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Tonie cox LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO TONIE COX ; PO BOX 31731 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94131, (650) 714-1936, E-mail

: toniecox@icloud.com, Digital portfolio : http://issuu.com/tonie_cox/docs/portfolio


PRIME CONSULTANT

PRIME CONSULTANT

LANDSCAPE PLAN GENERAL NOTES

COPYRIGHT 2013 IBI GROUP

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CONSULTANT

S8 --360 langton street, suite 102 san francisco, ca 94103 t: (415) 863-7800 f: (415) 863-7900 tanakadesign.com

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ARTISTS REPLACEMENT SPACE

PROJECT

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THE SHIPYARD HUNTERS POINT

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102 HORNE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, 94124

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MULCH-ONLY WHERE GROUND IS DISTURBED

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ARCHITECTURE PLANNING

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San Jose

160 W. Santa Clara St.,Suite 800 San Jose, CA 95113 408.924.0811 fax: 408.924.0844

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360 langton street, suite 102 san francisco, ca 94103 t: (415) 863-7800 f: (415) 863-7900 tanakadesign.com

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ARCHITECTURE PLANNING

San Jose

160 W. Santa Clara St.,Suite 800 San Jose, CA 95113 408.924.0811 fax: 408.924.0844

F C A L I FO

360 langton street, suite 102 san francisco, ca 94103 t: (415) 863-7800 f: (415) 863-7900 tanakadesign.com

Signature Renewal Date Date

ARTISTS REPLACEMENT SPACE

ARTISTS REPLACEMENT SPACE

102 HORNE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, 94124

102 HORNE AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, 94124

THE SHIPYARD HUNTERS POINT

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FLAT PANEL DRAIN

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ONE SANSOME STREET, SUITE 3200 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104 PHONE: (415) 995-1772 FAX: (415) 995-1778 www.lennarurban.com

COPYRIGHT:

360 langton street, suite 102 san francisco, ca 94103 t: (415) 863-7800 f: (415) 863-7900 tanakadesign.com

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Any reproduction or distribution for any purpose other than authorized by IBI Group is forbidden.

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GALVEZ AVENUE

ONE SANSOME STREET, SUITE 3200 SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94104 PHONE: (415) 995-1772 FAX: (415) 995-1778 www.lennarurban.com

COPYRIGHT: Any reproduction or distribution for any purpose other than authorized by IBI Group is forbidden.

E D A RCH NS I D CAR TN

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160 W. Santa Clara St.,Suite 800 San Jose, CA 95113 408.924.0811 fax: 408.924.0844

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No. C6564

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ARCHITECTURE PLANNING

A. ALL UNDERGROUND UTILITIES SHALL BE LOCATED BEFORE START OF WORK. B. ALL GRADES SHALL BE APPROVED BY THE ENGINEER PRIOR TO PLANTING OF ANY PLANT MATERIALS. C. CONTRACTOR SHALL LAYOUT TREES, SHRUBS AND GROUNDCOVERS AS SHOWN ON THE PLANS. LAYOUT OF PLANT MATERIALS, WHILE STILL IN CONTAINERS, SHALL BE APPROVED BY THE OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE PRIOR TO INSTALLATION OF ANY PLANTS. D. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE REPAIR AND REPLACEMENT OF ANY DAMAGE OR DESTRUCTION TO EXISTING PLANT MATERIAL AND TO RESTORE IT TO ITS ORIGINAL CONDITION TO THE SATISFACTION OF THE OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE. CONTRACTOR SHALL PROVIDE THE SAME PLANT MATERIALS IN MATURE SIZES. E. REFER TO SPECIFICATIONS FOR SOIL AMENDMENTS, FERTILIZER AND ADDITIONAL PLANTING INFORMATION. F. TREE, SHRUB AND GROUNDCOVER AREAS SHALL RECEIVE WEED CONTROL TREATMENT AS SPECIFIED IN THE SPECIFICATIONS. G. UPON RECEIPT OF "NOTICE TO PROCEED,” THE CONTRACTOR SHALL ORDER PLANT MATERIAL TO INSURE ADEQUATE QUANTITIES AND SIZES OF PLANT MATERIAL WILL BE AVAILABLE. COPY OF THE NURSERY INVOICE SHALL BE SUBMITTED TO THE OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE. H. ALL PLANTS SHALL BE OF THE GENUS, SPECIES, VARIETY, CULTIVAR, AND SIZES AS SHOWN ON THE PLANS. UNDER NO CONDITION, WILL THERE BE ANY SUBSTITUTION OF PLANTS OR SIZES FOR THOSE LISTED ON THE PLANS, EXCEPT WITH THE EXPRESS WRITTEN CONSENT OF THE OWNER'S REPRESENTATIVE. I. ALL PLANTS SHALL BE TRUE TO NAME, AND ONE OF EACH BUNDLE OR LOT SHALL BE TAGGED WITH THE NAME AND SIZE OF THE PLANT, IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE STANDARDS OF PRACTICE RECOMMENDED BY THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF NURSERYMEN. J. AFTER PLANTING IS COMPLETE, FURNISH AND SPREAD THE SPECIFIED MULCH TO 4" MINIMUM DEPTH OVER ENTIRE PLANTED AREA. QUANTITY OF MULCH SHALL BE THE CONTRACTOR'S RESPONSIBILITY. SUBMIT SAMPLE PRIOR TO DELIVERY TO THE PROJECT SITE. K. ALL PLANTING AREA FOR TREES, SHRUBS AND GROUNDCOVER SHALL RECEIVE AMENDED IMPORT TOPSOIL, AS DETERMINED IN A HORTICULTURAL SOILS REPORT BASED ON THE SPECIFICATIONS. CONTRACTOR SHALL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR SUBMITTING SOIL SAMPLES TO A QUALIFIED HORTICULTURAL TESTING LABORATORY AND FORWARDING THE REPORT TO THE ENGINEER FOR REVIEW AND APPROVAL. L. CALIPER OF TREES SHALL BE MEASURED 6" ABOVE FINISH GRADE. M. ALL TREES SHALL BE PLANTED A MINIMUM OF EIGHT (8) FEET FROM PAVEMENT EDGES, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED OR SHOWN. IF TREE IS PLANTED WITHIN 8 FEET FROM PAVEMENT EDGE, INSTALL ROOT BARRIER PER THE PLANTING DETAILS. N. QUANTITY OF PLANTS TO BE INSTALLED SHALL BE AS DESIGNATED NUMERICALLY ON THE PLANS. FINAL INSPECTION OF TREES AND SHRUBS SHALL BE CONDUCTED PRIOR TO PLANTING BY THE ENGINEER DURING ONE SITE VISIT. UPON THE DELIVERY OF ALL PLANT MATERIAL TO THE SITE, AND AT LEAST 5 WORKING DAYS PRIOR TO THE SITE VISIT, THE CONTRACTOR SHALL REQUEST THE PLANT INSPECTION.

MATCHLINE L2.01

MATCHLINE L2.02

ARCHITECTURE PLANNING

San Jose

160 W. Santa Clara St.,Suite 800 San Jose, CA 95113 408.924.0811 fax: 408.924.0844

Project The scope of the Bayview / Hunters Point Artist’s Replacement Building project is; site, planting, and irrigation design, and construction documentation. This is an on-going consulting project; I’m a subconsultant under the landscape architect. My role is construction documentation and visualization. These documents should be considered as process work, not finished presentation documents.

THE SHIPYARD HUNTERS POINT

DETAILS: IRRIGATION

L1.03


CAD & Rendering


LUM ROOFDECK

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

Solutions

The 4 Large skylights that bring light into the studio below currently have dated bubble style tops. The skylights cannot change in size or shape.

The adjacent living space has a bold aesthetic with an

Relate the inner and outer spaces though the repeating themes of shadow, color, and materials.

Create a dog run for a tiny French bulldog

overall modern feel. The rustic/industrial materials range from exposed concrete, to reclaimed wood, and local art. The client is willing to experiment. Consistent sunlight throughout the day.

Incorporate an existing pyramidal metal sculpture into the design.

Sidewalls offer wind protection and privacy

Create seating for parties that wont requiring storage when not in use.

Existing decking is in excellent condition and can be incorporated into the redesign.

Limited budget

Drainage systems are already in place

Shadows are cast by metalwork of the new roof deck skylight covers, which replace the current bubble style covers. The covers are flat to serve as party seating as needed. Additional party seating is provided in the form of colorful poufs and carved wooden stools which can remain outdoors. The palette of lime green, metallics, and earth tones will relate directly to the interior space; plum is used to compliment the lime interior wall. The materials are a mixture of inexpensive industrial materials like perforated metals, finishes like paint and acid bath on corrugated metal, existing artwork, and new pieces.


East wall

A fenced dog play area with decomposed granite flooring

Existing corrugated metal wall will receive an acid bath to match the distressed industrial look of the North Wall.

Lime and plum colored fabric seating poufs, and carved wooden stools

An elevated wire line will be strung front to back to match the West Wall elevation. Bunches of dried grasses will hang from the line to screen unwanted views. The laundry line references the building’s history as a Chinese laundry.

South / Entry wall

Five elliptical sconces provide lighting

A retractable awning above the doorway provides protection from winter rains

Moss graffiti, featuring Chinese characters, provides a focal point near the entryway. This element will only be seen from the outdoors

Central area

Perforated metal skylight covers double as party seating, and provide dappled shade to office below

Existing sculpture integrated into central skylight

North / Back wall Existing corrugated metal wall will receive an acid bath to add color and texture for a distressed industrial look Large wire mesh shade structure anchored at the back corners, covering 25% of the site will provide respite from summer sun. Night-blooming Ipomoea alba and Epiphyllum oxypetalum will cover the structure to provide visual interest at night, particularly during the dramatic nightly bloom A portable bar tucks into the corner when not in use

WEST wall Mural of the Hong Kong skyline painted on existing concrete wall

residential

LUM ROOfDECK Materials & Furnishings

Five elliptical sconces provide lighting


Section: West Wall

communication Design at its best is visual communication. My client Jon, is a practicing architect, so his aesthetic is extremely well developed. His home and office communicate that he is a risk taker, and believes that design should be an active process. He values natural materials and the beauty that can come with the patina of age.

My goal is an outdoor living space that feels like a bolder version of the existing spaces. At our initial meeting Jon had mentioned that this was the prime entertainment space for both his home and office. He wanted something that worked with the other spaces but with a higher energy level.

His design aesthetic is rustic industrial. It mixes weathered wood, with leather, concrete, and fabric. The contrast of saturated colors accents the muted grays and browns. The building is located in the Mission District, and had originally been a Chinese laundry; he wants to acknowledge the cultural identity of the building while maintaining his own.

Mural Inspiration: The Hong Kong Skyline

I combined Jon’s love of materials and textures, and added the bold colors of the Mission neighborhood with echoes of the former Chinese laundry to create this roof deck entertainment space.


residential

Plants Ipomoea alba

Epiphyllum oxypetalum

Astelia chathamica


Site plan Three layers of concentric circles form the Community Garden and Orchard. A row of raised planting beds is flanked by two rows of fruit and nut trees. The central rows allow for easy access and harvesting, but also invites visitors to stroll through.

The Bouldering Park introduces a natural area as well as recreational space.

The Relaxation Park features brick viewing terraces and a concert lawn. The terraces and lawn can be used for public events, picnicking, and passive recreation.

The neighboring buildings are primarily university office buildings and laboratories. Casual drop-in recreation is a practical option for this population. Bouldering requires very little equipment and can be done during a lunch break or after work.

The Geyser Plaza is formed by a radial paving pattern with a series of interactive geyser fountains leading to a central water feature. Two rows of trees lead to the water feature as well. The water can be turned off leaving a large flexible use plaza.

UCSF Commons Park

The Third Street Light Rail stops at the entryway.

The Adult Fitness park offers casual recreational programming. A jogging track forms the center ring, radiating from it are small mini parks with lawns for stretching with a par course interspersed. Just beyond the par course is the Tai Chi plaza

The Aquatic Garden is comprised of two ponds surrounded by a nature trail and aquatic planting beds. It is a secluded area that provides habitat and a place to interact with nature.

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

Solutions

No visual connection between individual parks

Community identity is not yet established providing an opportunity to facilitate a sense of community through casual use programming

Create wind breaks at opposing ends of the commons

New, mixed use neighborhood , primarily commercial, some residential with no established identity Modern buildings feel cold and industrial, no connection to nature

Growing neighborhood workforce falls within a narrow demographic; active adult professionals

Wind blows down central axis

Direct access to larger community through the Third Street Light Rail which passes through the park

Both the park and the surrounding community are rectilinear in design, with no visual break

Provide wind breaks for comfort Neighborhood site furnishings are established and in good condition, reuse possible Sunny most of the year, with no fog

Add natural areas to enliven the site, and provide a habitat corridor Establish a community garden and orchard to facilitate interaction Link destination parks using a central pathway Introduce activity for lunchtime and after work use through drop-in style programming: bouldering park, jogging track, par course, and Tai Chi plaza. Add opportunities for recreation through flexible program areas: concert lawn and viewing areas, geyser fountain plaza, and ponds surrounded by a nature trail


Tonie Cox, Landscape Designer

Urban Park

Key

Commons Park, Mission Bay San Francisco, CA

Community Garden & Orchard Water Features

Program Diagram

Fitness

Entertainment

Primary Pathway

Circulation Diagram

Access Points Circulation Within Program Areas Decomposed Granite

Pavers (multiple types)

Hardscape Plan

1/2� Gravel

Brick

Above: Section elevation of bouldering park Aquatic Garden: Nature Trail Ponds

Site Plan

Bouldering Park

Adult Fitness Park: Par Course Jogging Track Tai Chi Plaza

Entertainment Park: Concert Lawn Terraced Seating Structure

Interactive Geyser Fountains Community Garden & Orchard

Above: Exploded plan diagrams Below: Area map and land use analysis .

Below: Elevations and axonometrics of bouldering park and geyser park


america’s cup village

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

Solutions

Small, scattered entrances, no sense of arrival

Excellent views

Create a grand entrance at Fillmore Street

Sediment build-up along the shoreline necessitates costly dredging

Waterfront access

Restructure parking to a less dominant configuration

Opportunity to connect to the Bay Trail

Create an entertainment pier to increase waterfront access

Waterfront access is private in some areas, underdeveloped in others, with vary disparate user groups

Natural sediment controls can be created using existing landforms

Bland topography, with drainage issues; parking areas dominate the southern edge of the site

Fillmore Street intersection provides a natural entry point

Cold offshore winds

Leave a legacy of 34th America’s Cup to the city of San Francisco

Establish a public sailing academy to bring the public into the sailing community Enhance topography to create program “rooms” Add guest docks to East end of the Marina Green


SITE ANALYSIS The Marina Green is an unusual site in that it is a very public place, surrounded by very private spaces. It has spectacular views, and on occasion, spectacular weather to match. The majority of the time it is sunny, but windy and cold. The users are a mixture of local joggers, sports leagues, yacht club members and visitors, and tourists on rented bicycles. It’s a study in contrasts, changeable weather interacting with a constantly shifting population. The 34th America’s Cup may be the perfect opportunity to join these disparate elements. The America’s Cup has the opportunity to leave a lasting legacy on the neighborhood as the nearby Palace of Fine Arts did after the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exposition. By creating public spaces that are woven into the community the Marina Green can continue to be a public sports venue, but with the addition of a public water sports academy to complement the private sailing facilities. Evolving beaches, which will expand over time, will allow for direct launch of small watercraft.

Climate Conditions

An entertainment village extending from a new grand entrance at Fillmore Street will connect the Chestnut Street entertainment area to a new pier featuring a restaurant, outdoor picnic area, and public boat slips. The Bay Trail will connect to the pier as well. Rather than a park surrounded by a private community, the new America’s Cup Village will blur the line between public and private space.

Site Analysis: Acrylic on Wood Panel

Waterfront

Site Analyses: Climate, Public vs. Private Space, Neighbors vs. Visitors


Model: Looking South / Inland towards the Fillmore Street Pier Model Detail: Evolving Beach Study: Evolving Beach


The San Francisco West Harbor has always had a problem with sediment build up. The solution has been to dredge periodically, at great expense and inconvenience. Currently there are makeshift solutions in place called revetments, rip rap is built up to catch sand forming a wave break. An example can be seen in the first photo taken just outside the Golden Gate Yacht Club. My solution is a permanent structure that works with the natural movement of sediment rather than against it. In coastal resort towns it is very common to build a groyne, as seen in the second image, to trap sediment thus enlarging your private beach area. It is often considered beach stealing and can cause problems among neighbors as well as areas further down the beach that may not get the necessary replenishment of sand. When used correctly, they can calm sediment movement.

Existing Sediment Build-Up

Case Study: Groynes to Control Sediment Build-Up

In the third photo you can see a build-up of sand the left of the Saint Francis Yacht Club, and on the north side of the jetty where it forms a curve. The image was taken on a windy day and you can see the wind bringing waves directly toward the shoreline. Currently some sand is trapped in those two locations, but the rest moves around the tip of the jetty and into the harbor. On the facing page there is a sketch of a small egg shaped groyne that nests into the curve of the jetty providing a wave break and more surface area for sand to collect. The model shows the relative size of the structure, which would connect directly to the jetty. This would keep a great deal more sand on the bay side of the jetty and away from the harbor. In addition it would form a larger and more accessible beachhead. The area would be excellent for wind and kite surfing if there were more surface area as I have proposed. The new beachhead is a part of the water sports academy, intended for advanced students as well as the general public.

Waterfront

letting nature take its course


design elements Public water sports academy featuring dinghy launch, protected aquatic classroom, and beginner through advanced beach launches

Grand entrance from Fillmore Street leading to entertainment pier

Enhanced green space with naturalistic program rooms

Entertainment pier featuring large restaurant, public picnic area, sail up access, and direct access to the Bay Trail

Expanded use of the wave organ peninsula through the use of evolving beaches, to capture sediment and prevent shoals, which will enlarge the beach area allowing for increased public use Public moorings on the wave attenuator to expand usage


waterfront


bryant plaza

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

Solutions

Oddly-shaped triangular lot, with parking lot on SW border

Central location - a 6-minute walk from the Transbay Terminal, along the Embarcadero

Create a pedestrian and cyclist hub between the Transbay Terminal and Embarcadero

Windy, and sometimes cold

No established identity, currently a parking lot

Establish a Bay Area Bike Share location

Bland topography,

Large pedestrian population

Transient user groups

View Corridors to the Bay and Bay Bridge

Provide a dining pavilion for picnicking and food vendor use

No community identity

Sunny throughout the day

Install a cluster of sculptures to establish both a focal point and a sense of place Add a wide pedestrian boulevard as a connector between the Embarcadero and the city Screen negative views using rows of trees Swaths of lawn are available as unprogrammed space


bryant plaza, an auto-free transportation hub

A group of cyclists riding though tall grass was the inspiration for my cycling sculpture. The proportions are exaggerated, two times the height of a seated rider and two and a half times as long, to cause an optical illusion. From a distance the riders would appear to be in scale, and riding quickly through the grass.

At the corner of Bryant Street and the Embarcadero there is a parking lot, three blocks from the The Transbay Terminal which is scheduled to open in 2017. The Embarcadero is directly to the east leading to popular attractions to both the north and south.

The sculpture grouping is comprised of five metal sculptures coated in a vibrant red marine grade paint. Each sculpture is mounted in a different height of grass so the group appears to be riding through ribbons of grass.

Some of these destinations are within walking distance but many are not, although they are within a comfortable cycling distance. Consequently Bryant Plaza is an excellent site for a hub in the Bay Area’s Bike Share program. It would serve as a connection between local trains, ferries, and walking routes.

Hardscape Hardscape became an important part of my the design because Bryant Plaza is both physically and aesthetically about movement. Each program area has a distinct style of hardscape to define its boundaries. The main pedestrian boulevard has a circular poured-in-place concrete pattern at an enlarged scale. The dining pavilion features a red concrete aggregate with the appearance of terrazzo. Concrete railroad ties make up the secondary pathway, which intersects the main pathway. The curved pathways overlap for a brief moment and then curve away again.

inspiration for Seating sculpture The sculptural seating area is constructed of stacked stone supporting a wooden facing which forms the seating area. It is located nest to the dining pavilion; the piece is to be sited to provide views of the Bay Bridge from the seating area. Like a crumbling stone wall it rises from the ground and then slopes back down to meet it again.

Urban park

inspiration for bicycle sculpture


Longitudinal section

Eastern edge along the Embarcadero. The red bicycle sculptures are visible through the trees. The sculptural seating structure is to the right, facing the Bay Bridge. SITE plan

The plan originally included a small triangular lawn across Bryant street. Combining the two parks felt a bit forced to me, especially considering that the smaller park was directly in front of an office building, so I decided to treat them as two distinct spaces. Only the larger space is presented as Bryant Plaza. southwest from the embarcadero

This view is from the sidewalk of the Embarcadero looking across the dining pavilion at the main pedestrian boulevard and the bicycle sculptures beyond.


Large trees are used to screen the neighboring parking lot.

looking southwest

In the foreground you can see the secondary pathway intersect the main pedestrian boulevard.

urban park

section b, looking southwest


Existing Conditions

While the neighborhood is popular with some San Francisco residents, many others avoid it due to years of low-level crime and industrial blight.

Tonie Cox Studio L4 Warm Water Cove Arts District Idea Map & Program Images

It has excellent waterfront access, but the water itself is very polluted from years of industrial use. Water levels in the area are expected to rise 3-4’ within the next 50 years. Overall the area has tremendous potential. My concept combines the site’s natural attributes with the area’s growing cultural identity, the opportunity for sustainable development, and connections to transit and trails.

warm water cove

community planning

Warm Water Cove is located in the Dog Patch neighborhood of San Francisco. It’s currently a park that adjoins an industrial lot; it’s frequented by musicians, the homeless, neighborhood residents and local workers. The surrounding neighborhood is industrial with very little public access, consequently the park is under utilized. Located in one of the warmest neighborhoods in San Francisco, Warm Water Cove also has expansive views of the East Bay. The neighborhood has steadily improved and is becoming more popular among residents looking for more affordable housing. Area residents are often creatives who moved in looking for the live/work opportunities that the light industrial zoning provides.

Design goals

built environment

Cultural environment

Natural environment

Provide live / work townhouse style housing for local visual and performing artists

Use existing rock sculptures as inspiration for new interactive rock gardens

Offer porous entry to the neighborhood, with retail and dining space concentrated along 3rd and Illinois Streets, continuing to the waterfront

Add a cultural node to the existing artistic communities scattered throughout the eastern neighborhoods.

Reintroduce natural plant and wildlife habitat. Use tire tide pools as inspiration for natural tide pools, and establish a tide pool park for both climate change education and play. Reclaim the shoreline as a natural space by reconnecting the northern edge Promote the return of wildlife using stylized wetlands areas Make the Bay more accessible by using a filtration planting system to reduce toxins Create a sustainable site that anticipates sea level rise

Create a series of graduated rooflines that maintain sightlines to views and draw visitors toward the shoreline. Add a light rail station to connect the neighborhood to surrounding areas

Provide a dining pavilion for picnicking and food vendors; and a grass amphitheater as a performing arts venue Create a network of multi-use trails connecting the SF Bike Route and the Bay Trail from Illinois St. to Warm Water Cove

Provide hotel accommodations

Introduce the spiritual center of the site to the general public through a mixed-use public plaza

Establish a marshland research and housing center to provide opportunity for environmental innovation.

Facilitate collaboration through the interactive Mural Linear Park, a public exhibit space for casual additive art


Sacred Space Despite it’s location in a deserted looking industrial lot, Warm Water Cove attracts local artists and musicians who use it as a creative space. There are sometimes parties with live music and an informal annual music event is held there. The activity seems to center around the ever-changing rock garden. Sculptures are

Rising Tides Sea level rise along the San Francisco coastline is inevitable. Here I explored how the coastline could be utilized but with an understanding that it would change within a generation. A greenbelt area would provide recreation space, but allow flexibility along the coastline. Regrading the coast to make the beachhead deeper would allow for an enhanced tide pool area and wading. Filtration planting would clean the water over time, but further study would

formed and reassembled continually. Nearby, tides pools are formed by discarded tires. This combination of natural and discarded elements form an unexpected artistic identity. The site has many obvious problems, but it also has so much local significance. I explored ways to honor this identity by reserving the site of the current rock garden as an area of cultural significance.

be necessary to determine toxicity levels. Another option I explored was a tidal creek, which would allow for enhanced water access with less human contact. My final plan combines elements from each approach to create an urban art community that balances the site’s history with the evolution of the local culture.

Permeable Zones By creating varying program density, the shoreline is protected as a quiet place. The site boundary along Third Street has a fairly dense concentration of retail space that faces Third Street and the light rail that passes in front of it. A pedestrian street, or wider pedestrian boulevard, allows visitors to enter the area through

the urban west edge and transition gradually into the less dense mixed-use, recreation, and shoreline areas. This gentle transition introduces the naturalistic coastline and retains a bit of the peaceful air that the area currently enjoys.


San Francisco culture is a synthesis of its rich and varied artistic history. By providing an arts community that fosters interaction among innovators, we will lay the groundwork for an arts renaissance, much like the Silicon Valley provided the foundation for technological innovation.

Details: Tide pools and interactive fountain (top) Condos (below)

Warm Water Cove Arts District Master Plan and thesis

community planning

Thesis


Total Site Area

10,240 acres

Total green space Precedent Site: Jesse Square

80%

Agriculture & Farming

22.5%

Recreation

25%

Watershed & Bioswale

30%

Water Treatment & Fisheries

.5%

Total population

40,000

Apartment Homes

15,000

Townhomes

12,000

Mixed University Housing

13,000

program

20% (1,024 Acres)

University

2.5%

Schools

1%

Transportation

2%

Mixed Use Retail

5%

Mixed Use Office / Commercial

9.5%

building types Mid Rise - Urban Village

88 Blocks

Townhomes - Brownstone Village 143 Blocks Mixed Style University Village

Boca del Rio

115 Blocks

BOCA del rio, ca One of the defining characteristics of my precedent site, Jesse Square, is its subtle use of a shift in composition that causes visitors to slow down in the center of the busy plaza. The plaza connects three areas: Yerba Buena Gardens, Union Square, and Third Street; so it’s often used as a throughway. I have used the idea of an intentional pause, or slowness, as the basis of my design. The Civic Center acts as a node serving three neighboring villages. The main plaza in the Civic Center creates a sense of importance for the space by slowing visitors just as they reach it. The use of slowness is continued throughout the master plan to foster community building. The river serves as a natural boundary to define both the main urban center and the smaller university village. Both area share a pedestrianfocused design, public transportation and bridges for vehicular traffic, link the two areas.

Within the main urban center there are two smaller villages. The first is a mixed-use medium density waterfront community for residents who prefer easy access to restaurants, shopping, and the arts. This village is an auto-free zone accessible by train, bicycle, and foot. Train access is no more than .5 miles, a ten minute walk, from any part of the urban village. A system of shared community bicycles is available for longer trips.


urban riverfront community

Boca del Rio, CA

Townhome & University Village Communities

urban planning

Boca del Rio, CA


CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

Solutions

Annie Alley is situated in a busy urban area with no plant life.

Yerba Buena Gardens is nearby, providing access to local wildlife.

These two montages depict the relationship between the surrounding arts community and the wildlife that lives among them. The inspiration came from a hummingbird tattoo on a woman’s shoulder, the hummingbird became animated as she moved.

Pavement and sidewalks cover the entire footprint of the site.

Annie alley

The space is often used for pop-up events, but is empty the majority of the time. The Alley currently has no defining features or identity.

Visitors will be drawn from the gardens, Moscone Center, and local street traffic. The site has several arts organizations in close proximity.

The design goal is to strengthen the relationship between wildlife and humans by providing a link in the habitat corridor, utilizing vertical space to provide food and shelter for hummingbirds. Wall-mounted bird houses and feeders will attract local birds from nearby Yerba Buena Gardens. The built elements will double as public art to attract visitors and create an identity for the space. Each component will be designed by a local artist or designer. The habitat will be structured like an exhibit that visitors view from below, like to a theatrical stage.


COnceptual Design

open city manifesto

Too often we view the natural environment as a backdrop to our lives. We see it as pretty, almost decorative. It’s easy to forget that it is a community of living things and that we are a part of that community. The built environment is also treated as a stage where we conduct our lives. When it works well, we hardly notice, when it doesn’t suit our needs we are frustrated. It always seems to be us and them. This is a very dangerous way of thinking. Like a dysfunctional family we blame our environment as if it were our parents, forgetting that we are the parents now and that it is our responsibility to make our family whole. As designers we have even more responsibility than the average person, because we can do more good or cause more damage. When we alter the environment we affect everything from that site to several degrees beyond, and for many years to come. We sometimes forget how far

reaching our work is. I believe that my responsibility as a designer is much like that of an expectant parent. The first stage is planning: hoping, wishing, and preparation. Then you spend the next couple of years just trying to keep it alive. It always costs more than you expected, and you have to give up some of your dreams along the way. With any luck you watch your baby grow and mature. Sometimes it becomes something you don’t recognize, and if you’ve done your job well, you’re impressed with it. But every parent knows that there are outside influences, things that are beyond our control. It’s up to us as designers to do better than we think we need to. We have to over prepare, dream too big, and hedge our bets. It doesn’t matter if you are designing a backyard or a city; your baby is out there in the world affecting everything it

touches. Your responsibility is to make sure that you were a good parent when you had the chance. You have to anticipate the skateboarders, tourists, undesirables, nature lovers, business people, and the just plain oblivious; you have to prepare for them all. The land entrusted to you is not a canvas or a stage, but a living thing with an uncertain future. I want my work to better the ground it lives on and respect the ground it came from; environmentally, socially, and aesthetically. I want the places I design to have life and identity; and to be truly integrated into the community as a whole.


3D models

Rendered using 3D Studio Max

Corbusier Lounge, rendering only


industrial design Studio Furniture

ID case study

This custom chess table was made for a private client in Switzerland. He Wood, concrete, and glass were used to create a modern industrial wanted a table that would look like modern art, but still function as a game feel with enough warmth to fit into a residential setting. table. I designed the mosaic chess board to seem random from a distance. As you approach the mosaic squares resolve to form the grid of a chess board. The custom designed chess pieces are stored within cavities in the cast concrete table top. The chess pieces protrude at random angles to create the sense of a toppled ruin.


design

marker renderings

cool


“I like this place and could Willingly waste my time in it.� William Shakespeare

Address : PO BOX 31731 San Francisco, CA 94131 E-mail : toniecox@icloud Phone : 650.714.1936 Digital portfolio : http://issuu.com/tonie_cox/docs/portfolio

T. Cox, Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

University of California Berkeley Extension, Graduate Landscape Architecture Portfolio

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