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Architecture Portfolio Tommy Li

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ARCH 252 Winter 2018

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Angela Bracco Studio


Tommy Li Education

CALIFORNIA POLYTECHNIC STATE UNIVERSITY, SAN LUIS OBISPO Archiecture •

Projected Graduation Year: 2021

Mills High School, Millbrae •

Skills

Graduation Year: 2016

Media Model Building | Sketching | Photography

Digital AutoCAD | Illustrator | Photoshop | Rhino | Revit | InDesign | Excel

Experience in Architecture

Build San Francisco Summer Design Institution (2015) • • •

Professional Affiliations

Resarch and design 5M Project in SF collaboratively Created 3d Plaza based on real life project site located between Mission and 5th Street in San Francisco Presented digital model to architects who have been working on the real 5M Project

Alpha Rho Chi • •

Professional co-ed fraternity for studenst studying architecture and related professions Architecture career related workshops and volunteer events


Contents Project 1: Taxonomy Of Mechanics

Project 2: Repository of Time

Daily Dalliances

Quarter Reflection


Project 1: Taxonomy of Mechanics Everyday we walk by things that are essential to our daily lives; however, we always seem to ignore these things because we are always so busy and think that we have more important things to be paying attention to. Interestingly, our perspective change when we are forced to look at a specific object that we’ve never seen or pay attention to before even though it’s always been around us. Taxonomy of Mechanics opens our perspective to machines by making us find the qualities of a specific car part, and create a space that represents that quality. This gives us new way to consider space, though quality of an object, rather than just its geometry. My car part was a catalytic converter, in which I found that its function is to convert the dirty air coming out of the car’s engine. Thus, I use the same catalytic converter to create a space that I think would make the occupants feel purifying as they go from on end of the space to the other, just like the gas coming through the catalytic converter.


Catalytic Converter Picture


B

Top Plan

Car Part Drawings

A

1” = 2”

Section A

1” = 2”

Section B

1” = 2”


Car Part Render

Top Render

1” = 2”

Side Render

1” = 2”

Front Render

1” = 2”


Exploded Axo Render


Catalytic Converter Tommy Li

ARCH 242

Winter 2018

Angela Bracco

Converter Body

Platinum Substrate

Steel Heat Shield

The Liver Catalytic converter is a federally regulated device required for most cars to decrease harmful emissions. It’s been modified several times since the 70s and become more efficient.

The catalytic converter (or catcon) in your car is, actually, a very important element of the car�s exhaust system because it removes harmful nitrogen oxides (NOX, x=1,2,3) and carbon monoxide (CO) from the combustion residues before they are released into the environment. It is called a catalytic converter because it converts CO into ubiquitous CO2 and NOX into N2and O2 through chemical reactions on a solid catalyst. A catalyst is a chemical compound that helps the reaction to occur faster by reducing the activation energy barrier of the reaction. It is not consumed during the reaction. In the case of the catcon, the catalyst is a solid platinum (Pt) or palladium (Pd)surface unto which reactants from the gaseous phase adsorb and react. This process of a reaction being assisted by a catalyst that is in a phase different from the reactants� phase is known as heterogeneous catalysis.

Chemical Reaction

Resonator

Catalytic Converter

Hot/Cold Average Car Exhaust System Muffler


Spatial Machine Logic Blocks


Spatial Machine


Spatial Machine


Reflection

I felt like this is an excellent project to start the quarter as it teaches me a new way to think about and design space. Previously, I’ve never think about what would happen if building in the world is designed based on function of some machineries. This opens my mind to many possible ways to creating space since I now can think about a building like a machine while I am designing it. It was also interesting to work with an object that most people considered unrelated to architecture as I made my spatial machines using half the car part I began with. In the end, my spatial machine almost feels halforganic. However, I did think that this project was a little confusing at the beginning because most of the people in the studio, including me, didn’t understand the concept of a spatial machines as most of us never look at a car part as a building of a space before. In conclusion, it was an intriguing experience working with the car part, and now whenever I look at a everyday machinery, I would start picturing the possible spatial quality it holds and how I can utilize that in my future project.


Project 2: Repository of Time Repository of time is a study through which allows us to think about the idea behind exhibitions that showcase a series of artifacts in a specific way. It manifest the specimen of time, place, culture, and record. Essentially, our objective was to design a museum specific to a particular quality related to the Carrizo Plain. In 2014, the largest solar powered farm was built on Carrizo Plain. That is, no doubt, a huge milestone in the age of new energy forms. However, it makes me wonder, whyCarrizo Plain? Why was it chosen to site the largest solar farm in the world. As I walked across the dry grass land of Carrizo on a cool January afternoon, I realized the answer was obvious: this place has nothing but the sun! This, is what inspired me to design a solar technology museum on this plain that most consider worthless or inhabitable. I stared by looking into the history of Carrizo Plain as part of the site analysis assignment. One thing that stood out to me was the Chumash lived on the plain long ago and believed that the sun is a man carrying a torch, But they also realized how important the sun was to their survival. More amazingly, they have long been fully aware of winter solstice as the shortest day of the year, which caused them to view it as one of the most important day of the year. Therefore, I decided to create a circiular structure with a solar powered tower in the center as a trubute to the sun for providing us with a renewable source of energy, just like the Chumash did. As a result, this allows me to use concentrated solar power on my program to both power the building while educating visitors about a different form of solar powering than the more popular PV solar power.


Site Analysis: Maps

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   

San Luis Obispo County

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   

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 ’  

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Site Analysis: Carrizo Plain Timeline

2000 BC: Chumash populated the Carrizo Plain and created Painted Rock

1540 - 1630 AD: Wallace Creek offset by 40.6 feet due to earthquake

600CE: most Chumash people abandoned the place due to drought

1865 Chester R. Brumley built a home near the Painted Rock.

During WWI, a railway was built across one the of southern necks of the lake to move salt.

1857: Fort Tejon earthquake

Soda lake

Carrizo Plain

2001: Carrizo Plain National Monument was established

2012 May: largest solar farm (9.5 square miles) was constructed on the plain


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Site Analysis: Sun and Wind Path

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

 

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 

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Carrizo Plain Pictures

Project site next to hill. Relatively close to Soda Lake shown on the right.

Project site shown between two hills

Project site shown from higher vantage point


Carrizo Plain Pictures

Dried soil next to soda lake

Dried Soda Lake texture

Red moss on rock found near site

Dried grass found near site

Green moss on rock found near site


1

Small Exhibition Space

650 sq. ft

2

Public Space

800 sq. ft

3

Storage

1000 sq. ft

4

Main Exhibition Space

2500 sq. ft

5

Small Exhibition Space

650 sq. ft

6

Sky Space

400 sq. ft

7

Service Room

300 sq. ft

8

Cafe

800 sq. ft

9

Office

300 sq. ft

10

Restrooms

300 sq. ft

11

Entry

650 sq. ft

Total

1

Program/Massing Programming Diagram Programming

8300 sq. ft

2

3

4

Circulation (hallway)

5

6

7

8

9

10

11


Study Models


main Soda Lake Road and the other from the dirt road diviated from the Soda Lake Road. This circulation leads the vehicles straight into the parking lot, which gives people two options to enter the museum itself, as shown with the green lines. The parking lot is large enough to allow people to park near either entrance of the museum as the museum itself is quite big, spans 500’ from the highest points of either ramp from both sides.

Site Plan

Human Circulation Vehicles Circulation

Soda lake

2015’

2045’

2055’

2065’

Parking Lot 2075’

2105’

2395’ 2365’ 2335’ 2305’ 2275’ 2245’ 2215’ 2185’ 2155’ 2125’ 2095’ 2065’

Tommy Li

ARCH 242-02

Angela Bracco


Floor Plan and Sections

A

1” = 200”-0”

B Section A

1” = 100”-0”

Section B

1” = 100”-0”


Render


Render


2015’

2035’

2025’

2045’

2055’

2065’ 2075’

2085’ 1” : 100’-0” 2095’

Sun Rise on Winter Solstice

Sun Path on Site

Sun Set on Winter Solstice

Flex Space Small Exhibition 1 Storage

Small Exhibition 2

Main Exhibition

Service Space

 

Cafe

Men Women

Entry

Office

Circulation

Solar Technology Museum Tommy Li

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ARCH 252 Winter 2018

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Carrizo Plain

Angela Bracco Studio

P ra i s e t h e S u n

In 2014, the largest solar powered farm was built on Carrizo Plain. That is, no doubt, a huge milestone in the age of new energy forms. However, it makes me wonder, whyCarrizo Plain? Why was it chosen to site the largest solar farm in the world. As I walked across the dry grass land of Carrizo on a cool January afternoon, I realized the answer was obvious: this place has nothing but the sun! This, is what inspired me to design a solar technology museum on this plain that most consider worthless or inhabitable. I stared by looking into the history of Carrizo Plain as part of the site analysis assignment. One thing that stood out to me was the Chumash lived on the plain long ago and believed that the sun is a man carrying a torch, But they also realized how important the sun was to their survival. More amazingly, they have long been fully aware of winter solstice as the shortest day of the year, which caused them to view it as one of the most important day of the year. Therefore, I decided to create a circiular structure with a solar powered tower in the center as a trubute to the sun for providing us with a renewable source of energy, just like the Chumash did. As a result, this allows me to use concentrated solar power on my program to both power the building while educating visitors about a different form of solar powering than the more popular PV solar power.

1” : 32’-0”

1” : 32’-0”


Model

Museum Model

Site Model


Reflection

Although the museum we were set to design was a relatively small one, 8000 sq. ft., I’ve never design a project as big as this. This makes me wonder how I can design a building that does not seem too hollow. However, I later realized that it’s more important to figure out what the building needs to do or make the occupation feel than thinking only about not making the building too cramped or too empty. Throughout the quarter, I realized that I usually like to look at the big picture of the program. This makes me oblivious to the detail and the experience created by the building. Therefore, I need to start thinking about both the big and small pictures of the program because the massing of the building is equally as important as the width of the window I am designing. In other words, I also learned how to use some new programs (ie. Sketch Up, Luminon) I’ve never used before. This produced some interesting result that have pros and cons that I can use for considering which program to use for my future project. Overall this project, for me, was a little challenging because I didn’t feel like I had enough time thinking about the details of the building. However, it was certainly fun to have a challenge as it prepares me for the more intense designing work in the future.


Daily Dalliance


Final Reflection

A year ago, I knew almost nothing about designing a building. When I looked at what other architecture students above my year was doing in their studio, I knew it would be challenging, but also fun to figure out how to solve problems in beautiful ways. After last quarter, I though a lot about the balance between making a program aesthetically pleasing and functional because previously I always think about a building should be something functional only, and any decoration that are not justifiable through function are essentially useless. However, after this quarter I started to realize that function can be beautiful too if I exaggerate or expose it, rather than covering it up. For example, I never knew the solar panels and heat mirrors in my museum can provide an unique texture for my building. In addition to contemplating the balance between form over function, I also learned that it’s good to learn new software and model making methods as it can help me in the future to know what is the best way to create or represent something, and college is the best time for me to do this. In truth, I was confused about my project throughout most of this quarter since I was constantly uncertain about the purpose of most parts of my building, but I think that’s just the process of designing and I just need to learn how to fail faster so I can pick it back up and fix my mistake sooner.

Arch 252 portfolio Tommy Li  
Arch 252 portfolio Tommy Li  
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