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TABLE OF

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THE NEAR OPEN FRONT UNROUNDED VOWEL

ASSAULT ON ALPHAVILLE

ABSINTHE ABUSE, ART & ADDICTION

MUSIC REVIEWS IN THE KEY OF A

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INTERVIEW WITH ANIMAL COLLECTIVE

ARGUMENT WITH AN ANGRY AMERICAN

A IS FOR ADULTERY

YOU’RE SO AVANT GUARDE, GOTHIC

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ALIEN SPOTTING IN ARIZONA

AMERICAN TYPEWRITER

DEATH TO ARIAL

ANGLICAN ABSTINENCE

EDITOR IN CHIEF - ALEXIS AGOSTINO // SENIOR DESIGNER - TOMAS SHANAHAN // CREATIVE DIRECTOR - CLAUS VON HEINZ // FEATURE WRITER - STYLIST // MUSIC EDITOR - EUNICE VON CLAP // PRODUCTION MANAGER - THEODORE SHANAHAN // COPY EDITOR - INDIGO SHANAHAN // CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS - DALE BORDIN & KEVIN MCDOWELL // MATHEMATICIAN JAMES DONALD

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THE NEAR-OPEN FRONT UNROUNDED VOWEL 06


In English, the letter “A” by itself usually denotes the near-open front unrounded vowel (/æ/) as in pad, the open back unrounded vowel as in father, or, in concert with a later orthographic vowel, the diphthong as in ace and major, due to effects of the great vowel shift. In most other languages that use the Latin alphabet, the letter A denotes either an open back unrounded vowel, or an open central unrounded vowel (/a/). In the International Phonetic Alphabet, variants of the letter A denote various vowels. In X-SAMPA, capital A denotes the open back unrounded vowel and lowercase a denotes the open front unrounded vowel. A is the third most common letter in English, and the second most common in Spanish and French. On average, about 8.2% of letters in English tend to be As, while the number is 6.2% in Spanish and 4% in French. A is often used to denote something or someone of a better or more prestigious quality or status: A or A+, the best grade that can be assigned by teachers for students’ schoolwork; A grade for clean restaurants; A-List celebrities, etc. The number 1 is used in a similar way. A turned ‘a’ is used by the International Phonetic Alphabet for the near-open central vowel, while a turned capital ‘A’ is used in predicate logic to indicate universal quantification.

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ABSINTHE ABUSE, ART & ADDICTION EXPLORING THE LURE, LEGACY & INFLUENCE OF THE GREEN FAIRY ON SOME OF HISTORY’S GREATEST AND MOST INFLUENTIAL ARTISTS, WRITERS AND MUSICIANS.

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ABSINTHE HAS PLAYED A NOTABLE ROLE IN THE FINE ART MOVEMENTS OF IMPRESSIONISM, POST-IMPRESSIONISM, SURREALISM, MODERNISM, CUBISM... and in the corresponding literary movements. Though its psychoactive effects and chemical makeup are contested, its cultural impact is not. The legendary drink has more recently appeared in movies, video, television, music, and contemporary literature. The modern absinthe revival has had a notable effect on its portrayal. It is often shown as an unnaturally glowing green liquid demonstrating the influence Absinthe was featured prominently by most artists of the Belle Époque. In the early works of Pablo Picasso, one of the most important in the so called “Blue Period” is a painting from 1901 titled “Woman Drinking Absinthe” that shows a woman dressed in blue with elongated hands and fingers, sitting at the corner of a table in a Parisian cafe with a glass of Absinthe in front her. Picasso declared once that his earliest cubist works were inspired by Absinthe, including one named “Bottle of Pernod and Glass” painted in 1912. The ubiquitous print advertising hung by Pernod Fills in almost every bar and cafe in France was painted by Charles Maire. Unusually, the chromolithograph was backed on to canvas, and then varnished, giving it

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the appearance of an original oil technique, enhanced by the custom gilt-wood frame. Both Picasso and Braque were inspired by Maire cartons, as the basis of some of the very earliest Cubist paintings including “Bouteille de Pernod et verre”, a painting from 1912. In 1959, during a press interview with the French poet and artist Jean Cocteau, he talked about his friendship with Picasso, and his visits to the artist’s atelier. He described how a copy of Maire’s Pernod Fills chromolithograph was hung in Picasso’s studio during the time he was creating his early cubist masterpieces, and how Picasso gave it to him as a souvenir. This is not the only Absinthe item that acted as inspiration for the painter. Which is considered Picasso’s greatest Absinthe cubist masterpiece from 1914 is a sculpture named “Verre d’Absinthe” (Absinthe Glass), a painted bronze in an edition of six, all of which were painted differently. Such sculpture has a stable, glass like base, but an opened out, sliced up body. On the top rests a real Absinthe spoon and a painted bronze sugar cube.


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HEMINGWAY HIMSELF WAS A FREQUENT ABSINTHE DRINKER AND MOST LIKELY PROCURED HIS ABSINTHE FROM SPAIN AND CUBA AFTER THE BAN.

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The legacy of absinthe as a mysterious, addictive, and mind-altering drink continues to this day. Though its psychoactive effects and chemical makeup are contested, its cultural impact is not. Absinthe has played a notable role in the fine art movements of Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Surrealism, Modernism, Cubism... and in the corresponding literary movements. The legendary drink has more recently appeared in movies, video, television, music, and contemporary literature. The modern absinthe revival has had a notable effect on its portrayal. It is often shown as an unnaturally glowing green liquid demonstrating the influence Absinthe was featured prominently by most artists of the Belle Époque. In the early works of Pablo Picasso, one of the most important in the so called “Blue Period” is a painting from 1901 titled “Woman Drinking Absinthe” that shows a woman dressed in blue with elongated hands and fingers, sitting at the corner of a table in a Parisian cafe with a glass of Absinthe in front her. Picasso declared once that his earliest cubist works were inspired by Absinthe, including one named “Bottle of Pernod and Glass” painted in 1912, directly based on the Pernod publicity posters designed by Maire, picturing a bottle of Absinthe, a glass, and a folded newspaper. The ubiquitous print advertising hung by Pernod Fills in almost every bar and cafe in France was painted by Charles Maire. Unusually, the chromolithograph was backed on to canvas, and then varnished, giving it the appearance of an original oil technique, enhanced by the custom giltwood frame. In 1959, during a press interview with the French poet and artist Jean Cocteau, he talked about his friendship with Picasso, and his visits to the artist’s atelier. He described how a copy of Maire’s Pernod Fills chromolithograph was hung in Picasso’s studio during the time he was creating his early cubist masterpieces, and how Picasso gave it to him as a souvenir. Which is considered Picasso’s greatest Absinthe cubist masterpiece from 1914 is a sculpture namedlike base, but an opened out, sliced up body. Oscar Wilde has been quoted as saying,

“AFTER “AFTER “AFTER THE THE THE FIRST FIRST FIRST GLASS GLASS GLASS [OF [OF [OF ABSINTHE] ABSINTHE] ABSINTHE] YOU YOU YOU SEE SEE SEE THINGS THINGS THINGS AS AS AS YOU YOU YOU WISH WISH WISH THEY THEY THEY WERE. WERE. WERE. AFTER AFTER AFTER THE THE THE SECOND, SECOND, SECOND, YOU YOU YOU SEE SEE SEE THINGS THINGS THINGS AS AS AS THEY THEY THEY ARE ARE ARE NOT. NOT. NOT. FINALLY, FINALLY, FINALLY, YOU YOU YOU SEE SEE SEE THINGS THINGS THINGS AS AS AS THEY THEY THEY REALLY REALLY REALLY ARE, ARE, ARE, AND AND AND THAT THAT THAT IS IS IS THE THE THE MOST MOST MOST HORRIBLE HORRIBLE HORRIBLE THING THING THING IN IN IN THE THE THE WORLD.” WORLD.” WORLD.” and “what difference is there between a glass of absinthe and a sunset?” The legacy of absinthe as a mysterious, addictive, and mind-altering drink continues to this day. Though its psychoactive effects and chemical makeup are contested, its cultural impact is not. Absinthe has played a notable role in the fine art movements of Impressionism, Post-impressionism, Surrealism, Modernism, Cubism... and in the corresponding literary movements. The legendary drink has more recently appeared in movies, video, television, music, and contemporary literature. The modern absinthe revival has had a notable effect on its portrayal. It is often shown as an unnaturally glowing green liquid demonstrating the influence Absinthe was featured prominently by most artists of the Belle Époque. In the early works of Pablo Picasso, one of the most important in the so called “Blue Period” is a painting from 1901 titled “Woman Drinking Absinthe” that shows a woman dressed in blue with elongated hands and fingers, sitting at the corner of a table in a Parisian cafe with a glass of Absinthe in front her. Picasso declared once that his earliest cubist works were inspired by Absinthe, including one named “Bottle of Pernod and Glass” painted in 1912, directly based on the Pernod publicity posters designed by Maire, picturing a bottle of Absinthe, a glass, and a folded newspaper. The ubiquitous print advertising hung by Pernod Fills in almost every bar and cafe in France was painted by Charles Maire. Unusually, the chromolithograph was backed on to canvas, and then varnished, giving it the appearance of an original oil technique, enhanced by the custom gilt-wood frame. Both Picasso and Braque were inspired by Maire cartons, as the basis of some of the very earliest Cubist paintings including “Bouteille de Pernod et verre”.

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ASSAULT ON

ALPHAVILLE

THE FRENCH NEW WAVE FILM, ALPHAVILLE CHALLENGED NOT ONLY CINEMATIC CONVENTIONS BUT QUESTIONED THE FABRIC OF SOCIETY, REBELLING AGAINST THE CONSERVATIVE PARADIGM OF FRENCH AND HOLLYWOOD CINEMA. TODAY GODARD AND EVEN ALPHAVILLE ITSELF HAVE CLAIMED CULT STATUS, WITH STORES, BRANDS AND CLOTHING LABELS NAMED AFTER THEM. WITH THIS POPULARIZATION OF THE AVANTGARDE WE MUST ASK WHETHER TODAY’S SOCIETY VALUES IT OR SIMPLY DEFACES IT?

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Walking through the streets of Melbourne today it would be close to impossible to overlook the many people wearing t-shirts with the face of the man wearing black thick rimmed glasses with a cigarette hanging out of the right hand side of his face printed on it. That man is Jean Luc Godard a founder of the French New Wave cinema who defied cinematic conventions and changed the face of film today. Caution is, in fact, on a series of missions. First, he must search for missing agent Henry Dickson; second, he must capture or kill the creator of Alphaville, Professor Von Braun; lastly, he must destroy Alphaville and its dictatorial computer, Alpha 60. Alpha 60 is a sentient computer system created by Von Braun which is in complete control of all of Alphaville. Alpha 60 outlaws free thought and individualist concepts like love, poetry, and emotion in the city, replacing them with contradictory concepts or eliminating them altogether. One of Alpha 60’s dictates is that “people should not ask ‘why’, but only say ‘because’.” People who show signs of emotion (weeping at the death of a wife, or a smile on the face) are presumed to be acting illogically, and are gathered up, interrogated, and executed. In an image reminiscent of George Orwell’s concept of Newspeak, there is a “Bible” in each room: actually a dictionary that is continuously updated when words that are deemed to evoke emotion become banned. As a result, Alphaville is an inhuman, alienated society of mindless drones - many the apparent victims of reeducation campaigns by Alpha 60 that are implicitly reminiscent of Nazism and Communism. Alpha 60’s dictates have had some surprising results. Caution is told that men are killed at a ratio of fifty to every one woman executed. He also learns that Swedes, Germans and Americans assimilate well. Images of the E = mc² and E = hf equations are displayed several times throughout the film as a symbol of the regime of logical science that rules Alphaville. At one point, Caution passes through a place called the Grand Omega Minus, from whence brainwashed people are sent out to the other “galaxies” to start strikes, revolutions, family rows and student revolts. As an archetypal American private eye antihero in trench-coat and weathered visage, Lemmy Caution’s old-fashioned machismo conflicts with the puritanical computer (Godard originally wanted to title the film Tarzan versus IBM).[1] The opposition of his role to logic (and that of other dissidents to the regime) is represented by fauxquotations from La Capitale de la Douleur (The Capital of Pain), a book of poems by Paul Éluard.

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Newspeak, there is a “Bible” in each room: actually a dictionary that is continuously updated when words that are deemed to evoke emotion become banned.Alphaville is alienated society of mindless drones many the apparent victims of re-education campaigns by Alpha 60 that are implicitly reminiscent of Nazism and Communism. Alpha 60’s dictates have had some surprising results. Caution is told that men are killed at a ratio of fifty to every one woman executed. He also learns that Swedes, Germans and Americans assimilate well. Images of the E = mc² and E = hf equations are displayed several times throughout the film as a symbol of the regime of logical science that rules Alphaville.

Lemmy Caution is an agent from “the Outlands”. He poses as a journalist named Ivan Johnson, and claims to work for the FigaroPravda. He wears a tan overcoat that stores various items. He carries a camera with him and photographs everything he sees, particularly the things that would ordinarily be unimportant to a journalist. Despite the futuristic setting, references made in the film still set the action in the Twentieth Century. Caution is, in fact, on a series of missions. First, he must search for missing agent Henry Dickson; second, he must capture or kill the creator of Alphaville, Professor Von Braun; lastly, he must destroy Alphaville and its dictatorial computer, Alpha 60. Alpha 60 is a sentient computer system created by Von Braun which is in complete control of all of Alphaville.

IS THE PRESENCE A COMPLIMENT TO THE POWER OF GODARD’S VOICE THROUGH FILM? DOES IT MEAN THAT THESE MANY ACKNOWLEDGE THE NEED TO QUESTION AND REBEL SOCIAL NORMS LIKE GODARD HIMSELF? OR HAS THIS IMAGE OF GODARD COME TO STAND FOR EVERYTHING THAT IT IS NOT, POP CULTURE? Caution enlists the assistance of Natacha Von Braun (Anna Karina), a programmer of Alpha 60 who is also the daughter of Prof. Von Braun (although she says “I have never met him”). Natacha is a citizen of Alphaville, and when questioned says she does not know the meaning of “love” or “conscience”. Caution falls in love with her, and his love introduces emotion and unpredictability into the city that the computer has cfalls in love with her, and his love introduces emotion and unpredictability into the city that the computer has crafted in its own image.

Alpha 60 outlaws free thought and individualist concepts like love, poetry, and emotion in the city, replacing them with contradictory concepts or eliminating them altogether. One of Alpha 60’s dictates is that “people should not ask ‘why’, but only say ‘because’.” People who show signs of emotion (weeping at the death of a wife, or a smile on the face) are presumed to be acting illogically, and are gathered up, interrogated, and executed. In an image reminiscent of George Orwell’s concept of

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