Florence Design Academy

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2 COURSES’ INDEX SCHOOL OF BUSINESS The Global Economy: History and Evolution Macroeconomics The Economics of Sustainability Ethics in Business International Banking Human Resource Management International Management into the Italian Context Organizational Behavior The Italian Marketing Mix: Product, Price, Place and Promotion Consumer Behavior International Marketing Public Relations Strategies Internship in Financial Institutions Internship in the Hospitality Industry Internship in a Commercial Enterprise

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SCHOOL OF POLITICS AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Italian Politics Government and Business The Politics of Happiness Introduction to International Studies W.T.O. and International Trade The Global Economy: History and Evolution Introduction to International Human Rights Gender Studies The European Union The EU and the US: Rivals or Partners? European Political Economy Comparative Government in Europe Politics and Society of the European Union Comparative politics: Latin America, Asia and the European Union Non State Actors in Global Politics

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SCHOOL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE Comparative Deviance Comparative Criminal Justice Systems Cybercrime Mafia and other Organized Crime Groups History of Political Terrorism Transactional Crime Comparative Systems of Correction Psychology of Crime History of the Mafia Internship c/o Italian Police Internship at the Centre of Documentation on Mafia Internship at the Centre of Documentation Giuseppe Impastato Internship at the Fondazione Caponetto Internship at the OLAF, the European Union Anti-fraud Office SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATION AND JOURNALISM

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Intro to Communication Mass Communications Intercultural Communication in Italy Social Skills in Interpersonal Communication Italo-American Identity Intercultural Experience in Literature Public Relations Strategies Consumer Behavior Social Media Fundamentals of Publishing and Editing

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Magazine Editing and Publishing Travel Writing Internship in Editing Internship in Media Marketing Internship at a Radio Station

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SCHOOL OF FINE AND LIBERAL ARTS Introduction to Digital Photography History of Photography Photojournalism in the (Italian) Context The Art of Street Photography Photojournalism in the (Italian) Context Nature and Environmental Photography Introduction to Art History The Secret Language of Italian Renaissance Art: Exercises in Iconography Italian Renaissance Architecture From Michelangelo, to Caravaggio and Bernini The Early Renaissance in Florence from Giotto to Michelangelo Internship as a Volunteer Tour Guide at Florentine Churches Internship at a Private Art Collection Internship at the IAF Research Centre Internship at the Gabinetto G. P. Viesseux Fabric Stamping and Decoration Design Beginners Design Intermediates Live Drawing and Painting

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SCHOOL OF GLOBAL STUDIES History of Modern Italy Historical Geography of Italy History of Renaissance History of the Mafia History of Political Terrorism History of Photography Gender Studies Internship at as Research Assistant/TA for Art Historians from around the World Cultural Psychology: Culture Shock Intro to Social Psychology Consciousness and the Philosophy of Mind Psychology of Crime Volunteer Project 1 Volunteer Project 2 Volunteer Project 3 SCHOOL OF ITALIAN STUDIES Italian Language Beginning I Italian Language Intermediate Italian Language Intermediate I Advanced Conversation Made in Italy. The Symbols of Italian Identity ‘Dalla terra alla tavola’: Italian landscape and food culture of the many ‘Italies’ History of Italian Cinema and Society Italo-American Identity The Literature of Unified Italy: The Cultural Poetics of Sicily A Social History of Italian Migration Under the Tuscan Sun. An overview of Tuscany Dante and Medieval Culture Women, History and Culture in Italy The Civilization of Italy 20th Century Italian Literature Internship at Caffè Letterario Internship at a Library in Florence Internship at l’Accademia della Crusca Internship at Casa D’Anna Editrice

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SCHOOL OF BUSINESS (SB) DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS (EC)

DEPARTMENT OF  MANAGEMENT (MG)

The Global Economy: History and Evolution SB EC GE 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

International Banking SB MG IB 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

This course is divided into two sections. Section 1 will give an overview of the global economy evolution throughout the past five centuries. this section will discuss the emergence of the “New World Economy” and examine the integration of product, labour and capital markets. Section 2, using micro and macroeconomics analysis tools, will look at the catalysts for and obstructers of market integration, and the impact of globalization on the economy and welfare of nations. topics discussed will include: the role of international institutions such as the IMF and Wto, the impact of changing economic environments on competitive strategy, the emerging trade blocs (European Union, NaFta), the fluctuation of exchange rates, and the emergence of new markets. Prerequisites: Introduction to Economics (Micro and/or Macro)

This course will focus on international financial institutions and international banking activities. topics include: credit and market risk management, country risk assessment, bank exposure to liquidity, international debt crises and regulations, VaR analysis, RaRoc, and international rules for bank capital. Case studies are used frequently as a teaching tool to present real life banking.

Macroeconomics SB EC IB 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course presents an analysis of contemporary economic institutions and the application of macro-economic theory to current economic problems. the emphasis will be on the countries of the European Union (with comparative reference to North america). the course will give a broad but detailed overview of economic theories for determining national income, governmental monetary and fiscal policy, the role of money and the banking system, international trade and the determination of foreign exchange rates strategy, the emerging trade blocs (European Union, NaFta), the fluctuation of exchange rates, and the emergence of new markets.

Human Resource Management SB MG HR 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course provides a review of the behavioral and legal approaches to the management of human resources in organizations. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of human resources management, with particular emphasis in human resource planning and strategy, personnel selection, equal employment opportunity, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and contemporary issues. The course has been developed for the those whose job requires managing people in a global environment according to the traditional HR. According to a study was conducted for the Department of Labor by the American Society for Training and Development which identified the seven skills U. S. employers want most in entry level employees. These skills are motivation to learn, basic skills, communication, teamwork, critical thinking, career development and leadership. We are committed to preparing every student with the knowledge and skills needed to succeed in today’s dynamic work environment

Prerequisites: Introduction to Economics (Micro and/or Macro) The Economics of Sustainability SB EC ES 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

International Management into the Italian Context SB MG IM 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Economic concepts and theories for analyzing sustainable development and practices from business, government and nonprofit organizations learn how economics is irrevocably linked to the natural environment and our social institutions. Study market and non-market values for environmental and social services, approaches to measure national progress toward sustainable development, causes and potential solutions to environmental and social degradation, roles of the business, government and nonprofit sectors in fostering sustainability, and the emerging field of ecological economics.

This course is geared towards students interested in international business ventures and partnerships. Management, leadership, human resource management, organizational skills and strategy will all be analyzed from a cross-cultural business perspective. The class will focus on strategies adapting managerial skills with particular reference to Italian companies and Italian world-known brands. Guest lecturers and on-site visits to international business ventures form an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: Introduction to Management or equivalent.

Ethics in Business SB EC EB 400 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

4 this course focuses on the role and significance of ethics in commerce and entrepreneurship, the role of business in society, the nature of corporate responsibility. the question of how ethics can redirect and humanize the economy through values of democracy and the practice of corporate responsibility versus the impact of unregulated “laissez- faire” capitalism will be analyzed in the context of the present global economic situation.

Organizational Behavior SB MG OB 470 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course is designed to assist students in making sound decisions in the industry by heightening their sensibility to the organizational parameters that influence their decisions. Furthermore students will analyze how to manage the basics of Organization Policy Management, through Planning,to define the logical progression from “Planning”, to all the activities related to,to define different type of organization,to be acquainted with the communication inside a company,to the recognize the importance of the Interpersonal Communication in the Human Relation Management, to be acquainted with the anti discrimination and anti harassment policy.


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DEPARTMENT OF  MARKETING (MK) The Italian Marketing Mix: Product, Price, Place and Promotion SB MK MM 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

INTERNSHIPS

This course discusses and analyses major marketing themes and concepts. The course will focus on the influences a marketing plan has on product definition (market of reference and segment analysis), on Price, on Place (distribution channels) and on Promotion. Topics include: introduction to marketing, marketing planning, product concepts and product management, segmentation, targeting and positioning, consumer buying behavior, promotional activities, channels of distribution and pricing concepts. The course will discuss a valid approach to the marketing process into the Italian context: analysis, planning, implementation, and control of programs designed to bring about desired exchanges with target markets for the purpose of achieving organizational objectives.

Consumer Behavior BU MA CB 335 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course examines the practical and theoretical elements that drive consumer behavior. Managerial strategies and marketing research used to influence consumers studied alongside the psychological factors of perception, decision-making, persuasion, and socio-cultural and cognitive perceptions and influences will give students an in-depth understanding of consumer tendencies and how they shape the market.

International Marketing SB MK IM 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course expands on the main principles of marketing by exploring the strategic implications of marketing in different countries and cultures; identifying specific marketing techniques and modifications necessary to accommodate cultural differences. topics include: global marketing, marketing planning, segmentation, culture and business customs, political and legal factors and restraints, economical and technological development and the international monetary system. Pre-requisite: Intro to Marketing or equivalent. Public Relations Strategies SB MK PR 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For the description see SC SB PR 305

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Internship in Financial Institution SB IN FI 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held at the Centre of Studies of the Cassa di Risparmio. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship / Externship in the Hospitality Industry SB IN HO 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held either in the Front Office, either in the Back Office of four stars hotels (Cellai and Pierre) or in a five stars hotel (Golden Tower). Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship in the Commerce SB IN CO 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held at the Sales Department of one of the following Boutiques: Duca di Firenze, Piana or at the Sales Department of the Florence News Paper. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.


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SCHOOL OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (IS) DEPARTMENT OF POLITICS (PO) Italian Politics IS PO MP 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course examines the major aspects and issues concerning the Italian political system. It first introduces contemporary Italy by taking an historical perspective, focusing on the consolidation of democracy after Fascism, on the main historical events and political leaders between 1945 and 1992, together with the prominent role played by political parties. The second part of this course focuses on the Italian political system. More in detail, it describes the role and functions of its institutions (the government, the parliament and the judiciary), the institutional development of the State (with the ongoing devolution of powers to the regional level) and the impact of the European Union on Italian institutions, actors and policies. The third and final part of the course takes a thematic approach. Specific lectures will be devoted to organized crime and mafia, to the current Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi and to the recent transformations and electoral fortunes of the Italian parties. The course program is not set in stone and, in the third part, specific topics might be covered if students manifest particular interests and demands. Government and Business IS PO GB 425 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course introduces students to one of the most important relationships in modern societies, that between business and government. It examines what each side hopes to achieve, exploring questions that are both empirical (observable situation) and normative (legislative limits). Corporations and governments are among the most powerful actors in our societies; most resources are allocated through markets, firms, or states. Managing this relationship is one of the greatest challenges facing today’s policy makers because inadequate controls on business may lead to social ills such as pollution, unsafe working conditions, fraud, and financial instability, yet excessive or inappropriate controls on business may lead to reductions in competitiveness, investment, employment, and economic growth. In the first part of the course we will characterize the interrelationship of democratic government, politics and business in both the US and Europe. We will also examine corporate activities in the political arena including the impact of corporations on the policy-making process. The second part of the course centers on accountability at the national and international levels. We will investigate a series of key issues concerning the evolving relationship between business and government in the global economy, such as the nature of multinational corporations, the particular problems of developing countries, and the potential contribution of international civil 6 society to business regulation and global governance. Students will consider the theme of globalization, and the challenges posed by corporations to democracy and to state sovereignty. In this course we will consider some of the most crucial issues facing government and business today — including whether economic globalization threatens national sovereignty; the place of public opinion, unions, and other advocacy groups in government/business relations; and the best way to improve the accountability of multinationals.

The Politics of Happiness IS PO PH 455 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Recent decades have brought an explosion of scientific research on happiness in the field of psychology and economics. Inspired by this literature, many are calling for drastic changes in public policy, which in the modern era has been dominated by economics. The focus on economics makes sense if money is a good indicator of happiness, for instance because more money means greater freedom for people to pursue whatever goals they care about. Yet research on happiness has found a surprisingly weak link between money and happiness. Governments may, then, want to focus directly on happiness in making decisions—but this suggestion is controversial. People seem to have different views on happiness. This course will survey the current state of play in this area, asking what if any role measures of happiness (or other well-being measures) should play in setting policy. Readings will be highly interdisciplinary, covering philosophy, psychology, and economics. Introduction to International Studies IS PO IS 310 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Technological progress and sophistication has catalyzed the shrinking of an ever small social frontier. As the process (globalization) continues, the constructed realities of individuals comprising “us” and “them” becomes obscure, blurred, and, at times, incomprehensible. As travel, communication, violence, and economic interdependence become faster, cast wider nets, and redraw social groups, the norms and expectations of the global community change both to adapt to their environment and to shape the future. This dynamic world has witnessed the rise of intergovernmental, supranational, and non- governmental actors. The European Union, the Breton Woods Trio, Human Rights Watch International, Doctors without Borders, ASEAN, the African Union, and NAFTA are realized creations of this era. These actors have emerged to supplement traditional nation-states within the international political arena, attempting to transform the landscape and thought of the system. This course is designed to help students understand, critically reflect upon, and objectively analyze issues that affect the international community of states and the global order. The issues addressed in this course are foundational and interrelated, brought from a variety of disciplines. W.T.O. and International Trade IS PO IT 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course is designed to introduce the student to the legal system governing international economic transactions and international economic relations, particularly centered on the World Trade Organization (WTO), the most significant institution for international trade relations, and its constituent treaty parts such as the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). With the growing economic interdependence of the world, understanding this system is becoming increasingly important. The basic objective of this course is to give the student an in depth overview of the world trading system, with some experience in


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particular details. The course encourages an understanding of the system through the study and analysis of original materials in a systematic way, designed for students who may practice in the subject area (either in private firms or government positions), or for students who would like to have an understanding of the system for personal, scholarly, or leadership reasons. The Global Economy: History and Evolution IS PO GE 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For description see SB EC GE 405 Introduction to International Human Rights IS PO IS 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course introduces the theoretical and practical concerns shaping the study and promotion of human rights today. Using a variety of materials and case studies, our exploration focuses on: 1) the key concepts used in the discussion of human rights; 2) the debate over whether rights are universal; 3) the regional and international institutions and organizations devoted to enforcing human rights; 4) the role states play in protecting human rights, both internally and in relation to violator states; and 5) current topics, including responses to war crimes and genocide, the implications of globalization for human rights, and the dilemmas posed by demands for self-determination voiced by groups aroundthe world.

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Gender Studies IS PO GS 355 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course in Gender Studies consists of both theoretical and empirical lessons about the birth and the development of the concept of Gender in Human Sciences (Anthropology, History, Sociology, Psychology) and of its utility in the Sociological research and in the unveiling of the social inequalities. To the traditional view of concept of gender as a socio-cultural construction of the feminine and masculine it is added the most recent reflections of the Queer and Transgender Theories. In particular we address the issue of the management of intersexuality and the meaning of intersex bodies for the analysis of the sex-gender binarism system. So we deal with the empirical applications of the concept of gender: the interconnections between daily life and public sphere; gender education and the unequal gender division of care work; the horizontal and vertical segregation at work; the underrepresentation of women in politics; the imagine of women in the Italian mass media; gender and domestic violence; the management of intersexuality; gender equality, citizenship and human rights. The lessons have an interactive character and may be accompanied by films and documentaries on the subject.


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DEPARTMENT OF EUROPEAN STUDIES (EU) The European Union IS EU El 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

European Political Economy IS EU PE 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Europe is at the forefront of international regional integration: no other group of nation states has proceeded further in pooling sovereignty. This is an introductory course, which aims to give a broad overview of developments in the European Union (EU) from the aftermath of the Second World War to the 2004 wave of expansion that brought into the fold the countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the 2009 ratification of the Lisbon Treaty. The approach of this course is political and aims at helping the student understand the nature and the peculiar characteristics of European integration. The course is organized in three parts. First, we review the ideas, events, and actors that led to the foundation of the European Coals and Steel Community (ECSC) and the European Economic Community (EEC) and to its enlargement from 6 to 27 countries.

The European Union (EU) is the most prominent example of international economic integration. The aim of this course is to study the process of integration, the outcome and the main economic policies. Economic issues are examined in their political context being the EU policies the result of the political interplay between national governments and EU institutions. Moreover we examine the concept of supranationalism and the implications it has for the enacting of public policy at the national level in a scenario of global competition. The course is divided in two parts. First, the course gives a general account of the history of European integration from the Rome Treaty to the Lisbon Treaty focusing on the main turning point. The main EU institutions and the policy-making process will be described. Second, we explore the content and the meaning of the main economic policies such as the common market, the monetary union, competition, trade and agricultural policy. We examine the different welfare systems, the concept of Europeanization of national economic policies, the challenges the EU has to address in order to continue to be competitive in the global market, and the relationship with the Unite States.

Second, the course takes an in-depth look at EU institutions and policies, casting a critical eye on the crucial period from 1985 to 1993 that led to the acceleration of European integration, with the Single European Act, more enlargements, and the Maastricht Treaty. Finally, the course will reflect on the three major questions facing the EU in the new millennium and the different answers that have been suggested for each: What is the EU as a political object? What is its purpose? And what should be its role in a global world? To explore the resonance of these issues, this course will consider the practical policy dilemmas the EU faces in various fields such as the economic and monetary policy, regulatory and distributive questions, the democratic deficit, the challenge of enlargement to the East, the Lisbon Treaty, and the common foreign and security policy. The EU and the US: Rivals or Partners? IS EU RP 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The objective of the course is to analyze the relationship between the US and the EU: are they good partners or are they rivals? The course will start by putting the relationship between the two countries into an historical perspective to provide students with a long-term view of the subject. After briefly touching on important events in the relationship before 1945, the course will focus on the post-World War II era. The main topics include: the creation and evolution of the European Communities into the present European Union, and the US attitude towards European integration. Furthermore, the ups and downs of the relationship throughout the Cold War era will be analyzed. Some juridical notions will be introduced to enable students to better understand the institutional framework of the European Union. The concept of “power” will be introduced and discussed in its various forms (military, economic, “soft power”), as the course will try to address the main question on whether the US and the EU are cooperating or rivalling in8 the global arena. Then, the present trends in the relationship will be examined, with special emphasis on issues such as the Euro and the dollar, trade relations, the activity of transnational corporations, the Kyoto protocol, foreign policy and international affairs.

Comparative Government in Europe IS EU CC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course will provide an introduction to the political systems and political processes of European states. Between World War II and today, European democracies have developed in different sequences and in different types. This course is devoted to the analysis of democratic development and processes in selected European democracies in West and East. Students get basic introduction to the issue of system-comparison of democratic states, including basic classification and typology of democratic systems (parliamentary, presidential, direct democracies). Topics include welfare, the political culture, interest groups and parties, decision making and policies in selected policy fields. While this unit does not focus on the European Union, references to the EU will often be made as national politics and governance are mediated by it. Politics and Society of the European Union IS EU PS 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) In this interdisciplinary course students will read and discuss research on contemporary Europe. The course will begin with an overview of the history and politics of Europe since 1945. Readings throughout the course will come from history, sociology, political science, and political economy. As part of the course, students will participate in a colloquium involving visiting scholars and will have the opportunity to discuss the latest research on the European Union with these visitors.


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DEPARTMENT OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (IS) Comparative politics: Latin America, Asia and the European Union IS IS CP 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Non State Actors in Global Politics IS IS NS 415 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Why are some countries democratic and others autocratic? How do institutions differ between countries and how do these differences affect political competition? What is the role of political factors in determining different economic outcomes? This course introduces students to the comparative study of political relationships and processes within particular countries (as opposed to the relations between countries). The aim of the course is to analyze the domestic politics of nation-states and to compare different political systems. The course thus explores significant differences and similarities between the political, social and economic features of countries and attempts to determine how and why these differences matter and changed over time. Special attention will be focused on political institutions and culture in order to gain the necessary background to examine a wide range of political outcomes in a variety of geographical settings, with particular attention to Latin America, the European Union, Russia, Iran, China and India. The ultimate goal is to acquire concepts needed to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the domestic politics of countries.

This course introduces students to the transnational relations of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), large corporations (TNCs) and their international organizations. The course aims to address inter-society relations, as well as intergovernmental relations. By emphasizing the influence of transnational players on global policymaking, it complements courses on international politics. Please note: in this course, the term NGO is being used in the UN sense, covering all players in civil society, including those such as trades unions and religious groups that may not regard themselves as being NGOs. The course will start by outlining the great diversity of transnational players and explaining how technological change has facilitated cheap, rapid and effective communications that have enabled all transnational players to expand their global reach and/or their range of activities. Then the formal procedures and the political operation of the UN arrangements for NGOs in consultative status will be compared with the less formal arrangements at the European Union. The relations between the concepts of NGOs, TNCs, civil society and social movements will be analyzed. The course will raise questions of theoretical significance about the challenge transnational players make to the sovereignty of states. NGOs cause debate about the nature of political legitimacy at the level of global policy-making.

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SCHOOL  OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ) DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE (CJ) Comparative Deviance CJ CJ CD 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Starting from a sociological definition of the concept of deviance (Durkheim, Simmel, Parsons...), the course’s aim is to provide a full analysis of the types of deviance in different cultures. The approach is cross-culturally comparative and starts from 2 POVs (which are neither mutually exclusive nor mutually inclusive): legal system: how deviant behaviours are punished by the law and the correctional aspect social system: how different societies have different values and consequently different perceptions of deviant behaviours, also in terms of moral reprobation. Special attention will be dedicated to USA, UK and India, Italy (especially southern) and Latin America.

Comparative Criminal Justice Systems CJ CJ CC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course provides students with an introduction to the American criminal justice system and will compare the American system with different criminal justice systems around the world in relation to law enforcement, criminal procedure and criminal law, corrections, and juvenile justice; and worldwide overview of cultural and legal traditions related to crime. The federal judicial system compared to the multiple EU systems (one for each member) is the starting point to analyse the attempts to build up a global judicial system, with its gaps, failure and possible perspectives of solution. The course will then focus on EU boards and international agencies: OLAF - AIEA - International Court of Justice (The Hague) - UNICRI

its variety. Students will gain an understanding of the structures of organized crime and the varieties of businesses associated with traditional and non-traditional organized crime groups and will study international criminal organizations

History of Political Terrorism CJ CJ PT 410 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course will study the impact of modernization on propensity, preference, and opportunity for violence and provides historical information on terrorism, objectives of terror, modern terrorism, group movements, classification, and the tools of terror. The course will cover a history of terrorism from its origin to the recent days, starting with the French Revolution and its ‘Terror’. Then the course will focus on the most important historical movements (IRA - ETA - OLP - BR - RAF), reaching out the more recent declination of this criminal conduct. -When terrorism becomes ‘State’s terrorism’: ethnic cleansing in Africa. -Terrorism as an answer to the US presence: Al Qaeda and G.W. Bush’s ‘war on terror’

Transactional Crime CJ CJ TC 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course will study how globalization, increased numbers of immigrants and improved communications technology has impacted and benefited transnational crime groups. Areas of study will include disparate socio-economic conditions, human trafficking, the desire for illegal goods and services when suppliers and consumers are in different countries, and the universal greed for money and power.

Cybercrime CJ CJ CY 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Comparative Systems of Correction CJ CJ SC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

This course will examine how computers are used to commit various crimes, illegal attacks on personal computers and computer systems and on people via their computers as well as human and societal aspects of cybercrime, its prevention, and its significance for the justice system including international comparisons. Crimes have become trans-nationally widespread and have multiplied with the globalisation, and ITC from a precious source has become a potential menace to the stability of a global networked community. From financial frauds to cyber-terrorism and hackers-attacks, several threats arose and the need for electronic surveillance grew in these last years. The course will look at how the 10 with a special outlook establishments are defending their systems, on USA and China, with the issues of e-spionage and e-censorship.

This course examines and analyses the major types of custodial and community based criminal corrections in America and compares it to other international systems. Students will discuss the purposes of corrections, correctional organisation, impact of corrections and contemporary issues facing the field. This course will compare and contrast the following societies and their correctional systems: -Italy: the art.13 of the Constitution, overcrowding and suicides trend within Italian jails. -USA and EU at confront: death penalty, correctional systems, systems of law / police / courts. -Italy: Polizia di Stato and Carabinieri: a multi-layered structure.

Mafia and other Organized Crime Groups CJ CJ HM 310 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course provides students with an historical and theoretical overview of organized crime as well as specific understanding of


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Psychology of Crime CJ CJ PC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

Internship at the Centre of Documentation Giuseppe Impastato CJ IN DM 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours)

This course approaches the knowledge and understanding of criminal behaviour and its impact upon individuals and society from developmental, cognitive-behavioural, and other psychological perspectives. Students will acquire a new framework for interpreting criminal behaviour Students will be familiarised with different perspectives on criminal behaviour as well as etiology, risk factors, assessment and treatment in relation to different criminal behaviours Recent research findings will be incorporated.

Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. IAF collaborates with Umberto Santino, one of the world’s leading scholars on the mafia and director of the Centre of Documentation on Mafia and Antimafia “Giuseppe Impastato” in Palermo, Sicily. Candidates for this independent study project must have a strong interest in mafiarelated studies, excellent writing skills, and preferably be proficient in the Italian language. Dr. Santino will guide their research which will then be published in one of the scientific journals or reviews associated with the Centre. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

History of the Mafia CJ CJ HM 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course discusses the origins and development of the Mafia in the context of Italian politics, economics and society from the nineteenth century until the present day. Special focus will be given to judicial procedures against the Mafia in the past 30 years, to the nature of Mafia activities and their spread beyond Sicily to the Italian mainland and the relationship of ‘Cosa Nostra’ to the United States. lectures and discussions will be heavily supplemented with newspaper/ magazine articles, films (documentary and fictional) and contemporary literature. Please note that films and documentaries will be viewed outside of regularly scheduled class time. INTERNSHIPS Internship c/o Italian Police CJ IN IP 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. A student will be given the opportunity to intern with either the Italian police or the carabinieri for a period of three months. The student will assist the law enforcement officers in their task of solving criminal issues involving foreigners in Florence. Office hours and duties will be communicated by the police after the interview process.

Internship at the Centre of Documentation on Mafia CJ IN DM 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision 11 are proficient in the of an experienced professional. Students who Italian language can apply for an internship with the Centre of Documentation on Mafia and Terrorism of the Region of Tuscany. The Centre, founded by the regional government and located just outside the centre of Florence, is the only one in Italy which has access on a regular basis to all the Italian parliamentary proceedings. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship at the Fondazione Caponetto CJ IN CA 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. The anti-mafia organisation Fondazione Caponnetto offers an internship opportunity for one student. The Foundation is financed by the regional government of Tuscany and its activity consists of educating both Italians and foreign students about legal culture in Italy. The candidate, if accepted, will be the Foundation’s liaison with the Englishspeaking community of Tuscany, and will also perform other duties such as translator at the meetings and conferences organised by the organisation. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship at the OLAF, the European Union Anti-fraud Office CJ IN OL 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students may present an independent study project to OLAF, the European Anti-Fraud Office. To apply, students must submit a 2-3 page proposal. If the proposal is accepted by OLAF, the student will travel to the main office in Brussels, Belgium, to discuss it with a representative, who will provide research materials for the paper, which will be submitted two weeks prior to the end of the semester and will be, pending OLAF approval, published on the website. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.


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SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS AND JOURNALISM (SC) DEPARTMENT OF  MASSCOMMUNICATION (MC) Intro to Communication SC MC IC 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of communication and use these concepts to explore the different theories and studies carried out in this field. The areas of organizational communication, interpersonal/intercultural communication, and mass communication will also be touched upon as an introductory primer for specialized areas of interest within the vast field of communication. Mass Communications SC MC MC 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course is an introduction to the discipline of Mass communication. The course includes a historical and theoretical overview that begins in the early part of the 20th century, continues through the rapid development of mass communication over the last 50 years, and concludes with current issues and concerns. The nature, structures, roles, processes and effects of mass media will be examined with primary emphasis given to radio, television, film and print media. The effects of mass communication on society will be examined and social and professional ethical issues will be discussed. Comparisons will be made between the mass media in Europe and that of North America. Intercultural Communication in Italy SC SB II 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course is an introduction to the basic patterns of intercultural communication and to communication behaviors in interpersonal, intercultural, individual and group environments. An in-depth analysis of psychological and factual barriers (verbal and non-verbal communication) will be included. Along with studying the influence that one’s own culture has on identity, viewpoints and communication, students will study all the theoretical concepts that are necessary to analyze communication into the Italian interpersonal / intercultural context. Social Skills in Interpersonal Communication SC SB IC 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) An examination of personal and small group communication with particular emphasis on methods of perceiving information and transmitting messages, gender bias in communication, non-verbal behavior, and methods of communicating ideas and emotions. Students also learn about decision-making in groups and forces that influence group behavior. A review of the ways in which people communicate with each other and an introduction to the skills needed to communicate effectively in work situations. Students participate 12 in small and large group discussions and problem-solving situations as we cover the fundamentals of listening skills, interviewing skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, and public speaking. Italo-American identity SC SB IA 325 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course will examine the history of Italian immigration to the United States from the early nineteenth century to the twentieth century. The topics that will be discussed during the course include constructions

of race and the concept of whiteness, discrimination, a sense of displacement, the ways in which Italian immigrants formed a sense of their multicultural identity, and the different stereotypes of ItalianAmericans that were created in the United States. Course material consists of films focusing on the Italo-American experience, theoretical studies, biographical/autobiographical narratives and fictional works by twentieth-century Italian-American writers. Intercultural Experience in Literature SC SB IE 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This multidisciplinary course focuses on travel practices and literary representations of Italy from the eighteenth-century to present day. The tour of Italy was canonized in the British Grand Tour, which was a rite of passage for young boys coming from British aristocratic families. In the nineteenth century the different images created of Italy appeared in such travel volumes as Goethe’s Italianische Reise (1816), Stendhal’s Rome, Naples et Florence (1817) and Promenades dans Rome (1830) as well as in other works that contributed to foreign travelers’ emphasis on Italy’s past, such as Madame de Staël’s Corinne, ou l’Italie (1807) and Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage (1818). Students will compare the early representations of the peninsula and the ways in which the impressions of Italy were constructed to images that appear in contemporary travel texts. The Italian tropes that emerge from travel literature are often closely linked with art, fashion, and culinary culture, Through a close analysis of travel writing and fictional texts, students will consider the changes and continuity in travel motives and practices, the socio-cultural impact of travel, and the ways in which class, gender and the travelers’ race or nationality may shape the experience. Public Relations Strategies SC SB PR 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course introduces the student to the strategic roles and functions of the Public Relations (PR) practitioner and enables them to evaluate the context in which PR is practiced, to understand the potential and practice of PR as a management function, and to analyze critically the structure of PR management, its role and techniques. In addition, the student will be introduced to the rhetorical arguments that impact upon PR activities and will be made aware of the importance of professionalism and ethics in public relations practice. Consumer Behavior SC SB CB 335 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For description see BU MA CB 335 Social Media SC SB SM 330 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) What do we mean by “community?” How do we encourage, discuss, analyse, understand, design, and participate in healthy communities in the age of many-to-many media? With the advent of virtual communities, smart mobs, and online social networks (such as Facebook, Friend-feed, twitter, linked-in, Digg and Delicious), old questions about the meaning of human social behaviour have taken on renewed significance. although this course is grounded in theory, it is equally rooted in practice, and much of the class discussion takes place in social cyberspace.


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DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM AND PUBLISHING (JP) Fundamentals of Publishing and Editing SC JP PE 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours)

INTERNSHIPS

This course examines the fundamental aspects of the publishing industry with an emphasis on book publishing. Issues such as editorial brainstorming and manuscript selection, layout processes, production, interior and exterior design, marketing, and financial factors are explored on a hands on level with examples and collaborations drawn from ongoing publication projects. The emphasis on editing focuses on evaluating manuscripts, fact checking, copy cutting, editing, rewriting, proofreading and writing captions, titles and subtitles. Magazine Editing and Publishing SC JP EP 300 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course explores the world of magazines and how they are produced. the fundamentals of magazine design, content, editing, and printing will be covered. We will examine the types of writing styles used in magazine publications, editorial techniques, the professional roles in a magazine’s masthead and production team, and the work cycle of magazines. Students will have the opportunity to participate in magazine publications with staff and faculty for a hands on experience approach to the course topic.

Internship in Editing SB IN FI 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held at the Florence News Paper. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Internship / Externship in Media Marketing SB IN HO 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held at the Marketing & Sales Dpt. Of the International Florence University Press. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Travel Writing SC JP TW 400 Students will focus on writing journalistically with special emphasis on researching and reporting in a foreign country, in this case Italy. The objective is to force the students out of their comfort zone and to have them engage with the Italian community rather than simply relying on whatever sense of Americana they may see while here. That is to say that to fulfill most assignments, simply interviewing an American tourist will not suffice; rather, the students will interact with the Italian people to better understand their culture. Students in the course will cater their writing to a specific audience, one that should be defined as they each develop their own writing “voice” as a means of adapting their journalistic style. Assignments will include keeping a blog, a few “if-you-go” articles and several smaller reporting pieces, among other things.

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Internship at the Radio Station SB IN FI 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional, the internship will be held at the …........ Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.


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SCHOOL OF FINE AND LIBERAL ARTS (FA) DEPARTMENT OF PHOTOGRAPHY (PH) Introduction to Digital Photography FA PH DP 305 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) This course will introduce students to the digital photography world with a particular focus on up-to-date techniques and how they can be incorporated into classical fine art photography. The course will explore the use of state-of-the-art computer software and techniques. The instructor guides the students during the learning process to master photo computer software. Students will learn how to control the scanning of a picture, transparency and negative to make a good quality digital print. Prerequisites:Basic photography experience is helpful. Equipment: A digital camera of at least 5.0 mega pixels with an optical zoom lens 3X or more is required. History of Photography FA PH HP 315 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) This course proposes a history and appreciation of photography from the first photographs (1824/26) to the present day. The following topics will be covered: the work of the inventors Neipce, Daguerre and Talbot; the rise and acceptance of photography as an independent art medium; the aesthetic and humanistic ideas and beliefs of photographers within their cultural and social contexts; the contribution of photography to the visual arts and literature; the importance of photography in the rise of the Media System and its influence on modern society based on communication; the masters of B.&W. documentary photography and photojournalism the photograph as contemporary art. Photojournalism in the (Italian) Context FA PH PJ 405 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) This course introduces students to the world of photography with specific focus on the photojournalistic aspects of this art medium. The course will be divided between field study and learning introductory digital techniques, working with both black and white and color digital printing and finishing. The lab practice will give students the capability of elaborating and correctly printing his/ her own pictures. Students learn about the history, compositional issues and techniques of photojournalism by studying the work of influential photographers like Cartier-Bresson, Capa, Salgado and others. The class will also be conceiving, shooting, printing and laying out a series of documentary projects. This course is recommended for communications, journalism and social science students. Basic photography experience and knowledge will be helpful. A digital camera of 5.0 mega pixels minimum with an optical zoom lens of at least 3X is required.15 Nature and Environmental Photography FA PH EP 315 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) Environmental preservation and policy are at the forefront of the international news. This course examines the connected issues such as endangered species and animal behaviors and habitat. The struggle for defending species at serious risk of extinction and

the reduction of their natural habitats followed by human overpopulation, are among the great themes of this new millennium. Book Publishers and magazines are in the continuous need of pro images of wildlife and natural environments. this course is the gateway to explore this up to date photo area that requires skills, spirit of adventure, love for the planet, patience and commitment. Equipment: A digital SlR camera with a long focal lens is required. The Art of Street Photography FA PH SP 325 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) Street Photography is an expression that came into use in the 1960s and which defined the work of a group of young American artists. They were the offspring of the Beat Generation who, shooting in public places, caught the unease of the individual in an affluent society, which was rapidly changing. Almost everyone takes photos in the street, amateurs and tourists, but few are familiar with the rules of this particular expressive form. By examining the work of masters in this field, such as Robert Frank, and through practical exercises in the street of Florence, participants in this course will learn the fundamental elements of this deceptively simple type of photography. Method: theoretical lectures, slide shows, practical work and visits. Requirements: a digital camera. Prerequisites: none Photography in Contemporary Art FA PH CA 405 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) It has taken almost a hundred years for the mechanical technique of reproducing reality to be accepted as a form of art. Since the end of the twentieth century photography has come to play an ever increasing role in the panorama of contemporary art. It is now well represented in museums and galleries worldwide, coming a very close second to the primacy of painting. The stimulating and lively competition between these expressive forms had its beginnings in the middle of the nineteenth century and continues apace up to the present day. References: D. LaChapelle, N. Goldin, M Schoeller. Method: theoretical lectures, slide shows and visits. Requirements: none. Prerequisites: none Nature and Environmental Photography FA PH EP 315 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) Environmental preservation and policy are at the forefront of the international news. This course examines the connected issues such as endangered species and animal behaviors and habitat. The struggle for defending species at serious risk of extinction and the reduction of their natural habitats followed by human overpopulation, are among the great themes of this new millennium. Book Publishers and magazines are in the continuous need of pro images of wildlife and natural environments. this course is the gateway to explore this up to date photo area that requires skills, spirit of adventure, love for the planet, patience and commitment. Equipment: A digital SlR camera with a long focal lens is required.


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DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE (AH) Introduction to Art History FA AH IA 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This introductory art history course will take students through over two millennia of Italian and European art from the classical Greek and Roman period up to and including the eighteenth century. Special emphasis will be given to Florentine and Italian art of the thirteenth to sixteenth century of the Renaissance period. This introductory course is aimed at students who have not studied art history before. Prerequisites: none The Secret Language of Italian Renaissance Art: Exercises in Iconography FA AH EI 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) It is easy to admire the beauty of great works of art but not always easy to understand their precise meaning. The study of art’s ‘Secret Language’ provides the key to the symbols used by Renaissance artists. This course provides an overview of the signs and symbols that can help us to decipher artworks produced in Florence during the Renaissance, from the late 14th century until the beginning of the 16th century. The course starts with an introduction to iconographic methodology and the meaning of recurrent symbols, such as attributes, personifications, and allegories. During a second phase students investigate specific themes or concepts through the analysis of images, narratives, allegories, motifs, and context: the Creation, Mary and Jesus, the saints and symbols, mythology and ancient gods. Many classes will be held on site in the churches, museums and galleries of Florence, and there will also be a special day trip to Siena. Prerequisites: At least a survey course of Western art or its equivalent. Italian Renaissance Architecture FA AH RA 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course explores the principal architects, monuments and themes of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Italian architecture. The emphasis will be on Renaissance architecture in Florence but include references to architectural developments in Rome, Urbino and Mantua. Students will explore topics such as: architectural theory, Medici and papal patronage, urban planning and church and palace design. The focus will be on the following architects: Alberti, Brunelleschi, Michelozzo, Bramante, Michelangelo and Giulio Romano. In addition to the visits to key Renaissance buildings and urban spaces in Florence, a mandatory field trip to the Renaissance town of Mantua is included in the program. Prerequisites: none, although previous study of Italian Renaissance history and Western art will be helpful. 16 From Michelangelo to Caravaggio and Bernini, Transforming Arts of the Long Sixteenth Century FA AH MC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course focuses on the major artistic movements of the long sixteen century from Michelangelo to Caravaggio and Bernini. We will begin by analyzing the work of Michelangelo Buonarroti as an architect, painter and sculptor who was regarded as a hero and

model by subsequent generations of artists. While he represents the period of the “High Renaissance”,Michelangelo da Merisi, known as Caravaggio, was instrumental in transforming the mannerist style into the more painterly Baroque style. The course will investigate both issues of art criticism and recurrent problems in his troubled life. Nonetheless his work had a tremendous influence on the arts of Europe. Finally we move into the fully developed Baroque style through the study of the oeuvre of Gian Lorenzo Bernini, who is regarded as one of its most celebrated representatives. The course examines his artistic life as a sculptor and architect whose artistic creations compellingly visualized the aspirations of the Roman Counter-Reformation, the idea of triumphant Catholicism, as well as of secular absolutism. An overnight Rome trip forms part of the course. Prerequisites: At least a survey course of Western art or its equivalent The Early Renaissance in Florence from Giotto to Michelangelo FA AH ER 425 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course focuses on two centuries of the art and architecture produced during the early Florentine Renaissance (ca.13001500). Students are required to analyze the sources, styles and iconography of the works of masters such as Donatello, Brunelleschi, and Botticelli. On site visits and presentations in the museums and workshops of the city, illustrated class discussions, special projects and independent research aim to give the students a first-hand experience of the city’s art scene from the Renaissance to this day. The study of historical and economical factors during the Florentine Renaissance will try to provide answers to the ageold question of why this relatively small city became the cradle of the Renaissance.. All students are required to keep a class diary during the term Prerequisites: At least a survey course of Western art or its equivalent INTERNSHIPS Internship as a Volunteer Tour Guide at Florentine Churches FA AH TG 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. A cultural association organises volunteer helpers as tour-guides in a wide range of languages for the churches in the Florentine city centre. Use your language skills and art historical knowledge and gain a different point of view while also getting experience in teaching on-site that will be useful in future Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Internship at a Private Art Collection FA IN AC 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. This will take place at an art collection


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DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE ARTS (CA) that has been in private hands for centuries and is slowly turned into a museum and research centre. Join the team and enjoy the proximity of works of art that are still being displayed in the family palazzo. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Internship at the IAF Research Centre FA IN RC 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. The International Academy of Florence will house its own research centre that also offers internships to students. Be involved in organizing and running conferences and seminars, co-ordinate scholars and delegates, and be there on the day of the conference, meeting and greeting well-known art historians. Afterwards there will usually be the opportunity to be part of the editing team of the resulting publications. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required. Internship at the Gabinetto G. P. Viesseux FA IN RC 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. IAF students who are proficient in the Italian language may intern with the Gabinetto Scientifico Letterario G.P. Viessieux, a historic cultural association located in Palazzo Strozzi in Florence. Interested candidates will have the opportunity to provide assistance in one of the many cultural or research initiatives of the association, or they may carry out an independent research project under the association’s direction. Papers may be published, pending approval, in the organisations magazine, archives, or on the website. Students must attend the preinternship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

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Fabric Stamping and Decoration FA CA DE 305 6 semester credits (90 lecture hours) BATIK TECHNIQUE Historical –theoretical comprehension in batik technique. Study and realization of a decorative motive, reproduced over a tissue material, and the basic characteristic of reservation with wax. Practical process. Instruments and tools. BLOCK STAMPING TECHNIQUE Historical signs and marks in use, and the history of block stamping technique. Choice and realization of a decorative and modulate element, transferred and cut in matrix (linoleum or wood). Practical process. Instruments and materials. Execution of prototype, realized over diverse materials (leather, paper-fabric, plastic). STENCIL TECHNIQUE Theoretical comprehension of the stencil technique. Study of decorative elements, reproduced over a tissue material and use of masks. Practical process. Instruments and tools. Practical realization (bags, shirts, hats, etc.). FABRIC PAINTING AND DECORATION Initial graphic project of decorative elements. Practical process. Instruments and tools. Transferring over the tissue material the chosen images, using the fabric painting technique and further interventions of mixed techniques (tying, color shading and insert of reservation with wax).


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DEPARTMENT OF PAINTING AND DRAWING (PD) Design Beginners FA PD DE 305 6 semester credits (90 lecture hours) The course is aimed to develop abilities of design in all it’s aspects, from the concept of a project, to the search of shape and form. Operating the choices in functional and formal way. Industry and its influence upon the choices made. Graphic and plastic presentation of the object. Choices of materials and colors. Analyzing the established product. Technology as project input, fantasy as formal result. Phases: Redesign- planning, regarding the completed object and the project requirements Analyzing the established product and its production and industrial motivations Methods of representation, projections (orthogonal, axonometric, perspective), using the computer and graphic programs. Model-making as planning and assessment tool Technology and research as a planning tool, examples and results Formal elaboration as a tool to operate the project choices, applications and examples Practical project- study, development, elaboration and representation of a simple theme. From redesign to a complete experience in planning a theme on a primary level. Design Intermediates FA PD DE 405 6 semester credits (90 lecture hours) The course is aimed to consolidate the abilities of design in all it’s aspects, from the concept of a project, to the search of shape and form.

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Phases: Formal concept- planning, regarding the form and its main requirements Function- when the form is conditioned by the functional requirements Design in handmade production, constructive techniques and costs Practical project- complete planning stages, from analysis to function, planning choices’ criterions and the formal elaboration. Simple comstructive systems- handmade and industrial Planning, based on the needs of a firm. Analyzing its product, customers and costs. Planning and materials, technical design. Model (prototype) Live Drawing and Painting FA PD LP 405 6 semester credits (90 lecture hours) The course is aimed to develop abilities of observation, knowledge of various expressive techniques and attaining one’s comprehension in articulating and arranging a personal figurative language. “Form” understanding the details of various shapes and forms, in order to master the idea of a form as a whole. “Light” understanding that in order to create anything, light is always necessary. “Color” if shape distinguish, color gives life. Attaining the fundamental laws of colors and their applications. “Composition” the way form, light and color are combined. EXPRESSIVE TECHNIQUES Use of charcoal Use of sanguine Use of crayons and water colors Use of water colors Use of acrylic colors Use of oil colors.


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SCHOOL OF GLOBAL STUDIES (GS) DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY (HI) History of Modern Italy GS HI MI 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course introduces students to the history and politics of modern Italy from the time of its political Unification to the present. The major topics covered throughout the course include the process of political unification in the mid-late 1800s, the birth and growth of Fascism in Italy (1922-1943), the Second World War (1940-45), the workings of governing institutions in the postwar period (1946-48), the role of the Church, political parties and movements, as well as the industrialization (1950-60’s), political terrorist events (1960-80’s), as well as political corruption and political conspiracy. The course is particularly recommended to all those students that want to gain an in-depth knowledge of the contemporary social and political history of Italy.

Historical Geography of Italy GS HI GI 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The course has an interdisciplinary approach, as it aims to present and deepen the relation between the different layers of time (History) as they happened within the space (Geography), with a particular focus on Central Italy between Renaissance and the twentieth century. After an introduction to the physical conformation of Italy and its geographical features, the course will analyze how the most important central Italian historical happenings took place within such spaces, and how the latter were modified by the former. Particular attention will be devoted to the study of specific historical and social episodes that have transformed the Italian society since the fifteenth century, and the way these transformations have changed the geography of the Italian peninsula, with a focus on the agricultural changes of Central Italy and Tuscany in particular. The course will show the tight link between history and geography in Italy, and how it evolved during these recent centuries.

History of Renaissance GS HI HR 325 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) The age of the Renaissance is famously difficult to define: far more than the ‘rebirth’ of ancient Roman culture it needs to be seen and studied within its historical context. The bustling Italian centers of commerce and learning embarked on a series of political, 19 economic, social, intellectual and artistic changes that were going

to transform Western thought and education during two centuries (1300 to 1500). The Renaissance was one of four great intellectual movements that transformed traditional European society, followed by the Reformation that it had helped to prepare. The Scientific Revolution and subsequent industrialization finally brought society into the age of modernity. At the very beginning of these developments stood humanism, humanistic studies, and the importance given during this age to education at schools and universities. Hence, this course will focus on the achievements of humanist scholars and their influence on Renaissance philosophy, literature and the arts. Prerequisites: none

History of the Mafia GS HI HM 315 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For the description see CJ CJ HM 315 History of Political Terrorism GS HI PT 410 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For the description see CJ CJ PT 410 History of Photography GS HI HP 315 6 semester credits (90 hours: 45 lecture hours - 45 studio hours) For the description see FA PH HP 315 Gender Studies GS HI GS 355 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For description see IS PO GS 355 INTERNSHIPS Internship at as Research Assistant/TA for Art Historians from around the World GS HI RA 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Florence is always teeming with art historians, historians, and scholars from associated disciplines from around the world. Why not experiencing the research process at first hand by giving a hand to Italian and foreign scholars in libraries, before talks or as a class room TA? Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.


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DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY (PY) Cultural Psychology: Culture Shock GS PY CS 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) Over the past 30 years, globalization has brought with it a phenomenon that has increasingly been recognized by both psychologists and anthropologists as a viable field of research: Culture Shock. Also referred to as ‘culture fatigue’ or ‘role shock, Culture Shock refers to the reactions of travelers during their first few months in a foreign country. This course presents Culture Shock within the context of cross-cultural psychology and puts a specific emphasis on the students’ own experiences as they live and study in a foreign country. Topics explored will include the following: the role of communication and communication norms, cultural variables, taboos and rituals, and cultural adjustment.

Intro to Social Psychology GS PY SP 305 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course is designed as a comprehensive survey course of theory and research in social psychology. The goal of this course is to explain how our thoughts, feelings, and behavior are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of other people. Topics to be studied include the self, social perception, social cognition and information processing, attitudes and persuasion, stereotyping and discrimination, social influence and group behavior, romantic relationships, aggressive behavior, helping behavior, and applied social psychology. Throughout the course, you will be encouraged to think about how research in social psychology can shed light on events going on around the world and in your own lives.

Consciousness and the Philosophy of Mind GS PY PM 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course introduces the students to the contemporary debate within the philosophy of mind about the nature of consciousness. Central questions will be how we can describe and study consciousness, whether consciousness may be associated with local or global brain activity, whether there are specific aspects of conscious experience that cannot be explained by natural sciences, whether it is possible to re-create an artificial consciousness, and the relationship between consciousness in humans and animals. The course is divided into three parts. The first part will focus on several definitions of the very concept of consciousness, from both a historical and a theoretical standpoint. In the second part, we will examine, with reference to contemporary authors, several proposals that have been advanced either to place consciousness within the framework of natural sciences or to defend it from any kind of scientific analysis: 20 reductionism, materialist and functionalist eliminativism, dualism, epiphenomenalism, mysterianism, and enactivism. Finally, we will turn to what makes human consciousness so special. We will discuss the interplay between consciousness and language; we will compare human consciousness with the cognitive abilities showed by apes; and we will discuss Artificial Intelligence and the cognitive robotics’ goal of implementing consciousness into machines. Students will be confronted with the ethical issues connected to the topics above.

Psychology of Crime GS PY PC 405 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For the description see CJ CJ PC 405 VOLOUNTEER PROJECTS (VP) Volunteer Project 1 GS VP VP 200 1 semester credit (50 volunteer hours) This unique project provides the opportunity of an unpaid, parttime volunteer project with local non-for-profit organisations or other community associations and institutions. Students will be supervised and have regular meetings with their volunteer co-ordinator during the period of their project. Students must complete a journal and reflection paper on their experience. Volunteer Project 2 GS VP VP 201 2 semester credits (100 volunteer hours) For description see PS VP VP 200. this section may only be taken during the Fall or Spring semester. Volunteer Project 3 GS VP VP 202 3 semester credits (150 volunteer hours) For description see PS VP VP 200. this section may only be taken during the Fall or Spring semesters.


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SCHOOL OF ITALIAN STUDIES (IS) DEPARTMENT  OF ITALIAN LANGUAGE (IT) Italian Language Beginning I IS IT IB101 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course develops basic conversation, reading and writing skills. Equal focus will be given to grammatical structures, vocabulary and conversation skills. Students will develop a vocabulary that will enable them to engage in simple but useful everyday conversations, thus enhancing and supporting their Italian experience. After taking this course, students will be able to express themselves in the Present tense, Passato Prossimo and to use both nouns and adjectives in the correct form with reference to gender and number. Emphasis will be given to oral expression of practical vocabulary and newly acquired grammar structures. this level is for absolute beginner students who have never studied Italian before.

Italian Language Intermediate IS IT II 250 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This level is for those students who already have an active knowledge of elementary language structures (i.e. the expression of past actions and events, the discussion of future plans), who can communicate simple and routine tasks, discuss familiar and routine topics and describe his/her background and who can understand clear standard speech on familiar matters regularly encountered in work, school, leisure, etc. after taking this course, students will be able to use more complex pronouns both in spoken and written Italian and will have a basic grasp of Subjunctive and all four tenses. Prerequisites: two semesters of Italian language or equivalent, the last course of which should have been taken in the last academic year. Students must take the Italian language Placement test.

Italian Language Intermediate I IS IT IA 301 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) This course builds on and extends fundamental skills developed in the beginner course. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency skills and integration of language and culture through more extensive reading their skills in the use of all verb tenses acquired at the Intermediate levels. Prerequisites: Four semesters of Italian language or equivalent, the last course of which should have been taken in the last academic year. 21 Students must take the Italian language Placement test. Advanced Conversation IS IT AC 451 Course taught in Italian for majors/minors and advanced language students 3 semester credits (45 hours)

This course offers students the opportunity to develop skills in speaking and interacting in the Italian language through a variety of materials and methods which focus on an understanding of cultural and linguistic contexts. This approach will also target the expanding of vocabulary and a review of the grammatical constructs which have proven to be an impediment to the oral mastery of the language. The content of the course will be modelled to the speakers interests and abilities, and will include readings intended to provide a foundation for contrasting Italian culture with the students’ respective culture. Oral presentations and constant in-class participation are fundamental elements of this course. Pre-requisite: 4 semesters of previous Italian language experience

DEPARTMENT OF ITALIAN CULTURE (IC) Made in Italy. The Symbols of Italian Identity IS IC MI 315 3 semester credits (45 hours) Italy occupies a prominent place in world’s culture, history, and thought. This course will consider the history and practices of consumption in Italy, and the consumption of goods, products and services that have been encoded as ‘Italian’ outside the country itself. It analyses aspects of consumption (broadly defined) through a social, cultural, artistic and anthropological approach. Symbols of the ‘Italian-ness’ may include themes such as the transition to a consumer society, investigating areas such as advertising, fashion, industrial design, food culture and sport; and the impact of consumption in processes such as Italian identity formation and the construction of gender roles. The course includes two field trips, one to the Museum of Ferrari car factory and one to the Museum of Vespa scooter company.

‘Dalla terra alla tavola’: Italian landscape and food culture of the many ‘Italies’ IS IC FC 305 3 semester credits (45 hours) After an introduction to the geography of Italy and to the cultural significance of the value of food in Italy as a physical pleasure and a form of socialization, the course will analyze the creation of the many and different agrarian landscapes that characterize the peninsula, according to its physical morphology and the raise of the local ‘cultures’. Different agrarian landscapes and diverse cultures have generated a multiform use of food across Italy for generations, expressing itself in the ample range of ways to prepare food and dishes. The course will show the link between the geographical position of most of the regions of Italy and the creation of regional dishes, which have made Italy renown worldwide. Particular attention will be devoted to the development of the Italian food culture, and students will be introduced (even with practical visits to wine-farms, old mills, new food factories and field trips in the countryside of central Italy) to experience the ‘invisible’ thread that still links the soil resources of any Italian area to its products and food.


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History of Italian Cinema and Society IS IC IC 315 3 semester credits (45 hours)

Under the Tuscan Sun. An overview of Tuscany IS IC OT 305 3 semester credits (45 hours)

The history of Italian cinema and Italian society as represented in film. Post-war Italian cinema offers a valuable range of films to study. Italian cinema within the context of world cinema to gain an understanding of realism as an aesthetic convention as well as insight into Italian culture and ways of thinking. We will examine some key moments and issues in contemporary Italian history and society and the way they were represented in Italian cinema: - The attempt of building a new national identity after the fall of Fascism; - The North South divide, the “economic miracle” and its reflections on Italian society; - Contemporary changes in the Italian Society. The course will pay special attention to the key periods in Italian Cinema of Neorealism and the Commedia all’italiana and to the most important movie directors such as Rossellini, De Sica and Fellini. Recent developments in Italian cinema will also be taken into consideration.

The first part of the course is focused on the characteristics of the region. Particular emphasis is given to the strict relationship between the geography and history of the region, from the Etruscans, the first inhabitants of the region, to modern Tuscany. We will focus on the rural heritage of Tuscany, in particular on its influence on the society and economy of the region. In the second part the course we will stress on the main historical and cultural features of Tuscan cities (Florence, Siena, Arezzo, Pisa, Livorno and Lucca) and on the relevant areas or the region (Mugello, Casentino, Garfagnana, Chianti and Maremma). The main economic characteristics (craftsmanship, industry and tourism) of the region will be highlighted. The last part of the course is centered on the importance of the perception of Tuscany and of Tuscan landscapes by the Englishspeaking culture from the 19th century onwards. Some excerpts from British and American travelers and residents in Tuscany will be read and commented in class.

Italo-American identity IS IC IA 325 3 semester credits (45 lecture hours) For description see SC SB IA 325 The Literature of Unified Italy: The Cultural Poetics of Sicily IS IC CP 455 3 semester credits (45 hours) This course will focus on the literary production of the region of Sicily in the context of united Italy. Sicilian-born authors since the unification have made major contributions to the Italian literary landscape that reach far beyond Italy and even Europe. The works of authors such as Verga, Lampedusa, Sciascia, and Camilleri represent a social and cultural reality that provides a counter-history of a nation, one which has both horrified and fascinated readers for over a century. In this course, students will learn about the problems Sicily has faced and, in many cases, still faces today. They will also analyze the narrative techniques of the authors in order to appreciate and understand the literary value of these works. And most importantly they will discern a distinctly Sicilian literary culture which continues to survive against the backdrop of an Italian national identity.

A Social History of Italian Migration IS IC IM 405 3 semester credits (45 hours) The course examines the history of Italian22settlements in Europe, the U.S., Canada, selected Latin American countries and Australia in the context of Italian migration in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course is a socio-historical exploration of migratory patterns of Italians abroad during the last 150 years and consequent issues of identity and integration, both filtered through an interdisciplinary method that – beyond history and sociology – approaches also anthropology, geography and psychology. Students will investigate these topics from a wide variety of sources, historical and sociological texts as well as literature, media reports and films.

Dante and Medieval Culture IS IC DC 405 3 semester credits (45 hours) This course is designed to be an introduction to the important aspects of medieval thought and culture through the study of the life and works of the most important figure of the Italian Middle Ages, Dante Alighieri. There will be particular focus on the Inferno, the first canticle of his epic poem known as the Divine Comedy. The exiled Florentine’s masterpiece, arguably the greatest work of Western Literature, still inspires its readers after seven centuries, and the issues it illustrates continue to be relevant in the 21st century. It is also one of our most important sources for an understanding of the Middle Ages. The course consists of a historical and cultural introduction to the Middle Ages, and will then concentrate on the life of Dante, including an overview of his literary career leading up to the Comedy. The reading selections will consist mostly of canti from Inferno, but will also include some from Purgatory and Paradise. The critical essays will supplement the reading of Dante’s poem and will aid in contextualizing elements of medieval society. The final part of the course will provide perspective on both the Comedy and the period by introducing the other major cultural figures of the 14th century: Petrarca and Boccaccio.

Women, History and Culture in Italy IS IC WH 405 3 semester credits (45 hours) The course surveys the changing roles and perceptions of women in the italian history and culture from ancient times to the present. The relatively recent political enfranchisement of women and the rise of feminist thought and theory offer a framework and a destination. Students examine a wide variety of exemplary roles (wife, mother, priestess, nun, etc.) and individuals. In conclusion, students encounter constructions of women present in today’s culture and media, and still unresolved issues. Courses taught in Italian for majors/minors and advanced language students:


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The Civilization of Italy IS IC CI 425 3 semester credits (45 hours) This course offers an introduction to the important questions of Italian history and culture from the Italian Unification to the present through the emblematic works (literature, film) of cultural production. In the first part of the course, there is particular emphasis on the dramatic events leading up to and including the Second World War, while the second half will examine the phenomena which have characterized the Italian Republic, including the economic boom, the rise of terrorism, and the consolidation of the mafia into the fabric of society. More contemporary issues will also be studied, such as immigration, the dynamics of the European Union, and the crisis of Italian youth.

20th Century Italian Literature IS IC IL 465 3 semester credits (45 hours) The course examines the literary movements which have characterized the 20th century in Italy. The historical and stylistic developments of both poetry and prose will be the focus of the course, which will consist of an analysis of the most emblematic works and authors of the period: from D’Annunzio and Pascoli to Calvino and Pasolini. The final part of the course will include still developing movements, such as postmodern and detective fiction, which lead into the 21st century.

INTERNSHIPS Internship at Caffè Letterario IS IN CL 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. Students who engage on an internship with the Cafe will be working with the cultural programme (concerts, book launches, readings) organised by and for this Cafe that operates in the Florentine tradition of an artists’ and writers’ meeting place. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship at a Library in Florence 23 IS IN LF 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. If you think that you may wish one day to work as a librarian, this is a placement that will allow you to find out whether you are suited since you will be working directly with librarians, teachers, scholars and the general public. Great to use your interpersonal and language skills and you will also come across a wide range of books you will want to read in future.

Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship at Accademia della Crusca IS IN AC 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. The Accademia della Crusca is one of Italy’s most important linguistic associations, and one of its oldest (it was founded in 1583). Prospective interns can collaborate with a member of the Academy on one of the ongoing linguistic or cultural projects, or they can do research on a specific element of the Italian language’s historical development. Candidates must be proficient in Italian and have an interest in the history of the Italian language. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.

Internship at Casa D’Anna Editrice IS IN DE 450 3 semester credits (150 Internship hours) Unpaid part-time professional experience under the supervision of an experienced professional. IAF students with an interest in learning about the publication process may apply for an internship with the D’Anna publishing house, which has been an important presence in the field of scholastic publications in Florence for over 50 years. Interns can assist in one of the many areas of the sector, depending on their skills, experience, and goals. Candidates must submit a resume in advance of their arrival to Italy, and they must have a basic knowledge of Italian language. Students must attend the pre-internship seminar sessions as well as all the scheduled meetings with the mentor/supervisor. A daily journal is required, signed by the internship supervisor, with detailed descriptions of tasks and experience. Summary and evaluation reports are required.


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