Issuu on Google+

HEad OfficE

dUn

sWEdEn Haglöfs scandinavia aB industrigatan 18 p.O. Box 520 774 27 avEsTa sWEdEn phone: +46 (0) 226 67 000 fax: +46 (0) 226 571 59 haglofs@haglofs.se www.haglofs.se

sYnTET gOga

nORdic WinTER 200:1750g 183:1630g Temp (En 13537) -14 °c T comf -22 °c T lim -44 °c T ext gOga 3s 200:1230 g 183:1130g Temp (En 13537) -6 °c T comf -13 °c T lim -33 °c T ext gOga 2s 200:990 g 183:890g Temp (En 13537) 2 °c T comf -4 °c T lim -20 °c T ext gOga 1s 200:800g 183:710 g Temp (En 13537) 7 °c T comf 2 °c T lim -13 °c T ext

HYpna

Q dOWn

HYpna 3s 200:1410g 183:1310g Temp (En 13537) -2 °c T comf -9 °c T lim -27 °c T ext HYpna 2s 200:1150g 183:1050g Temp (En 13537) 4 °c T comf -1 °c T lim -17 °c T ext HYpna 1s 200:950 g 183:850g Temp (En 13537) 9 °c T comf 5 °c T lim -9 °c T ext

Q dOWn 3s 175:1330g Temp (En 13537) -5 °c T comf -12 °c T lim -31 °c T ext Q dOWn 2s 175:1170g Temp (En 13537) -1 °c T comf -6 °c T lim -24 °c T ext

liM

liM 100 200:750g 183:660g Temp (En 13537) 10 °c T comf 6 °c T lim -7 °c T ext liM 50 200:520g 183:460g Temp (En 13537) 16 °c T comf 13 °c T lim 1 °c T ext

sYnTET nORdic WinTER 200:2670g 183:2350g Temp: (En 13537) -12°c T comf -20°c T lim -42°c T ext ZEnsOR 3s 200:1750g 183:1600g Temp: (En 13537) -2°c T comf -8°c T lim -26°c T ext ZEnsOR 2s 200:1400 g 183:1260 g Temp: (En 13537) 2°c T comf -3°c T lim -18°c T ext ZEnsOR 1s 200:1100 g 183:990 g Temp: (En 13537) 5°c T comf 0°c T lim -15°c T ext ZEnsOR cOMpacT 200:900 g 183:810g Temp: (En 13537) 11°c T comf 7°c T lim -6°c T ext

slUMBER slUMBER 3s 200:2200 g 183:2030 g Temp: (En 13537) -4°c T comf -11°c T lim -30°c T ext slUMBER 2s 200:1700 g 183:1540 g Temp: (En 13537) 0°c T comf -5°c T lim -22°c T ext slUMBER 1s 200:1400 g 183:1300g Temp: (En 13537) 6°c T comf 1°c T lim -14°c T ext slUMBER cOMpacT 200:1080 g 183:1000 g Temp: (En 13537) 10°c T comf 6°c T lim -7°c T ext slUMBER JUniOR 150:900 g slUMBER TOddlER 110:670g

Q fiBRE

Q slUMBER Q 3s fiBRE 175:1820 g Temp: (En 13537) -7°c T comf -14°c T lim -33°c T ext Q fiBRE 2s 175:1480 g Temp: (En 13537) -2°c T comf -8°c T lim -26°c T ext Q fiBRE 1s 175:1150 g Temp: (En 13537) 3°c T comf -2°c T lim -19°c T ext

Q slUMBER 3s 175:2140 g Temp: (En 13537) -9°c T comf -16°c T lim -37°c T ext Q slUMBER 2s 175:1720 g Temp: (En 13537) -1°c T comf -7°c T lim -24°c T ext Q slUMBER 1s 175:1360 g Temp: (En 13537) 5°c T comf 1°c T lim -15°c T ext Q slUMBER cOMpacT 175:990 g Temp: (En 13537) 10°c T comf 6°c T lim -7°c T ext

nORWaY Haglöfs as postboks 221 1319 Bekkestua nORWaY phone: +47 67 53 35 08 fax: +47 67 53 35 09 bjarne@haglofs.no

nETHERlands snowgoose de Kwekerij 5 1921 XZ akersloot nETHERlands phone: +31 (0) 251 320 764 fax: +31 (0) 251 316 995 info@snowgoose.nl

iTalY Travel division srl strada ninz, 61 39030 la villa in Badia (BZ) iTalY phone: +39 (0) 471 845570 fax: +39 (0) 471 847755 haglofs@travel-division.it

dEnMaRK Haglöfs danmark a/s Björnholms allé 4 8260 viby J dEnMaRK phone: +45 86 14 14 00 fax: +45 86 11 63 13 haglofs@haglofs.dk

pORTUgal altitude - Jogos de aventura, lda Rua João saraiva 34 a/B 1700-250 lisboa pORTUgal phone: +351 (0) 21 843 5580 fax: +351 (0) 21 846 2834 altitude@cipreia.pt

spain & andORRa Mega sport s.a. Mercuri, 14 planta 2ª polígono almeda 08940 cornellà spain phone: +34 93 475 14 20 fax: +34 93 474 32 41 info@megasportsa.com

finland Haglöfs Oy pakkalankuja 7 01510 vantaa finland phone: +358 (0) 988 680 080 fax: +358 (0) 988 680 089 haglofs@haglofs.fi

gERManY & aUsTRia Haglöfs deutschland gmbH albert-Einstein-str. 6 87437 Kempten gERManY phone: +49 (0) 831 512 800 fax: +49 (0) 831 512 8029 info@haglofs.de

UK & iREland Haglöfs UK River Mill, staveley Mill Yard, staveley, cumbria la8 9lR UK phone: +44 (0) 1539 822595 fax: +44 (0) 1539 825244 info@haglofs.co.uk

sWiTZERland ace ag dorfstrasse 23 postfach 62 8873 amden sWiTZERland phone: +41 (0) 55 611 61 61 fax: +41 (0) 55 611 61 62 info@haglofs.ch

10/11

BElgiUM Terra incognita Hallebaan 21 2520 Oelegem BElgiUM phone: +32 (0) 3385 88 27 fax: +32 (0) 3385 88 26 info@haglofs.be Japan fullmarks 957-12 Kawamukai-cho Tsuziki Yokohama Japan phone: +81 (0) 45 470 4900 fax: +81 (0) 45 472 4726 waka@full-marks.com

HAGL FS LOGOTYPE B A S I C L O G O T Y P E . TO B E U S E D A S N E G AT I V E W H I T E O N A B L A C K O R D A R K B A C K G R O U N D

fRancE nord Ouest 325 Route de valparc 743 30 poisy fRancE phone: +33 4 50 67 00 17 fax: +33 4 50 67 16 69 admin@nordouest.fr

fOR OTHER MaRKETs, plEasE cOnTacT HEad OfficE. HAGLÖFS LOGOTYPE

BASIC LOGOTYPE. TO BE USED AS POSITIVE BLACK ON A LIGHT BACKGROUND

7 318840 440126

ZEnsOR

H aglö f s 10 /11

sOvsÄcKaR

föR MER infO OM pROdUKTERna sE WWW.H agl Ofs.sE

O U T s Ta n d i n g O U T d O O R E QU i p M E n T

OUR WaY


haglรถfs 09/10

L ar s Thu lin

2


Contents

h ag l ö f s m ag a l o g 10 / 11

06

24

38

56 68

16

32

46

0 3 co n t e n ts 04

i n tr o d uct i o n

0 6 c l i m b i n g i n Yo s e m it e 14 C l i m at ic pa n t s - a produ ct guide 16 22

T h e K a i t u m r i v e r : L apland at i t’s wildes t T r e kki n g - a p r o d uct guide

24 36

w i n t e r i n Sto ck h o lm’s ar chipelago s l e e p i n g b ag s - a produ ct guide

38 Ya k attack - A ” l i ttle” race among high moun tains 4 4 I n t e n s e - a p r o d uct guide 46 K l ua n e n at i o n a l par k 5 4 Backc o u n t ry - a p rodu ct guide 56 a ly e s k a sk i r e s o rt 6 6 Fr o ntc o u ntry - a produ ct guide 6 8 th e Pa rti s a n l e d e n - S ummi ting the five pea k s 7 4 Mo u n ta i n e e e r i n g - a produ ct guide HAGL FS LOGOTYPE

7 6 HAGLÖFS' ASSORT MEN T 2010

B A S I C L O G O T Y P E . TO B E U S E D A S N E G AT I V E W H I T E O N A B L A C K O R D A R K B A C K G R O U N D

9 2 HAGLÖFS' co l o u r s 2010

o u t s ta n d i n g o u t d o o r e q u i p m e n t 3

P L E A S E C O N TA C T H A G L F S I F Y O U R E Q U I R E A S S I S TA N C E O R A D V I C E W I T H T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F T H E L O G O T Y P E T E L + 4 6 2 2 6 6 7 0 0 0 , FA X + 4 6 2 2 6 5 7 1 5 9


2 010 / 2 011 h ag l ö f s m ag a l o g 10 / 11

Every time we go into nature something is given to us. It is a constant source of inspiration and adventure, as well as a place for reflection and recovery. Nature doesn´t need us, but we need nature and the paths we hike today must survive to be discovered by others tomorrow. This magalog is a bundle of dreams from outdoor enthusiasts who love adventures and push their limits to gain new insights about themselves. We hope you’ll be inspired by the beauty of the Kluane National Park, by the fantastic climbing in Yosemite, by Swedish Lapland at it´s wildest or by a somewhat unexpected winter adventure in the Stockholm archipelago. Please enjoy your reading and your next adventure! The Haglöfs team.

contributing photographers Yves Garneau (cover) Lars Thulin Jolanda Linschooten Henrik Trygg Johan Rosengren Ptor Spricenieks Markus Alatalo Product pictures: Bertil Strandell

Contributors Niclas Sjögren Jolanda Linschooten Michael Lemmel Andreas Danielsson Per Jonsson Mikael Af Ekenstam Ptor Spricenieks Patrik Brynielsson

PEFC/06-39-08

This product is from sustainably managed forest and controlled sources.

HAGLÖFS IN FIGURES Haglöfs was founded in 1914 and has today 120 employees in 7 countries. A further 12 markets are taken care of by Haglöfs agents or distributors. The company develops and markets around 500 different products every year. Haglöfs sales approached SEK 590 million in 2009. Every year Haglöfs sponsors environmental care projects such as “Association For Conservation”, www.eogconservation.org.


Jolanda Linschooten


Yo s e m i t e It is one of the world’s most dramatic landscapes of vertical granite. At some point, all climbers with high ambitions wander this way. Johanna Tiensuu Stålnacke had spent a number of years climbing in both Europe and south-east Asia. Now it was time for Yosemite. In the early 1920s, when journalists asked the legendary climber George Mallory, who may have been the first to summit the world’s highest mountain, why he was so keen to summit Mount Everest, he answered with the now famous quote “Because it's there”. Nowadays, it is just as obvious that almost all big wall climbers want to squeeze their fingers into a crevice in the legendary granite of Yosemite National Park. Climbing in Yosemite just can’t be avoided once you have started to look at vertical granite.

text: Niclas sjögren Photo: Lars Thulin

Facts Yosemite In 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signed a document that meant that the Yosemite Valley in California was to become the one of the world’s first national parks. It is now a popular tourist destination and attracts around 3.5 million visitors every year. Several thousand of these are climbers who are drawn to the legendary routes in the area. The most famous route, The Nose on El Capitan, was first climbed in 1958 by Warren Harding and is now a yardstick that is used to separate the wheat from the chaff of big wall climbing. Lynn Hill performed the first free ascent of The Nose place in 1993, and her feat was not repeated for another five years. Yosemite was classed as a World Heritage Site in 1984.


“ I t takes t he a dventure to a ne w le vel . I magi ne cam pi ng and a ll t hat it en tail s, but o n a v ertica l c l iff face t hat is any th in g from a fe w h undre d metres to a kilometre high.”

Johanna Tiensuu Stålnacke has been climbing for over a decade on famous cliffs in France, Britain and Spain, as well as on coveted big walls in south-east Asia. It was no great surprise that she won the Nordic Championship in bouldering in 2006. However, her completion of several 8a (red point) and 7b (on sight) climbs, is certainly extraordinary for a 26-year-old woman. Johanna’s dream of Yosemite had been growing for a number of years and more or less subconsciously her plans had taken shape. Dedicated sport climbing had been mixed with increasingly challenging expedition-style ascents; from bouldering south of Paris to magnificent granite walls in northern Norway. Apart from the fact that the climbing is a little more exciting than in many other places around the world, Yosemite National Park is also a pretty wild place on the ground, below the vertical granite. Being scared of the dark takes on a new dimension when you have to go out into the coal-black night to pee, knowing that there are black bears wandering around close to the tent. When Johanna climbed a number of famous routes, of which perhaps the best known is The Prow (Washington Column). “We know that climbing is so much more than just the actual physical performance. One of the things that most appeals to me is that climbing stimulates you both physically and mentally – and maximally. You can’t have the one thing without the other, which means that you can be very strong and have a good technique, but if you don’t have the right mindset when you climb then … you can’t climb if your head’s not in it, without thinking. Your head has to be involved, otherwise you won’t be able to communicate with the rock. It’s vital, as otherwise you fall.” It can be difficult to convey the feeling of what climbing a huge granite wall entails. Sure, the photos give a clear picture of the dizzying heights, small holds and wrecked fingers. But it is much more than that, It is about balancing on the edge of what is physically and mentally possible, as well as the slight awkwardness involved in camping several hundred metres above ground. Whatever you lose here is gone forever, as well as being potentially lethal for those on the ropes below you. Something as simple as going to the toilet becomes a complicated project. Up here you must pee or defecate into cans, bottles or bags and carry them with you up and then away from the rock face. Each item of equipment is carefully weighed up. When you leave behind you on the ground cannot be retrieved, whether it’s a comfy raincoat or your favourite friend. h a g l ö f s 10 / 11

“It takes the adventure to a new level. Imagine camping and all that it entails, but on a vertical cliff face that is anything from a few hundred metres to a kilometre high. You have to carry all your equipment to the wall and then haul it up as you climb. How much do you really drink each day in scorching sun while working hard. Three litres? Seven litres? How many days will it take? Three? Four? Will it rain? Or can I risk not taking a rain cover for the portaledge, thus saving a few grams? How much protection do I need? What type? Everything that I do on the ground has to be done on the rock face. There are difficult choices all the time. Choices that can determine whether you succeed or not. “Water is one example. Each kilogram that has to be hauled means that I use up more energy and perhaps take a longer time on the wall. And the longer I’m on the wall, the more food and water I need to take with me. Getting that equation to balance is … umm … interesting.” For most people who succeed on the The Prow it takes three to four days to climb. It is just over 400 vertical metres; an upward journey of aid climbing. Twelve pitches closer to heaven. Johanna and her climbing partner, Fred Degoulet, completed the ascent in three days and did so clean, even if they used existing pitons and hardware. Johanna, is it possible to describe Yosemite’s climbing in words? “Oh … Yosemite is so much more than just the extremely difficult big wall climbing. Strangely enough there’s something for everyone, from the beginner to a people who have dedicated decades of their lives to climbing. “This climb has everything. Sometimes it can take two hours just to climb one pitch, and you feel extremely exposed when you’re standing there, jumping on a four-millimetre steel wire attached to a minimal nut – pretty much like the head of a nail. You test that it holds and below is 400 metres of air. Sure, there is protection below, but it’s still a breathtaking experience. You move upwards, always upwards, methodically. That’s when you are one with your thoughts: it’s just you and the rock. Those moments linger in the memory for a long time …” Johanna, do you have any suggestions for climbers who are thinking about going to Yosemite? “Yes, that’s easy. I actually only have one suggestion: Go!”

11


ABOUT JOHANNA Name: Johanna Tiensuu Stålnacke Age: 26 Home: Kiruna, Sweden Johanna… … been a climbing bum in Railey Beach and Ton Sai in Thailand, 2003-2004, and climbed almost all routes up to grade 7c+. … won the 2006 Nordic Championship in Women’s Bouldering. … climbed in *Céüse, France: routes such as Privilège du serpent 7c+, Mirage 7c+, Makash Walou 7c+, etc. … gained her most impressive “tick” in Oslo, Hauktjærn, with routes such as Gamle Jomfru and Normalveien (both 8a on the French grading system). … been bitten by the Yosemite bug, including the following routes: The Prow c2+, 12 pitches, 3 days (aided), East Buttress of Middle Cathedral 5.10b 12 pitches (free). … dreams of returning to the US and climbing on El Capitan.


Climatic A good fit for you is not the same as it is for anyone else. At the end of the day, it is a combination of comfortable, functional material, along with the right technical detailing and a design that is suitable for demanding activities and everyday life. We have added a low cut to our women’s pants and a loose cut to the men’s styles, so that you have the opportunity to decide what is a good fit for you and your adventures; be they bouldering in Yosemite, rounding the southern tip of Landsort in a kayak or strolling around town.

LOW CUT

MID Q TRAIL PANT Versatile & fully featured mid weight pant in a low cut

14

MID Q FJELL PANT A durable versatile medium weight pant in a regular cut

MID FLEX PANT A versatile medium weight pant in a regular cut


Climatic pan ts

RUGGED Q MOUNTAIN PANT A fully featured heavy weight stretch hybrid all-mountain pant in a regular cut

MID TRAIL PANT Versatile & fully featured mid weight pant in a loose cut

Four front pockets, one back zippered pocket. Triple Stitch

LOose CUT

Gusseted crotch for ease of movement

Reinforced knees and seat in a FlexAble™ stretch fabric to improve comfort and waterresistance

Articulated knees

Cord adjustable leg openings Buckle adjustable cuffs

To see more pro ducts and col ours, pl ease visit www.hagl ofs.se


Th e K a it u m r i v e r: L a pl a n d at it ’ s w i l d e st. Always on the lookout for great adventures, my eye was caught by the description of the Kaitum Elva in Swedish Lapland. “A river with an enormous wilderness character”. That in itself would be enough to pack my gear, but what followed was even more interesting. The put-in lay hidden so far in the middle of nowhere, that it could only be reached by floatplane. The guidebook said: “Probably it’s possible to reach the put-in by a long portage on your own keel and legs, but obviously no one has tried this yet.” Well, if I read something like that, there’s only one solution: go to Lapland. Preferably during the period that fall colours splash from the mountainsides and the mosquitoes are starting their hibernation.

Text and photography: Jolanda Linschooten

Fa c t s K a i t u m ä lv e n The tributaries of Kaitumälven rise west of the Kebnekaise massif and flow eastwards, through Övre, Mellersta and Nedre Kaitumjaure. It is about 1500 km long, finally flowing into the Kalixälven river. Kaitumälven is famed for its clear water and good fishing, which includes char, grayling and trout. Paddling and rafting are other popular activities.


A mon th l ong t re k means a pi le of gear which i s reasonab le to s tow in a canoe. But if you are tow ing your canoe ups tream and then carry everyt h i ng over the Kungs leden, you as k yourse lf why yo u ever s tart ed t his adven ture! t he answer to that qu e stion ma kes me happy, B ecause I can on ly blame m y s elf; i t was my own choice. This is u ltimate free dom and t hat is exactly why I’m out here.

After a week we arrive at the source lakes of the river Kaitum. The lake Padje Kaitumjaure is crystal clear and our coffee kettle is simmering over a small fire. The sky has changed colours from sheer blue to soft pink and the first stars appear. Quite some mugs of coffee later, even the northern lights are mirrored on the water. I don’t want to sleep, because this is absolutely perfect. Not just this moment, but the knowledge that beyond these mountains are more mountains and more birch forests, with bear scat and wolf tracks. Wilderness and silence in large. It sharpens my senses and clears my focus. Time is getting a different meaning. No longer is it about getting somewhere. Of course, we have the goal to get further downriver and in the end we hope to reach a small place named Kaitum Station. But on moments like this, I’m so happy to have plenty of time before we get there. Sometimes we leave the canoe down at the riverbank and roam the mountains until late in the afternoon. The river looks so different from above and for just a few of these pictures

18

I don’t mind walking half a day. The berries up there taste great so we return to our camp with purple tongues. After the lakes, the Kaitum narrows to a real river. Frequently we encounter whitewater passages and after scouting we paddle most of them. The moment we push off from the stoney banks and pick up speed from the river is always thrilling. You’re still able to steer and dictate direction, but you’ll go with the flow anyway. Water splashes in my face. The canoe bounces on the waves. Plain action. Strained muscles are preventing a sudden capsize. In the middle of a roller coaster I’m only busy staying upright. Not until the waves are dying out, I become reckless and wish it would last even longer. After the action we’re heading for shore to unload our canoe. Our daily routine of making camp, gathering firewood, cooking, eating and drinking coffee. We don’t talk that much and exactly that silent connection is very dear to me. It is why treks like this reach beyond rushing adventures. At first glance we only have little out here. No internet, no TV, no fridge en no supermarket. But the luxury world of tele-

h a g löf s 1 0 / 11


phones, computers and deadlines can’t beat the silence of Swedish Lapland, the dancing northern lights and the taste of wild blueberries. Here, less becomes more. More wild for instance. Quite often we catch sight of lightfooted herds of reindeer, travelling upstream. One evening a herd runs so close alongside our camp, that we fear for our guylines. When I hear splashing in the river that night, I jump upright and fumble the tent zipper. Meanwhile Frank is looking at the river through the ventilation cap in the peak of out teepee tent. In the pale moonlight I see four young moose bulls stepping through the water. The moose climb the bank next to our tent and disappear into the forest. Satisfied I lay down on my insulation pad. “Great, four moose bulls at once!” I say to Frank. “Huh, Moose?”, he recalls. “In my opinion there are ten reindeer. They are still here by the way.” Can’t I count to ten anymore? Did I forget the difference between a moose and a reindeer or did I get too much berries? I look outside again, at the other side of the tent this time, where indeed a group of reindeer is passing by. No words come close to this feeling of becoming part of nature. Only the knowledge that autumn in the north is short and that it won’t be long until frost will stop the current in the river, drives us on the next day. Hardly a month after our departure we reach a railroad bridge. A handful of houses is laying scattered in the forest. A shabby waiting room – hardly three by four metres – is called the Kaitum Station. In fact there is a timetable hanging on the wall, but we just can’t imagine that a train has stopped here the past ten years. In a metal box with the inscription Information hangs a telephone which, when I pick it up, is almost immediately answered to my surprise. In my best Swedish for beginners I ask when a train will stop here. In decent English for advanced is explained that we should turn a yellow sign towards the railroad. Thus the train will stop and pick us up. To my astonishment the system seems to work out the next morning. We get on the train with our folded canoe, buy a ticket and after a month in the wilderness we then sit a bit in a daze between the commuters on their way to Gällivare.

20


TREKKING The first few days of a trek often feel like hard work for your body. It has to become used to a heavy pack and uneven terrain; it is now that your backpack and boots, in particular, will prove their worth. Your backpack should fit your body shape: back length, hip and chest circumferences, so that it can be carried in the right way – on your hips and not on your shoulders. Your boots should be stable, light and quick drying. Haglöfs has produced a unique boot that fulfils these requirements; it is made from synthetic materials, so it is very easy to care for. We are extremely proud of Grym. You are welcome to give it a try and to literally walk in the new generation of trekking boots.

A footbed from SOLE® that moulds itself to your foot. Orthopaedic shape that supports your entire foot, from heel to toe. Deep heel cup for stability and increased comfort.

SuperFabric® – extremely durable, lightweight and quickdrying.

Sole developed in partnership with Vibram®. Unique rubber compound and a tread that is specially cut for good grip in tough terrain and on wet surfaces.

Innovative hiking boot with a high shaft made of a unique material combination, resulting in a lightweight boot that is durable, quick drying and very easy to look after.


SUMO Expedition backpack engineered to transport huge loads over great distances.

Ample front pocket with water resistant zippers

Rollable compressionstraps

Hydration system compatible with internal sleeve and hose keepers on shoulder straps

Pack accessible via zippered side panel opening

Featuring extra wide, extra thick shoulder pads to support expedition size loads Carrying handles on front- and backside

Wand pockets to accommodate water bottles, tent poles etc.

Pivoting hipbelt

Sleeping bag compartment with large funnel opening for easy in/easy out

Spear™ load transfer rods. 7001 aluminum tubes that distributes the weight of the pack to the hipbelt.

Sled hauling loops on hipbelt

Top-lid converts into a lumbar pack.

Contact™ PRO Adjustable System. A Velcro adjustable shoulder harness system for tuning the torso length.

To see more produc t s and co lours, p l ease visi t www.hagl o fs.se

Ample front pocket with water resistant zippers.


Patrik Brynielsson


winter i n S to c k h o l m ’s a r c h ip e l ag o In the summer, the Stockholm archipelago is a famous and popular tourist destination, but those who come here in the winter get to see another side to it, one that is at least as fantastic. The ice extends to make the outer skerries accessible to long-distance skaters. Add a few centimetres of snow to that and you have a paradise for crosscountry skiers. Paddling is good in places that have not submitted to the ice or, if the winds are from the south-west and over 8-12 m/s, conditions are right for surfing at Torö’s stony beach. In brief – winter in Stockholm’ archipelago is the perfect playground for outdoor enthusiasts.

text: Michael Lemmel Photos: Henrik trygg

Fa c t s S t o c k h o l m a r c h i p e l a g o The Stockholm archipelago has around 35,000 islands and skerries and covering about 1,700 km². It has about 10,000 residents, but it is estimated that around 3 million people visit the archipelago in the summer. The harsh coastal climate affects the flora and fauna, and rare species such as grey seals, eagle owls and sea eagles are found here. There is one national park, Ängsö, in the archipelago, as well as several nature reserves. Around 15 percent of its land area is owned or administered by the Archipelago Foundation (Skärgårdsstiftelsen). Most of the remaining land is owned by private property owners, some by companies that run tourism businesses.


As I crawled on my stomach on the ice floes in the newly created shipping channel, I started to smile. With a fear-tinged delight, I felt how the blocks of ice started to rotate and how I inevitably slid down between them. “Damn, this is going to be cold”, was one thought that flashed through my head, while another was “Will I be able to get through the ice blocks and up onto the ice on the other side?”. But most of all, euphoria spread through me, as this was exactly the type of everyday adventure I was looking for.

26


The winter of 2010 has been an epic one for winter sport enthusiasts in Stockholm. The persistent cold and the snow, which have made normally frosty roads look like roads in the Alps, have created infinite opportunities for everyday adventures. Early in January, when the ice in the archipelago was snowcovered, I went cross-country skiing with my dog, Akeela. My skate skiing and his movements blended together in a symbiosis where we maintained speed through my gliding and poling and his pull on the harness. We flew along and both enjoyed it. It was like skiing on midnight snow in the late winter mountains, but on the flat and with lots of houses around us. It was on one such trip that I started to dream of a multi-day trip through the archipelago, from north to south. Sadly I would have to leave Akeela at home, as he wouldn’t appreciate open channels or accidental swims. Instead, I needed a two-legged companion. As I was having these thoughts a good friend, Calle, rang and said: “We have to come up with a good adventure in the archipelago now that the snow and the weather are so good!” He was thinking of kayaking, skating and skiing. I felt it was complicated and thought about my longer trip. “What about a tree-day trip, Kapellskär to Sandhamn, Sandhamn to Utö and Utö to Nynäshamn on skate skis? He went for it. Yes! A thorough planning process started. Every day, I looked at satellite images of the ice in the Baltic, ice reports from long-distance skaters, organised dry suits from Gore, thought through equipment in order to minimise it, talked to locals and – most of all – tried to interpret the weather in order to find the ideal timing. Finally, I decided that the best dates would be 15, 16 and 17 March. A few degrees below freezing, light northerly winds and sunshine. After that would there would be a thaw, rain and southerly winds. I also realised that this winter could be the last chance; who knows what future winters will be like? My whole body was tingling – this was it! At the very last second, Calle dropped out. Panic! I called everyone who could imaginably want to and be able to come along, but no one could. I didn’t dare go alone, that would have been stupid. Calle had organised a photographer who would meet up with us en route and, on Monday night, 12 hours after I’d planned to leave, I finally got hold of the right person: Mårten Ajne – a fantastic long-distance skater who is an expert on ice and cold water. Perfect!

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11

Mårten and I talked about route choices and equipment. The most important item we decide on was a “pack raft” – a small inflatable raft that weighs 2 kg, which can be used to transport backpacks and skis over open channels so that they stay dry. Our Journe y

On Tuesday night, there was a light snowfall that left about 7 mm of snow on the ice. Mårten and I met in Älgö and went through the final details. Finally – I was excited and wanted to get going! We started at nine in the morning. The sky was cloudy and there was a light wind from the south-west. Our bulky, 15 kg backpacks weighed down our shoulders, as well as the arches of our skis, and it was soon apparent that the little snow that had fallen during the night had radically changed the conditions. The snow was no longer hard and fast, it was soft and resistant. It was like skiing with klister wax. The trip from Älgö to the southern tip of Ingarö disintegrated into a nightmare. The sweat poured off us and we worked like dogs. I quickly realised that Mårten was a superb companion; even though he didn’t “own” the dream in the same way as I did, he just gritted his teeth and got with it in an impressive manner. It is a marvellous feeling to move through the outer archipelago on skating skis, accompanied by a good friend. The freedom of seeing the sea to the east and islands in the west expands your senses. We were out on a living sea with huge amounts of water beneath our feet. We were alone, it was beautiful, it was fantastic. We met the photographer, Henrik, in Björkvik on Ingarö. He laughed heartily when he saw us appear, wet and sweaty, and as we were standing there we suddenly saw something moving at the northern end of Jungfrufjärden – at ship moving southwards at full speed through the ice. Damn! She was moving fast and straight towards our route across the sound. Now we had to move quickly. I set off at a furious speed out into the shipping lane to see if I could get the ship to swerve behind us or to brake so that we could pass in front of her. Mårten was right behind me. We charged on with the taste of blood in our mouths and, to our horror, we saw that the ship was not slowing down or changing course at all. The ice vibrated and broke up as the ship passed just in front of us, making a 20-metre wide channel that we would have to swim across in order to continue. This would be a test of our experience – had we planned properly?

27


© 2010 GOOGLE EARTH

MY E QUI PMENT Worn: LIM jacket Lightweight windpants (Haglöfs) Prototype base layer (Haglöfs) Icebreaker wool socks SealSkinz socks Windstopper® gloves (Haglöfs) Fanatic fleece hat (Haglöfs) Ice claws Heaving line B a c k pa c k : 35 L backpack Sevylor pack raft Drybag Haglöfs base layer Haglöfs fleece top Fanatic fleece cap (Haglöfs) Barrier Pullover (Haglöfs) 2 pairs of thick Icebreaker wool socks Thick gloves Sunglasses Windpants and wind jacket (Haglöfs) 7 mm Neoprene shoes Neoprene gloves with thin fleece gloves as lining Dry suit from Gore® Half-litre thermos Enervit bars Action pack meal Ortovox bivi bag Maps in map case Samsung B2100 waterproof mobile phone SPOT satellite messenger Skate skis Skate ski boots Skate poles without baskets


I moved to the edge of the channel, doubt and determination whirling around my head. Mårten caught me up. We calmly established, but with butterflies in our stomachs, that the only thing to do was to get changed. Backpacks off, dry suits on, neoprene shoes, neoprene gloves, inflate the pack raft, attach the heaving lines to each end of the pack raft, attach backpacks and skis to the pack raft. I knotted one end of the heaving line around my waist, both so that I could take the line to pull over the pack raft and so that Mårten would be able to pull me back if anything happened in the channel. I grinned at Mårten and, as if I was crossing the Styx, the border between the kingdoms of the living and the dead, said “see you on the other side” and stepped onto the first floe. I had to lower my centre of gravity rapidly in order to keep my balance, so I lay flat. As I crawled on my stomach on the ice floes in the newly created shipping channel, I started to smile. With a fear-tinged delight, I felt how the blocks of ice started to rotate and how I inevitably slid down between them. “Damn, this is going to be cold,” was one thought that flashed through my head, while another was “Will I be able to get through the ice blocks and up onto the ice on the other side?”. But most of all, euphoria spread through me, as this was exactly the type of everyday adventure I was looking for. I finally pulled myself out on the other side. A little bit of a struggle, slightly cold hands and feet, but otherwise fine. My heart thudded with excitement. I pulled the pack raft and equipment over, which also went smoothly as the blocks of ice simply moved out of its way due to the weight. I unpacked the equipment and Mårten pulled it back over. We wanted to test whether it would be possible to pull him over as well and, to our delight, it worked perfectly. I was happy that carting the pack raft’s extra weight had been worthwhile and Mårten was overjoyed about something entirely different, namely: “It was groundbreaking, epochal. The pack raft’s proven functionality has solved the century-old problem of open channels. This opens up entirely new opportunities for long coastal skating trips.” In total, it had taken us an hour to cross the channel. As we got changed and packed the backpacks the sun came out and the clouds disappeared.

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11

We continued south of Uvön, up into the strait west of Mörtö and stopped for a much-needed rest and lunch in a gazebo on the southern end of Nämdö. We were tired of the unforgiving snow conditions that meant we had to fight for every metre’s progress, but we were cheered by our successful passage over the channel. It was sunny and we felt that now we could over come any obstacles ahead of us. We ate and drank what we had in our backpacks to refill our energy stores and then continued our trip. We decided to ski up to Solvik on Nämdö to see if we could refill with water and hopefully find something to eat. Of course, the grocery shop in Solvik was closed, so I went and knocked on the door of an elderly couple. They were happy to give us water and would have loved us to stay for coffee, but we had to keep on northwards to catch the last ferry to Stavsnäs. We followed a snowmobile track across Orrön, heading towards Bullerö, and then turned north. The difficult deep snow was draining, but Mårten showed unwavering strength and determination. Now we were racing the clock. Our first aim was to get to Skarpö-Runmarös’ western point, to catch the ferry from there, but we realised that would be too close time-wise and didn’t dare risk it, as the ice and snow conditions could be even worse ahead of us. Instead, we decided to ski towards Södersunda on Runmarö, from where we could follow the road to Styrsvik to give us enough time to catch the ferry to the mainland. As the tips of our skis left the ice and we poled our way up onto land, hunger and gratitude washed over me. I was ecstatic at having completed this dream journey and enormously hungry after completing 48 km on sea ice in 7.5 hours. The road to Styrsvik passed a shop, which was closed – of course. Once we were in Styrsvik we got changed on the dock and were the subject questioning glances from the other ferry passengers: what had we been doing with such strange equipment? Skate skis, large backpack, ice claws and heaving line…? When we told them, they wondered if we were in our right minds. I smiled a little to myself as I realised that that was exactly what we were. Once we were on the ferry we ran to the cafeteria and tried to buy everything; we ate, we laughed and were happy!

29


Rot t en ice, candle ice and b ra s h ice. Late in the seas o n , i ce ha s many name s and s tage s , but none are a s d e l i g htful a s young ice or nila s. The fact i s that th e i c e i s n ow at it s mo s t di ff icult, causing the mo s t pro bl e ms and b arrier s , and p res enting new challenge s.

Te x t and photos: Patrik Bryniel sson

Once again, the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute’s daily ice chart was right – it had said that Yttre Hållsfjärden would be open and, through the car windscreen, I can see open water glittering farther out. Closer in, there’s just rotting spring ice. The twisting road ends in a turning area at Stora Uttervik. There is a floating dock with two boats, one of which is painted blue and white and named AURELIA, ASKÖ. There is ice here too, except for where an old channel has broken through. It feels as if it is the link between me and the freedom outside it, an artery that brings lifeblood to my dream of paddling in the outer bays. The question is whether it is open all the way out, or is the ice hard-packed and frozen? I pick up my binoculars. It looks as if it should be possible… doesn’t it? As I’m standing there, trying to weigh up the situation, a white pickup truck rolls up alongside me. Out jumps a man with a warm knitted hat, three-day stubble and firm, friendly eyes. He looks at the kayak on the car and at my sad expression. “You can come with me out to open water if you want,” he says. “The ice is going to move out because there’s a north wind, so there’ll be no problems getting back in again,” he continues, introducing himself as Johan. My gaze catches a few embroidered words on his jacket: ‘Supervisor” and below that, ‘County Administrative Board”. I hesitate slightly. If the wind changes the opposite will happen, it would be more difficult to get back to land across the rotten ice. Then I would have to take the kayak out further away and carry it back; a tough and difficult project bearing in mind the steep, high cliffs that frame the bay. Option two would be to put up my tent and hope that the ice moved away if I got stuck out there. But back home the kids have planned tacos, so… no night in a tent. The supervisor appears to see what I’m thinking and suggests driving back a few hundred metres and turning

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11

off to Käftudden. However, he says that there is lots of private property there so it’s difficult to get between the houses and down to the water. The open water is glistening just past the edge of the ice… so close! I weigh up the option of trying out Käftudden and jump into the car. The road gets bumpier and bumpier and, just as Johan said, it’s impossible to even see a path down to the water. I give up and drive back to Uttervik, just in time to see Johan’s boat slowly work its way out through the ice, a little bit at a time. Back a bit, then breaking forward, haphazardly, but a narrow channel is finally open out to the water. Now I’m in a rush; the kayak comes off the roof, equipment is quickly packed into the storage compartments. The morning is sunny and still, 6°C with dazzling, warm sunshine. Despite this, I put my dry suit on; better safe and dry than extremely cold and wet is my reasoning. Impatiently, I urge myself on, each second feels like an eternity. The paddle fits together with a click and, with an effort, I lift the packed kayak down into the water, and then glide down into the cockpit. A shiver of anticipation rushes through me. I raise my eyes as the paddle’s blade finds the water’s surface. First on the left and then on the right. My yellow blades cut and crackle through the thin sheet of ice that formed overnight in the older part of the channel. Quick, small, light strokes, the ice makes the rules. There is lapping, sucking and scraping below the kayak. I feel how the hull submits to the harder ice, but this is reversed where the ice is more porous: the kayak presses down the ice. Up on a large floe, about 3 square metres, move my body weight forward and the kayak rests on the ice. Slowly, with a sucking sound, the floe divides and sinks. Fine trunk adjustments so I’m balanced… making sure I am sitting high to be able to respond more effectively. Active relaxation.

33


I hold the ice in my hand and feel how my fingers dig through a porous layer, get a good hold and pull myself forward. Lift my eyes and squint at the open water, lose focus for a second. That’s when it suddenly happens: the kayak’s bow becomes wedged stuck in a large floe and, before I have time to back up, the floe I just passed floats up and effectively chisels itself around the stern – and I can move neither forwards nor backwards.

rotation, pull and push through the paddle stroke. The paddle responds well and there is a spring in its shaft, swosh, swosh, swosh. The bow cleaves the surface. An ice floe passes. Waves lift and lower the hull and bunches of bladderwrack drift below the kayak. I tip the kayak to the right and round a cape with a soft leftward arch… glide silently over the water’s surface. The only sound is a flock of eiders chattering.

A long second passes. I don’t want the ice to begin to turn and rotate with the help of the forces I have added to it. Bathing in this icy mush doesn’t feel that attractive, surrounded by rotting ice floes and bobbing slush. I try to tug myself loose with short, sharp paddle strokes. The ice loosens its grip, giving me increased confidence that I’m using the right technique. And so it continues, metre by metre through the channel; total concentration and forward planning, choosing my route as much as I can. The ice is packed together for the final 20 metres, but breaking through it is fine.

A number of skerries in the area have a landing ban and I stay away from the flocks of seabirds. A pair of long-tailed ducks pass over my head, their long tail feathers sticking out like spears. Long-tailed ducks overwinter in large flocks in the shallow bays, moving north when the ice breaks up. Small groups of eider sit and bob around, mature males and females waiting to go up on land and breed. Over at Bockholmen, a few gulls are patrolling the cliffs and there are good odds of being accompanied by a seal or a sea eagle. Protective hunting is the only form of seal hunt that is permitted in the area and the sea eagles have had one their best breeding seasons in a long time, so their numbers have increased significantly.

Suddenly, all the scraping noises are gone and the water surface is free. There is total silence as the hull glides through the soft water. I put down my paddle and look back towards the ice field. It can’t help but smile, raise my arms in the air and give a short “Yee-hoo”! That passage along has made the entire trip a great memory. I paddle along the cliffs that rise out of the sea. My knees are in firm contact with the underside of the deck, good trunk

34

The sea is as calm as a mirror, the sun’s rays reflect back up in my face and my hat was removed a while ago. I pass by small skerries and over reefs, squint through the sunlight and out over the bay. I have the water to myself and ‘Indian paddle’ back and forth over the bay, down towards the island of Lacka. And tonight there’ll be tacos.

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11


Sleeping bag s Sleeping out in the winter places high demands on your equipment. Most people instinctively think that a sleeping bag should be warm, but the sleeping pad is at least as important, so that you are warm when you go to bed. If you sleep out in the winter, the most difficult issue is that of moisture; when you wake in your tent or bivouac your sleeping bag may be covered with a layer of frost or moisture, depending on the temperature. This is the moisture that your body has released during the night and which has passed through the sleeping bag’s lining fabric, through the fill and on to the outside of the sleeping bag. Only really good sleeping bags with carefully selected materials can manage this. It is easy to deal with moisture or frost on the outside of the sleeping bag by taking it out and shaking it off, then allowing the sleeping bag to air for as long as possible before packing it up for the day.

HYPNA: 3S, 2S, 1S

36

ZENSOR: Nordic winter, 3S, 2S, 1S, Compact

Slumber: 3S, 2S, 1S, Compact, Junior, Toddler

Q Down: 3S, 2S

Lim: 100, 50


GOGA : Goga: Built for those looking for the highest warmth to weight ratio our top level Goga down sleeping bags are made with box construction and feature top quality 800 cuin fill-power goose down. Superlight 15 denier polyamide outer and lining fabrics with extremely high vapour permeability together with a waterproof hood and foot construction combine to keep the user dry and warm.

Goose down with 800+ fill power. The down has not been plucked from live geese.

Head- and foot section has 1505 WP fabric for waterproofness Available in two sizes

All sizes has a higher insulation rated foot section and bottom chamber to keep feet warm

Three dimensional hood with single hand adjustment. Down filled peak at forehead adds comfort.

For minimum pack volume and weight, select from the down sleeping bags.

Down filled double baffles with improved zipguard. Down filled adjustable thermal collar

To see more product s and colour s , plea s e vi sit www.haglo fs .s e


Yak At tac k A ” l i t t l e ” r ac e among high m o u n ta i n s . Sometimes, two newly-trained, relaxed guys having a chat over a cup of coffee can come up with the most amazing ideas. Martin had asked, a little cautiously, whether I had any suggestions for a “different and exciting” bike race. I did: Yak Attack in Nepal. A ten-day stage race on mountain bikes that has everything from +35°C and deserts to -15°C and glaciers. At its highest point it crosses a 5,416-metre mountain pass. On the whole, it’s a real challenge and absolutely a “different type of race”. Of course, I was counting on Martin being sensible enough to say no and ask about something simpler. He didn’t. It’s now almost two years since we drank up our coffee at Fiskartorpet in Stockholm, and I’m sitting at home, unpacking the last few items from our trip. I still don’t really understand how everything happened. What did Martin actually say to my family that meant I could be away for almost a month – as the new father of a third child? And what did he say to his own family? It wasn’t like he was going out on tour again …

Te x t: Andreas Danielsson

photogr aphy: Johan Rosengren

Fa c t s Yak At tac k Yak Attack goes around the Annapurna Circuit in the Himalayas and covers 420 kilometres in 10 days. It has more than 8 000 metres of climb and the highest point is 5 416 metres above sea level. High altitude, combined with the extreme weather conditions, makes Yak Attack one of the world’s toughest cycle races. Competitors were able to experience everything from 35°C and desert landscapes to -15°C and glaciers, something that places great demands on both the participants and their equipment.


I have spent most of my life on a bicycle and have had biking as a job for many years. First as an athlete, then as a coach and federation captain. Martin has had biking as a hobby for his whole life, alongside his profession as a musician. He has lived most of his life on a stage; eaten, breathed, slept and consumed music 24 hours a day. I have also spent a lot of time with music – but at an amateur level. That our journey to Nepal was to be an uncompromising mixture of music and sports was fairly likely. Nature has always been both mine and Martin’s biggest idol – if it’s possible to express it like that. Mountains are at home in nature and don’t need any introduction; beautiful, aweinspiring, frightening, harmonic and dynamic, the mountains have everything. Even though we didn’t really talk about it, the motivating factor driving us in our preparations and the race was probably the opportunity to spend time on the pastoral slopes of the Himalayas. C hoosing equipment

Like many other men, choosing gadgets makes me a cheerful profligate. I don’t just like the cool gear; high quality equipment is an absolute necessity in difficult situations. My job includes optimising equipment for cyclists, so my claim is that my gear interest is both a bit of a guy thing as well as of real worth. If you are in the outdoors and trying to battle through difficult conditions, then good equipment is essential. Heavy rainfall can actually be quite enjoyable if you are properly dressed for it, as can not having to shiver in extreme cold. The list of all the clothing and equipment that adds to life in the outdoors, regardless of weather and other conditions, is a long one. Cycling in the mountains when it’s cold is one of the most difficult activities for which to dress properly. Staying warm is

40

not a problem as long as you are moving uphill, as speeds are low and the intensity is high, quite the opposite. But as soon as you start going downhill and aren’t working as hard, the cold is noticeable. The wind that is generated, combined with sweaty clothing, means that you rapidly become cold and stiff. A good shell layer has become my favourite for the mountains. A jacket that really keeps the elements at bay if necessary, one which is easy to ventilate and can provide extra protection with a hood. A zip that is easy to open and close is an absolute must, unlike one of those zips that always gets caught in the fabric. My favourite detail is a chest pocket; large enough for a mobile phone, car key, small change, camera or anything else that has to be easy to get to. To Nepal, via Bangkok and an ox ygenat e d t r a i n

After a year of mixed preparations, training and planning, we were ready to depart from Arlanda on 2 March. Haglöfs were right in their scepticism about all of our material, so we sent 400 kg as freight a week before we left. On the flight, we had a toothbrush each, a couple of guitars, our coordinator Lasse Strand and a photographer. Thai Air gave us permission to perform a small 10,000 metres gig on the way to Bangkok. After that we continued to Beijing, before checking in on the Himalayan Express. This is the world’s highest railway, between Beijing and Lhasa. At its highest point, the train passes a little over 5,000 metres and extra oxygen is available in the carriages for those who want some. We tried to have a small gig on the train as well, but the Chinese were only moderately impressed … Things were different in Lhasa, where we gathered a hundred or so people in the square in 40 seconds. However, this wasn’t popular with the police and the military, who immediately demanded that we stop and menacingly confiscated our cameras,

h a g l ö f s 10 / 11


removed all the material and asked us to leave the city. Which we did, almost. Lhasa’s smallest establishment is a restaurant that seats six and has yak as a speciality. This was where we hid from the strong arm of the law, ate grilled meat from curlyhaired animals with horns and shared our western music. After one song, both the cook and his sister, who were also the restaurant owners, were singing and playing. The following day, we flew from Lhasa to Kathmandu and got our first view of Mount Everest from the plane. Like Japanese tourists we took loads of (completely rubbish) pictures of this great mountain. I n t h e m o u ntains, the mountains decide

The race started from central Kathmandu at 8.00 a.m. on 9 March, and we hit the first mountain fairly quickly. Martin had a bit of a shock on cycling up his first ever mountain. “Holy Maloney, it never ends,” he said, after 300 of 1,200 metres of ascent... At that point I became a little anxious about how the remaining 9,000 metres of ascent would be greeted. When we reached the top he immediately regained his good mood and was looking forward to a lovely downhill slope. Yeah, right! After more than an hour’s bone-shaking on paths of large stones, walking trails and gravel roads, we reached the river bed on the other side of the mountain. Martin was once again shocked over how difficult it was to cycle down a mountain, both physically and mentally. Losing focus for a single second can be disastrous – dangerously so. I revisited my anxiousness over how this was going to go, but then came the turning point. “Okay, now I understand what this is actually all about, so let’s go,” said Martin, in a steady voice. And so we did. He grew into it more and more with every mountain and every day that passed. This was where I noticed Martin’s enormous capacity for rapidly adapting to new situations. Yak Attack is full of incredible contrasts. After the initial days of extreme heat and desert landscapes, we gradually moved into alpine terrain with snow, cold and thin air. We reached our highest point on day six. We moved almost ridiculously slowly so as not to crash or be beaten down by the altitude. The reaction speed between what the eye sees and what the body does is extremely reduced at high altitude, as the brain gets too little oxygen. This means it is necessary to have large safety margins when moving at heights above 5,000 metres. We wrapped ourselves in wonderful down and felt ill for a while

42

after arriving at the stage finish with blue lips and pounding headaches. That night’s sleep was nothing to write home about. We felt a bit better on the following day and things went much faster, with speeds in excess of 80 km/hour along the gravel roads down the mountain. The last stage finished in the world’s deepest valley, surrounded by several 7,000 and 8,000-metre peaks. We cycled along a riverbed, passed waterfalls, cheerful people and views that looked as if they were paintings. We were in complete agreement that this was the best thing we’d ever experienced from a bike saddle. Namaste to all

We hired a porter whose task was to carry our guitars along the Annapurna Circuit. Despite tired bodies and empty brains, there was a great deal of creative entertainment in the evenings. There was often someone from the village at the stage finish who joined in with their own instruments, songs or dances. Music, like sharing a beer, is an excellent way to rapidly get to know new people. We had one aim with Yak Attack, which probably sounds boring and unambitious – to finish the race and to do so with enthusiasm. In my world, that type of goal is practically forbidden. But if you’ve spent your whole life on stage, I think it’s an appropriate aim for one of the world’s most complex races. Martin’s efforts were extremely impressive and we finished in places seven and eight. It really wasn’t an easy experience, but there was a sense of joy in everything, right to the finish. One of my many reflections was that Martin politely greeted everyone we passed throughout the entire race. Sometimes he was so wonderfully tired that he could barely remember the lyrics to his biggest hit, 7-mila kliv, but he never missed a namaste. And the race really did make him enthusiastic. Just the day after we arrived in Sweden, a mildly irritated Martin phoned me to say that he couldn’t find the quick release for his front wheel. He was on his way out to train. I wasn’t. I promised Martin a cup of coffee on Mount Everest if he succeeded with this challenge, which resulted in our project name, ForEverest. And so it happened that on 22 March we were sat on a slope next to Everest, drinking coffee and summing up our half-term holiday: 2,300 pictures, 900 minutes of film and 300 minutes of music. Memories, meetings and many, many experiences. Did the coffee taste good? Well, ask Martin next time you see him!

h a g l ö f s 10 / 11


INTENSE Haglöfs’ Intense Series is a streamlined range of clothing and backpacks for high pulse activities, made in our way. The materials that are used are carefully selected to remain functional during long and demanding during endurance sessions. They are lightweight, quick drying and have high breathability. Garments worn next to the skin have been treated to counteract unpleasant odours by restricting bacterial growth, leading to fewer washes and a longer product life. In addition, the designs are exacting so that they provide the best possible fit and freedom of movement, with no unnecessary detailing or pattern pieces. This reduces the number of seams and thus the need for lamination and taping. We have taken things away and added them, all so we obtain garments that are as light and flexible as possible, without negatively affecting durability and functionality.

H a lo pant A f u l l s t retch pant with a n o p t i m a l f abric mix for cold w e a t h e r i n tense activities.

44

ozo q pullover One of the wolrd´s lightest Gore-Tex ® Paclite pullovers for intense activities. Unique pattern construc tion reduces weight and bulk.

intense zip to p A lightweight zip t o p w i t h extra long zip for ve n t i l a t i o n . Next to skin com f o r t w i t h a soft touc h .

sprint lum bar pack Light weight lumbar pack for trining and competing. Wide elastic waistband with Velcro adjustment for a close-to-body fit.

wigo glov e Liner glove ma d e f ro m Polartec ® Power s t re t c h ® . Fast wicking and w i t h g o o d thermal prop e r t i e s .


shield j acket Ultralight packable jacket for intense activities. Highly wind and water resistant with extremely good breathability.

Laminated and zippered chest pocket with stuff bag capability.

Reflex print

Flexable back and under arm panel for maximum breathability and ease of movement.

Elasticated cuffs with thumb grip.

Hi g h l y w i n d a n d water re s i s t a n t w i t h e x t re mely good b re a t h a b i l i ty.

C hest pocket with stuff capability.

S ecure back pocket.

To see more products and colours, please visit www.haglofs.se

Front a n d b a c k reflec t i ve p r i n t .


K l ua n e n nat atiio on na all pa par rk k The St Elias mountains of the Yukon’s Kluane National Park are a fantasy place for skiers and climbers. From some of the most massive mountains on the planet, still growing glaciers cascade down onto flat glacial highways and flow into the Pacific Ocean. Despite this conduciveness to ski-plane and ski-touring access, engaging the exposure of this remote netherworld demands serious commitment and preparation. huge vertical, mysterious conditions and some of the most intense weather on the planet combine to create serious challenges for accomplishing objectives inspired by such incredible aesthetic beauty. Massive coastal storms that last for weeks make for sporadic opportunities and can easily trap mountaineers both at basecamp and at altitude in a fight for survival. Skiing in Kluane was always my fantasy. One fine May, a strong, motivated partner, enough money for supplies and a ski-plane, together with strong legs from a big winter of ski-touring, all came magically together to make a ski expedition there. I’ll always remember the daunting feeling of anticipation while waiting for our window to fly in at Andy William’s ski plane base on the shore of Kluane Lake. We paid close attention to his words of experience and observations to temper our bold ambitions. Soon enough, the plane would fade away in the distance leaving us in the thundering silence beneath the Mount Logan. With a hundred something kilometers of ice and rock in every direction, we were left to match wits with giants. text and photos: Ptor Spricenieks

Fa c t s K l u a n e N at i o n a l Pa r k Kluane National Park is located in south-western Yukon, Canada. It was founded in 1972 and is slightly larger than 22,000 km². The park is the world’s largest non-polar glacier area; 82 percent of its surface consists of mountains and glaciers. It is home to the St Elias Mountains, which have Canada’s highest peak, Mt Logan (5959m). The park is rich in wildlife, including moose, wolf, lynx and grizzly bear. There is no road into the national park, which received World heritage status in 1979.


48

h a g l รถ fs 10 / 11


h a g l รถ fs 10 / 11

49


50

h a g l รถ fs 10 / 11


F o r both T revor an d I, this was our first vi sit to t h e S t Elia s m ountain s an d except for the topo map an d s om e alpine journal picture s , it wa s an “on- sigh t ” m iss ion. The m o st valuable re s ource o f in formati o n wa s the vie ws fro m the plane ri d e. O ur “theoretica l” sk i line on Logan di d not loo k good on this pa rticularly low s now year. So a fter a steep war m u p run near Hub s ew P eak w e head ed south dow n t h e H u bbar d Glacier towards Mt Vancouver - the mos t s tri king sk i-objective w e had seen. The 35 km approach de fine d the i mmen se s cale of things .

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11

51


“O ur e y e s anchore d us to Mt L ogan an d Mt St Elia s catching the la s t light before relea sing u s into the pale blue night to ma ke big long turn s in the col d powder.”

From our new camp, still 6km away from the base of the mountain, we made haste to take advantage of the perfect weather. The following afternoon we began skinning and climbing on into the pseudo-darkness of the Yukon night, roped up on shady features of ice and accompanied by the rhythm of a constantly shedding colossal serac. At 4:20 in the afternoon we stood atop Mt Vancouver’s 4812m summit, mesmerized at the view. Just as we began to ski onto the Northwest face, sharp winds from the south began to tube us with the chalky spray of our turns and it felt as if we were being hustled of the mountain. Back at the camp 30 hours later we had completed an uninterrupted 3132m ski run. The next 4 days were spent tentbound, resting, eating and reading as our fabulous views turned to ping-pong ball style isolation and fresh snow. When the storm broke we skied a beautiful small steep 400m north face on an unnamed peak we had passed on the way over as well as making a reconaissance to the west side of Mt Vancouver. Then we decided to prioritize the rest of our time for a go at Mt MacArthur, our other inspiration from our air reconaissance. After leaving a cache of gear en route, we were once again pinned down by two days of snow. Our supplies were running low and our pickup time approaching but the full moon brought back clear skies and colder temperatures giving us a window for

52

another overnight mission in our final days. At our next camp, a nearby steep face was too enticing with such good powder conditions and we chose to ski it in place of additional rest and sleep. The plan was to attempt MacArthur like we had Vancouver, going light and fast to see how far we could get before skiing down in the sunset. After a 5km approach we began skinning up the North ridge, climbing as it turned to a knife edge and even navigating a crux of mixed climbing before reaching it’s high plateau. As smoke from Alaskan forest fires set the midnight sunset ablaze we stood atop MacArthur’s 4308m East Summit. Our eyes anchored us to Mt Logan and Mt St Elias catching the last light before releasing us into the pale blue night to make big long turns in the cold powder. By lunchtime the next day, we were flying back, riding the winds from the approaching storm. Finally, a valley to return to. Kluane Lake had melted out and the trees were all green now. A lone moose waded through the river as Andy banked the plane around for final approach to the dirt runway. Stunned by the sensuality of the Yukon spring after 20 days of watching the sun circle the horizon in a white desert, it was dificult to express our experience to the other climbers waiting to fly out. Our fortune was indeed great having skied 5 premiere descents when normally making one summit is a cherished success. It just might have been the best backcountry adventure ever.

h a g l ö fs 10 / 11


h a g l รถ fs 10 / 11

53


b ac kc ount ry A trip in the backcountry can be anything from a relaxing experience in a few degrees below zero with a light breeze and warm sunshine, to a hard struggle in severe cold, spiced with low visibility. Often, the reality is somewhere in the middle. In addition to external conditions, your level of activity will vary between efforts that are on the verge of difficult to recovery and rest. Finding the right equipment for such differing circumstances is an art form. Your shell layer must provide maximum protection from the elements, but without being too bulky to spend a lot of time in your backpack. A softshell jacket and pants – which are perhaps the ultimate backcountry garments – must also combine warmth with good ventilation and maximal vapour transport. Haglöfs’ backcountry products are a carefully selected mix of well tested materials and well thought-out detailing so that you can enjoy the best possible comfort on your trip.

Fanatic print cap Activity hat in smooth stretch fabric with excellent thermal properties.

Reptile jacket A high performance minimalist design jacket for core users and back country skiers.

Omni II pant Versatile technical softshell pant with excellent stretch for maximum range of motion and comfort. 54

Reptile II Q Hood A high performance minimalist design Softshell hoodie for all-round serious use.

Mountain surf Ideal backpack for full day ski and snowboard touring. h a g l ö fs 10 / 11


Q ANUK JAC KET Weather resistant insulation jacket in a minimalist design for core users. Combine shell layer and mid layer to reduce bulk and increase comfort.

Two inner pockets

Laminated fleece lined chinguard

Varius loft insulation 700 g (size large)

3-way adjustable fully insulated hood.

Excellent weight to warmth ratio and packabillity.

55

h a g l รถ fs 10 / 11

To s ee m ore pro duct s and colour s , plea se vi s it www.haglofs .s e


A LY E SK A As I put down the phone I could almost feel the ground swaying beneath me. It was definite: Anna Lissola, photographer Markus Alatalo and I were going to ski at the Alyeska ski resort in Alaska. I nearly couldn’t believe it, but it was true. We all have dreams; things we want to buy or places we want to visit. It had been my dream to visit Alaska ever since I’d watched my first ski film from there; the place where it says “Last Frontier” on the number plates and where vast amounts of snow fall every year.

te x t: Per jonsson Photos: marcus alatalo

Fa c t s A lyeska Alyeska Resort is 65 km south-west of the city of Anchorage, in the village of Girdwood. It is also the location of the Chugach Mountains, a massif that receives an average of 16 metres of snow each year and thus has a great range of superb off piste skiing. The system only has seven lifts, but has 68 slopes, of which half are groomed. People have skied here since the mid 1950s, when a French baron took a liking to the area and made a number of investments, including a double chairlift that carried people more than 600 vertical metres up the mountain. It now has a couple of hundred residents, most of whom earn their living through tourism in one way or another and are dedicated skiers and snowmobilers.


ALY e SK A


“Fifteen minutes later I steered off piste but as soon as I passed the piste markings, my skis started to bounce uncontrollably. It was rock-hard ice instead of snow and the old tracks were more like a luge; if you got your skis in them all you could do was to hold on and go along for the ride.”

I have skied since I was tiny, and have packed my skis into their bag an infinite number of times, put my ski clothes in a pack and headed out for different adventures. Of course, in the beginning my mum was there to help but now, after all these years, I know in my bones exactly what I need to pack for a day on the mountain. Still, this time something inside me said that it was time to write my packing list again. This time, nothing was to go wrong. I woke early on our departure day. It was one of those mornings when you wake before the alarm, despite only having a few hours’ rest. I’d found it difficult to get to sleep the night before and had tossed and turned all night. What will it be like? What does it look like? These were thoughts that filled my mind. I met Marcus and Anna at the airport. They were standing, each with a smile, and could hardly find words for their happiness. Like me, Anna had made a packing list over the previous days, though hers was a few pages longer than mine and her ski bag looked like a fully grown whale, instead of a light and versatile ski bag. Excess baggage was unavoidable and, after long negotiations, the final result was that Anna had to leave behind one of the three pairs of skis she had planned on taking. We got the green light to board and the journey of our dreams could begin. We were to fly from Stockholm, via Amsterdam to Minneapolis, and then on to Anchorage from where we would continue by car. According to our tickets, this would take 24 hours, excluding the final car trip. Not exactly a Sunday outing – and we got off to a bad start; a technical fault on our plane caused a two-hour delay and so we landed in Anchorage at 3 a.m. instead of 1 a.m. as planned. The car rental company closed its office at 2 a.m. and didn’t open again until 6 a.m. This meant

60

that we couldn’t get our car and the only option was to lie on a cold stone floor at Anchorage airport and to try to get the time to pass. We played cards, listened to music and teased each other until the jokes ran out and our eyelids finally closed in exhaustion. Morning came, and we could sign out our car and continue. At 8 a.m., after 28 hours of travelling, we finally arrived at Girdwood and Hotel Alyeska. The village is small, with just a few hundred inhabitants, and the natural meeting place is the petrol station out on the highway. Much of the village is built around the hotel and most locals are seasoned skiers or dedicated snowmobilers. I don’t know how many rainy autumn evenings I have spent sitting with my friends and watching ski films, ones where the skiers ride the most extreme slopes, snow whirling around their faces and in the most fantastic terrain. Anna, Marcus and I were unbelievably tired because of the long journey and the time difference and even though on paper the best thing to do would have been to sleep, trying it would have been pointless. After a few cups of coffee we were in the gondola lift on the way up into the lift system, full of caffeine and anticipation. Fifteen minutes later I steered off piste but as soon as I passed the piste markings, my skis started to bounce uncontrollably. It was rock-hard ice instead of snow and the old tracks were more like a luge; if you got your skis in them all you could do was to hold on and go along for the ride. I just didn’t understand. Had we travelled this far to ski on ice? Where was the powder, the sun and the face shots? This was NOT what I had expected from Alaska! Ah well, after a few hours the sun was high in the sky, the snow was soft and slushy and the luge tracks had thawed along with my mood.

h agl ö fs 10 / 11


64

h agl รถ fs 10 / 11


Alyeska has a relatively small lift system, with only seven lifts. The slopes are good and there is plenty of easily accessible off piste skiing below the gondola. The area is called North Face and has 34 named off piste routes. There is also easily accessible off piste skiing above the lifts that you have to get to yourself, though the avalanche risk is often high and thus the area is often closed for long periods of time. Heading out on skis after 28 hours of travelling is not the easiest thing to do. Our legs were like lead, our brains weren’t keeping up and after a few hours we were really tired and on the verge of being a hazard in the lift system. Instead we decided to take our boots off and explore the surroundings, of which we hadn’t seen so much because it was dark when we arrived. We each bought a large cup of coffee, got in the car and drove off. The scenery was incredible. Everything felt so big and wild. It really is like the number plates say, “the last frontier”. The mountains were high and spectacular and you could see the traces of enormous avalanches that had flowed over forests and, in some cases, even over the road we were driving on. After half an hour we came up to the Turnagain Pass, where the valley was divided into two sides, one for backcountry skiers and one for snowmobilers. All the peaks went straight up from the road like pointy ice cream cones and, in principle, you started gaining height as soon as you closed the car door. It looked like fantastic terrain and we could see great ski tracks coming down from the tops. After looking upwards for what must have been half an hour, a creeping headache started. My body was starting to have its say and it was time to finally go to be bed and get a much-needed night’s sleep. Early the next morning I opened my eyes and looked out through the window. Blinked and looked again. The previously green spruces outside my window were now absolutely white and had large cushions of snow on them. It had dumped! After a breakfast at the local bakery that would make a nutritionist shudder (egg, bacon, scrambled eggs and pancakes with syrup), we jumped onto the gondola. The dump had resulted in 40 cm of fluffy powder that covered all the old tracks, and the mountain looked just as cool as in all the ski films I’d seen. We followed some locals; one of them, Gary Machburn, had done 35 seasons at Alyeska Resort. We got on chairlift 6 and dropped down into Christmas Chute. The snow was magical and flew up into our faces on every turn. We kept our height out to the right and continued down to Christmas Trees. The slope was perfect and you could give it everything all the way down.

h agl ö fs 10 / 11

It was possible to push a little harder in a turn at any time and bring your speed down as necessary. When we met up at the gondola at the end of the line I could state that the long trip to Alaska was worth every minute. This was what we were here for, to experience huge amounts of snow and cool terrain. We skied a bit with Gary and his friends before it was time for lunch at Sitzmark Bar & Grill, and thus also the trip’s first burger. This also fulfilled all our expectations and was so big that there was hardly enough room for it on the plate. After I was unable to finish a meal for the first time ever, we headed up the mountain again. We tried the forest route, Lolos; the forest was pretty tracked, but there were still lines that no one else had found. We went up and down like maniacs and our joy in the snow was never-ending. When the lifts closed at 5.30 p.m. we sank into big armchairs in front of the fire at the hotel, drank a hot chocolate each and talked about the day’s skiing and our funny wipeouts. When darkness finally sank over Girdwood we’d already been asleep for hours. Alyeska Resort doesn’t only have excellent skiing in the lift system, they also have a huge and varied cat ski area. Cat ski is skiing with the help of a snowcat, which can climb high on mountainsides without difficulty. Girdwood has two snowcats and, on one day, we were able to go along on a trip. There had once again been a great snow dump the previous night and, on this particular day, the conditions were epic. Before departure, our guide Jeff took us through avalanche and transceiver training. Up on our first run, Jeff made a few initial tracks and investigated the avalanche risk. The snow cover was stable. “Stay to the right of my tracks,” was the last thing we heard before he whooped his way through the sparse, wonderful forest down to our waiting snowcat. Even if it wasn’t bright sunshine, all the snow was enough and there wasn’t a single ski track. The wide skis I’d chosen for the day were in their proper element and it was almost like surfing down the mountain. Sometimes I just had to stop, not because I was tired but because I couldn’t breathe in all the new snow. The feeling of skiing on pristine snow for line after line was incredible. Days and nights overlapped each other. Time rushed by and the only things that reminded us that the days were passing were our tired bodies and weak thighs. When, on the last day, I once again pulled back the curtains and saw that the cushions of snow on the trees outside my window were even bigger, I understood that this was going to be a memorable day on the trip of our dreams. I pinched myself and wished that time would stand still.

65


fr ontc ountry If you are going to spend a whole day outside in sub-zero temperatures, you need to be careful when getting dressed in the morning. Skiing in a lift system entails both pulse-raising downhill skiing and sedentary uphill transports. In both these situations you need to feel dry, warm and comfortable. You will also need a well-fitting backpack with enough space for safety equipment, extra clothing, and maybe a change of clothes and a tasty snack. If you choose clothes that can be ventilated in strategic places, wicking base and mid layers a long with a stable backpack, you will have considerably improved your chances of enjoying a successful day’s skiing.

Snow passion Small daypack made for heliskiing and other lift accessed freeriding.

Pirtuk Q jacket Full featured Gore-Tex® insulation jacket for ski use. Combine shell – and mid layer to reduce bulk and increase comfort.

Helix II glove Wind and highly water resistant technical shell glove with stretch.

Couloir Q pant Full feature, highly technical winter pant in Gore-Tex® Stretch Soft Shell. Reinforced seat, thigh and knee sections. 66

Mountain surf Ideal backpack for full day ski and snowboard touring.

Yo Yo Q Hood All-round midweight hooded pullover in a featured design to wear as mid and outer layer. Excellent wicking and thermal properties.

Couloir Q pant Full feature, highly technical winter pant in Gore-Tex® Stretch Soft Shell. Reinforced seat, thigh and knee sections. h agl ö fs 10 / 11


C oulo ir q J ACKET Full feature, highly technical winter jacket in Gore-Tex® stretch soft shell.

Laminated fleece lined chinguard

3-way adjustable hood with a high stand-alone, fleece lined collar

Recco-reflector

Ski pass pocket

Gore-Tex® Softshell Stretch fabric

Laminated watertight pitzips for ventilation

Fleecebacker To increase warmth and minimize bulk the majority of the jacket has a fleece backer.

Snowskirt Integrated, adjustable snow skirt. 67

h agl ö fs 10 / 11

To see m ore pr oduct s and co lours , please visit www.haglofs .se


Summiting the f i v e p e a ks The plan was to follow a razor-sharp ridge past five jagged tops and then ski a fantastic line down to the Norwegian fjords. But sometimes things don’t quite go the way they were intended.

text: Mikael af Ekenstam Photo: Lars Thulin

Fa c t s Pa r t i s a n l e d e n The Partisanleden trail starts at Fagernesfjellet in Narvik, which is the first peak in a chain of mountains that stretch to the south-east. These peaks are commonly known by their place in the chain, such as Andratoppen (Second Summit), Tredjetoppen (Third Summit) and so on. This trail is generally called Partisanleden because it is said that the Norwegian resistance used it to be able to secretly observe what was happening in occupied Narvik during the Second World War.


We get off the upper lift in Narvik’s lift system and are suddenly at the top of Fagernesfjellet, more than 1000 metres above sea level. Here you are literally above the sea, with Norwegian fjords on the three sides of the mountain and high peaks in the fourth and final direction. The city of Narvik is wedged in where the mountains meet the sea. We all have some kind of link to the area: manager of the climbing hall, Susanne; ski patroller, Sven; photographer, Lasse, and I all call it home and are happy to do so. Sven points out that it feels strange to start a summit trip by taking a ski lift all the way up, but today this summit is just the start of the trip. Fagernesfjellet is the first mountain in a chain of peaks that stretches to the south-east. Colloquially, they’re known according to their place in the chain (Second Summit, Third Summit and so on). On the map, they mostly have tongue-twisting names in Norwegian or Sami. Today’s trip will take us up and over the peaks, all the way to the fifth in the chain, which is called Beisfjordtøtta according to the map. It is called Partisanleden (the partisan route), because it is said to have been used by Norwegian resistance fighters in World War Two to clandestinely observe what was happening down in occupied Narvik.

h a g l ö f s 10 / 11

We have a long trip in front of us, so we quickly adjust our mindset and our equipment from taking a ski lift to ascending under our own steam. In addition to the usual summiting equipment we have crampons, ice axes, climbing rope and harnesses with us. It probably looks pretty extreme to the other ski tourists on the lift. It’s fun to feel a bit cool once in a while, but while we would have liked to avoided the extra weight, the equipment is necessary as some stretches of the route are very steep and exposed. The sunshine is unrelenting and we are a little worried that some areas will become avalanche zones in the increasing warmth. Ah well, we’ll deal with that eventually, it’s far too nice a day to cancel the trip before we’ve even started. We soon leave the first summit behind us. On the way to the second summit we meet up with some acquaintances who are going to test Narvik’s famed off piste skiing. Together we reflect on the fantastic weather, the astoundingly beautiful surroundings and our happiness at being precisely here at precisely this time; life is good. The second summit is a perfect excuse to stop and drink some water. It is also a perfect viewpoint over the off piste area. Our entertainment during our break is watching as the skiers

71


It is on the way down the steep slope on the other side of the summit that it happens. The strong spring sunshine has warmed up the slope and the snow feels unpredictable, as we previously suspected but didn’t really want to believe. We can also see large avalanche cones below the slopes farther down. Suddenly, everything that felt so natural now feels so doubtful. We become nervous and look at each other; “what do we do now?”

far below us etch curves into the huge, inviting snowfield. As we continue on to the third summit, we pass the place where you can turn your ski tips down into the notorious Mørkhålla offpiste route. Just the thought of abandoning a horizontal location for a gradient that seems almost vertical puts butterflies in my stomach. But we are moving on to even greater things – out of the frying pan and into the fire. The second summit is the emotional threshold of this adventure. Until now we have followed well-worn paths, with the lifts and the city easily visible in the distance. This is where we and our off piste friends part ways; awaiting them is a pleasant ski back to the lifts and for us there’s a razor-sharp ridge right into the wilderness. With those familiar butterflies in out stomachs we say goodbye and step across the threshold. A horizontal line of cliffs is the first real barrier between us and the peaks farther along the ridge. My stomach lurches as we peer over the edge and down at the ridge below us. Farther right, Susanne finds a narrow snow passage to a steep snowfield lower down. It feels a like little too much excitement to head down there without any form of safety device, so we arrange a rope that we can use for support when climbing down. Actually doing so is problem-free, it’s just like any other normal challenge, as long as you start by problem solving things generally go well. The fourth summit is halfway to heaven. Literally. We have now overcome a significant barrier and feel ready for any challenge, be it large or small. Now all that remains is a walk along the ridge to the final summit and then a long downhill ski, about which our imaginations have now built up great expectations. It is on the way down the steep slope on the other side of the summit that it happens. The strong spring sunshine has

72

warmed up the slope and the snow feels unpredictable, as we previously suspected but didn’t really want to believe. We can also see large avalanche cones below the slopes farther down. Suddenly, everything that felt so natural now feels so doubtful. We become nervous and look at each other; “what do we do now?” Because one thing is clear, that we have no desire to enter the minefield below us, everyone’s gut is shouting “stop!”. Not even stubborn wills and our great expectations for the trip succeed in splitting the group’s unanimity. How wonderful that no one needs to feel singled out for being cowardly or stupid! The focus on the ridge in front of is replaced by a focus on the available alternatives: Returning the same way we came? Nah, preferably not. Skiing down to the right? Nah, too great an avalanche risk, too complex and too far back to civilisation. Skiing down to the left? Perhaps, at least we have a chance of finding good snow and returning to the road. Secured by a rope, Sven heads out to the edge of the ridge and searches for improbable lines down through the steep terrain. “This looks really good!” we hear after a while. “Give over, we don’t believe you!” Lasse takes over Sven’s end of the rope to give a second opinion: “Yeah, it actually looks good!” “Stop messing about, now I want to check!” says Susanne. But at the edge, Susanne can see that there is a possible line between the surrounding cliffs and cornices. Great, in spite of everything we hadn’t managed to get ourselves into a dead end with a long hill to climb to get back. Our newly-found escape route leads us down many slopes and through beautiful scenery, back to the road where a taxi is waiting for us. It turns out to be an unexpectedly pleasant end to an amputated trip; a fifth summit and a long ski downhill the poorer, but a few experiences richer.

h a g l ö f s 10 / 11


Š U gland it Group a s - kartdata s tatens kartverk, tillatel s e n u m m e r : 1 2 2 4 7 n e - 5 4 2 6 5 5


MOuntaineering It is a challenge to manufacture clothing and equipment for alpine use. The materials and the technical solutions must work as well on the rock face as they do on the long, sweaty approach and the cold, tired descent. A jacket should withstand the roughest of treatment, crumpled in a backpack and easy to carry, but then give 100 percent functionality when the wearer and weather demand it. We have taken these requirements to heart and produced a number of high quality, uncompromising products that cope with whatever conditions nature comes up with, allowing you to focus on the crux.

Stripe b eanie Knitted activity beanie with excellent thermal properties. Mix off wool (mulesing free) and acrylic. Wigo II Q jacket Technical midweight jacket in a clean design to wear as mid or outer layer. ROC 25 All purpose mountain pack, versatile enough to work well in almost every climbing challenge. A clean, minimalistic design for all season use.

G ua rd Q pant Durable Gore-Tex速 Pro Shell pant for all round usage. Reinforced seat, knee and lower leg.

Link II glove Durabel Gore-Tex glove with stretch. Insulated with Primaloft速.

Fang Q jac k e t A versatile Windstopper速 Soft Shell jacket for winter related activities. Mixed materials to provide less bulk and enhance body movement.


s pitz q JACKET Highly technical, shorter length, light and durable Gore-Tex速 Pro Shell jacket for alpine use.

Thinner material for increased comfort

Helmet compatible hood

Rugged durable material

Laminated pocket solution

Short cut design to fit with harness

Laminated watertight pit zips for ventilation

Reinforced shoulder, back and hip sections

3-way adjustable roll-away hood compatible with helmet.

To s ee more product s and colours , plea s e vi s it www.haglofs .s e


HAGLÖFS' ASSORTMENT 10/11 HAGLÖFS' CLOTHES, FOOTWEAR AND EQUIPMENT HAVE BEEN DEVELOPED TO PROVIDE YOU WITH THE BEST EXPERIENCE IN EVERY SITUATION. THIS PRODUCT OVERVIEW WILL HELP YOU INTEGRATE INDIVIDUAL PRODUCTS INTO A WHOLE THAT IS SUITED TO your own particular needs. Complete product information regarding materials, fabrics, weights and colours can be found at our website www.haglofs.se

CLOTHING BASE LAYER/MEN Actives rou ndneck 175 g ( S ize l)

Ac tives tee 130 G (Size L)

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

Acti v es boxer 55 G ( Size L )

Black/charcoal

DRYSKIN

Offwhite Ac tives sh ort j ohn 135 g ( S ize l)

DRYSKIN

Charcoal Ac tives long j ohn 160 g ( Size L)

DRYSKIN

Charcoal Ac tiv es zi p top 190 g (Size L )

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

Black

Twic e jacket 340 g (Size l)

Juniper Hood 315 g (S ize l)

Black

Oxide green/verdigris

Deep red/mellow red

Meso blue/abyss blue

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

Abyss blue Frost II jac ket 530 g (S ize l) P OLARTEC® THERMAL PR O®

POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Black

Ju niper top 245 g ( Size l) POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Verdigris

Ju niper vest 185 g ( Size l) POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Verdigris

Yoyo zi p h oo d 455 g ( Size l)

Yoyo hood 450 g (Size l)

Tungsten

Yoyo jacket 415 g ( Size l)

Verdigris POLARTEC ® THERM AL P RO®/STRETCH

Yoyo vest 265 g (Size l)

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

Wigo II tights 200 g (Size l)

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

Wigo II jacket 390 g ( Size l)

Orange rush/sunset

Tungsten

76

Wigo II top 325 g ( Size l)

Po lart ec® Micro

P ola rtec® Powe r S t retch ®

drysk in

Ste m top 365 g (S ize l)

P ola rtec ® Powe r S t retch ®

MID LAYER/MEN

Zone jacket 470 g (Size l)

Abyss blue/meso blue

haglöfs 10/11


WOMEN Actives Q tee 90 g ( Size m)

Actives Q roundneck 135 g ( Size m)

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

Acti ves Q boxer 35 g (S ize m )

Charcoal

Black/charcoal

Actives Q lo ng jo hn 135 g ( Size m)

Actives Q short john 115 g (Size m)

Black/charcoal

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

DRYSKIN

Charcoal Activ es Q zi p top 150 g ( Size m )

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

Wigo II Q top 280 g ( Size m)

Wigo II Q jac ket 290 g ( Size M)

Black

Mellow red

Twice Q jacket 280 g (Size m)

Ju niper Q h ood 250 g (S ize m)

Lilac blaze

haglöfs 10/11

Black

Deep red/mellow red

Ice blue/arctic blue

Flash lilac/lilac blaze

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

Deep red

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

Yoyo Q jacket 340 g (Size m)

Melow red

Ivory Frost II Q jacket 410 g (S ize m) P OLARTEC® THERMAL PR O®

POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Crimson Ju niper Q top 200 g ( Size m) POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Ice blue Ju niper Q vest 150 g ( Size m) POLARTE C® MICRO/DRYSKIN

Carnelia/crimson

Yoyo Q h ood 370 g(S ize m)

POLARTEC® THERMAL PRO®/ POLARTEC® POWER STRETCH®

Yoyo Q hood v est 290 g (S ize m)

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

P ola rtec® P owe r Str etc h®

Wigo II Q tights 180 g (Size m)

Yoyo Q zi p h ood 400g ( Size m )

Po lart ec® Micro

P ola rtec® Powe r S t retch ®

drysk in

S tem Q top 280 g ( S ize m )

P ola rtec ® Powe r S t retch ®

WOMEN

Zone Q jacket 345 g (Size m )

Ivory/basalt

77


Reptile jac ket 600 g (Size l)

Reptile II hood 750 g (Size l)

To rnado jacket 600 g (Size l)

WINDSTOPP ER ®

PO LARTE C® POWER SHIELD ®

FLEXA BLE TM

POLARTE C® POWER SHIELD ®

Boiga hood 630 g (Size l)

Abyss blue

Sunset

Verdigris

Abyss blue

Black

Naja h ood 480 g ( Size l)

massif jac ket 630 g (size l)

Tu rbine hood 510 g (Size l)

Fang jacket 705 g (Size l)

Jaw jacket 805 g ( Size l) WINDSTOPP ER ® So f t shell

WINDSTOPP ER ® So f t shell

WINDSTOPP ER ® So f t shell

WINDSTOPP ER® SOFT SHELL

WINDSTOPP ER ® So f t shell

Charcoal Naja jacket 435 g ( Size l) WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL

Charcoal

Meso blue

Lush green/basil green

Deep red

Sunset/orange rush

Rand pant 760 g ( Size l)

Omni II pant 850 g (Size l)

Turbine pant 530 g (Size l)

Su ta pant 815 g (Size l)

Charcoal

Black

Cool steel

Meso blue/abyss blue

WINDSTOPP ER ® SOFT Shell SCHO ELLER ® KE PR OTE C®

WINDSTOPP ER® S OFT S hell S CHO ELLER ® KEPR OTE C®

FLE XAB LE™/ SCHOELLER ® KE PROTE C®

Meso blue Co l pant 545 g ( Size l)

FLE XAB LE™/ SC HOELLER ® KE PR OTE C®

Black H alo pant 345 g (size l)

fle xab le®

WINDSTOPP ER® SO FT SHELL /DRYSKIN

Boiga jacket 595 g ( Size l)

FLEXABLE TM

H alo II vest 235 G (size l)

Naja vest 295 G ( Size l) WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL

WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL / DRYSKIN

Halo II jac ket 380 g (size L)

WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL / FLEXA BLE™

soft shell/MEN

Black

Charcoal/black

Black

LIM Ultimate jac ket 247 g (Size l)

LI M u ltimate II pant 290 g (Size l)

Bora jac ket 390 g (Size l)

windstopp er ®

windstopp er®

GO RE -TE X® PAC LITE ®

GO RE -TE X® PACLITE ®

A rete jacket 650 g (Size l)

Black

Abyss blue Alto pant 780 g ( Size l)

Black

Deep red GORE-TEX ® P ERFORMANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER /SCHOELLER ® KEPROTEC®

Response pant 560 g ( Size l)

Meso blue/abyss blue

Sunset/orange rush

Meso blue/abyss blue

GORE-TEX® PERFORMANCE SHELL 2- LAYER/GORE-TEX® PRO SHELL 3-LAYER

Black

Riot II jac ket 745 g (S ize l)

GO RE-TEX® P ERFOR MANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER

Meso blue/abyss blue

Crag jac ket 820 g (Size l)

GORE-TEX® P ERFORMANCE SHELL 2-LAYER

Black

Route jacket 660 g (S ize l)

G ORE-TEX® PERFO RM ANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER

Speed blue

Topo jacket 685 g ( Size l) GO RE-TEX® PERFO RMANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER

Charcoal

Glade pant 730 g ( Size l)

PRO OF™ RECYCLED/SCH OELLER® KEPROTEC®

Charcoal

Glade jac ket 730 g (Size l)

GORE-TEX® PERFORM ANCE SHELL 2-LAYER/S CH OELLER® KEP ROTEC®

GORE-TEX ® P ERFORMANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER

Aero pant 300 g (Size l)

Oxy blue/charcoal

Sunset

78

Ozo pullover 180 g (size l) G O RE- TE X® PACLITE ®

Shield pant 175 g (size l) PERF OR M AC® REC Y CLED

Shield jac ket 185 g (size l)

P ROOF™ RECYCLED

PERF ORM AC® RE CY CLED /FLE XABLE ™

SHELL LAYER/MEN

Orange rush/mango

Edge pant 730 g ( Size l)

Abyss blue

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglöfs 10/11


Reptile II Q hood 580 g (Size m)

Tornad o Q jacket 455 g (Size m )

WINDSTOPP ER ®

PO LARTE C® POWER SHIELD ®

FLEXAB LE™

PO LARTE C® POWER SHIELD ®

Re ptile Q jac ket 490 g (Size m)

Oxide green

Crimson

Crimson

Black

Massif Q jacket 525 g (size m)

Turb ine Q hood 440 g (S ize m)

Fang Q jac ket 570 g (S ize m)

Jaw Q jacket 645 g (Size m )

Black

Black

WINDSTOPP ER® Sof t shell

WINDSTOPP ER® SO FT SHELL

Ice blue/arctic blue

Deep red

Flash lilac/lilac blaze

Turbine Q pant 485 g (S ize m )

Su ta Q pant 730 g (S ize 38)

WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT S hell SCH OELLER ® KE PROTE C®

Omni Q II pant 750 g (Size m)

Black

Lilac blaze/flash lilac

WINDSTOPP ER® S OFT Shell S CHOELLER ® KE PR OTE C®

WINDSTOPP ER® SOFT SHELL

Deep red Rand Q pant 670 g ( Size m)

FLE X ABLE ™/S C HO ELLER ® KEPR OTE C®

Lilac blaze Co l Q pant 485 g ( S ize 38)

FLE XAB LE ™

Black

WINDSTOPP ER® So f t shell

Crimson N aja Q h ood 410 g ( Size m)

WINDSTOPP ER® Sof t shell

Charcoal

H al o Q pant 305 g (size m )

Charcoal

Boiga Q hood 535 g (Size m)

N aja Q jacket 345 g ( Size ) WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL

WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL /DRYSKIN

Boiga Q jacket 480 g ( Size m)

FLE XAB LE ™/SCH OELLER ® KE PROTE C®

Charcoal N aja Q v est 240 g ( S ize m )

Halo II Q vest 200 g (size m)

FLE XABLE ™

H alo II Q jac ket 305 g (size m )

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/FLEXABLE™

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/DRYSKIN

WOMEN

Black

Charcoal/black

windstopper ®

Bora Q jacket (335 g S ize m)

Aero Q pant (270 g Size m )

windstopper ®

GORE -TE X® PACLITE ®

GORE -TE X® PACLITE ®

LIM u ltimate II Q jac ket LIM ultimate II Q pant 215 g (Size 38) 265 g (Size m)

Fire/deep red

Black

Riot II Q jacket (635 g S ize m)

Arete Q jacket (545 g Size m)

PROO F™ RECYCLED/ S CH OELLER® KEP ROTEC®

haglöfs 10/11

A lto Q pant (640 g Size m)

Black

Artic blue GORE-TEX® PERFORMANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER/SCH OELLER® KEPROTEC ®

Black

GORE-TEX® PERFORMANCE SHELL 2- LAYER /SCHOELLER® KEPROTEC ®

Response Q pant (475 g S ize m )

Crimson

Deep red/mellow red

Ice blue/artic blue

Oxide green/verdigris

GORE- TEX® P ERFORM ANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER/GORE- TEX® P RO SHELL 3- LAYER

Black Crag Q jacket (685 g Size m)

GORE-TEX® P ERFOR MANCE SHELL 2 -LAYER

Fire Route Q jacket (570 g Size m)

GORE-TEX ® P ERFO RMANC E SHELL 2-LAYER

Charcoal Topo Q jacket (595 g S ize m)

GORE-TEX ® P ERFO RMANC E SHELL

Charcoal G lade Q pant (625 g Size m) GORE-TEX® PERFORMANCE SHELL 2- LAYER

Charcoal G lade Q jacket (595 g Size m)

Artic blue

GORE-TEX® PERFORMANCE SHELL 2- LAYER

Ozo Q pullov er 155 g (size m)

GO RE -TE X® PAC LITE ®

Shield Q pant 160 g (size m) PERF ORM AC® RE CY CLED

Shield Q jacket 155 g (size m )

PRO OF™ RECY CLED

PERF ORM AC® RE CY CLED /FLE XABLE ™

WOMEN

Lilac blaze/flash lilac

Edge Q pant (640 g Size m)

Mellow red

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

79


Meso blue

N ev l uk jac ket 835 g ( Size l)

Pirtuk jacket 1100 g (Size l)

Oxide green

Oxide green

GORE- TEX® P ERFORM ANCE SHELL 2-LAYER / PRI MALO FT®

Meso blue/abyss blue

Qanuk jacket 705 g ( Size l)

GORE- TEX® P ERFORM ANCE SHELL 2-LAYER / PRI MALO FT®

Black

Couloir pant 820 g (S ize l)

Meso blue

Gully jac ket 790 g (Size l)

Couloir jacket 875 g (Size l)

GORE -TE X® S OFT SHELL 3-LAYER

Atom II bib 800 g (Size l)

GORE -TE X® S OFT SHELL 3-LAYER

Guard pant 645 g (Size l)

G ORE-TE X® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER/ S CHO ELLER ® KEP ROTE C®

Rati o jacket 420 g ( Size l)

G ORE-TE X® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER

G ORE-TE X® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER ( STRET CH )

Cirque jacket 605 g ( Size l)

Oxide green/verdigris

WINDSTOPP ER® / PRI MALOFT ®

GORE -TE X® S OFT SHELL 3-LAYER

GORE -TE X® PRO SHELL 3-LAYER

Spitz jacket 495 g (S ize l)

G ORE-TE X® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER

SHELL LAYER/MEN

Sunset

Orange/rush

Abyss blue/meso blue

BARRIER KNEE PANT 255 g (Size L)

BARRIER II PANT 590 g ( Size L)

BIvVY DOWN JACKET 440 g ( Size L)

Deep red/mellow red

Black

PERF OR MAC™ RE CY CLED / GOO SE DOWN

PERF OR MAC™/ THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

Black

PERF OR MAC™/ THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

Black

BARRIER VEST 270 g (S ize L )

Black

Verdigris

BOREA D OWN PARKA 960 g ( S ize L) PERF OR MAC™/G OO SE DOWN

P ERFO R MAC™/G OO SE D OWN

Black

B ARRIER H OOD 610 g ( Size L)

PERF OR MAC™/ THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

Verdigris BelaY D OWN HOOD 825 g (S ize L)

BARRIER JACKET 465 g (Size L)

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M ICRO

BARRIER PULL OV ER 370 g (Size L )

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M ICRO

INSULATION/men

Sunset

Black

CLIMATIC TM/men

Charcoal

80

Bracken

Bracken

RU GGED FJELL PANT 550 g (S ize L )

C LIMATIC TM

Bracken

RUGGED MOUNTAIN PANT 760 g (S ize L ) CLIMATIC™ /FLE XABLE™

MID FLEX PANT 510 g (Size L) CLIMATIC™ /FLE XABLE™

MID FJELL PANT 435 g (S ize L )

CLI MATIC™

MID TRAIL PANT 480 g (S ize L)

CLI MATIC T M

DRYSKIN REC YCLED

RETU RN LS TEE 220 g (Size L )

Bracken

Bracken/black

haglöfs 10/11


Fire/deep red

Deep red

Qan uk Q jacket 580 g ( Size m)

N evl uk Q jacket 695 g ( S ize m)

Pirtuk Q jacket 890 g (Size m)

Mellow red

Vital

GORE -TEX® P ERFO RMAN CE SHELL 2-LAYER / P RIMAL OFT®

Deep red/mellow red

G ORE-TE X® PERF ORMAN CE SHELL 2- LAYER/ P RI MALOFT ®

Vital/maize Coulo ir Q pant 750 g ( Size m)

Crimson

Deep red/mellow red

BARRIER Q VEST 220 g ( S ize M)

BARRIER Q KNEE PANT 230 G (S ize 38)

Black

Gully Q jacket 670 g (Size m)

G ORE- TEX® so f t shell 3-layer

Atom II Q bib 730 g (Size m)

G ORE- TEX® so f t shell 3-layer

Guard Q pant 595 g (Size m)

GORE -TE X® PRO SHELL 3-LAYER / S CHOELLER ® KEP ROTE C®

Rati o Q jacket 390 g ( Size m)

GORE- TEX® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER

Cirqu e Q jacket 535 g ( S ize m)

GO RE-TE X® PRO SHELL 3-LAYER (STRET CH)

G ORE- TEX® PR O SHELL 3- LAYER

Spitz Q jac ket 430 g ( Size m )

WINDSTOPP ER® / P RIMAL OFT®

G ORE- TEX® sof t shell 3-layer

GORE -TE X® PRO SHELL 3-LAYER

WOMEN Couloir Q jacket 745 g (Size m )

Oxide green/verdigris

Verdigris/oxide green

BIVV Y Q DOWN JACKET 375 g (Size M)

BELAY Q DOWN HOOD 690 g (Size M)

Black

Black

P ERFO RM AC™/ GOO SE DOWN

BARRIER II Q PANT 520 g (Size M)

PERF OR MAC™ RE CY CLED / G OO SE D OWN

PERF OR MAC™/ THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

Lilac blaze

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M I CR O

Deep red

BARRIER Q H OO D 520 g ( S ize M)

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M ICRO

B ARRIER Q JAC KET 415 g ( Size M)

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M ICRO

PERF OR MAC™/THER MO LITE ® M ICRO

women

Black

Crimson

RU GGED Q FJELL PANT 495 g (Size 38)

RUGGED Q MOUNTAIN PANT 705 g ( Size 38)

Arctic blue

PERF OR MAC™/G OO SE DOWN

BO REA Q DOWNPARKA 840 g ( Size M)

Deep red

Mellow red

haglöfs 10/11

Charcoal

MID Q FLEX PANT 455 g (Size 38)

Bracken

CLIMATI C™

CLIMATIC™ /FLE XABLE™

MID Q FJELL PANT 425 g ( Size 38)

C LIM ATIC TM

MID Q TRAIL PANT 370 G (S ize 38)

CLIMATI C TM

DRYSKIN RECYC LED

R eturn Q LS tee 1 65 g (Size M)

CLIM ATIC™ /FLEXABLE™

women

Bracken

Charcoal/black

Bracken/black

81


H alo pant 345 g (Size l)

Charcoal

P ERFORM AC™ RECY CLED/ FLEX ABLE™

Charcoal

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/DRYSKIN

Charcoal

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/FLEXABLE™

Charcoal

H alo II jacket 380 g (Size l)

Shield jacket 185 g (Size l)

Oxy blue/charcoal

Ozo pullover 180 g ( S ize l) G ORE- TEX® PACLITE ®

p erf orm ac™ recyled

Shield pant 175 g (Size l)

Charcoal

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/DRYSKIN

Oxy blue/charcoal

I ntense pant 205 g ( Size l)

dryskin stret ch

dryskin re cy cled

I ntense zip top 200 g (Size l)

FLEX ABLE™ RECY CLED/ FLE XABLE ™

INTENSE/men

Charcoal

Charcoal

INTENSE/Backpacks

82

Ace L 670 g (20 L )

Ace M 620 g (12 L)

Ace S 460 g (5 L)

E ndu rance 660 g (12 L)

S tam ina 450 g (5 L)

Sprint Lumb ar pack 290 g inkl. flaska

Oxy blue/charcoal

Charcoal

Oxy blue/charcoal

Oxy blue/charcoal

Oxy blue/charcoal

Budgiegreen/charcoal

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglöfs 10/11


Charcoal

H alo Q pant 305 g ( Size m)

Charcoal

PERF ORMAC™ REC YCLED / FLEXAB LE™

Charcoal

Hal o II Q vest 200 g (Size m)

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/DRYSKIN

Charcoal

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/FLEXABLE™

Charcoal

Halo II Q jac ket 305 g (S ize m)

Shield Q jacket 155 g (Size m )

Charcoal

Ozo Q pullover 155 g ( Size m) gore-te x® pac lite®

P ERF ORMAC™ RE CYCLED

Zap Q tights 194 g ( Size m)

WINDSTOPPER® SOFT SHELL/DRYSKIN

Oxy blue/charcoal Shield Q pant 160 g ( Size m )

Intense Q pant 185 g ( Size m)

DRYSKIN STRET C H

dryskin re cy cled

Intense Q zi p top 155 g ( Size m)

FLE XABLE ™ REC YCLED / FLEXAB LE™

women

Charcoal

haglöfs 10/11

Charcoal

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

83


ACCESSOries

Crimson/mellow red

Black

ws balac lava 35 g (ONE Size)

neck gaiter 20 g (ONE Size)

shaped HEAD BAND 30 g (ONE S ize)

Off white

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

Black

belts

Black ins ulated mitten 210 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

WINDSTOPP ER ® S OFT SHELL /PITTARDS ® GOATSKIN LEATHER

Black

heli x II glove 215 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

Black

heli x II mitten 180 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

SHAKE BELT 90 g (70,90,110)

Black

Black

Black JIG BELT 115 g (en Size)

PR OO F™ RE CY CLED /FLE XABLE ™/P ITTARDS ® AR MOU R TAN G OAT/G ORE -TE X® WATER P ROO F INSERT

FLEXABLE™/PITTARDS® ARMOUR TAN GOAT/GORE-TEX® WATERPROOF INSERT

Black link II gl ove 160 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

fang glove 110 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

FLE XAB LE™/P ITTARDS ® AR MOU R TAN G OAT/P ROO F™ WATER PR OO F INSERT

R egul us glove 90 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

FLEXA B LE™/PITTARDS ® AR MOU R TAN G OAT/PR OOF™ WATER P ROO F INSERT

wigo glove 35 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

WINDSTOPP ER ®/PITTARDS ® MU STANG S UEDE /POLARTE C® POWER STRET C H®

Po larte c® P ower Stret c h®

DRYSKIN RE C YC LED

actives liner glove 25 g (6,7,8,9,10,11)

frost CAP 30 g (S/M, M/ L)

WINDSTOPP ER® SOFT SHELL

Black

pS BALACLAVA 35 g (S/M, M/L )

Po larte c® Power S tret ch®

Charcoal

alpine II ca p 45 g (S/M, M/L )

WINDSTOPP ER® SO FT SHELL / DRYSKIN RECY CLED

Verdigris/oxide green

jaw CA P 40 g ( S/M, M/L)

PO LARTE C® POWER STRET CH ® / DRYSKIN RECY CLED

Mellow red

wind C AP 35 g (S/M, M/ L )

WINDSTOPP ER® / PO LARTE C® MICR O

Deep red/mellow red

gloves

Black

84

BREEZE C AP 25 g (S/M, M/L)

PO LARTE C® THER MAL PRO® RE CYCLED

FANATIC PRINT CAP 30 g (S/M, M/L)

P olarte c® MICR O

FANATIC C AP 25 g (S/M, M/L)

P olarte c® P ower S tret ch®

HEL MET II CAP 15 g (S /M, M/L )

P olarte c® P ower Stret ch®

stripe BEANIE 50 g (O NE Size) DRYSKIN RECY CLED

MOU NT BEANIE 65 g (ONE Size)

MERIN O W OOL (MU LESING FREE)/ ACRYLI C

MERIN O WOO L (MULESING FREE )/ ACRYLI C

MA P BEANIE 55 g (O NE Size)

WINDSTOPP ER® SO FT SHELL

POLARTE C® M ICRO/ WINDSTOPP ER®

MERIN O W OOL (MU LESING FREE)/ ACRYLI C

headwear

Black

Black

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglöfs 10/11


WATATAIT Ma pcase 95 g

Neck pouch 50 g

Travel pouch 95 g

Moneybelt 80 g

Mobile pouc h 25 g

Foldable mobile pouc h 30 g

Ca mera pouch 40 g

Toilet paper pouch 70 g

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

Dry bag 5,10,20,30,45 95-320 g

Laptop drybag 15", 17" 210-260 g

Mandarin/charcoal

Mandarin/charcoal

TRAVEL Flight bag M, L (60-90 L) 490-550 g

Gu ideb ag M, l 355-625 g

Toiletbag M, L 230-280 g

Mesh pac kers set S/M, L /XL

Mesh bags

Travel wallet

Wallet

Black

Charcoal

Black

Charcoal

Charcoal

Charcoal

Charcoal

haglรถfs 10/11

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

85


FOOTWEAR TREKKING/MEN gry m 780 g 1/2 par (Size 42)

grym HI 850 g 1/2 par ( S ize 42)

granit gt 920 g 1/2 par (S ize 42)

s olid hi 1020 g 1/2 par (S ize 42)

solid lite 750 g 1/2 par ( Size 42)

Black

Black

Umber

Black

Led

HIKING/MEN /CORE

PERFORMANCE

TRAIL MID gt 650 g 1/2 par (S ize uk8)

TRAIL gt 590 g 1/2 par ( Size u k8)

jau nt gt 735 g 1/2 par (Size 42)

CRAG HI GT 640 g 1/2 par (S ize 42)

VERTIGO HI GT 650 g 1/2 par ( Size 42)

Umber

Black

Black

Golden green

Barque

OFFROAD/MEN /approach crag gt 510 g 1/2 par ( Size 42)

crag 470 g 1/2 par ( Size 42)

vertigo gt 490 g 1/2 par (Size 42)

Golden green

Charcoal/budgie green

Abyss blue

OFFROAD/men /explore ramb le 510 g 1/2 par ( Size 42)

motio n gt 475 g 1/2 par ( Size u k8)

x-hale 425 g 1/2 par (S ize u k8)

x-hale gt 440 g 1/2 par (Size uk8)

Barque

Charcoal

Banner blue

Golden green

weight a pplies to one sho e/boot.

86

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglรถfs 10/11


WOMEN gry m q 680 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

granit q gt 800 g 1/2 par (S ize 38)

solid lite q 680 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

Black

Umber

Black

WOMEN /CORE

PERFORMANCE

TRAIL MID Q gt 5 60 g 1/2 par (Size uk5)

TRAIL Q gt 505 g 1/2 par ( Size u k5)

jaunt Q gt 610 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

CRAG HI Q GT 540 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

VERTIG O HI Q GT 560 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

Black

Umber

Cedar green/algar green

Mellow red

Barque

WOMEN /approach crag q gt 425 g 1/2 par (S ize 38)

c rag q 390 g 1/2 par (S ize 38)

v ertigo Q GT 410 g 1/2 par (S ize 38)

Arctic blue

Deep red/silver

Mellow red

women /explore ra mb le Q 430 g 1/2 par (Size 38)

motio n q gt 415 g 1/2 par ( Size u k5)

x-hale Q 365 g 1/2 par (S ize u k5)

x-hale Q gt 375 g 1/2 par (Size uk5)

Black

Umber

Black

Fire

haglรถfs 10/11

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

87


BACKPACKS backpacking/TREKKING

expedition

OXO 750,650,650Q,550Q 2,8-3,0 Kg

MATRIX 30,40,50,60,70 1,25-1,70 Kg

SUMO 75,95 3,15-3,4 Kg

Bronze green/golden green

Deep red

Black/charcoal

MOUNTAIN backpackS/hiking fl ow M, l 1,20-1,25 Kg (18-23 l)

breeze m, l 1,25–1,30 kg (25-30 L)

vapour l 1,50 Kg (32 L )

lim 35, 45 1,00–1,03 Kg

rambler lumb ar pack 490 g (4 l)

Charcoal/basalt

Bronze green/golden green

Deep red/basalt

Graphite

Black/charcoal

snow

88

ra mbler evo l umb ar pac k 600 g (9 l)

rand 28, 38, 48 1,65-1,95 Kg

mountain surf 1,65 Kg (30 L )

powder poetry 1,15 Kg (18 L )

snow passion 1,00 kg (14 l)

Bronze green/charcoal

Black/black

Papaya/mango

Verdigris/oxide green

Mellow red/deep red

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglöfs 10/11


climbing roc 25, 35 1,4–1,5 Kg

roc ice 1,5 K g (35 L )

roc speed 860 g (25 L)

roc hard 1,40 Kg (30 L)

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

daypacks/MULTI TIGHT EVO M, L,XL ,XXL 1,1-1,6 KG (25-48 l)

TIGHT PRO XS ,s,M,L,X L 655 G-1,45 Kg (15-38 l)

TIGHT X S,S,M,L ,XL 500 g-1,35 K g (15-38 l)

VOLT EVO L 930 G (22 L)

volt 700-760 G (18-22 L)

Mellow red/deep red

Black/abyss blue

Golden green/black

Mellow red/deep red

Black

raw 575 G (20 L)

C orker m 800 g (20 L)

C RACKER 550 g (12 L)

Budgie green

Abyss blue/meso blue

Mellow red/deep red

haglöfs 10/11

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

89


TRAVEL work BACKUP EVO 15",17" (23, 28 l) 1,30-1,40 Kg

B ACK UP 12",15",17" (18, 23, 28 L) 950 G-1,15 K g

projekt l, x l (32, 38 L) 1,2-1,25 K g

c hill m,l (23, 26 L) 820-870 g

cou rier 15" 970 g

Barque

Barque

Black/black

Deep red/mellow red

Sunset/Orange rush

backpacks mu ltila p 15",17" 1,6-1,8 Kg

lap 15",17" 1,15-1,3 Kg

CARRIER 50,60 2,35-2,45 KG

SEC TRACK 65,55 Q 2,9-3,0 Kg

Black

Black

Charcoal

Charcoal

bags DOME 40,70,100,130 490-790 G

VULCAN 60,90,120 1,80-2,45 KG

VULC AN WHEEL 5,20 Kg (120 L )

co nvoy 80,110 5,00-5,70 Kg

CART 2,90 Kg (38 L)

Charcoal

Arctic blue

Charcoal

Black/charcoal

Black/charcoal

skibag 195 cm lร…ng, 3,40 KG

Charcoal

90

For further prod uct information sEe www.haglofs.se

haglรถfs 10/11


SLEEPING BAGS DOWN

synthetics

goga

NORDIC WINTER 200:1750G 183:1630G Temp (EN 13537) -14 °C T comf -22 °C T lim -44 °C T ext GOGA 3S 200:1230 G 183:1130G Temp (EN 13537) -6 °C T comf -13 °C T lim -33 °C T ext GOGA 2S 200:990 G 183:890G Temp (EN 13537) 2 °C T comf -4 °C T lim -20 °C T ext GOGA 1S 200:800 G 183:710 G Temp (EN 13537) 7 °C T comf 2 °C T lim -13 °C T ext

HYPNA

HYPNA 3S 200:1410G 183:1310G Temp (EN 13537) -2 °C T comf -9 °C T lim -27 °C T ext HYPNA 2S 200:1150G 183:1050G Temp (EN 13537) 4 °C T comf -1 °C T lim -17 °C T ext HYPNA 1S 200:950 G 183:850G Temp (EN 13537) 9 °C T comf 5 °C T lim -9 °C T ext

Q DOWN

Q DOWN 3S 175:1330G Temp (EN 13537) -5 °C T comf -12 °C T lim -31 °C T ext Q DOWN 2S 175:1170G Temp (EN 13537) -1 °C T comf -6 °C T lim -24 °C T ext

LIM

LIM 100 200:750G 183:660G Temp (EN 13537) 10 °C T comf 6 °C T lim -7 °C T ext LIM 50 200:520G 183:460G Temp (EN 13537) 16 °C T comf 13 °C T lim 1 °C T ext

SYNTHETICS ZENSO R NORDIC WINTER 200:2670 G 183:2350G Temp: (EN 13537) -12°C T comf -20°C T lim -42°C T ext ZENSOR 3S 200:1750G 183:1600G Temp: (EN 13537) -2°C T comf -8°C T lim -26°C T ext ZENSOR 2S 200:1400 G 183:1260 G Temp: (EN 13537) 2°C T comf -3°C T lim -18°C T ext ZENSOR 1S 200:1100 G 183:990 G Temp: (EN 13537) 5°C T comf 0°C T lim -15°C T ext ZENSOR COMPACT 200:900 G 183:810G Temp: (EN 13537) 11°C T comf 7°C T lim -6°C T ext

haglöfs 10/11

SL UMBER SLUMBER 3S 200:2200 G 183:2030 G Temp: (EN 13537) -4°C T comf -11°C T lim -30°C T ext SLUMBER 2S 200:1700 G 183:1540 G Temp: (EN 13537) 0°C T comf -5°C T lim -22°C T ext SLUMBER 1S 200:1400 G 183:1300G Temp: (EN 13537) 6°C T comf 1°C T lim -14°C T ext SLUMBER COMPACT 200:1080 G 183:1000 G Temp: (EN 13537) 10°C T comf 6°C T lim -7°C T ext SLUMBER JUNIOR 150:900 G SLUMBER TODDLER 110:670G

Q FIBRE Q 3S FIBRE 175:1820 G Temp: (EN 13537) -7°C T comf -14°C T lim -33°C T ext Q FIBRE 2S 175:1480 G Temp: (EN 13537) -2°C T comf -8°C T lim -26°C T ext Q FIBRE 1S 175:1150 G Temp: (EN 13537) 3°C T comf -2°C T lim -19°C T ext

For furthe r product information sEe www.haglofs.se

Q slumber Q SLUMBER 3S 175:2140 G Temp: (EN 13537) -9°C T comf -16°C T lim -37°C T ext Q SLUMBER 2S 175:1720 G Temp: (EN 13537) -1°C T comf -7°C T lim -24°C T ext Q SLUMBER 1S 175:1360 G Temp: (EN 13537) 5°C T comf 1°C T lim -15°C T ext Q SLUMBER COMPACT 175:990 G Temp: (EN 13537) 10°C T comf 6°C T lim -7°C T ext

91


La r s Thuli n

H AG L Ö F S ' C O L O U R S

WE DISCLAIM RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY PRINTING ERRORS REGARDING PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO MAKE CHANGES AFTER CATALOGUE PRINTING. The opinions of individual writers do not necessarily reflect Haglöfs’ official position. You are free to quote us given that you provide the source.

ABYSS BLUE

ALGA GREEN

ALOE VERA

ARCTIC BLUE

Banner Blue

Barque

BASALT

BASIL GREEN

Black

BLUE MOON

BLUE SHADOW

BRACKEN

BRONZE GREEN

BUDGIE GREEN

CHARCOAL

CLOUD BLUE

CRICKET GREEN

CRIMSON

DEEP PURPLE

FIRE

FLASH LILAC

GOLDEN GREEN

GRAPHITE

ICE BLUE

IVORY

LILAC BLAZE

MAIZE

MANDARIN

MANGO

MESO BLUE

MELLOW RED

OFF WHITE

OLIVE

ORANGE RUSH

OySTER

OXIDE GREEN

OXY BLUE

PURPLE HAZE

SALVIA

SEAWEED

SUNSET

TUNGSTEN

UMBER

VERDIGRIS

VITAL

THE COLOUR CHART IS A GUIDE TO COLOURS IN HAGLÖFS ASSORTMENT. N uances may differ from actual colours for technical reasons.


La r s Thuli n

H AG L Ö F S ' C O L O U R S

WE DISCLAIM RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY The opinions of individual writers do not necessarily reflect Haglöfs’ official position. You are free to quote us given that you

ABYSS BLUE

ALGA GREEN

ALOE VERA

ARCTIC BLUE

Banner Blue

Barque

BASALT

BASIL GREEN

Black

BLUE MOON

BLUE SHADOW

BRACKEN

BRONZE GREEN

BUDGIE GREEN

CHARCOAL

CLOUD BLUE

CRICKET GREEN

CRIMSON

DEEP PURPLE

FIRE

FLASH LILAC

GOLDEN GREEN

GRAPHITE

ICE BLUE

IVORY

LILAC BLAZE

MAIZE

MANDARIN

MANGO

MESO BLUE

MELLOW RED

OFF WHITE

OLIVE

ORANGE RUSH

OySTER

OXIDE GREEN

OXY BLUE

PURPLE HAZE

SALVIA

SEAWEED

SUNSET

TUNGSTEN

UMBER

VERDIGRIS

VITAL

THE COLOUR CHART IS A GUIDE TO COLOURS IN HAGLÖFS ASSORTMENT. N uances may differ from actual colours for technical reasons.


HEAD OFFICE

dUN

SWEDEN Haglöfs Scandinavia AB Industrigatan 18 P.O. Box 520 774 27 Avesta SWEDEN Phone: +46 (0) 226 67 000 Fax: +46 (0) 226 571 59 haglofs@haglofs.se www.haglofs.se

syntET

goga

NORDIC WINTER 200:1750G 183:1630G Temp (EN 13537) -14 °C T comf -22 °C T lim -44 °C T ext GOGA 3S 200:1230 G 183:1130G Temp (EN 13537) -6 °C T comf -13 °C T lim -33 °C T ext GOGA 2S 200:990 G 183:890G Temp (EN 13537) 2 °C T comf -4 °C T lim -20 °C T ext GOGA 1S 200:800 G 183:710 G Temp (EN 13537) 7 °C T comf 2 °C T lim -13 °C T ext

HYPNA

Q D OWN

HYPNA 3S 200:1410G 183:1310G Temp (EN 13537) -2 °C T comf -9 °C T lim -27 °C T ext HYPNA 2S 200:1150 G 183:1050G Temp (EN 13537) 4 °C T comf -1 °C T lim -17 °C T ext HYPNA 1S 200:950 G 183:850G Temp (EN 13537) 9 °C T comf 5 °C T lim -9 °C T ext

Q DOWN 3S 175:1330G Temp (EN 13537) -5 °C T comf -12 °C T lim -31 °C T ext Q DOWN 2S 175:1170G Temp (EN 13537) -1 °C T comf -6 °C T lim -24 °C T ext

LIM

LIM 100 200:750G 183:660G Temp (EN 13537) 10 °C T comf 6 °C T lim -7 °C T ext LIM 50 200:520G 183:460G Temp (EN 13537) 16 °C T comf 13 °C T lim 1 °C T ext

Syntet NORDIC WINTER 200:2670 G 183:2350G Temp: (EN 13537) -12°C T comf -20°C T lim -42°C T ext ZENSOR 3S 200:1750G 183:1600G Temp: (EN 13537) -2°C T comf -8°C T lim -26°C T ext ZENSOR 2S 200:1400 G 183:1260 G Temp: (EN 13537) 2°C T comf -3°C T lim -18°C T ext ZENSOR 1S 200:1100 G 183:990 G Temp: (EN 13537) 5°C T comf 0°C T lim -15°C T ext ZENSOR COMPACT 200:900 G 183:810G Temp: (EN 13537) 11°C T comf 7°C T lim -6°C T ext

SLUMBER SLUMBER 3S 200:2200 G 183:2030 G Temp: (EN 13537) -4°C T comf -11°C T lim -30°C T ext SLUMBER 2S 200:1700 G 183:1540 G Temp: (EN 13537) 0°C T comf -5°C T lim -22°C T ext SLUMBER 1S 200:1400 G 183:1300G Temp: (EN 13537) 6°C T comf 1°C T lim -14°C T ext SLUMBER COMPACT 200:1080 G 183:1000 G Temp: (EN 13537) 10°C T comf 6°C T lim -7°C T ext SLUMBER JUNIOR 150:900 G SLUMBER TODDLER 110:670G

Q FIBRE

Q slumber Q 3S FIBRE 175:1820 G Temp: (EN 13537) -7°C T comf -14°C T lim -33°C T ext Q FIBRE 2S 175:1480 G Temp: (EN 13537) -2°C T comf -8°C T lim -26°C T ext Q FIBRE 1S 175:1150 G Temp: (EN 13537) 3°C T comf -2°C T lim -19°C T ext

Q SLUMBER 3S 175:2140 G Temp: (EN 13537) -9°C T comf -16°C T lim -37°C T ext Q SLUMBER 2S 175:1720 G Temp: (EN 13537) -1°C T comf -7°C T lim -24°C T ext Q SLUMBER 1S 175:1360 G Temp: (EN 13537) 5°C T comf 1°C T lim -15°C T ext Q SLUMBER COMPACT 175:990 G Temp: (EN 13537) 10°C T comf 6°C T lim -7°C T ext

NORWAY Haglöfs AS Postboks 221 1319 Bekkestua NORWAY Phone: +47 67 53 35 08 Fax: +47 67 53 35 09 bjarne@haglofs.no

NETHERLANDS Snowgoose De Kwekerij 5 1921 XZ Akersloot NETHERLANDS Phone: +31 (0) 251 320 764 Fax: +31 (0) 251 316 995 info@snowgoose.nl

ITALY Travel Division Srl Strada Ninz, 61 39030 La Villa in Badia (BZ) ITALY Phone: +39 (0) 471 845570 Fax: +39 (0) 471 847755 haglofs@travel-division.it

DENMARK Haglöfs Danmark A/S Björnholms Allé 4 8260 Viby J DENMARK Phone: +45 86 14 14 00 Fax: +45 86 11 63 13 haglofs@haglofs.dk

PORTUGAL Altitude - Jogos de Aventura, Lda Rua João Saraiva 34 A/B 1700-250 Lisboa PORTUGAL Phone: +351 (0) 21 843 5580 Fax: +351 (0) 21 846 2834 altitude@cipreia.pt

SPAIN & ANDORRA Mega Sport S.A. Mercuri, 14 planta 2ª Polígono Almeda 08940 cornellà SPAIN Phone: +34 93 475 14 20 Fax: +34 93 474 32 41 info@megasportsa.com

FINLAND Haglöfs Oy Pakkalankuja 7 01510 Vantaa FINLAND Phone: +358 (0) 988 680 080 Fax: +358 (0) 988 680 089 haglofs@haglofs.fi

GERMANY & AUSTRIA Haglöfs Deutschland GmbH Albert-Einstein-Str. 6 87437 Kempten GERMANY Phone: +49 (0) 831 512 800 Fax: +49 (0) 831 512 8029 info@haglofs.de

UK & IRELAND Haglöfs UK River Mill, Staveley Mill Yard, Staveley, Cumbria LA8 9LR UK Phone: +44 (0) 1539 822595 Fax: +44 (0) 1539 825244 info@haglofs.co.uk

SWITZERLAND Ace AG Dorfstrasse 23 Postfach 62 8873 Amden SWITZERLAND Phone: +41 (0) 55 611 61 61 Fax: +41 (0) 55 611 61 62 info@haglofs.ch

10/11

BELGIUM Terra Incognita Hallebaan 21 2520 Oelegem BELGIUM Phone: +32 (0) 3385 88 27 Fax: +32 (0) 3385 88 26 info@haglofs.be JAPAN Fullmarks 957-12 Kawamukai-cho Tsuziki Yokohama JAPAN Phone: +81 (0) 45 470 4900 Fax: +81 (0) 45 472 4726 waka@full-marks.com

HAGL FS LOGOTYPE B A S I C L O G O T Y P E . TO B E U S E D A S N E G AT I V E W H I T E O N A B L A C K O R D A R K B A C K G R O U N D

FRANCE Nord Ouest 325 Route de valparc 743 30 Poisy FRANCE Phone: +33 4 50 67 00 17 Fax: +33 4 50 67 16 69 admin@nordouest.fr

FOR OTHER MARKETS, please contact head office. HAGLÖFS LOGOTYPE

BASIC LOGOTYPE. TO BE USED AS POSITIVE BLACK ON A LIGHT BACKGROUND

7 318840 440126

ZE NSOR

H aglö f s 10 /11

SOVSÄCKAR

för mer info om prod ukterna se www.haglofs.se

O U T S TANDING O U T D O O R E QUIP M EN T

our way


Haglofs collectie 2010 - 2011