solid STF Division A6: Halfmoon Patterned ST A11. Bicolor STM A12. Multicolor STM A13. Other Patterned (bf, marb, griz) STM A14. Bicolor STF A15. Multicolor STF A16. Other Patterned (bf, marb, griz) STF Division A2: Halfmoon ST Patterned A17. Multicolor STM A18. Multicolor STF A19. BiColor STM A20. BiColor STF A21. Butterfly STM A22. Butterfly STF A23. Marble / Grizzle STM A24. Marble / Grizzle STF Division B: Halfmoon Doubletail B1. Doubletail Males B2. Doubletail Females Division C: Crowntail ST C1. Crowntail Males C2. Crowntail Females Division D: Shortfin ST D1. Traditional Plakat Male D2. Show Plakat Dark Solid-Color Male D3. Show Plakat Light Solid-Color Male D4. Show Plakat Bicolor Male D5. Show Plakat Multicolor Male

D6. Show Plakat Patterned Male D7. Halfmoon Shortfin D8. Traditional Plakat Females D9. Show Plakat Females D10. Doubletail Plakat Males D11. Crowntail Plakat Males (TRIAL CLASS)* Division E: Breeders Division E1. Color or Form Variations Male E2. Color or Form Variations Female E3. Form and Finnage Males E4. Form and Finnage Females E5. Pairs E6. Large Pectoral Form Males (TRIAL CLASS)* Division F: Wild Type Betta Pairs F1 Small / Large Bubblenesters F2 Small / Large Mouthbrooders Division G: Arts & Crafts G1 Photography G2 Illustration G3 Crafts

Group B: New Breeder Classes NB1 Males VT (TRIAL CLASS) NB2 Males ST/DT NB3 Crowntail Male NB4 Shortfin Male NB5 Females VT (TRIAL CLASS) NB6 Females ST/DT/CT NB7 Shortfin Female Regular Classes: 33 Trial Classes: 4 Wild Classes: 2 Arts & Crafts: 3 New Breeder Classes: 5 NB Trial Classes: 2 49 Total Classes Note: If not specified, classes are to be judged with all colors/patterns. *The trial classes for Crowntail Pakats and for Large Pectorals are written for males only. Females with these characteristics should be entered in E2â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Color or Form Variations Female.

FLARE! 43


AREA 6 IBC 2013-2014 SHOW CLASS LIST Group A: Regular Classes

GROUP B : OPTIONAL CLASSES

Division A: Halfmoon Single Tail

Division E: Female Classes

A1. Red STM (Dark and Light Body) A2. Black STM A3. Dark Iridescent STM A4. Light Solid Color STM A5. Bicolor/ Butterfly STM A6. Marble/ Grizzled/ Multicolor STM A7. Metallic Dark STM A8. Metallic Light STM A9. Color Variation STM (AOC) Division B: Halfmoon Doubletail B1. Dark Solid Color DTM B2. Light Solid Color DTM B3. Patterned DTM B4. Metallic Dark/Light DTM B5. Color Variation DTM (AOC) Division C: Crowntail ST C1. Red/Black CTM C2. Dark Iridescent CTM C3. Light Solid CTM C4. Patterned CTM C5. Black Orchid CTM C6. Metallic Dark CTM C7. Metallic Light CTM C8. Color Variation CTM (AOC) Division D: Shortfin ST D1. Red STM Show Plakat D2. Black STM Show Plakat D3. Dark Iridescent STM Show Plakat D4. Light Solid Color STM Show Plakat D5. Bicolor/Butterfly STM Show Plakat D6. Marble/ Grizzled STM Show D7. Multicolor STM Show Plakat D8. Metallic Dark STM Show Plakat D9. Metallic Light STM Show Plakat D10. Color Variation STM show Plakat D11. Giant Solid Color Show Plakat (TRIAL CLASS) D12. Giant Patterned Show Plakat (TRIAL CLASS)

E1. Solid Color HM/DT Female E2. Patterned HM/DT Female E3. Solid Color CT Female E4. Patterned CT Female E5. Solid Color Show Plakat Female E6. Patterned Show plakat Female Division F: Wild Type Betta Pairs F1. Bubble-nesters (small size) F2. Bubble-nester (medium/large size) F3. Mouth-brooder (small/medium size) F4. Mouth-brooder (large size) Division G: Optional Classes G1. Photography G2. Illustration G3. Crafts Division H: Optional Plakat Classes H1. Traditional Plakat H2. Halfmoon Shortfin Division I: Temporary Classes I1. Doubletail Show Plakat I2. Large Pectoral HM/PK (TRIAL CLASS) I3. Form Variation Division J: Form & Finnage Classes J1. Halfmoon J2. Doubletail Halfmoon J3. Crowntail J4. Shortfin Division NB: New Breeders NB1. Singletail Male NB2. Doubletail Male NB3. Crowntail Male NB4. Shortfin Male NB5. Singletail Female NB6. Doubletail Female

Regular Classes: 32 Trial Classes (Regular): 2 Optional Classes: 21 Trial (Optional): 1 New Breeder (Optional): 6 62 Total Classes 44 FLARE!


AREA 7 IBC 2013-2014 SHOW CLASS LIST Group A: Regular Classes Division A: Halfmoon Singletail A1. A2. A3. A4. A5. A6. A7.

Dark Solid Colour STM Iridescent Dark Solid Colour STM Light Solid Colour STM Bicolour and Patterned STM Metallic Solid Colour STM (dark and light) Solid Colour STF Bicolour and Patterned STF

Division B: Halfmoon Doubletail B1. Solid Colour DTM B2. Bicolour and Patterned DTM B3. Doubletail Female (all colours/patterns) Division C: Crowntail C1. Solid Colour CTM C2. Bicolour and Patterned CTM C3. Crowntail Female (all colours/patterns) Division D: Shortfin D1. D2. D3. D4. D5. D6. D7. D8. D9.

Dark Solid Colour Show Plakat STM Iridescent Dark Solid Colour Show Plakat STM Light Solid Colour Show Plakat STM Bicolour and Patterned Show Plakat STM Metallic Solid Show Plakat STM Giant Show Plakat STM (TRIAL CLASS) Solid Colour Show Plakat STF Bicolour and Patterned Show Plakat STF Giant Show Plakat STF (TRIAL CLASS)

Division E: Breeders Division E1. Colour and Form Variations E2. Form and Finnage E3. Pairs

Division F: Wild Type Betta Pairs F1. F2. F3. F4.

Bubblenesters – small Bubblenesters – medium/large Mouthbrooders – small Mouthbrooders – medium/large

Division G: Art and Craft (Optional) G1. Photography G2. Illustration G3. Crafts Division H: Temporary Classes H1. H2. H3. H4.

Traditional Plakat Male Halfmoon Shortfin Male Doubletail Plakat Male Female (H1-H3)

GROUP B: New Breeder Classes NB1. NB2. NB3. NB4. NB5. NB6.

Singletail Male Doubletail Male Crowntail Male Shortfin Male Singletail Female Doubletail Female

Regular Classes: 23 Trial Classes: 2 Wild Classes: 4 Optional Classes: 3 Temporary Classes: 4 New Breeder Classes: 6 42 Total Classes

FLARE! 45


IBC CHAPTER NEWS The club curtains have been here since the 1970s and we’re sure they will eventually become stylish again.

Victoria Betta

The Birth of a Chapter by Michael Chang

In 2009, a group of betta hobbyists who had largely been communicating online via the AusAqua forum decided to meet face-to-face in Sydney. Within days of the Sydney folk making their announcement, the Melbournians, ever in competition with their northern neighbours, announced theirs—to be held on the same day! These meetings were called the Sydney Betta Gathering and Melbourne Betta Gathering. The Brisbane Betta Gathering followed only a couple of months later. To begin with, these were just informal gatherings of like-minded hobbyists but, as you may have already guessed, they soon moved towards more formal arrangements. The Sydney Splendens Society was formed. Betta Australis, a club which had existed a few years ear46 FLARE!

lier but had suspended operation, was revived in Brisbane. And in Melbourne, Victoria Betta became a subset of the Aquarium Society of Victoria. The Aquarium Society of Victoria is one of Australia’s longest running aquarium clubs, having been founded in 1933,. Victoria Betta’s association with the Aquarium Society has been mutually beneficial. Betta hobbyists, always keen to learn something new, eagerly attended the Society’s meetings, relishing the wealth of fishkeeping experience suddenly available to them. Each one of those older fishkeepers, some of whom had been in the hobby for fifty years, were living, breathing libraries of aquarium knowledge. In their turn, the new members brought enthusiasm and

a breath of fresh air to a club that had faced some challenges in keeping their members interested and involved. Falling under the auspices of the Aquarium Society also meant that we did not have to incorporate as a club or worry about insurance – and the best part is that we get to use the Society’s club house. Located barely 5 kilometres (3 miles in the old money) from the centre of Melbourne, this building has been owned by the Society since 1971. For almost three years now, Victoria Betta have been running four meetings a year which include a small show, educational talks and general discussion. It was only a matter of time before the inevitable decision was made to become an IBC Chapter.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mandatory for all newcomers to pay due attention to the Keesha.

Three more circumstances have helped to accelerate progress. Firstly, four of our members travelled to Aquarama in Singapore, where they completed the requirements for their judging certification. Secondly, in the whirlwind of activity that followed Convention we found ourselves benefiting from the tireless work of Gerald Griffin and Larissa Williams, who were heavily involved in discussions leading to the updating of class lists, revising standards, and creating a new standard for Giants. A third piece of excitement was the creation of the Area 7 showing area for Australia and New Zealand. Before we knew it we were putting our hands up to host Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very first IBC Sanctioned Show to be held in Melbourne on Sunday 29th September, with yet another show planned for Brisbane in October to be hosted by Betta Australis. Someone could have warned me what a wild ride this was going to be! It is an extremely exciting time for

the betta hobby in Australia. The announcement of the two IBC shows has attracted huge interest. Facebook groups are popping up all over the place and by the time this article is published it is expected Australian IBC membership will

increase significantly (from 30 members as at June 2013). The future of the betta hobby is looking bright downunder and we are looking forward to making our mark in the IBC family.

FLARE! 47


ibc chapter news

2013 IBC Convention Report by Peter Baerwald My journey began on 18 June at 11:30 am (an hour late) at Frankfurt Airport with a direct flight to Dallas. At Dallas airport waited for me Pavia Claire and Jean-Michel Jennerat (Switzerland) and took me in reception. The plane landed at about 3:30 pm local time. And 5 pm against clock I finally came out of the airport. The weather was bombastic, 34 degrees C in the shade, dry air and a damned warm wind. The first path led through a shuttleservice from the hotel to the hotel, to check in and inspect the hotel-room. The room was not comparable to hotel room in Germany. It was a large room with small kitchen, small bathroom and a small hallway before the bathroom. Television, Internet (Wi-Fi), refrigerator, etc. was all there. The hotel itself is non expensive and ostentatious .... by American standards but for German it had much to offer. In the evening, I met Claire and Jean-Michel to go to the neighboring hotel for dinner. This was a more ostentatious hotel with a great bar and restaurant and really great food. We had good conversations and a lot of fun. Wednesday, 19th June, we started after a great breakfast to visit Fort Worth. At first with the shuttle from the hotel to the train station, from there take the train to Fort Worth and then a few stops by bus. A real experience. The train had a ground floor, a middle floor and one upstairs. Fort Worth has a lot to offer, especially for those who are interested in cowboys, Indians and rodeo. There was plenty to see, from the longhorn herded by real cowboys to the museum of the “Hall of Fame” and many stores with many clothes, jewelry and knick-knacks. Priced from cheap to expensive, but even the cheapest t-shirts are quality than what we get in Germany as an expensive commodity. At noon, we entered a real steak restaurant where I then ate the best steak of my life. Juicy, great flavor, exactly to the point, just fantastic. After a really great day, we returned back to the hotel. Now a few other IBC members had arrived, for example Siegbert Illig with wife Judy and Jack Tobin with his wife Kathy. Thursday after breakfast we decided to drive to Fort Worth again. This time accompanied us Judy Illig and Kathy Tobin. Arrived at the station in Fort Worth, we 48 FLARE!

have been able seeing a police operation, which I have photographed secretly. I can only say .... the American police can be your friend and helper, they are super nice, but if you do bad things, then it really like you see it on TV. Then they attack through fast and hard. Because of one man ... within 15 minutes four police cars, a police motorbike and a police bicycle, six policemen, who followed all the only goal to arrest the bad guy. Everything went very fast .... first there was only one policeman who grabbed the villain after a conversation with a woman and then swore loudly and asked questions, then he struck the villain. I have not noticed if the man made any reaction before, if he raised his hand in the air or anything else, but the policeman grabbed him, slapped on him, threw him to the ground and kicked him without mercy. Then the policeman came on the bicycle very quickly approached, jumped off his bike directly onto the man lying on the ground while the first police officer jumped up turned around, drew his phaser and fired at the man. A short time later, two other police cars arrived, then the motorbike and then another car. Then we went further and enjoyed the weather and the city, went shopping and eating lunch in a restaurant, which was a little bit unusual. It was more of a bar with really good quality fast food type. The waiters were all very young and female and had a very very short skirt .... so really short and a really short top with a wide neck .... all very form-fitting. After dinner we strolled shopping again. Around 4:30 pm, we arrived back at the hotel. Now more IBC members had arrived, including Joseph Becerra with his wife Amy. At 5:15 pm, a meeting of the IBC EBoard was held. It was the first personal meeting for me and I must say it was great. I could see and hear how well the club is organized, how well the club stands and how wonderful everything is planned. I was really excited because I did not see this from clubs in Germany. Many members arrived since the morning. The showroom was set up and the fish were put in. I met more and more members and Claire introduce me to all, which I gradually became more comfortable, because everyone knew me or heard about me, and all have been really happy to meet me personally . The chapter “Kampffischfreunde” has a very good reputation in the IBC. Everyone

knows about the video of the last show in Friedrichshafen. All look to Europe, to Germany. A great honor for me was to be able to meet the founder of the IBC, Dr. Gene Lucas. He is now 85 years old, but still really fit. Towards the evening we all went in a large American/Mexican restaurant, where we got served up a really good buffet. I think I’ve got three servings and even dessert. It was delicious. Then we returned to the hotel. Here I was able to look at the stock shop. There were all types of things to buy, in addition to t-shirts and everything possible from ZooMed to Betta food and much more. Around 10 pm, the hospitality suite opened. This is a hotel room which has been specially rented for that evening, that everybody can sit down, can talk, or to take a lot of beer and other alcohol at all can, as well as snacks. It was moist and happy. Friday, after breakfast, the judging seminars began. These were indeed nothing new for me, but I listened to them to refresh my knowledge. I also took part in the judging board meeting, which was also very interesting. It’s always nice to hear and see how well the club is organized and structured. All see it as a hobby, but even bring the necessary seriousness and discipline in and everyone does his job. For lunch, Claire, Jean-Michel, Amy Becerra and I went back over to the hotel next door. By 2 pm, we started with the judging of the show betta. I had the honor to judge with Siegbert Illig. Connie Emery was the main judge and she allocated us to two trainees. Here I must say that there is a big difference between the trainees in the United States and in Europe. The knowledge of the trainees in the United States is much higher. Maybe it is because of the language and therefore understand the standard better or easier and can learn faster, or it is the interest on the fish or or or .... I have no idea. For dinner, a buffet in the hotel next to the swimming pool, the judging was interrupted. In principle, only the BOV and BOS had to be judged include the Reserve, what we have done then after eating. In the evening, still took place a few seminars and then it went back to the Hospitality Suite. At Saturday, after breakfast took place, a few seminars again. At 10 am the E-Board meeting started. Here I was able to admire the unity and the good cooperation of the members again. We were informed of the news. All


IBC members were able to attend the meeting and ask questions or express ideas. After further seminars were held and subsequently at 4 pm took place the General Assembly. In the General Assembly, the results of the elections were announced. Each committee reported on its news and current status were taken two or three points to the vote and was agreed at the end where, in 2014, the Convention shall take place, or which chapter gets the nod for the alignment. There have applied two chapters. The entire general assembly was extremely quiet and wellmannered. Questions were always expressed constructively, as well as ideas. There was much constructive debate, since everything that was said and was always covered and was well received by all other than constructive, well covered, before you expressed them. The General Assembly then was not as long as planned. After the end the individual commitee covered with their new members right back and held a first meeting. Then the award banquet started. The food was great. After dinner the awards ceremony of the current competition began. Here, I am sorry to say .... it went too fast. In America, it does not seem to be common to stay with the prize, the medal or trophy at the front, that all can take photos. Here the people were “mostly” only at the front, grabbed their prize, turned around and they went back in place. All have been looking forward to, but photos were hardly possible. After the award ceremony, the year-end awards were issued. After the Year-End Awards for the Top 20 followed the awards for merit. After some awards go to members of the U.S. was Claire Pavia (Switzerland) surprised with an award, the Judging Board Award of Merit. Claire was visibly surprised and there was a great applause. She really deserves it. Right after I got into a weird situation. I leaned against a pillar and tried to photograph each award and suddenly a speech held at the front .... it was not called a name, but I felt observed, so I turned slowly to the side and saw all looked at me and then all already began to laugh ...OKk, my face must have looked very strange when I realized that I would get an award. I put away my camera, and then Claire has already taken it and in the same time I was called to come the front. This was a real surprise, I was awarded for the second time in a row with the “Outstanding Service Award.” I was visibly moved. After I had then gone back and took my camera ready to go again I found myself back on the column .... but not for long .... after a few seconds I realized that I would still receive another award, so I gave my camera again to Claire

and strode forward with a red face, because I had now realized that I would receive the highest award of the IBC. I came close to tears when Joseph Becerra handed me the award “Fellow of the Congress.” It took me a long time to realize that this is reality, because I was only four years a member of the club and the earliest to get the award is after 4 years of membership. Everyone stood up and clapped, and later I was told that this award is very rarely awarded to members who are just four years at the club. I was proud, but thought to myself that this award should have been conceded to my wife, because without her I would never could have the time to do so much in such a short time. There were many awards, which you can find the winners starting on page 20. Following the award Banquet the most members went into the show-room to pack the fish for the auction on Sunday and prepare the room. After the work many members met again in the hospitality Suit for a last long night. It was for many a very long night. On Sunday, the last preparations were made for the auction, which then started at 10am after breakfast. The auction is different as we know it in Europe. The fish are already all bagged. So you should look to the fish the day before in the show boxes. Nevertheless, many, many betta were auctioned during the auction, which was 4-5 hours long. No later than the end of the auction packed up most of their stuff and were on their way home. Only a few remained another night. For dinner we went together to a nearby steak restaurant and a few were found after that in the neighboring hotel bar and had some great conversations and fun. Monday after breakfast, Claire, Jean-Michel and I went to Walmart, a really big shopping center. Again convinced the quality of cheap goods. We could not stay long because I had to be on my way to the airport at 1pm. After we sit for an hour waiting for the start on the plane, we had to get out again. The plane was damaged on the last flight and thus had to be organized for us a another plane. This actually went very quickly, but the delivery of catering still took quite a bit of time so we were able to start with over 2.5 hours to late. My impressions: It was the first time at the Convention and the first time ever in America. I was very impressed. The city of Dallas intrigued me. The weather inspired me, because although it was every day between 34 to 38 degrees Celsius, I was not sweating. The warm everlasting wind was so dry that I did not have sweat. In the sun I could very well endure. Dallas is a beautiful city. In addition to old—

I suspect historic—buildings are newfangled fully glazed skyscrapers and still fits the picture, because between the houses is often a lot of space and it is mostly present as some green trees and other plantings. Generally, between the buildings mostly space and some planting. Service is very big in America. No matter where you go, whether restaurant, shop, hotel, bar, wherever you are treated very friendly and courteous. They are all super nice and accommodating. The food is great. Whether steak or pizza, it tastes everything. Somehow everything was stress free. Somehow no one had even the signs of stress. All do their job as quickly and well as they can, but showing no stress. There you just feel comfortable. The road also everything seems to be much more relaxed. I have not heard a car horns. Everyone takes in any respect, without grumbles and everything runs quite smoothly. It may of course can be that this is all just so beautiful in Dallas, maybe other cities are not so nice and stress free. This I cannot “or not now” judge. The convention was great. Everything was well organized, very well. Everyone knew what he was doing when he has to do it and did it well, and this is always on time. Here, too, came to no stress, or you have it not noted at anyone. There are differences to shows in Europe, which is probably partly because that the convention takes place in a hotel and not on a fair (Friedrichshafen) or in a greenhouse (Italy) or similar. The auction was tedious, but it was not so bad. Is not so good that the fish are already all packed and you can not really see. Here I find the variant in Europe much better where you can see the fish live on a screen or a canvas. When judging the Show Betta there were differences in the way, while European judges put more emphasis on the form, it seems a little more to go to the color by the American judges. I think here we should meet a little more in the middle to get a balance, maybe 50% to 50% I am thrilled by the IBC members. They are all super nice. Everyone is respectful of the others and helps where help is needed. No one is jealous of another. There was no dispute but only fun and a whole lot of it. I felt very well cared for and not felt like I was the 5th Wheel. I had very much fun and even had a proper fit of laughter, where the tears come, thanks to Joe Green. All in all it was a great experience. I’ve made new friends and learned a lot. If I can afford it financially, I will fly to the 2014 IBC Convention. FLARE! 49


ibc chapter news

2013 IBC Convention Report by Peter Baerwald Meine Reise begann am 18. Juni um 11:30 Uhr (mit einer Stunde Verspätung) am Flughafen Frankfurt mit einem Direktflug nach Dallas in Texas. Am Flughafen in Dallas erwarteten mich Claire Pavia und Jean-Michel Jennerat (Switzerland) und nahmen mich in Empfang. Das Flugzeug landete um ca. 15:30 Uhr Ortszeit. Und gegen 17 Uhr kam ich dann endlich aus dem Flughafen heraus. Das Wetter war bombastisch, 34 Grad im Schatten, trockene Luft und ein verdammt warmer Wind. Der erste Weg führte mittels einem vom Hotel bereit gestelltem Shuttleservice zum Hotel, einchecken und Zimmer begutachten. Das Zimmer war mit Hotelzimmern in Deutschland nicht zu vergleichen. Es war ein großer Raum mit kleiner Küche, kleinem Bad und einem kleinem Vorzimmer vor dem Bad. Fernsehen, Internet (W-Lan), Kühlschrank, usw. war alles vorhanden. Das Hotel selbst ist kein teures und pompöses….für amerikanische Verhältnisse, aber für Deutsche hatte es doch einiges zu bieten. Am Abend traf ich mich mit Claire und Jean-Michel um zum Nachbarhotel zum Essen zu gehen. Dies war ein pompöseres Hotel mit toller Bar und Restaurant und wirklich tollem Essen. Wir hatten tolle Gespräche und viel Spaß. Mittwoch den 19. Juni sind wir dann nach einem tollen Frühstück auf nach Fort-Worth. Erst mit dem Shuttle vom Hotel zum Bahnhof, von dort mit dem Zug bis Fort-Worth und dann noch ein paar Stationen mit dem Bus. Ein echtes Erlebnis. Der Zug hatte ein Erdgeschoss, ein Mittelgeschoss und ein Obergeschoss. Fort-Worth hat einiges zu bieten, vor allem wenn man sich für Cowboys, Indianer und Rodeo interessiert. Es gab viel zu sehen, vom Longhorn treiben über echte Cowboys bis hin zum Museum der „Hall of Fame“ und vielen Geschäften mit tollen Klamotten, Schmuck und Nippes. Preislich von günstig bis teuer, aber selbst das günstigste T-Shirt hat dort eine Qualität was wir in Deutschland als teure Ware erhalten. Mittags kehrten wir in einem echten Steakrestaurant ein wo ich dann das beste Steak meines Lebens gegessen habe. Saftig, 50 FLARE!

super im Geschmack, genau auf den Punkt, einfach fantastisch. Nach einem echt tollen Tag kehrten wir zurück ins Hotel. Nun waren schon ein paar weitere IBC Mitglieder eingetroffen, zum Beispiel Siegbert Illig mit Frau Judy und Jack Tobin mit Frau Kathy. Donnerstag nach dem Frühstück beschlossen wir wieder nach Fort-Worth zu fahren. Diesmal begleiteten uns Judy Illig und Kathy Tobin. Am Bahnhof in Fort-Worth angekommen konnten wir einen Polizeieinsatz beobachten welchen ich auch heimlich abgelichtet habe. Ich kann nur sagen….die amerikanische Polizei kann Dein Freund und Helfer sein, sie sind super nett, aber wenn ihnen einer Krumm kommt, dann ist es wirklich wie man es im Fernsehen sieht, dann greifen sie schnell und hart durch. Wegen einer Person standen innerhalb von 15 Minuten 4 Polizeiwagen da, ein Polizeimotorat und ein Polizeifahrrad, also 6 Polizisten, welche alle nur das Ziel verfolgten den einen Bösewicht zu verhaften. Alles ging sehr schnell….zuerst war nur der eine Polizist da welcher sich den Bösewicht nach einem Gespräch mit einer Frau schnappte und dann laut beschimpfte und Fragen stellte, dann schlug er zu. Ich habe nicht mitbekommen ob der Mann irgendeine Reaktion vorher gemacht hatte, ob er die Hand hob oder sonstiges, aber der Polizist schnappte ihn sich, schlug auf ihn ein, warf ihn zu Boden und trat erbarmungslos zu. Dann kam der Polizist auf dem Fahrrad sehr schnell angefahren, sprang von seinem Bike direkt auf den am Boden liegenden Mann, während gleichzeitig der erste Polizist aufsprang, sich umdrehte, seinen Phaser zog und auf den Mann schoss. Kurze Zeit später kamen zwei weitere Polizeiautos, dann das Motorrad und dann noch ein weiteres Auto. Wir gingen dann irgendwann weiter und genossen das Wetter und die Stadt, gingen Shoppen und zum Mittag in ein sehr ungewöhnliches Restaurant etwas essen. Es war eher eine Bar mit einer verdammt guten Qualität einer Art Fastfood. Die Bedienungen waren alle Weiblich und sehr Jung und hatten ein sehr….also wirklich sehr kurzes Röckchen an und ein kurzes Oberteil mit weitem Ausschnitt….alles sehr Figurbetont. Nach dem Essen schlenderten wir weiter Shoppen. Gegen 16:30 Uhr trafen wir wieder im

Hotel ein. Nun waren weitere IBC Mitglieder eingetroffen, unter anderem auch Joseph Becerra mit Frau Amy. Um 17:15 Uhr fand ein Meeting des IBC Vorstandes statt. Es war für mich das erste persönliche Meeting und ich muss sagen es war toll. Ich konnte sehen und hören wie gut der Verein organisiert ist, wie gut er da steht und wie exzellent alles geplant ist. Ich war wirklich begeistert, denn so kenne ich es von Vereinen in Deutschland überhaupt nicht. Seit dem Morgen waren viele Mitglieder eingetroffen, der Showroom wurde aufgebaut und die Fische wurden eingesetzt. Ich begegnete immer mehr Mitgliedern und Claire stellt mich ihnen allen vor, was mir nach und nach immer unangenehmer wurde, denn jeder, aber wirklich jeder kannte mich, bzw. hat von mir gehört und alle haben sich wirklich sehr gefreut mich persönlich kennen lernen zu können. Das kann einem echt Angst machen. Das Chapter Kampffischfreunde hat im IBC einen sehr guten Namen. Jeder kennt das Video der letzten Show in Friedrichshafen. Alle schauen nach Europa, nach Deutschland. Eine große Ehre war für mich den Gründer des IBC kennen lernen zu dürfen, Dr. Gene Lucas. Er ist mittlerweile 85 Jahre alt, aber noch echt Fit. Der Mann kann erzählen…. woow. Gegen Abend fuhren dann alle in eine großes amerikanisches/mexikanisches Restaurant, wo wir ein echt sau gutes Buffet vorgesetzt bekommen haben. Ich glaube ich habe mir drei Portionen und noch Nachtisch geholt. Es war lecker. Danach kehrten wir zurück ins Hotel. Hier konnte ich mir dann mal den Stock-Shop genauer betrachten. Es gab allerlei zu kaufen, neben T-Shirts und allem möglichem von ZooMed auch Fischfutter extra für Betta und vieles mehr. Gegen 22 Uhr eröffnete dann die Hospitality Suite. Dies ist ein Hotelzimmer welches extra dafür angemietet wurde, dass hier Abends alle einkehren können, sich unterhalten können um einiges an Bier und anderen Alkohol zu sich nehmen zu können, sowie kleine Snacks. Es wurde feucht und fröhlich. Freitag nach dem Frühstück begannen die Judging Seminare. Diese waren für mich zwar nichts neues, aber trotzdem wohnte ich ihnen bei um mein Wissen aufzufrischen. Eb-


enso nahm ich am Judging-Board Meeting teil, was auch sehr interessant war. Es ist immer schön mitzubekommen wie gut der Verein organisiert und strukturiert ist. Alle sehen es als Hobby, bringen aber doch den nötigen Ernst und Disziplin mit rein und jeder macht seine Arbeit. Zum Mittagessen gingen Claire, JeanMichel, Amy Becerra und ich wieder rüber ins Hotel nebenan. Um 14 Uhr starteten wir mit dem Bewerten der Fische. Ich hatte die Ehre mit Siegbert Illig richten zu dürfen. Connie Emery war Hauptrichter und sie teilte uns zwei Auszubildende zu. Hier muss ich sagen, dass ein großer Unterschied zwischen den Auszubildenden in den USA zu denen in Europa besteht. Das Vorwissen in den USA ist viel höher. Mag sein dass es an der Sprache liegt und sie den Standard daher besser verstehen und schneller erlernen können, oder am Interesse für die Fische oder oder oder….ich hab keine Ahnung. Für das Abendessen, einem Buffet im Hotel neben dem Swimmingpool, wurde das Richten unterbrochen. Im Prinzip mussten auch nur noch die BOV und BOS, inkl. der Reserve ermittelt werden, was wir dann nach dem Essen getan haben. Abends fanden noch ein paar Seminare statt und anschließend ging es wieder in die Hospitality Suit. Samstag fanden nach dem Frühstück wieder Seminare statt. Gegen 10 Uhr startete das E-Board Meeting. Hier konnte ich wieder die Einigkeit und die gute Zusammenarbeit der Mitglieder bewundern. Es wurden die Neuigkeiten mitgeteilt und bekannt gegeben. Alle Mitglieder konnten dem Meeting beiwohnen und Fragen stellen oder Ideen äußern. Danach fanden weitere Seminare statt und anschließend gegen 16 Uhr die Mitgliederversammlung. In der Mitgliederversammlung wurden die Ergebnisse der Wahlen bekannt gegeben. Jedes Gremium berichtete über seine Neuigkeiten und den aktuellen Stand. Es wurden zwei drei Punkte zur Abstimmung gebracht und zum Ende wurde abgestimmt wo in 2014 die Convention stattfinden soll, bzw. welches Chapter den Zuschlag für die Ausrichtung bekommt. Es hatten sich zwei Chapter beworben. Die gesamte Versammlung verlief äußerst ruhig und gesittet. Fragen wurden immer Konstruktiv geäußert, ebenso wie Ideen. Es gab

wenige Diskussionen, da alles was gesagt wurde auch immer überdacht war und ebenso von allen anderen als konstruktiv aufgenommen wurde und überdacht wurde, bevor man sich dazu äußert. Die Mitgliederversammlung dauerte dann nicht so lange wie geplant. Im Anschluss zogen sich die einzelnen Gremien mit ihren neuen Mitgliedern gleich zurück und hielten ein erstes Meeting ab. Anschließend startete das Award Banquett. Das essen war klasse. Nach dem Essen begann die Siegerehrung des aktuellen Wettbewerbs. Hier muss ich leider sagen….es ging zu schnell. In Amerika scheint es nicht üblich zu sein sich mit seinem Preis, seiner Medaille oder seinem Pokal noch mal extra vorne hinzustellen, damit alle anderen Fotos machen können. Hier gingen die Leute „meistens“ nur nach vorne, schnappten sich ihren Preis, drehten um und schon waren sie wieder an ihrem Platz. Gefreut haben sich alle, aber Fotos waren kaum möglich. Nach der Siegerehrung wurden die Year-End-Awards ausgegeben. Hier blieben dann doch mal einige vorne stehen zum Ablichten. Nach den Year-End-Awards für die Top 20 folgten die Auszeichnungen für Verdienste. Nachdem einige an Mitglieder in den USA vergeben wurden wurde Claire Pavia (Switzerland) mit einer Auszeichnung überrascht, dem Judging Board Award of Merit. Claire freute sich sichtlich und es gab einen tollen Applaus. Sie hat es auch wirklich verdient. Gleich danach kam ich in eine komische Situation. Ich hatte mich an eine Säule gelehnt und versucht jede Auszeichnung abzulichten und plötzlich wird vorne eine Rede gehalten….es fiel kein Name, aber ich kam mir irgendwie beobachtet vor, daher drehte ich mich so langsam zur Seite und sah das mich alle ansahen und schon zu lachen begannen…ok, mein Gesicht muss sehr seltsam ausgesehen haben als ich dann realisierte dass auch ich eine Auszeichnung bekommen würde. Ich legte meine Kamera weg, bzw. Claire hat sich diese dann gleich geschnappt und schon wurde ich nach vorne gerufen. Das war eine echte Überraschung das ich zum zweiten Mal in Folge mit dem „Outstanding Service Award“ ausgezeichnet wurde.

Ich war sichtlich gerührt. Nachdem ich dann wieder zurück gegangen war und meine Kamera wieder startklar gemacht hatte stellte ich mich wieder an die Säule….jedoch nicht lange….schon nach ein paar Sekunden realisierte ich dass ich noch eine Auszeichnung erhalten würde, also gab ich meine Kamera wieder zu Claire und stiefelte mit rotem Gesicht nach vorne, da ich mittlerweile begriffen hatte dass ich die höchste Auszeichnung des IBC bekommen würde. Mir kamen fast die Tränen als Joseph Becerra mir den Award „Fellow of the Congress“ überreichte. Ich brauchte lange um zu begreifen dass dies Realität ist, denn ich war gerade mal 4 Jahre lang Mitglied im Verein und bekomme die Auszeichnung welches ein Mitglied erst nach 4 jähriger Mitgliedschaft frühestens bekommen kann. Alle standen auf und klatschten und später sagte man mir dass diese Auszeichnung sehr selten vergeben wird an Mitglieder welche gerade erst 4 Jahre im Verein sind. Ich war Stolz, aber dachte mir für mich, dass diese Auszeichnung eigentlich meiner Frau zugestanden hätte, denn ohne sie hätte ich es nicht so weit gebracht, bzw. die Zeit gehabt so weit zu kommen und so viel zu tun. Es gab viele Auszeichnungen wie nachfolgend aufgeführt: Betta Person of the Year: Sieg Illig Judging board award: Claire Pavia Fellow of the Congress: Karen Mac Auley, Peter Baerwald Gene Lucas Award: Connie Emery Grand Champion: Sieg and Judy Illig New Breeder Grand Champion: Kayla Griffin FLARE awards: Richard Atwood, Karen Mac Auley Chapter of the Year Award: SCUBA  Outstanding Service: Peter Baerwald, Cecilia Bailey-Mallet, Sally Van Camp, Connie Emery, Joseph Becerra, Jeremy Waugh (one time)  Special SCUBA certificates: Stacy Deaton Fenhaus, Tonya Garrison, Gerald Griffin, Kayla Griffin, Lori Green, Joe Green (one time)  Special LIfetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Writing: Gene Lucas The First Coast Bettas of Florida Spouse/ Significant Other award: Sally Van Camp Walt Maurus Award: Cecilia Bailey Mallett FLARE! 51


Im Anschluss an das Award Banquett fanden sich die meisten Mitglieder im Show Room ein um die Fische für die Versteigerung am Sonntag zu verpacken und den Raum herzurichten. Gleichzeitig wurden schon die nicht mehr benötigten Boxen und weiteres gesäubert, verpackt und eingeladen, bzw. aufgeladen. Anschießend trafen sich wieder viele Mitglieder in der Hospitality Suit zu einer letzten langen Nacht. Es wurde für viele eine sehr lange Nacht. Am Sonntag wurden nach dem Frühstück noch die letzten Vorbereitungen für die Versteigerung getroffen welche dann pünktlich um 10 Uhr startete. Die Versteigerung verläuft anders als wie wir diese in Europa kennen. Die Fische sind bereits alle verpackt und werden hoch gehalten. Jeder Interessent kann dann bieten. Es ist also von den Fischen nicht viel zu sehen oder zu erkennen. Man sollte also die Fische am Tag vorher noch in den Show-Boxen gesehen haben um auf die richtigen bieten zu können. Trotzdem wurden viele, viele Betta im Zuge der 4-5 Stunden langen Auktion versteigert. Spätestens nach Ablauf der Versteigerung packten die meisten ihr Zeug zusammen und machten sich auf den Heimweg. Nur wenige blieben noch eine weitere Nacht. Zum Abendessen ging es gemeinsam in ein nahe gelegenes Steakrestaurant und ein paar wenige fanden sich danach noch in der Bar des benachbarten Hotels ein und hatten noch einige tolle Gespräche und viel Spaß. Montag nach dem Frühstück sind Claire, Jean-Michel und ich zum Walmart, einem echt großen Einkaufzentrum. Auch hier überzeugte wieder die Qualität der günstigen Waren. Lange konnten wir nicht bleiben, da ich gegen 13 Uhr mich auf den Weg zum Flughafen machen musste. Mein Rückflug begann damit, dass wir nach einer Stunde sitzen im Flugzeug auf den Start wartend wieder aussteigen mussten. Der Flieger war auf dem letzten Flug beschädigt wurden und somit musste für uns ein anderer Flieger organisiert werden. Dies ging dann eigentlich sehr schnell, aber die Lieferung des Caterings dauerte noch einiges an Zeit weswegen wir dann mit über 2,5 Stunden Verspätung erst den Rückflug antreten konnten. Was gibt es neues: Die Convention 2014 findet statt in 52 FLARE!

San Jose, Kalifornien (California Betta Society) In den IBC-Standards ändert sich eine Kleinigkeit im Bereich der Farbe Multicolor. Zur Gründung eines Chapters müssen keine 5 Mitglieder auch Mitglied im IBC sein, es reichen nun 3 IBC-Mitglieder aus. Zum neuen Präsidenten wurde Gerald Griffin gewählt und Vize-Präsident wurde Cecilia Bailey Mallett. Der vom Chapter Kampffischfreunde in 2011 eingereichte Standard für Veiltails wurde mit ein paar kleinen Änderungen akzeptiert. Area2 wird eine eigene Veiltail-Klasse bekommen. Die International Betta Competition in Friedrichshafen, ausgerichtet vom IBC-Chapter Kampffischfreunde, wird zur Area2 Convention werden. Dies ist bisher einzigartig, denn keine andere Area außer Area1 (USA) hat eine eigene Convention. Die Convention in Area1 ist auch zugleich die World-Convention, kurz IBC-Convention. Es ist die einzige Convention welche auch außerhalb ihrer Area stattfinden kann. Meine Eindrücke: Ich war das erste Mal auf der Convention und überhaupt das erste Mal in Amerika. Ich war sehr beeindruckt. Die Stadt Dallas faszinierte mich. Das Wetter begeisterte mich, denn obwohl es täglich zwischen 34 und 38 Grad warm war, schwitzte man nicht. Der warme immerwährende Wind war so trocken, dass man nicht schwitzen musste. In der knallen Sonne konnte man es sehr gut aushalten. Dallas ist eine wunderschöne Stadt. Neben alten – ich vermute historischen – Gebäuden stehen neumodische vollverglaste Hochhäuser und trotzdem passt das Bild, denn zwischen den Häusern ist häufig viel Platz und es ist meistens etwas grünes vorhanden wie Bäume und andere Bepflanzungen. Generell ist zwischen den Gebäuden meistens viel Platz und irgendeine Bepflanzung. Service wird in Amerika ganz groß geschrieben. Egal wo man hingeht, ob Restaurant, Shop, Hotel, Bar, überall wird man super freundlich und zuvorkommend behandelt. Alle sind super nett und zuvorkommend. Das Essen ist super. Ob Steak oder Pizza, es schmeckt einfach alles. Irgendwie war alles Stressfrei. Irgendwie hat kein Mensch auch nur das Anzeichen von Stress gehabt. Alle machen

ihre Arbeit so schnell und gut sie können, aber keiner zeigt Stress. Da fühlt man sich einfach wohl. Im Straßenverkehr scheint ebenfalls alles viel lockerer zu sein. Ich habe nicht ein einziges Auto hupen gehört. Jeder nimmt auf jeden Rücksicht, keiner schimpft und alles läuft relativ flüssig. Es kann natürlich sein, dass dies alles nur so schön in Dallas ist, dass andere Städte nicht so schön und Stressfrei sind. Dies kann ich leider „noch“ nicht beurteilen. Die Convention war Klasse. Es war alles sehr gut durchorganisiert. Jeder wusste was er zu tun hat, wann er es zu tun hat und tat es auch und dies immer pünktlich. Auch hier kam kein Stress auf, oder man hat es niemanden angemerkt. Es gibt Unterschiede zu Shows in Europa, was wohl unter anderem daran liegt dass die Convention in einem Hotel stattfindet und nicht auf einer AquaristikMesse (Friedrichshafen) oder in einem Gewächshaus (Italien) oder ähnlichem. Die Versteigerung war langwierig, was aber nicht so schlimm war. Nicht so schön ist, dass die Fische bereits alle verpackt sind und man sie nicht mehr wirklich sehen kann. Da finde ich die Variante in Europa, wo man die Fische live auf einem Bildschirm oder einer Leinwand sehen kann, besser. Auch bei der Bewertung der Ausstellungsfische gab es Unterschiede in der Art und Weise. Währendem die europäischen Richter mehr Wert auf die Form legen scheint es bei den amerikanischen Richtern ein wenig mehr um die Farbe zu gehen. Ich denke hier sollte man sich etwas mehr in der Mitte treffen und ein Gleichgewicht herstellen, so in etwa 50 zu 50%. Begeistert haben mich die IBC-Mitglieder. Alle sind super nett. Jeder geht respektvoll mit dem anderen um und hilft wo man nur kann. Keiner ist neidisch auf einen anderen. Es gab keinen Streit sondern nur Spaß und davon eine ganze Menge. Ich habe mich sehr gut aufgehoben gefühlt und kam mir nicht so vor als wäre ich das 5. Rad am Wagen. Ich hatte extrem viel Spaß und hatte sogar einen richtigen Lachanfall, wo mir die Tränen gekommen sind, dank Joe Green. Alles in allem war es ein echtes Erlebnis. Ich habe neue Freunde gewonnen und einiges gelernt. Wenn ich es mir finanziell leisten kann werde ich in 2014 wieder zur IBC-Convention fliegen.


2013 EB Meeting Minutes June 22, 2013 (35 minutes) Joe Becerra, President presided; 8 of 10 EB members were in attendance. The Election Committee is to count ballots after this meeting. Recap of the past year: There were issues with the website, getting the forum going, and currently there is no web tech person. Hopefully the website problems will be resolved by the incoming EB. Karen has been involved with the Facebook page, which appears to be successful. Last year, we put together a program to financially help both Chapters and show participants which was well accepted by the clubs and entrants. The program will not continue in its current form; however we are offering a $200 stipend to all chapters for their first show held in the new show season. Committee Reports Treasury (Jack Tobin): We have approx. $37,500 which also includes the Paypal account and a CD. Education (Gerald Griffin): Tested Module 1 in an elementary school where we gave 25 bettas to students to take home over the summer. When they return in the fall they will look at breeding them in the classroom. We are working on Module 2 which will focus on a middle school. After we get that going we will work on Module 3 with the possibility of running Module 2 and 3 together. We have commitments from Area 6 and Australia to go ahead and do bettas in the classroom there. The Yahoo Group that we had in place for this went nowhere so the new plan is to move it to Facebook. The hope is that it will take off like the SMP did when we moved that to Facebook. Membership: Joe Becerra read a report from Steve Van Camp who was not at convention. Membership is up 14.5% from last year. Nominations (Jack Tobin): no problems Publications (Jeremy Waugh): There is a FLARE! Committee and all business is conducted on the IBC forum. We are trying to take the publication from a newsletter towards a magazine format which will include more content and more photos. Joe

Becerra would like to see if we can publish articles from Area 2 and 6 members, in both in their native language and English translations. Judging Board (Connie Emery): There is a change in the multicolored standard which the JB will have ready before the new show season starts. The trial MAP program was very successful and Gerald has a commitment from more members to participate in it. The JB has approved that MAP be a permanent part of the show program. Last year as a trial it was run on a donation basis. Now that MAP will be permanent we would like the auction split to be allowed for the breeders. We need approval from the EB for the 75/25 split to be implemented. Motion was made, seconded and passed. Awards (Joe Becerra): Due to an error, some name plates need to be redone with the correct convention location and show year. I will be retiring as chairperson; we need a replacement. Chapters (Jack Tobin): We hope that the membership approves the proposal where we have reduced the 5 IBC member requirement down to 3. This will help in the formation of new chapters and also in keeping current chapters that fall below the current 5 from being dropped. There is a problem with communication between myself and some chapter contact persons. This must change; the chapter contact person needs to be more active. T.A. Library (Sherolyn Craig): Is being worked on and we will wait for website access to upload files. SMP (Gerald Griffin): The move to FB has been successful and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting lots of questions and answers. Next thing to work on is to rebuild the SMP website and add new species. Chapter 8 of the Standards needs to be updated and I hope to have that done by next convention. IBC Forum: Need more posts on Facebook, the forums and the lists. Elections (Jeremy Waugh): Jeremy will verify memberships. Christine Tanner, Lori Green and Steve Migota will count the ballots. Parliamentarian: We have not had one for a while but we do need one. The motion was adjourn by Connie Emery, seconded and passed. FLARE! 53


2013 General Membership Meeting Minutes June 22, 2013 (35 minutes) President Joe Becerra opened the meeting. OLD BUSINESS Committee Reports Treasurer (Jack Tobin): We have approx. $37,500 which also includes the Paypal account and a CD which is a replacement for the Gene Lucas Fund Account. Education Committee <Bettas in the Classroom Project> (Gerald Griffin): We completed Module 1 in an elementary school. Module 2 will target middle schools and Module 3 high schools. I don’t know if Module 2 & 3 will be done this year. People in Area 6 are adopting Module 1 for their schools next year, followed by Australia. The program will be going on Facebook, which is where I obtain most of my comments. Membership Committee (Joe Becerra read Steve Van Camp’s report): Members can find their expiration date in the website member-only area; 34 new memberships took advantage of the special join for 2 years and get 6 months free offer; total membership is up by 14.5% from last convention. JB (Connie Emery): A new multicolor change was approved and will be effective at the beginning of the new show year. Copies of the changes were passed out at the meeting. Last year’s trial Species Maintenance MAP Program will now be a permanent part of the show system. The breeders who donated their fish for MAP last year will now be able to get the auction split. There will be several changes coming from the JB next year. Constitution Committee (Jack Tobin): We hope that the membership passes all the proposals. One proposal is regarding chapters where the 5 IBC member requirement would be reduced to 3 members. We hope this change will increase the number of chapters. Chapter contact persons are not replying to emails

I send them when new members join IBC in their general area. It is important that I hear from the contact person. Awards (Joe Becerra): Class awards came through with the incorrect city and date. They will be corrected and the recipients will be getting new name plates. Technical Assistance (Sherolyn Craig): We are converting some of the FLARE! articles, which will eventually be uploaded to the website. Social Media (Joe Becerra): The website is not where we would like it to be and there is still room for improvement. The hope is that the new EB will evaluate all the options available so we can get the site in a position to attract people to IBC. Facebook is doing well. FLARE! (Jeremy Waugh): We have a committee to help with the print content, photos, etc. We have a lot of things planned for the future. Elections (Jeremy Waugh): Ballot counters were Christine Tanner, Lori Green and Steve Migota. All Constitution/By-Law proposals passed. JB: Larissa Williams; Wally Nida; Igor Prpic EB: President- Gerald Griffin; Vice President-Cecilia Mallett; Secretary-Steve Van Camp; Treasurer-Jack Tobin Convention 2014: 2 bids received; Mid-West Betta Club and California Betta Society. A vote was taken; next convention will be in California. NEW BUSINESS Technology Committee: Sherolyn Craig would like to head a new committee, along with Mike McBrien, to tackle social media, videos, DVDs and the website. Joe Becerra suggests that she put together a proposal for the new EB to review. Meeting adjourned. Respectfully submitted, Steve Van Camp, Secretary


Code of Ethics of the International Betta Congress The International Betta Congress (IBC or The Congress) welcomes everyone who is interested in bettas, whether new at owning and/or raising bettas or an old pro who has raised thousands. The IBC feels there is room for all betta enthusiasts, be it young or old, new or experienced, individuals, families, teams or commercial breeders. The IBC is a club of individuals, families, teams, and commercial breeders who support the keeping, breeding, and/or the showing of bettas bred by our members; the research into the genetics of the betta species, and support of the preservation of the wild species through the Species Maintenance Program. It is IBC policy that members who sell, trade or give bettas to others must represent the description of such bettas in a proper manner, so as to assure that the buyers, consumers or recipients are not misled. An intentional misrepresentation would be a violation of the IBC policy and Code of Ethics. Moreover, it is the policy of the IBC, that when bettas are entered in a show, all such bettas should be raised and bred by the entrant or exhibitor unless clearly stated otherwise. Failure to comply with this policy would be contrary to the IBC Code of Ethics. The IBC does not participate in the fighting of fish for any reason and does not condone the fighting of bettas by others; nor does it support any individual or organization that does. The IBC expects all members to conduct transactions with all parties in a responsible, fair and ethical manner, in all dealings concerning the purchase and sale of betta stock and supplies. While we hope that all disputes be amicably resolved among the parties, the Congress, however, is not an enforcement agency for the transaction of betta stock and/or supplies, nor can the IBC mediate disputes involving members or any individuals over said transactions. In the interest of fairness, the IBC does not endorse individual business enterprises, and does not allow the promotion of those enterprises in posts on the IBC website, its forums or discussion lists, whether they are personal testimonials or commercial advertisements. The IBC believes that if all members abide by these simple guidelines we will have a happy, fun and stimulating club.

New Members Please welcome the following new members to the IBC: Linda Adams

Richard Downton

Yasuyuki Iwaya

Jenny Lee McDonald

Rolando Alabastro

Daniel Esparza

Jan Kleyn

Mackenzie Mulligan

Leslie Barker

Javier Frias Garcia

Chelsey Knaack

Joe Myers

Kathy Bielecki

Ed Goldsmith

Atena Komar

Aubrey Persons

Jennifer Blake

Robert Grant

Dawn Krebs

Erik Chan

Lois Grushka

Andry Kurniawan

Colin Chin

Dan Hodnett

Peter & Beth La Frentz

Rachele Cruz

Shannon Horvatek

Billy Sin Chee Leong

Ana Dasalla

Joe Choo Eng Huah

Lydia Lestingi

Richard DeLeonardis

Phang Guan Hwee

Samantha Martin

Huang Piwi Wallis Schuessler Melinda Seabridge Emily Stewart Vanessa Sturgill Adrian Teh Brenton Tomlinson

IBC Dues Electronic Membership - Includes electronic full color FLARE! - You will be invited to join the IBC Members-Only BetterBettas Mailing List in order to access FLARE! and other IBC documents. • $20 Individual • $22 Family 1 • $14 Junior (under 16 - all areas) Paper FLARE! Membership - Includes black & white mailed paper issue of FLARE! • $35 Individual (North America only) • $37 Family 1 (North America only) • $40 Individual (all other areas) • $42 Family 1 (all other areas) • $29 Junior (under 16 - all areas) • $50 Associates (Includes fish hobby organizations and commercial entities)

Lifetime Rate: Available to individuals & families at a one-time fee of only $500. Payments by PayPal or check in US funds only. If you are sending money to IBC using PayPal for membership dues, show sanctioning, etc. please use bettacongress@yahoo.com as the IBC email address. 1 Family refers to family members living at the same residence.

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