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Landscape Architecture Final Year Studio 2011 Never Stand Still

Faculty of Built Environment


TRANSARC TRANSFORMING LANDSCAPES OF THE GLOBAL ARC

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LAURA ABBEY DAVID BAKER SAMUEL BATTERHAM GAVIN CARL ENRIQUÉ CASTILLO MICHAEL CAVANAGH SUSAN CRITHARIS RICHARD CROFT JASON CUFFE TIMOTHY DAVIDSON GEOFF DUGGAN VIVIEN FU JULIE GAVELLE ROBERT GREEN LUCY GRIEVE FRANK HALL THEA HARRIS ADAM JEFFERY CHRISTOPHER LEE JACQUELINE LEE

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ANTON LI WINNIE LUU NATHAN LYNCH SHAWNA NG CARLOS NGAN JACQUELINE ENGEL NGUYEN 82 NIKKI PHILP 84 BEILU QIAN 86 ROHIT RAMANATHAN 88 HOI KUK SIN 90 JESSICA SLADE 92 BEN STYLES 94 DEAN WARDY 96 HAYDEN WATSON 98 SAM WESTLAKE 100 DAVID WHITEWAY 102 BOWIE WONG 104 MARCO TIN WAI YIP


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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

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INTRODUCTION

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GROUP WORKS

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INDIVIDUAL WORKS

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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ALUMNI PROFILE


MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN FACULTY OF BUILT ENVIRONMENT UNSW Built Environment (BE) is focused on research and education relevant to the design, delivery and management of the 21st century city and the elements within it. This catalogue presents selected projects from our final year students in Landscape Architecture. The unprecedented level of urban growth and associated urban issues of critical significance provides the global context and distinctive knowledge framework of the UNSW BE curriculum. A distinguishing feature of our student experiences comes from our capability to focus on design, research, teaching and learning from perspectives that place emphasis on the stewardship of the built environment and the interdisciplinary dimensions from which it is formed. The strategic direction of BE is based on a faculty commitment to deliver high impact research and graduates equipped with the knowledge and practical skills required to realise sustainable urban environments of enduring cultural value. New research initiatives undertaken in the last twelve months build on the faculty’s strengths concentrating on themes that include sustainable design and development, urban typologies, people and places and emergent digital technologies. Each degree program integrates relevant research methods and The unprecedented outcomes to ensure our students understand and value lifelong learning and possess level of urban intellectual skills to enable successful growth and future careers in a global context. associated urban Your student experiences, hard work issues of critical and skills are in many ways reflected in summary form by the quality of work significance provides contained within this catalogue. On the global context behalf of the faculty I congratulate all the and distinctive students who have completed their degree program and now become our alumni. knowledge We wish you every success in your framework of the chosen field of endeavour. In many respects, UNSW BE curriculum our relationship is just beginning as we look forward to your ongoing participation in the life of our university through the many events and activities that we undertake to support research and the education of future generations of built environment graduates. Professor Alec Tzannes Dean UNSW Built Environment 5


TRANSARC TRANSFORMING LANDSCAPES OF THE GLOBAL ARC The exhibition, TransArc: Transforming Landscapes of the Global Arc, and this accompanying catalogue celebrate the accomplishments of our students in the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program’s 2011 Graduating Studio. Students in their fourth and final year have been engaged in a two-semester investigation of the middle ring suburbs north of Sydney Harbour that comprise the ‘global arc’; an area also under consideration for the proposed Epping-to-Parramatta Rail Link. In Semester 1, Professor James Weirick and Brendan Randles introduced students to the complexities of inserting major public transport infrastructure into Sydney’s suburban fabric and the attendant landscape challenges and opportunities revealed by that process. The students’ initial planning and design investigations were undertaken as group projects during which they carried out detailed site analyses and applied their understanding of contemporary urban design theory to generate master plan proposals. In Semester 2, these group projects provided the framework within which students selected a site, formulated design questions and project briefs for individual design investigations. The final semester of Graduating Studio was convened by Associate Professor Linda Corkery, assisted by Libby Gallagher and Mark Tyrrell. The projects undertaken by our students reflect the increasing range of contemporary issues landscape architects engage with in practice: regional open space planning, urban agriculture, remaking post-industrial sites, revealing and restoring urban ecologies, green infrastructure, interpreting heritage sites, reinvigorating older town centres, creating new urban precincts for living, working and playing...all vital aspects of the continual re-making of Sydney’s urban landscapes. The graduation projects presented in this catalogue demonstrate our Program’s commitment to assist each student in developing their individual creative capacity and technical acumen, determining their ethical stance on contemporary issues and, importantly, envisioning themselves as effective agents in the creation of built environments that enhance quality of life. Congratulations to the 2011 Bachelor of Landscape Architecture graduands on their achievements and best wishes for continued success and a personally rewarding career in Landscape Architecture. Linda Corkery Program Director and 2011 Graduating Studio Convener

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JESSICA SLADE JACQUELINE LEE LAURA ABBEY LUCY GRIEVE

A. Section: Plaza and Interchange at Carlingford B. Masterplan of the Epping to Parramatta Rail Link C. Rydalmere Precinct Plan D. Macquarie University Interchange E. Aerial Perspective of Telopea

Dynamic Corridors In order to stimulate change and progress in Sydney’s Mid Ring City, Dynamic Corridors proposes the introduction of the Epping to Parramatta Rail Link (EPRL): a catalyst for ecological, social and sustainable urban development. Sydney’s rail network contains a major gap in the inner and outer northwest areas of the city. The proposed EPLR in addition to new bus corridors, improved road networks and the introduction of more cycle ways, will reconnect these neighbourhoods to the wider metropolitan. True to a post-industrial landscape, many of the natural water systems are in poor condition. Dynamic Corridors attempts to revitalise these neglected water systems by utilising sensitive water management practices, including suitable housing for flood affected areas, and the construction of wetlands and bio swales to improve downstream water quality. Through ecological engagement and integrating the landscape with urban communities, Dynamic Corridors can reconnect the fragmented landscapes in the Mid Ring City. High-density development and public spaces near the train stations will accommodate this future growth. Through the implementation of these social, ecological and sustainable strategies, it is envisaged that a dynamic and vibrant corridor will emerge.

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SUSAN CRITHARIS JULIE GAVELLE HOI KUK SIN WINNIE LUU

A. Diagrams showing the three key ideas of design concept images of transitional vegetation communities B. The Masterplan C. Section of the transport hub at Telopea D. View of the Carlingford transport hub E. View of the Macquarie University Student Housing precinct

GEL.arc Our vision is to create new opportunities for people to appreciate their environment and enjoy their living spaces while increasing housing density and providing job opportunities. We have designed a diverse range of residential and commercial areas that have links with the natural world. The design will have environmental, economic and social benefits. ‘Grain Diversity’ introduces new suburbs within unique natural landscape conditions. This creates places with a variety of experiences and character. ‘Ecological Links’ seeks to create habitat by connecting fragmented vegetation communities and revitalising suburbs by creating a walkable green corridor – ‘The Groundline’. This space is achieved by moving the train line underground, utilising the existing rail corridor as passage. Suburban communities are linked within a viable extension of habitat. ‘Local Networks’ encourages links between the local network and the City of Sydney, supporting future generations by encouraging and protecting natural systems that will ultimately enhance the quality of life in a growing urban centre.

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VIVIEN FU CHRISTOPHER LEE SHAWNA NG CARLOS NGAN

A. INJECTION over time, region and global arc B. Commercial INJECTION from Macquarie University, Epping and West Epping C. Overall Masterplan D. Section illustrates the accentuated topographical assets at Carlingford E. Cultural INJECTION from Telopea, Dundas, Rydalmere and Camellia

INJECTION Once seen as ideal dwelling places free from the city’s social ills, the suburbs of the 21st century are deemed as static spaces that lack distinctive character; the conventional zoning principles fail to inspire exciting potentials. The future appears bleak, but all is not lost. The law of physics states that an opposing force must be applied to overcome inertia. Though not necessarily extravagant, this injection has to be radical to trigger the domino effect. Through detailed landscape and programmatic analysis of each suburb, one realises the potential for creating poetic and exciting landscapes is revealed inherently from the site itself. In light of this, injection is explored in 3 key scales to rethink the suburbs beyond their static-ity. Regional injection sees suburbs not as self contained entities, but transition zones, with a conscious awareness of the overall vision. The Global Arc injection explores the role of the mainspring of Sydney’s global status. Like tributaries in a river, each suburb is seen adding new volume to the arc. Acknowledging that landscapes are dynamic, the project also suggests injections over time. Are we willing to push aside stereotypical perceptions of places and promote more ambitious agendas for their futures in hope of creating livable world class cities?

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NATHAN LYNCH NIKKI PHILP HAYDEN WATSON BEN STYLES

A. Cross section showing the newly developed shopping precinct in Epping. B. Master Plan. ‘The Western Stream’ C. Integrating social and cultural networks within a grand urban precinct-Epping D. Newly erected civic centre with public open space E. Rydalmere’s new foreshore parklands linking sites key districts

REVITALISING THE WESTERN STREAM As Sydney’s population density is expected to swell dramatically in the foreseeable future, a challenge was presented as to the most productive way to incorporate the western suburbs of the city. ‘The Western Stream’ illuminates the structural integration of Sydney’s CBD with that of Parramatta, therefore strengthening the ‘Global Arc’. The key components of the project were to facilitate the Epping to Parramatta rail link, identify key destinations along the arc where landscape interventions could exploit the existing landscape character and enhance the greater communities. Historical, social and environmental issues informed much of the design process, leading to exciting new developments in Carlingford, which had to deal with a site with such a sensitive historical form. Equally exciting is the complete re-development of Rydalmere, which again required resolution to successfully integrate the new suburb with the edge of Parramatta River, the educational hub of UWS Rydalmere and create a symbiosis between the new development and that of the Parramatta CBD. ‘The Western Stream’, through the Macquarie to Parramatta rail link takes the user on the literal journey through western Sydney, revealing the hidden qualities along the Parramatta River valley rim.

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Tim Davidson Robert Green Dean Wardy Sam Westlake

A. Parramatta Rail Loop B. East Riverfront Precinct plan C. Bioregeneration / Foreshore edge / Sandown Track D. Section Epping Station E. Section East Riverfront South (Camellia)

Sustainable Ecologies City and water, infrastructure and ecology, destination and retreat: the essence and potential of the Mid Ring City resides in celebrating these multiple ecologies. Great cities and metropolitan precincts are well organised and diverse, with multiple scales, multiple routes, efficient services and amenities. Great cities work simultaneously for the local resident, the metropolitan visitor and the global traveler. Sustainable Ecologies subscribes to and manifests this view of city life. Through a carefully considered framework, Sustainable Ecologies illustrates the ability for large scale infill development to give people greater access to areas of high amenity, add to the cultural vibrancy of suburbs intersected by the rail network and encourage the pursuit of an active lifestyle. Central to this framework is the creation of the Parramatta Rail Loop and the East Riverfront which serve to amplify the capacity of Parramatta as a CBD and synthesise larger social, natural, civic and economic ecologies.

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SAMUEL BATTERHAM RICHARD CROFT THEA HARRIS ROHIT RAMANATHAN

A. Section of sunken Pennant Hills Road B. Epping – Parramatta Rail Link illustrious masterplan C. Rydalmere precinct plan: The extension of the university D. Carlingford Court plaza and train station E. Carlingford’s key elements

The Fractal City In any development the idea of maintaining sense of place as well as ‘quality of life’ at a pedestrian scale, through key design initiatives station precincts will be designed to achieve vibrant flourishing communities and avoid socio-spatial segregation. The key idea behind the creation of public domain lies within the creation of spaces which act to engage individuals whom otherwise may never come in contact as well as provide general public amenity. Through the acts of walking, cycling and catching a bus or a train we act to increase the public domain within the urban fabric. The architectural aspects are used as sculptural elements within the landscape and it is the defining elements within this such as the public domain and urban forest which generates character and creates a sense of place. The rail now rather than dividing neighborhoods is seen as a unifying community focused element seamlessly integrated into its surrounding public spaces.

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GAVIN CARL FRANK HALL ANTON LI BEILU QUIAN

A. Section of Carlingford underground station and plaza B. Global Arc Masterplan: The Urban Spine C. Precinct plan of Rydalmere D. Rydalmere town plaza adjacent to relocated train station E. Users interaction overlooking Parramatta River’s edge

The Urban Spine This proposed scheme will see the continuation of the Global Arc notion through to Parramatta and create a more comprehensive and integrated city. Through our design we will achieve: •

 new rail line joining the two cities of A Epping right through to Parramatta.

 rovide housing for over 25 000 new P residents between Epping and Parramatta as well as service 10 000 new job opportunities within the extension of the Global Arc.

 wo major spines of development T through the re-alignment of Carlingford Road and Vineyard Creek Road.

 he transformation of the two major T roads will act as green anchors for new life within the site.

 his design focuses on the two vastly T different areas found on site, from the Hawkesbury sandstone under Carlingford Road to the shales that stretch from Dundas to Camellia. It is from these cues which have formed the framework of the two urban spines of development that run through the extension of the Global Arc.

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ENRIQUÉ CASTILLO EMEN EL-SAYED JACQUELINE NGUYEN KENNY THAI BOWIE WONG

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Ville Linéaire Our mission is to generate a compelling urban landscape with environmentally sustainable designs that will globally extend the ‘Global Arc’ to Parramatta and the mid-ring city by means of sustainable transport with the light rail network. It will encourage people to have a more active healthy lifestyle and provide better linkages that will enhance the functional efficiency of the mid-ring city. The potential light rail will increase residential population along the new mid-ring helping people access jobs and services and solving congested roads. The objective of this proposal is to create a convincing urban landscape for the northern rim of the Parramatta River Valley along the alignment of the proposed Epping – Parramatta railway, envisioned as the extension of Sydney’s Global Arc while creating a city signature with the light rail service.

Camellia: Detailed Plan Ville Linéaire Masterplan Proposal for Rawson Street in Epping Proposed Town Centre in Carlingford Section of Camellia

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MICHAEL CAVANAGH JASON CUFFE GEOFF DUGGAN ADAM JEFFERY

_INFRA-COLOGY _INFRA-COLOGY provides housing for 30,000 new residents and commercial spaces for 18,000 new jobs taking into consideration a displacement of 5,000 residents and 8,000 jobs. The design proposes an integrated public transport system including routes, networks, and transit hubs to extend the “Global Arc� concept to Parramatta along the northern rim of the Parramatta River Valley. _INFRA-COLOGY utilises the existing fabric of vegetation and stream corridors to create green linkages which act as a catalyst for urban development. Of specific consideration is the development of Carlingford, which seeks to connect the riparian corridors of Subiaco Creek and Upper Parramatta River. The design uses ESD principles of energy generation, water recycling and food production where possible to create integrated and self sustaining developments with an outward approach to the surrounding environment.

A. Camellia perspective and design interventions. B. Mid-City Ring Masterplan. C. Education, interpretation and recreation D. A family community E. Carlingford - The Green Link.

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LAURA ABBEY Email laura.m.abbey@gmail.com

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Community Hub; the centre of activity Natural Landscape Conditions of the Site Overlooking the Production Gardens Community Allotments Abstract Model Representing the Urban Landscape Engulfing the Pastoral Landscape

Urban Victories During the war periods in the first half of the twentieth century, ‘Victory Gardens’ were a great asset in many countries in the Western World. Relieving the pressures of producing and transporting agricultural goods from rural communities to urban centres. The end of this period coincided with rapid urbanisation in the outer suburbs of Sydney, including Carlingford, following the influx of migrants due to the Federal Government’s “Populate or Perish” policy. With this rapid urbanisation, our very own agricultural land began to be consumed by the urban environment. Urban Victories is about restoring the historic agriculture identity of Carlingford in the context of a twenty first century urban environment. With approximately 1000 people requiring housing in Sydney every week, it comes as no surprise that there is increasing pressure throughout metropolitan Sydney to find the required housing. The Hills Council DCP for Carlingford plan highlights this movement to drastically increase population densities

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in urban centres throughout Sydney. Whilst creating dense nodes of emerging communities throughout the city is imperative, the importance of green space in the urban landscape should not be neglected. The Carlingford area is an excellent example where the agricultural landscape has been lost to the pressures of urbanisation. Little evidence remains of this once vital source of food production for the Sydney metropolitan. The remaining green spaces of Carlingford are underutilised and constantly threatened by development. Urban Victories attempts to recreate these lost agricultural landscapes and adapt them into an urban context. The adaptation of these agricultural landscapes is generated through the weaving of green spaces throughout the urban landscape, redefining the public domain and enhancing community engagement. Through Urban Victories, the historic landscape identity of Carlingford can be recovered, revitalised and adapted into a 21st century setting.


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DAVID BAKER Email baker8_8@hotmail.com

A. Masterplan showing school, park and riverine alongside development B. Riparian classroom with erosion control and pedestrian interaction C. Water sensitive urban design bioswales along Sturt street D. Site analysis at different scales E. Section detailing the topography through all three zones

SociaLandscape Changing the social landscape of Telopea Telopea is a small suburb, 23kms North West of Sydney and just north of Parramatta on the Carlingford line. The physically and psychologically enclosed study area predominantly consists of affordable housing and housing commission properties. It is highly dilapidated space that generally feels unsafe and unloved, all of which attributes to the stigma associated with Telopea. This project for a new Telopea, is motivated by these negative connotations and potential for change and works in conjunction with the proposed $580 million urban renewal project that will see 1900 new dwellings constructed as part of the Sydney Metro strategy. The conceptual underpinning of the design was predominantly found in the book Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv and his theory of ‘nature deficit disorder’. The proposal will reinvigorate, create and activate this neglected area through several staged interventions of the adjoining; Telopea Public School, Sturt Park and The Ponds creek – Education, Community and Nature.

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SAMUEL BATTERHAM Email sjbatterham@gmail.com Phone 0425 218 331

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The bushland transition zone The Urban Forest masterplan Experiencing the canopy walk The educational precinct Understanding the site

Rehabilitating the Urban Forest Landscape architecture has a vital role in urban forestry, and holds the opportunity to express the significance of the tree population within an urban context. Urban forestry is the management and planning of all trees within not only the public domain, but also the private. A successful urban forestry strategy has a strong connection with all natural processes, such as stormwater runoff, and a good balance with community values. My proposal for Carlingford is a dynamic strategy which acts as a stimulant for further urban forestry schemes. The urban forestry strategy highlights the opportunities and constraints in Carlingford; identifying different tree typologies, and prioritising between the preservation and renewal of the urban tree population. The interaction between the pocket of remnant Turpentine Ironbark Forest and the urban fabric is presented through a canopy walk. This experience is continued through a bushland rejuvenation corridor created by powerlines, linking back up to the education centre.


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Gavin Carl Email gavin_carl@hotmail.com Phone 0405 944 884

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The Station Oasis The Station Oasis creates integration between a newly relocated Rydalmere Train Station and Water Sensitive Urban Design Scheme, culminating in a constructed wetland network. The integration of the wetland system and train station provides a unique opportunity to create spatial experience that is not utilised at any other transportation system. It provides a new major entry point to UWS as well an alternate entry axis to the Rydalmere industrial area. The constructed wetlands enhance the Water Sensitive Urban Design of the area as well as generate a series of intimate and open spaces that can be used by UWS students, industrial workers and the community. The station itself is surrounded by various water bodies to provide the notion that it is floating. ‘The Station Oasis’ will enhance the image of UWS as well as the Parramatta Catchment area as it becomes the forefront of train station design.

Section of station and wetland Masterplan Site character University walk Constructed wetland boardwalk

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ENRIQUÉ CASTILLO Email enriqueacastillo@gmail.com Phone 0413 190 183

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The Green Fibre The objective of this design proposal is to integrate Carlingford’s proposed city centre in ‘Ville Lineaire’ with the city’s distinctive natural milieu. This is achieved by providing coherency through the urban design strategy of ‘The Green Fibre’. Fibres are important in nature. These elongated, thread-like filaments are responsible for holding the cells of living things together. The Green Fibre will act in the same manner as in nature, integrating the two important components of Carlingford, which are the urban realm and the turpentine ironbark forest districts surrounding the city. The Green Fibre will take shape in different forms – illustrating that linearity is not a 2D concept and can take place on the x,y or z axes of the Cartesian Coordinate System.

The Experiences Montage of the Proposed City Centre The Urban Greenway Section of the Urban Greenway Section of the Green Corridor

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MICHAEL CAVANAGH

Suburban Cadence

Email m_cavanagh@hotmail.com.au Phone 0415 930 850

In cities around the world cycling infrastructure is helping to provide an efficient means of transportation dramatically reducing the dependency on the motor car. Suburban Cadence shows how a cycleway from Rydalmere to Carlingford can provide more than just a sustainable method of transportation. It is an exploration of how cycleways can improve the environmental and social quality of the suburbs through which is passes. The trajectory of the path uncovers inherent things about place by showcasing different layers of the urban fabric. A unique experience is created for the users through a cinematic itinerary by creating a memorable journey through different environments. The journey is punctuated by a series of simple design iterations that celebrate the transitions through the different fabrics and rhythms of Sydney’s suburbs. Suburban Cadence creates strategic links to existing transportation networks increasing mobility and making the suburbs more legible and its streets more accessible.

A. Metropolitan and regional analysis B. Rydalmere rhythm and context C. Rhythms: convergence and arrival at Rydalmere D. Conceptual network model E. Conceptual convergence model/collage

Uncovering Rhythm, Movement and Place in Sydney’s Suburbs

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SUSAN CRITHARIS Email scritharis@gmail.com Phone 0414 522 524

A. Model – The ‘Creek Walk’ – with future possible expansion. B. Connecting the Ponds Walk to Parramatta River C. Vineyard Creek at ‘The Bridge’ D. The ‘Creek Walk’ perspective – space occupied by motion. E. Open Woodland – spacing.

The Driftway By finding the essence of a place, the layers of occupation, by understanding the evolution of the natural place, it is possible to design a project where there is integration of the ecological processes and the cultural landscape. This project was inspired by both the cultural and natural landscapes, and was motivated by ‘The Ponds Walk’, which begins on the ridge at Carlingford overlooking the Cumberland Plain. This 6.6km walk has its roots in the setting aside of 100m of land along the Ponds Creek – ‘The Driftway’ - by the early settlers to preserve water quality. The project extends the walk to reach Parramatta River, following the creek to its destination, and making links. Subtle interventions are made in the landscape creating movement through six designed sites - varied and quiet places of light, shadow and texture; the journey will be an ephemeral experience within a transitional landscape.

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RICHARD CROFT Email richard.j.a.croft@gmail.com Phone 0415 373 280

Sensitive Matter The Macquarie Centre is the heart of the Macquarie park corridor, if activated it will provide a catalytic effect to mesh with the surrounding interfaces. By looking at the ways that these interface manifest themselves and how people move through and to them it is possible to develop directional and transitional spaces as an experience within the public network rather than just destinations and thoroughfares. Nodes are identified as key points to punch through, break the surrounds and create concise strategical connections. These connections are forged to unify edges and landscapes enhancing the connectivity of place. By creating a stronger sense of inter-connectivity within and on the edges of the site it will start to break down the already implemented boundaries of roads and uses and instead these points shall be key cross-axial nodes which accentuate the development of spaces which will help to bind the urban framework.

A. A new hybrid park interface B. Re-defining a lost edge C. Creating connections and permeability of space D. Re-asserting the stream E. Forging a sense of place

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JASON CUFFE Email jason.cuffe@hotmail.com Phone 0425 328 259

A. Re-engaging with Parramatta River B. Illustrative masterplan and staged implementation C. Milieu abstract expression D. Modelling unique spatial opportunities

Fluid Milieu The former James Hardie site at Camellia presents challenges of contamination, flood risks and disconnection from the greater community. However, the proximity to the Parramatta River, the locality of the University of Western Sydney and existing connections provide opportunities for a integrated landscape proposal. Fluid Milieu attempts to combat these issues, implementing a remediating landscape where the process of transformation is ingrained within a unique landscape of recreation, transportation and industry. With existing flood issues along Parramatta River, terrestrial and aquatic thresholds are manipulated, through excavation of asbestos contaminated land. With the provision of new technologies, which convert asbestos material into recycled silicate glass and concrete, the site will provide a working example of post industrial remediation. This process of remediation is separated into stages, allowing varying landscape characters to evolve and contribute to the unique site experience based on temporal qualities. What develops is a theatrical process, exhibiting unique milieu’s between urban, natural and post industrial form.

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Timothy davidson Email tim_d_88@hotmail.com Phone 0433 390 426

A. Eco-Spine section: rehabilitating Subiaco Creek B. On-site/for-site Greenhouse: Parkland plant establishment C. Water garden – natural, social and commercial layers combine. D. Insurgent Ecologies masterplan: layered, tangled and mutually dependant E. Sustainable aquaculture – food-waste diagram

Insurgent Ecologies Building Blocks for Post Industrial Landscapes The Post-Industrial Landscape is a relatively new urban form that often requires rehabilitation and remediation. Many Post-Industrial landscape rehabilitation projects around the world have displayed extensive and successful interventions that have rejuvenated the natural ecology of the site but have failed to integrate other ecologies such as socio-cultural and economic/commercial. The Post-Industrial landscape needs to focus equally on ecological, socio-cultural and economic/commercial factors. These varying ecologies will be known as the three building blocks for the Post - Industrial landscape. The ‘insurgent ecology’ refers to a hidden urban form that is not yet visible but will emerge if the existing building blocks are layered in the appropriate order and given the opportunity to become tangled and mutually dependant on one another. Although each layer is equally important in creating the new hybrid ecology, one of them must be treated first and this is the natural ecology. Located in the Industrial/Commercial suburb of Rydalmere along the Parramatta River, the implementation of the Eco-spine, through the polluted and contaminated Subiaco Creek, will see the emergence of a new hybrid ecology that provides sustainable natural, social and commercial outcomes.

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Geoff Duggan Email geoff.duggan@rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au Phone 0409 122 951

A. Bush food forest station and Food Tower market place B. Cherry Tree café courtyard C. Landscape master plan D. Precinct diagram E. Food Tower market place

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Suburban Harvest The Sydney Basin was the food bowl for Australia’s largest city, Sydney. The New South Wales Department of Industry predicts that only 1000 hectares of agricultural land will remain 20 years from now when the north-west and south west growth areas are developed. Suburban Harvest will provide an edible landscape to educate and feed our community. Rail platforms, steep embankments, electricity easements, footpaths, community gardens and parklands will demonstrate how we can provide productive landscapes in our suburbs where our community can connect with the environment and each other. In a regional context the site provides an opportunity to connect riparian corridors of Subiaco Creek and Upper Parramatta River. It will benefit and gain support by its three local government areas, a multicultural community and nine schools within 3 km. This will drive an education program, acknowledging Carlingford’s agricultural history in a contemporary suburban context, for the local and wider community.


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Vivien Fu Email vivienfu@hotmail.com Phone 0405 506 409

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Concept diagram Public Square masterplan Site analysis Public Square montage

Macquarie Oasis The area immediately around the train station entrance on the Macquarie Shopping Centre side of Herring Road will become a vibrant public open space, capitalising on the activity generated by the station to provide a safe and stimulating focal point for the community. The area will accommodate cafes, restaurants and bars and provide the surrounding area with a range of day time and night time activities. This new urban space will enhance the quality of life for university students, people who work in nearby offices and residents living within close proximity to the Centre. Development of the urban square and associated green spaces will provide a setting for informal meetings and social interaction. Awnings and colonnades at street level will create a pleasant pedestrian environment. To reduce the area of concrete surfaces, plantings will occur along the streetscape and on vertical surfaces, as well. Green roofs and living walls will help reduce the urban heat island effect and also mitigate stormwater runoff, reduce energy consumption and improve thermal conditions within the buildings.


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JULIE GAVELLE Email julie.gavelle@mac.com Phone 0415 544 689

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Perspective of tall forest Plan of university edge Flipping the university Changing the focus Section through open space

Redefining Borders In a world where nature is taken over by the urban fabric the attempts to fight back are not always noticeable. The interaction between these two worlds is outlined by a blurred line. This struggle is highlighted on the northern edge of Macquarie University. The university, sitting within a large scale business park, is attached to one of only a few open spaces. The university is anchored to the south by a new train station. This anchor has forced the university to turn its back on its northern green edge. The intent of this project is to flip the focus from the south to the north, giving importance to the interaction between built form and nature with the help of the open space.


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ROBERT GREEN Email green_rob@hotmail.com Phone 0422 020 130

A. Varying ecotones, schematic representation B. Urban habitat concept, Shell Oil Refinery C. Exploded axonometric, river foreshore stormwater drainage analysis D. Shoreline intervention, rebuilding a functional shoreline

Just Add Water Reclaiming the Intertidal Ecotone In the small suburb of Camellia, growth has always been tied to ongoing industrial development, bringing with it a neglected shoreline. With the decline of the old industrial waterfront comes the challenge of returning the site to ecological and community function. The traditional vertical seawalls that shape the shoreline have had a detrimental impact on the estuary and they represent a significant departure from the natural graduated intertidal foreshore habitat. With the requirements to repair or replace these seawalls comes the exciting opportunity to create or enhance intertidal habitats. This project aims to activate the river’s edge through new gateway spaces and a subtly articulated path, creating opportunities for education and recreation organized around existing natural resources and local opportunities. As ecological processes develop through a series of phases, human inhabitation brings the site to life. The ephemeral movement of water sets the stage for unique programs to develop and informs visitors about the local hydrology whilst fulfilling their innately human need to experience the wild and intricate forces at play in the environment.

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LUCY GRIEVE Email lucyanngrieve@gmail.com URL www.lucygrieve.blogspot.com Phone 0425 345 203

A. Site explored through existing, strategic and concept diagrams B. Perspective montage of Kissing Point Road pedestrian crossing C. Elevations of Vineyard Creek D. Topographic demonstration of project strategies

Unearthing Identity The loss of local and regional community identity is a rapidly growing issue, seen particularly in the Mid Ring City. The focus of this project is to explore how water quality measures such as stormwater bioswales and constructed wetlands can be used to enhance existing community vitality and local pedestrian connection in the mid ring suburb of Dundas. The development of local and regional pedestrian networks, which includes connections to existing infrastructure, public transport, and ‘The Ponds Walk’, is vital to Unearthing the Identity of Dundas. Water quality and ecological management will sustain and enhance the natural beauty of the remnant bush land surrounding Vineyard Creek. The design uses vegetated stormwater swales within the central square of Dundas and a series of constructed wetlands along Vineyard Creek to cleanse the black and grey water of the suburb. The water management interventions are fundamental to bringing the ecological community into the suburban fringe. The project encourages the local residents and regional community to discover the identity of the experiential landscape of Dundas.

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FRANK HALL Email z3253501@student.unsw.edu.au

Carlingforward The aim of this project was to create a new town centre for the community at Carlingford, utilising aspects of New Urbanism and Transit Oriented Design, while still tying it into its surrounding landscape. The current site of Carlingford lacks a distinct character, with no dominant building types or legible street pattern. This project intends to rectify these issues, creating a vibrant, lively new town centre. The movement of the station and removal of the existing Carlingford Court were integral in the success of this development. It allows for a new, centralised train station, as well the creation of street shopping, breathing new life into the community of Carlingford. This project aims to turn Carlingford into an exciting new community, with a vibrant streetscape with the opportunity for new employment and residential areas.

A. Railway Square section B. Community Park concept C. Railway Square concept

A

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Thea Harris

A. Section of the Ferry Wharf B. Montage of Pedestrian Boulevard through to the quad C. Montage, the quad D. Model, campus growth along river E. Design framework diagram

A River Campus Located along the Parramatta River, is the Parramatta Campus of the University of Western Sydney. Already a significant campus, the site has potential for future growth as a major educational institution for Western Sydney. This design proposes a vision of the Parramatta Campus 2050. It explores the potential expansion and development of this site, bringing clarity and coherence to the campus. Re-establishing a connection between the landscape and buildings will create an interactive environment, encouraging the campus to grow and develop outwardly towards the river. A unified core will strengthen its structure and future expansion. A pedestrian boulevard will be established as the main axis connecting the major areas within the campus. This emphasises a pedestrian based hierarchy of circulation and minimises car flow around the campus. Integrating the existing heritage buildings and extending it into the industrial site in Rydalmere will create a series of vital and interesting spaces along the river’s edge. This proposal connects many of the site’s existing strengths, anticipates growth and utilises its surrounding transport resources. Creating an interactive and cohesive framework that appreciates its riverfront location and builds a model of Sydney’s river campus.

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Adam Jeffery Email azzajep@hotmail.com Phone 0408 231 879

A. Ideation models - circulation, ecology and hydrology B. Pedestrian bridge crossing Vineyard Creek C. Concept masterplan D. Elevated boardwalk and screens provide minimum disturbance to migratory bird roosting E. Sections through Baludarri wetland and constructed wetland

Cellular Ecology This proposal is a catalyst project that initiates the improvement of ecosystem health and generates new resources for human use. The design aims at improving the dynamics and ecological diversity of the site and accommodates change over time. To conceptually convey this design process, it involves three overlapping strategies which were inspired by the anatomy of a leaf. Using a section of the Parramatta River at Rydalmere, the project transforms the site into a waterfront open space that restores diverse landscape ecologies while offering a range of recreational and educational opportunities. The design proposes to improve water quality conditions and improve the diverse ecologies of the site, including salt marsh, shale/sandstone transition forest and alluvial woodland habitats. The site also incorporates an accessible open space for residents and university students, including a new River Cat terminal at the UWS Rydalmere Campus. The design allows for diverse recreation and programs including cycling, kayaking, bird watching, nature education through the use of interpretive signage and way finding.

A

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Christopher LEE

A. Model studies for reprogramming existing silo structure B. Reveal Camellia landscape structure through model exploration C. RE_Camellia masterplan D. Experience in the hidden wetland of Shell Oil Refinery E. The urban plaza of the new Oil Tanks Precinct

A

66

RE_Camellia An Urban Strategy for Sydney’s Industrial Suburb The recent announcement of the closure of the Shell Oil Refinery has covered the industrial suburb of Camellia with a mist of mystery. Perhaps the current state of Camellia is best described in the words of urban theorist, Alan Berger from his book Drosscape: “it lives in transition and eludes classification, something that resists new stability and reincorporation�. RE_Camellia presents a series of strategies and design interventions in the light of transforming the Camellia peninsula from a homogenous heavy industrial wasteland into a new multi-faceted suburb consisting of the natural environment, heavy and light industries, a mix of low- to high-density residential development, interwoven by a green open space network. The aim of this project is to reintroduce this wasteland into the surrounding urban context by working with the existing industrial texture and revealing the hidden ecological value of an impending post-industrial site.

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Jacqueline Lee

Ripple Connection

Email jacq_linnn@hotmail.com Phone 0433 576 884

Rydalmere has historically been an area of heavy industry, but with the increase in population in this area of Sydney, there is a great need to provide more housing and green spaces. The concept of the “ripple effect” comes from the patterns created by a water drop. The new population being injected into this area will “ripple” across the landscape. The proposed design focuses on three aspects: building layout, tree planting strategies and infrastructure design. The centre of the ripples is located at the centre of Rydalmere, then moving across the landscape from higher density to more open areas; isometric shapes to more organic forms; highly structured designs to more informal; height of buildings ranging from taller to lower as the development moves toward the Parramatta River. Retention basins and bio-swales are proposed on site to address the flooding problem and a recycling water system manages the water quality. Cleansed water then serves the needs of the neighbourhood and the nearby parklands. Open space provides for passive recreational use; vegetation and green spaces act as linkages throughout the site with the planting strategy enhancing the overall environment. This project provides an opportunity for a successful redevelopment of Rydalmere with the flooding and water contamination being solved, parklands for passive recreation created as well as a better experience throughout the site.

A. Concept and transition diagram B. Perspective of outdoor market space C. Perspective of amphitheatre D. Section of amphiteatre

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Landscape and Hydrological Connection with the Transition of Structural to Informal


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ANTON LI Email lianton88@hotmail.com Phone 0431 702 896

A. Sections depicting reclaimed Green Park and increased community facilities B. Epping Plaza as a meeting point and transitional point C. Proposed residential apartments to cater for influx of population D. Proposed Site masterplan of Epping Town Centre: The Green Remix E. Epping Plaza as a meeting point and transitional portal

Epping Town Centre: The Green Remix Epping is currently in need of a physical transition which will help increase its potential to link to other larger centres in Sydney. With its location in the ‘Global Arc’, Epping is in a good position to benefit from future residential and commercial growth. Epping currently has a large train station which runs above and underground. Beecroft Road connects with Epping Road and Carlingford Road, all main arterials in the road infrastructure network. Along Beecroft Road the retail services are gradually degrading, as the vehicle volumes and lack of parking spaces drive the pedestrian experience and service levels down. From this, the proposed design focuses on the street parallel to Beecroft Road which is Rawson Street.Design interventions are increased community facilities throughout the core of Epping. Underground parking has been implemented to give much needed extra parking spots for the commuters and residents.Green space has been reclaimed as a result. A new plaza has been formed at the base of the pedestrian bridge extension from the train station which serves as a meeting point and communal exhibition/market space. Additional dedicated office, retail and business towers have been implemented, however their storeys in height have been kept as minimum to conserve Epping’s character and existing landmarks in the new town centre.

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WINNIE LUU Email winnie.luu@live.com.au Phone 0422 956 300

A. Conceptual models of the words motion, fluctuations and rhythm B. Development of the ideas through experimentation with micro-spaces C. View of Carlingford’s new transport interchange D. Section cutting through the platform at Carlingford Station

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Grounding Transit On average, Sydneysiders spend about 1hr and 40mins per day travelling between the home, work place and school. The experience of travelling from the home to the station, waiting on the platform and sitting inside the train carriage is often mundane and lacks social interaction. Grounding Transit investigates the opportunities for creating an integrated landscape strategy for the Carlingford Line including a number of design interventions that focus on the station, platform and cinematic quality of the train journey. Given the scale of the 7.3km project, two key sites have been selected for detailed design investigations. The first site is the Carlingford train station where the focus of the design is about the pedestrian movement through a sequence of open spaces before descending to the train station and onto the platform. The intent of this experiential sequence is to uncover the potential for spaces between high-residential buildings to become more interactive public spaces. The second site, at Rydalmere examines the edges of existing green spaces and waterways. Railways have the potential to become attractors of people and natural habitats.


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Nathan Lynch Email nlynch@y7mail.com Phone 0403 700 907

A. Wetlands providing interaction and respite at the water’s edge B. Shrimpton’s Creek spatial qualities emphasised through planting C. Pedestrian is elevated off Waterloo Rd D. Early site analysis E. Modeling ideas, revealed opportunities and keys for intervention

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Integrating Networks Macquarie Park is a hi-tech industrial hub that lies at the midpoint of Sydney’s global arc. Numerous students, workers and shoppers migrate to the area on a daily basis, along with the residents and students that live and work in the area. The agricultural legacy of the area has left the current zoning at an industrial scale meaning large scale block sizes, this results in no fine grain for the pedestrian to move freely throughout the site and forces people to turn to the car as their mode of transport. ‘Integrating Networks’ uses water movement as a catalyst for pedestrian links, user informed design and linking social boundaries by bringing the indoors out. It is to be seen as a model to be used throughout the traffic congested global arc. Manipulation to the edge of Shrimpton’s Creek allows for interesting level changes and water interaction opportunities for the user, with enhancing the remnant bush land, encouraging wildlife and increasing water quality all integral ideas underlining the design. The design seeks to provide spaces with all senses in mind, with three defined areas providing collision points for the pedestrian on track to the key existing anchors of the site.


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Shawna Ng Email ng.shawnaa@gmail.com Phone 0433 566 887

A. Abstractions of concept model exploring a catalyst’s roles B. Determining proposed catalytic space based on landscape context C. Key design moves challenging conventional suburb development D. Process of creating urban fabric through catalytic carparks E. The Carparked Park: through pushing, pulling and stacking

The Curious Case of Cars and their Parks With the advent of the automobile, car parks have long been accepted as necessary features of the urban fabric. Along with their presence is an implicit assumption that these spaces are characteristically unsightly and unfriendly to the pedestrian. However, beyond the superficial perceptions, a curious case emerges. Though car parks are presumably ruled by automobiles, they are essentially a typology of ‘parks’. Why then, are they not celebrated as public recreation spaces like the latter? There are a plethora of possibilities to understand this disjuncture we are brought to. Can we rethink ‘parking’ such that it no longer refers to a mundane act of leaving the vehicle in a lot, but rather a heightened experience of enjoying parks? Can these vast infrastructures be re-imagined such that they are no longer mere products of functions and needs but as new landscapes, acting as active catalysts for social, spatial and ecological insertions?

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CARLOS NGAN Email carlosngan@hotmail.com Phone 0450 011 977 (Australia) (852) 6418 5838 (Hong Kong)

Liquid-Solid River Transitions This project investigates how the Parramatta River can connect the urban fabric and become a significant part of the everyday landscape for the surrounding communities. By changing the landform, space flows to the water and people flow to space. The concept was inspired by the transitions of water from liquid to solid, expressed in three concepts: Fluidize, Solidify and Dissolve. Fluidized spaces consist of soft materials to create flexible space and weave the waterfront into the fabric of the surrounding communities. Solidified spaces form a range of platforms at different levels to let people to stay on the water with different views, and create habitats for wildlife. Changing the landform creates pockets of spaces and integrates landscape with buildings to dissolve the solidified and fluidized spaces. The design proposal for this stretch of the Parramatta River has the potential to link with the complex urban setting and become a vibrant destination.

A. Art Centre and outdoor space along Parrmatta River B. Visual Corridors and linkages integrated with city grid C. Concepts: fluidize, solidify and dissolve D. Models reveal spatial qualities of the three concepts

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Jacqueline Engel Nguyen Email jacqueline.engel.nguyen@gmail.com Phone 0420 505 124

A. B. C. D. E.

Broader Sensibility Progression | Transformation | Character A greater sense of connection to the landscape can be observed through the “borrowed landscape” at Macquarie University. A profound, deep connection to the openness of space, air and nature is brought upon an individual within this University among the trees. This is the existing character of Macquarie University which is subjected to extensive infrastructural development. To maintain this landscape character, the design concept is based on the existing essence of the university and its program as an academic institution. A journey of senses through thoroughly designed pathways will be one design approach-“path, portal and place”. Another design strategy is to create visual and physical connections to the broader landscape. In addition to these landscape interventions, the academic core will continue to intensify as it has in its planning history.

Student housing section Path intersection montage Strategy diagrams Student housing montage Macquarie University masterplan

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Nikki Philp Email nikkiphilp@gmail.com Phone 0416 016 443

A. Section through orchards and recreational play B. Section through permaculture zones and passive play C. Habitat corridor through interactive play elements D. Experiential path weaving within permaculture zones E. Permaculture Zones Journey Play Habitat Corridor Topography

The Apricot Express In response to “Revitalizing the western streams”masterplan in Carlingford, where the boundaries between the old village and the new urban city were tested, this scheme seeks to reintroduce forgotten heritage values. Carlingford is an area with a rich agricultural history, which dates back to the 1800’s when locally produced fruit was supplied to Sydney via the single-track line known to the local residents as ‘The Apricot Express’. A current fragmented condition within the landscape in Carlingford has seen the segregation of the community and the disengagement to the sites significant past. This project asks the question, “How can heritage and the finer grain of the urban fabric merge to create a playful landscape?” In defining a new landscape where the principles of permaculture and the notion of play are intermingled , an emotive and educational journey is experienced where natural responses are evoked and explored.

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Beilu Qian Email z3249735@student.unsw.edu.au Phone 0413 324 531

A. B. C. D. E.

Section through Vineyard Creek Montage Plan Montage Perspective model of the bridge

E.D.G.E land The visual symbol for this project is the “stalk as impetus”, used to explain the idea of edge effect and interpret this site within the mid-ring suburbs of Telopea, Dundas and Rydalmere. In an abstract way, the stalk is a metaphor for Vineyard and Subiaco Creeks; the Parramatta River represents the root, a living system which feeds the stalk and generates new energy. Together they merge, change and generate new ideas. The research question for the design approach is: “How can we maximize the quality of the environment and heal some of the fragmentation between people and nature by focusing on edge effects?” At the edge, there is an exchange of materials and information. There is a possibility for increased synergies, or mutually beneficial relationships between elements of a system. The edge is seen as the place for creativity. In many ways the project is looking branching structures to allow a maximum length of edge between elements of a system to encourage exchange and flow. Human activity is accommodated in flexible spaces. For example, the arcing boardwalk is situated along the river, mimicking the fragile riverside. The keyword for this project is “edge” and it is the edge boundary of urban development and natural resources. The edge can be considered as a corridor, connecting the rivers or as a buffer offering protection.

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Rohit Ramanathan Email rohit_r23@hotmail.com Phone 0430 990 004

An Urban Defibrillation An Urban Defibrillation attempts to explore the concept of inserting a spark into an existing area through testing a streetscape’s role in an urban environment. To test whether the street can be more than just a physical connection, to test whether it be a new urban element, which is part of the landscape, part of the built form and designed for the movement and behavior of people through a surge of energy, active fronts and open space. This design exploration looks at the spatial form between the Macquarie Centre and the Macquarie University. The proposal occurs over two phases. The first is to regenerate a segment of Herring Road as a revitalized urban streetscape with active frontages and strong connections to the new Macquarie University Station locations. The second is the establishment of a fine grain student development, which feeds of the regenerated streetscape. These two phases in design will aim to achieve a strong open space connection between the Station precincts, Macquarie Centre and Macquarie University.

A. Sections across site B. Illustrative masterplan C. Perspective montage facing Station Square West D. Concept montage

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Hoi Kuk Sin Email hoikuk@hotmail.com Phone 0411 285 092

Inside lanes –Epping Epping will be a major junction for traffic in the future, including the PERL (ParramattaEpping Rail Link), the existing rail connection to Macquarie and CBD, the main road (Epping Road) connecting to the North and Castle Hills. Roads and railways will become the dominant elements in this town centre, while pedestrians, vehicles and bicyclists will be competing in the same spaces. Walking is a basic and direct activity by which people experience a place, however, the hierarchy of pedestrian spaces in Epping is currently very limited and ignored. The main road is full of “grey infrastructure” while the existing laneway system in the commercial strip provides a great opportunity for visitors to have their own journey.

Inside the laneways Visitors will experience the place through travelling the laneways, which will lead them to different pockets of spaces with different functions and experiences: pocket green spaces, walking paths, vehicle/pedestrian shared lane; they can be explored, interacted with. Day and Night The area will be developed into different zones for different purposes, including the day zone where there will be facilities for day travellers such as seating, a green square with shade, etc. The night zone will offer opportunities for bars, cafes and night shopping with lighting and water features. The green zone will encourage locals to enjoy community activities such as community gardening, gathering or workshops. Epping will be a unique place with its own character to be explored and enjoyed by visitors and locals alike.

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A. Section of the space within the laneways B. Masterplan C. The existing Laneways system within the urban form D. The site will functional zoning E. Long photo elevation of the proposed environment


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Jessica Slade Email samplestudent@hotmail.com Phone 0439 269 007

A. Section of reinstated salt marsh and vegetation groups that create various experiences B. Model showing the experiential qualities of the site C. Montage of board walk through experience of enclosed woodland and open salt marsh D. Montage of historic Rail arch and proposed university entrance seating area E. Analysis diagrams showing historical heritage layers and biodiversity corridor layers.

Sustainable Beauty How can the aesthetic experience of landscape and the performance of beauty help transform the landscape design for the mouth of Vineyard Creek adjoining the south eastern entrance of the University of Western Sydney into a sustainable design? How can the characteristics of sustaining beauty be incorporated into the Rydalmere urban renewal precinct, on the mid ring city? The theorist Elizabeth Meyer has a design framework to achieve a sustainable landscape design. She proposes a design that includes the aesthetic experience of a landscape in her recent 2008 design manifesto. This performance of ‘sustaining beauty’ is about an unfolding aesthetic experience that allows the public to appreciate the power of nature in sustainable design. The public become a participant with the sustainable landscape design because of their close proximity to all the elements used in the sustainable design such as the WSUD constructed wetland, reinstated ecological endangered saltmarsh and historical layers of the design. The new rail transport hub adjoining the wetland encourages the use of public transport with walk and cycleways and will therefore

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allow the public to experience the saltmarsh and historical elements at close range. A new historically enhanced UWS entrance alongside a reinstated saltmarsh, will construct aesthetic experience of landscape alongside constructed ecological sustainable design. There will be sustainable seawall design, permeable paving, rail corridor green walls and an elevated boardwalk to protect sensitive saltmarsh. At all times there will be respect for former historical layers of the site with a design that recognizes and incorporates past landuses. Cultural and social layers are included in the design with careful consideration to preserve heritage protected areas of the landscape such as the historical rail arch. Aesthetic landscape experience has also considered views and site lines to offer the user greater experience of nature. There will be views looking at the constructed wetland weir from the outdoor university rail plaza. The outdoor hub will allow further exposure for the community to sustaining beauty as they use the outdoor facilities and commute through the wetland.


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BEN STYLES Email styles_ben31@hotmail.com Phone 0406 413 764

A. Indicative creek, using an abstracted planting palette B. Journey through site is disrupted by traffic flow C. Site characteristics, which informed design D. Highlighting the impact of planting within the space E. Interpretive forest, leading towards reactivated shopping precinct

Unpacking the Park Unpacking the Park explores the lack of landscape experiences within the Macquarie Park corridor through the medium of extracting components identified in Lane Cove National Park as essential to creating a naturalist experience in an urban environment. Spaces within the site are informed by the built form, this leaves the site without any significant landscape character. Through the process of mapping Lane Cove National Park, I was successful in identifying elements, which could seamlessly filter through my site and inform new spaces and a renewed landscape character. Central to ‘Unpacking the Park’ are spaces that serve as functional nodes as users flow through the site to their destination. ‘Unpacking the Park’ is a linear journey that is suggestive of heritage of the area and is sensitive to the active ecological systems of Lane Cove National Park. The design process is informed by, what is missing from site, rather that enhancing the existing. This allows a design that is focused on the natural systems of the site, and doesn’t rely on the built form or the hard scapes.

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DEAN WARDY Email deanwardy@hotmail.com Phone 0422 973 047

Natural Adaptation: Interpret, Improvise, Naturalise Designing a vibrant University by creating a sense of arrival and creating a central, democratic space to serve as a public forum for student activities, a place for casual encounters, and a space for the entire student population to unite as a whole. Macquarie University will be a 24/7 live-work-play community to explore, exchange and entertain. Being a student we want a comfortable inviting space with places to sit, places to eat, places to play, places to study and a place to gather and that they are conveniently connected. The vision is to provide a flexible space that will encourage people to “interpret” a space to how they want to use it, for people to “improvise” within a space for example using a wall as a place to seat and then for people to “natuarlise” to a space making it their own. This gathering space will be located in between the New Library, the Hearing Hub and the Cochlear Building and will be host to a variety of programs,

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A. Design process and intent: circulation, vistas and seating B. Abstract montage C. Section through terraced landscape to the New Libaray Lawng D. Site analysis E. Masterplan

events and activities including: Celebrations, performances, and everyday uses like studying, eating, socializing, gaming and tabling, unique activities such as outdoor movies/ theatre, student activity advertisements, outdoor study areas, outdoor gallery, an artist “do it yourself” corner. The uses of this space will change during the course of the day, week and year. To respond to these fluctuations, uses and activities, the proper amenities and elements are necessary, such as : movable chairs, shade structures, temporary stage, areas for exhibiting student art and public art installations, flexible outdoor furniture, seasonal planting. The aim is for greater connections to flexible spaces that encourage people to assemble within a space and use the space freely for their individual expression, benefit, comfort or interpretation. This will create a sense of ownership, sense of place and greater social points in and around campus for people to interact and create a greater community… the idea of being and belonging to the university.


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HAYDEN WATSON Email h_watson@live.com.au Phone 0438 952 839

A. Analysis of Parramatta River Parkland System B. Sections representing ‘space’ throughout the site C. Site analysis of the proposed design D. Sections through the length of the site

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The Gateway As the migration of people to Sydney continues to flourish, the Western suburbs have to deal with a significant increase in population density. With residential communities infiltrating into unfamiliar territory, it is vital to provide and promote community parklands and practical ecological spaces. ‘The Gateway’ is a regional park in Camellia that will prove to be a crucial destination along both the Western Link train line and the Greater Parramatta River systems. Through the distillation of programmatic space, ‘The Gateway’ will provide a destination that is welcoming for all. Seeking to promote recreation, education and amalgamation, this foreshore park will support the proposed residential developments around the Camellia region. The intriguing location of the site, on a unique bend of the river and to the south of the UWS Parramatta campus, invites a bold design proposal that will engage and enhance the entrance to Parramatta City via the waterway system. ‘The Gateway’ is a contemporary multimodal Park that represents aspects of culture and history as well as educating the general population in measures of land remediation and sustainable living. Through highly programmatic activity and a unique character this site will play a fundamental role in the Greater Western Sydney parkland system.


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Sam Westlake Email swesty2001@hotmail.com Phone 0416 330 460

A. B. C. D.

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Sketch plan design development Fluctuating tidal habitat Phased site remediation Section depicting vegetation gradient and foreshore access

Neo-Nature, Synthesising the Natural and the Artificial Today we find ourselves in a paradoxical situation. As technological advancements promise new capacities for movement, interpretation and intervention in the landscape, we are confronted with failed infrastructure, shrinking biodiversity, sprawling urban populations and high levels of environmental toxicity. In the past we have addressed these issues through the design of infrastructures according to the civil engineering paradigm. Today, our situation calls for the development and deployment of mycelial, lo-fi landscapes; adaptive, specific, capable of generating new forms of agency, synthesising new objects and catalysing new social possibilities. Situated in the industrial suburb of Camellia, Neo-Nature embraces the concept of mycelial, lo-fi landscapes to resurrect the Parramatta River, capatalising on the emergence of the mangrove along the foreshore. The mangrove ecosystem is encouraged to take hold and grow, enabling rich potentials for agricultural production, urban apiculture, foreshore management, habitat restoration, university research and education.


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David Whiteway Email d.whiteway8@gmail.com

A. Sections displaying key landscape treatments B. Plan of the high ground secure facility C. Plan of group home community on Creek’s Edge D. Plan of River’s Edge residence for able residents E. Concept diagram showing three landscape typologies and connectivity

Green for the Grey Matter Centred on landscape design for mental health, this project endeavours to meet the needs of – and provide a framework for further development in – what is a burgeoning national issue: the escalating number of Australians suffering and affected by dementia. The conceptual foundation that underpins the design stems from the research of various building forms used in mental health facilities, and how they can be harmonised with and appropriated to diverse landscape typologies. In the design development, these building forms have been synchronised with the three key landscape typologies found within the site. The design functions on four levels: an extension of UWS and its campus; a research facility for dementia study; residential care for dementia sufferers, and; a unified sequence of landscapes that both meet the design guidelines required for use by dementia sufferers of various stages as well as having utility as successful public open space.

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Bowie Wong Email bowiee.w@gmail.com Phone 0412 262 282

A. B. C. D. E.

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Boronia Park New Retail facing Rawson Street Boronia Plaza Boronia Plaza Cycle Track at Epping

Epping- Reactivate and Connect The focus of this project is to revitalise the Epping town centre’s identity through a more liveable green network where cyclers and pedestrians come first by creating different user spaces and by providing a separate, safe and pleasant way for them to move throughout the town centre. The proposed liveable green network at the town centre of Epping will provide a network of safe, linked pedestrian and cycle paths that will make walking and cycling an easy option for residents and visitors, as well as improve the health and sustainability of the suburb. A new plaza will also be proposed to support the pedestrianisation of the centre streets and the development of quality open spaces for meeting, rest and leisure.


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Marco Tin Wai Yip Email yipmtw@gmail.com Phone 0410 218 405

A. B. C. D. E.

Epping Parklands Revisiting the current Meriton development with a biointense solution to sustainable urban development, the project aims to integrate food production with modern living. To the west of the site lies Mobbs Lane Reserve, while TAFE is on the adjacent north east boundary. Production of various crops keeps the landscape productive while also fulfilling its role of residential for 300 dwellings in low rise buildings. It is designed using “Agriburbia� principles, providing affordable housing while it produces enough vegetables for the residents through a community supported agriculture program. In the wider context of the Global Arc it acts as a residential hub which supports Carlingford, Epping and Eastwood. Throughout the estate platforms are located around the farms as well as other courtyards offering different opportunities of recreation, play and learning; raising awareness of land and farming amongst residents. A further community sense is built through the combined efforts of farming.

Section of farmed terraces Play area within the farmed terraces Sketch of entrance boulevard Masterplan Entrance to apartments

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The students of the 2011 Final Year Studio in the Landscape Architecture Program would like to give a special thank you to all our sponsors for their generosity, contribution and support

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ALUMNI PROFILE ADAM FOWLER Gradation year 1994 Degree Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Position Senior Landscape Architect at the City of Sydney I chose my course because it was well recognised in the profession both NSW and throughout Australia. The course was actively supported by the design community within Sydney through guest lectures, a mentoring program and design tutors. This enriched the learning experience and provided us the opportunity to develop professional relationships while still at university. The program offered a major focus on design and planning through highly challenging, project-based studios. One highlight for me was a design studio that culminated in a public exhibition of the proposals. Programs were delivered by committed staff from diverse backgrounds, academic and professional, design and planning, science and arts. My degree has been the foundation of my career and gave me a pathway into a consultancy practice upon graduation. My advice to anyone considering the program would be to take the time to research the profession and seek out people who can provide an insight into the areas of practice that most interest you. There are a range of career paths for landscape architects in government and the private sector.

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CREDITS

Cover: The cover of this document is printed on Geon Silk,which contains elemental chlorine free pulp. It is manufactured by an ISO 14001 Cover: certified mill and sources come 250gsm Sovereign from well-managed Double coated A2 forests. Sourced from Hankuk Mill, Korea Internal pages: FSC, ECF, ISO 14001 The internal pages of this document were printed on Geon Silk, which Internal pages: contains elemental chlorine free 150gsm Titan pulp. It is manufactured by an ISO Double coated A2 14001 certified mill and sources Sourced from Hansol Mill, Korea come from forests. Certified forwell-managed HP Indigo Digital printing FSC, ECF, ISO 14001 Concept and production Tonic Connective www.tonicconnective.com

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Faculty of Built Environment The University of New South Wales UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia

Web Phone Email

www.fbe.unsw.edu.au +61 2 9385 4843 fbe@unsw.edu.au


UNSW Landscape Architecture