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t h o m a s j a n d e r n oa m.a. su stainable l andsc ape design + pl anning b.f.a. g raphic design 616.450. 12 8 6

jandernoa 10 @c sld .edu

r e s u m ĂŠ & p o r t f o l i o


resumĂŠ

2-3

landscape design + planning ngs/u center and institute for sustainability, campus landscape plan (falmouth, ma) 4 - 11 feed northampton, first steps toward a local food system (nothampton, ma) 12 - 21 donna johnson, residential landscape plan (greenfield, ma) 22 - 27

graphic design menus 28 - 3o posters and fliers 31 marketing kit 32 sweatshirt, tote bag, logo, flier and program 33 logos 34 - 35 wedding invitations 36 greeting cards 37 package and label 38 business collateral, logo, packaging, poster, post card and signage 39

c o n t e n t s


r e

s

u m

landscape design & planning, professional student projects

é landscape master plan

Falmouth, MA (Spring 2010)

Two-person team project prepared for the Center and Institute for Sustainability, National Graduate School of Quality Management • Generated existing conditions map from existing base map for 2.75 acre residential property • Conducted research and on-site analysis for sustainable solution demonstrations throughout the landscape • Drafted initial schematic designs and slide show and presented to clients and critics • Prepared preferred design, layout, and hand and digitally rendered graphics for plan set

feed northampton, first steps toward a local food system

Northampton, MA (Winter 2010)

Four-person team project prepared for the Northampton Food Security Group • Conducted research, and generated GIS maps for city-scale analysis of Northampton’s land and infrastructure, with a focus on food production, processing, distribution, education, and waste management • Assisted in facilitation of client meetings and stakeholder charrette, and participated in public presentation • Prepared slide show and presented preliminary plans to clients and critics • Conceived logo design, hand and computer rendered illustrations, and layout and cover design for 83 page, comprehensive food system plan for Northampton that serves as a model for other communities

residential landscape plan

Greenfield, MA (Fall 2009)

Individual project prepared for residential client with one-acre suburban property • Surveyed the one-acre site with a team of students, and used Vectorworks to draft base map, and a combination of hand and computer rendering to produce existing conditions map • Administered client interviews and conducted site conditions analyses including vegetation, soil types, slopes, drainage patterns, views on the property, access & circulation, and sun & shade • Prepared three preliminary alternative designs and final slide show and presented to the client and critics • Drafted preferred design and final plan set that includes section and perspective drawings, planting plan, and plant palette

professional work experience

companies university of vermont extension, youth horticulture project | Crew Leader

Brattleboro, VT (May - August 2009)

• Led and trained eight youth between the ages of 16 and 21 to maintain the UVM Extension, 2 acre farm • Instructed and managed youth to staff display table at local farmers’ market and Brattleboro Co-op • Facilitated community service work, farm-based projects, and workshops for youth • Developed brochure for Vermont Food Stamp program

maya traditions | Volunteer

Panajachel, Guatemala (November - December 2008)

• Designed an informational brochure to promote the medicinal plant garden project that distributes traditional medicine to the indigenous communities surrounding Lago Atitlán

punta mona - center for sustainable living and education | Staff Member • • • •

creative graphics management | Graphic Designer • • • •

Gondoca/Manzanillo Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica (March - November 2008)

Managed website, designed promotional materials for events, courses, and workshops, and provided photographs to Curve Magazine Managed greenhouse and led intern workshops about soil fertility, proper cultivation strategies and handling plant material Led interns and volunteers in permaculture garden design projects Aided in the initiation and management of community outreach projects Chicago, IL (January 2007 - March 2008)

Created numerous menu, brochure, book and publication designs in the restaurant, sports and entertainment sectors Designed poster, signage and magazine advertisements for sports and entertainment events Produced marketing kit, promotional materials and slide show presentations for corporate meetings for Levy Restaurants Developed collateral and logo designs for Levy Restaurants

the human race theatre co. | Graphic Design Internship

Dayton, OH (May 2005 - January 2006)

• Designed posters, billboards, newspaper & magazine ads, and programs for theater performances • Provided original computer illustrations 2

Thoma s Jandernoa r e s u m é


professional work experience

freelance independent buyer London, England (September 2010) • Produced pen and ink drawing for client

school for international training environmental working group Brattleboro, VT (February - April 2009) • Assembled logo, flier, t-shirt, tote bag and program designs for the Renew

independent buyer Grand Rapids, MI (September 2010) • Created acrylic landscape painting for client

Conference on social and ecological renewal

green letter press Grand Rapids, MI (January 2009- Present) • Provided a multitude of wedding invitation designs in various styles

spark educational facility Brattleboro, VT (April 2009) • Designed logo for new graduate level teaching program

southeastern environmental education alliance

key to costa rica Brattleboro, VT (January 2009 - March 2009) • Updated website for Key to Costa Rica eco-tourism agency

New Bedford, MA

(June - August 2009)

• Prepared logo for the Southcoast Climate Change Challenge, launched at the Bioneers by the Bay Conference

post oil solutions Brattleboro, VT (March 2009) • Conceived logo and flier designs for No Gardener Left Behind Campaign, and other fundraising events

formal education

independent buyer Grand Rapids, MI (December 2007) • Developed holiday greeting card designs for client jubilee juice Chicago, IL (August 2007) • Illustrated digital splash page for café website

fertile fields farm Westmoreland, NH (February - March 2009) • Designed website for farm and Community Supported Agriculture program

the goods Ohio Musicians (January 2003 - March 2008) • Provided poster, flier, press kit, sticker and t-shirt designs for Ohio musicians

master of arts in sustainable landscape design and planning Conway School of Landscape Design Conway, MA (2009 - 2010)

bachelor of fine arts in visual communications design concentration in graphic design

University of Dayton Dayton, OH (2001 - 2005) • Student Exchange Program, Chaminade University of Honolulu Honolulu, HI (Spring 2004)

skills & strengths

software experience personal interests

• Developed skills in a variety of artistic media, including, but not exclusive to:

Hand rendering - perspective & axonometric rendering, landscape graphics including plan & section views, botanical sketches, planting plan, construction details, grading and site engineering, parking lot design Digital rendering - graphic design, document layout, photo simulation, digital illustration Fine art - landscape, portrait and abstract rendering with acrylic, ink, pastel, oil pastel and/or charcoal Book binding

proficient: Adobe Photoshop CS4, Adobe Illustrator CS4, Adobe InDesign CS4, iWork

fields: Permaculture, Community Food Security, Sustainable Development, Social Justice, Global Climate Change

• Stormwater management calculating and infiltration basin sizing • Dynamic design background contributes to the ability to fuse passions • • • •

for visual communication, sustainability and ecology to produce conscious, creative solutions Versatile designer with the aptitude to design in the style necessary for a project Detail oriented and strong problem solver Dedicated team player, and a pleasure to work with Qualified in Mac and PC platforms

knowledgeable: AutoCAD, ArcGIS, Google Sketchup, Vectorworks, Microsoft Office

activities: Hiking and Kayaking, Yoga and Meditation, Cooking and Food Preservation, Brewing and Fermenting

References available upon request Thoma s Jandernoa r e s u mé

3


l a n d s c a p e d e s ign + pl anning

N AT I O N A L G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F Q U A L I T Y M A N A G E M E N T C E N T E R A N D I N S T I T U T E F O R S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y Landscape Master Plan 12 Onawa Lane, Falmouth, MA 02541

LILY JACOBSON TOM JANDERNOA Spring 2010

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Rd. Conway, MA 01341

Printed on 50% recycled paper

Front cover art, 11 x 17 in., landscape format

project summary

The National Graduate School of Quality Management (NGS/U), a distance-learning institution based in Falmouth, Massachusetts, purchased a property that they plan to redevelop as a new Center and Institute for Sustainability. The school will hold events and host visitors in the lower part of the campus; the upper campus will be the residence of the school’s president, Dr. Bob Gee, and his wife, Aileen Waters Gee. 4

NGS/U teaches systems and quality management to professionals in a range of different disciplines. Over the past several years, more and more NGS/U students have requested to do environmental quality-related projects, and the school’s curriculum is expanding to encompass this area of study with a new master’s degree program in Environmental Quality Management. NGS/U wants to document changes on the site and use the site as an evolving case study. The school hopes to communicate lessons learned in displays at the visitor center, signs throughout the

Thoma s Jandernoa l a n d s c a p e d e s i g n a n d p l a n n i n g

campus, and other graphic and written materials. Some visitors to the site will come for a single event or site tour. Other visitors will stay overnight or for more extended periods of time. NGS/U would like the campus of the Center and Institute for Sustainability to teach about sustainability, whether those learning live there, stay for a few days, or are there for only an hour. The following are select pages from the final landscape plan.


CONTEXT Massachusetts

The Onawa Lane property is located about two miles from downtown Falmouth and from the NGS/U administrative campus. The Shining Sea Bikeway, which traverses about ten miles of the southwestern Cape from Woods Hole to North Falmouth and connects with other bike routes, such as through downtown Falmouth, passes within hundreds of feet of the property. The easy bicycle connection between the Center and Institute for Sustainability and the other places its guests are likely to need to go—downtown for its amenities, and the school’s administrative campus for any other functions—puts NGS/U in a good position to promote transportation by bicycle as an element of the Center’s sustainability.

Shi

nin g

Sea

Bik ewa y

Vineyard Sound and Martha’s Vineyard are visible from a number of places on the property; the site is a third of a mile from the ocean and is part of the Cape Cod coastal ecosystem. The coastal climate makes for relatively mild temperatures all year and strong winds that plants in exposed spots must be able to tolerate in order to survive.

NGS/U Center and institute for Sustainability

Photo courtesy of bing.com

Oyster Pond

The property sits on Oyster Pond, a brackish coastal pond. According to the Oyster Pond Environmental Trust website, like other Cape Cod ponds, Oyster Pond is known to be polluted from stormwater runoff and septic groundwater contamination. The nitrogen level of the pond is very high, with nitrogen entering the pond from septic systems, lawn and garden fertilizers, and stormwater runoff. The pond is also contaminated with hormones and other pharmaceuticals and toxic chemicals entering from septic systems. Stormwater runoff brings salt, automotive chemicals, metals, grease, garden chemicals, animal waste, dust, and dirt into the pond. All of these pollutants are also issues in Vineyard Sound and the ocean in general. Such pollution is a major concern of groups like the Falmouth Conservation Commission and the Oyster Pond Environmental Trust. Waterfront properties and properties directly adjacent to ponds have especially direct impact on water bodies, and shoreline properties on Cape Cod ponds and coast are highly developed. The National Graduate School will demonstrate ecologically responsible shoreline living on two levels: by filtering water before it enters the ground and Vineyard Sound the pond, and by not polluting.

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan

LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

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EXISTING CONDITIONS

Oyster Pond

The eastern side of the 2.75-acre property forms a low-lying bowl, with the driveway’s center island at the lowest point, just above the water table at an elevation of about two feet above sea level. Steep slopes in the northeast rise up to the road and the adjacent properties. The higher western side of the property forms a mound, with the highest part at an elevation of about twenty-four feet. The land forms a peninsula in the northwest of the property, known as “the Point.”

tio Pa

Dock

A'

Maple

Beech

Cottage

The Point

10

8

White pine 18 Lil ac

Oak Pitch pine

Septic

12

14

8

Patio

6

16

2

4

Maple

Espaliered apple tree

20

8 10 12

14

Maple

American beech

Four-stall garage

American holly

24

22

A

12 10

White House

Japanese maple

1 14 6

Eastern red cedar

Patio

Deck

Septic

Pool

Two-stall garage

Oak

G e hore usen-

2

Garden beds ic Sept

Quonset Road

6

20 18 16

Many ornamental plants throughout the property, some exotic and unusual, reflect care and thought over time, perhaps by longtime resident Marjorie Whittemore, who may at one time have been the president of the Garden Club of America. An espaliered apple tree northeast of the White House, a few Japanese maples, an exotic flowering dogwood, unusually large cedars, and showy rhododendrons, azaleas, and lilacs make a striking impression. Several established garden areas also reflect an interest in plants, including a currently unused terraced former herb garden adjacent to the southern brick patio on the pond, a currently unused former rose garden east of the large garage, and a few areas near buildings.

Patio

tio Pa

Oak

The property was developed over the first half of the twentieth century as a summer estate. The property’s original house (the “White House”), the Gees’ intended residence, sits on the property’s highest ground. The eastern bowl holds the property’s other four buildings. The “Long House,” the cottage, and the four-stall garage with a second-story apartment will be remodeled to provide guest rooms, kitchens, and meeting space. Half of the two-stall garage will hold a visitor center, and the other half will be used as storage space. Other built structures include the property’s two driveways (the northern one asphalt, the southern one gravel), a network of mostly stone and brick footpaths, retaining and decorative stone walls, fenced enclosures, two patios on the pond and several other patios near the houses, a swimming pool to the southwest of the White House, a greenhouse attached to the small garage, and a dock in disrepair northwest of the Long House.

c pti Se

Long House

Cherry

ane wa L a n O

Eastern red cedar

Beech Oak

Patio

Terraced garden beds

0’ 10’ 0' 20'20’10'

20’ 20'

Section 1

A

A'

Section not to scale.

Photos of the site of the future NGS/U Center and Institute for Sustainability

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan 6

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LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

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40’ 40'


Analysis: SUMMARY The steep slopes of over fifteen percent on about a quarter of the property, combined with impervious surfaces on about one-sixth of the property, present challenges and opportunities for slowing down, filtering, and infiltrating stormwater runoff before it reaches Oyster Pond, and dealing with the flooding that takes place in the low area of the property. The property’s old septic systems in very permeable soils within a high water table are likely to be contributing to nitrogen-loading in Oyster Pond. The large amount of tree canopy distributed throughout the property means that the site already has valuable wildlife habitat. There are also opportunities to dramatically improve habitat on the site by replacing the thick, brushy invasive vegetation on the steep slopes around the pond, and much of the acre of lawn, with native vegetation. Plant choices will be guided by sunlight and shade, exposure to wind and to salt from the road and Oyster Pond, and goals of NGS/U and the Gees. While there are footpaths between the buildings and a few other spots on the property, there is little access to the pond or the perimeter of the property. Steep slopes make such access challenging. The steep slopes also limit ADA accessibility on the property, especially between the upper and lower campuses. 20' 10' 0'

20'

40'

The site’s position on Oyster Pond and the openness of the eastern side of the landscape make views important on the property. Education about local ecology could be enhanced by better views of the pond. Making ecologically beneficial changes like addressing flooding, stabilizing slopes, and reducing impervious surfaces could make views within the property more attractive and more educationally useful.

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan

LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

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PREFERRED DESIGN— site experience

Oyster Pond

A

D

The new Center and Institute for Sustainability at the redeveloped Onawa Lane property is an informative, inspiring, effective living classroom. The property’s infrastructure serves people’s needs in harmony with the natural processes and cycles of the land. The beautiful woodland A , meadow B , and gardens C create inviting spaces and food for people while also providing food and shelter for wildlife. The site is managed to use resources efficiently and minimize waste and pollution. A clear, comfortable network of paths D and observation places E are punctuated by informational signs that facilitate easy movement through the site. Furthermore, they provide education about the site’s environment, history, and infrastructure.

A H

Guest House

E

A

C E

E

D

C

Guest House

E D

E

E

B

D

E A

C E

Visitor Center

C

White House

The visitor center F introduces guests to the site. Informational signs and places to observe throughout the property facilitate visitors’ continued learning. The Center’s power to teach comes from telling the story of how and why the site has changed over time. The landscape design itself helps to tell that story. For instance, the native rose garden G refers to the ornamental rose garden that was once in the same spot, and with its native rather than exotic plants, it offers the opportunity to explain the ecological importance and beauty of native vegetation.

C

Guest House and Meeting Center

D

C

Pool

C F

Quonset Road

D

Time spent on the site leaves visitors and residents with new knowledge of sustainability and ecology, and with a sense of connection with the land. The Center holds a meaningful place in the community.

Visitors and residents are inspired by direct experience with the land—the pond H , the woodland A , the meadow B , and the various gardens C . Lessons from the visitor center and the informational signs enable visitors to see more complexity and detail in the landscape. The well-functioning habitat for humans and other organisms promotes a sense of comfort in the environment and genuine connection with it. Native plants flourish in their natural environment, encouraging the presence of

E

G

Lane a w Ona

C

D

20' 10' 0'

wildlife; hardscape is constructed from local natural materials and looks like it belongs in the landscape; glacial erratic boulders evoke the region’s geological history. No sense of alienation from the landscape stems from poorly functioning infrastructure, like flooding. The Center occupies a positive, meaningful place in the neighborhood and community. The Center’s promotion of

20'

40'

sustainability and attention to relevant local ecological issues have helped NGS/U to develop mutually beneficial alliances with interested local organizations. Neighbors appreciate the property’s beauty, as well as the ways that the Center has reached out to them. They are inspired and educated by the common-sense, attractive demonstrations of how to reconfigure infrastructure and land use to meet people’s needs while cooperating better with the land’s natural processes.

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan 8

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LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

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Plant PALETTE Plants native to Massachusetts, many to Barnstable County and to Falmouth specifically, have been chosen to fit the particular growing conditions on the property, and for the aesthetic and ecological qualities they provide to the landscape. Photos of selected plants appear on the following pages.

ENTRANCE GARDENS

salt-tolerant native trees, shrubs & Groundcover Amelanchier canadensis (shadblow serviceberry) Arctostaphylos uva-ursi (bearberry) Aronia arbutifolia (red chokeberry) Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) Baccharis halimifolia (groundsel bush, groundsel) Carya ovata (shagbark hickory) Celtis occidentalis (hackberry) Cephalanthus occidentalis (buttonbush) Clethra alnifolia (sweet pepperbush) Ilex glabra (inkberry) Ilex opaca (American holly) Iva frutescens ( Jesuit’s bark) Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) Lindera benzoin (spicebush) Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay magnolia) Myrica cerifera (wax myrtle) Myrica pensylvanica (bayberry) Nyssa sylvatica (blackgum, tupelo) Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper) Pinus rigida (pitch pine) Prunus maritima (beach plum) Prunus nigra (Canada plum) Prunus pensylvanica (fire or pin cherry) Prunus serotina (black cherry) Rhus copallinum (winged sumac) Rhus typhina (staghorn sumac) Sambucus canadensis (American black elderberry) Viburnum dentatum (arrowwood) Waldsteinia fragarioides (barren strawberry) Salt-tolerant native grasses Agrostis hyemalis (winter bentgrass) Andropogon gerardii (big bluestem) Carex viridula (little green sedge) Eleocharis acicularis (needle spikerush) Eleocharis parvula (dwarf spikerush) Juncus bufonius (toad rush) Muhlenbergia glomerata (spiked muhly)

Panicum amarum (bitter panicgrass) Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass) Spartina patens (saltmeadow cordgrass)

Oyster Pond buffer

native plants approved by Falmouth Conservation Commission Amelanchier canadensis (shadbush) Aronia arbutifolia (red chokeberry) Aronia melanocarpa (black chokeberry) Clethra alnifolia (sweet pepperbush) Hierochloe odorata (sweetgrass, vanilla grass) Ilex glabra compacta (inkberry) Ilex opacum (American holly) Ilex verticillata (winterberry) Juniperus virginiana (eastern redcedar) Myrica pensylvanica (bayberry) Nyssa sylvatica (black gum, tupelo) Pinus strobus (white pine) Pinus rigida (pitch pine) Prunus maritima (beach plum) Quercus alba (white oak) Quercus coccinea (scarlet oak) Quercus velutina (black oak) Salix discolor (pussy willow) Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry) Viburnum dentatum (arrowwood) Viburnum nudum (wild raisin)

Constructed pond

Acora americanus (sweetflag) Alisma subcordatum (American water plantain) Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed) Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) Carex stricta (upright sedge, tussock sedge) Hibiscus moscheutos (swamp-rose mallow) Iris versicolor (blue flag iris) Juncus militaris (bayonet rush) Leersia oryzoides (rice cutgrass) Nuphar lutea (yellow pond-lily) Nymphaea odorata (American white waterlily) Peltandra virginica (green arrow arum) Pontederia cordata (pickerelweed) Sagittaria latifolia (broadleaf arrowhead) Saururus cernuus (lizard’s tail) Schoenoplectus acutus (hardstem bulrush) Schoenoplectus americanus (chairmaker’s bulrush)

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan

Lobelia cardinalis (cardinal flower) Asclepias tuberose (orange butterfly weed) Iris versicolor (blue flag iris) Caltha palustris (marsh marigold) Asclepias incarnata (swamp milkweed) Eupatoriadelphus purpureum (purple joe-pye weed) Chelone glabra (turtlehead) Monarda didyma (beebalm)

Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani (softstem bulrush) Scirpus atrovirens (green bulrush) Sparganium americanum (American bur-reed) Sparganium eurycarpum (broadfruit bur-reed) Thelypteris palustris (eastern marsh fern) Typha angustifolia (narrowleaf cattail) Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail)

constructed pond Edge

Chelone glabra (white turtlehead) Eupatoriadelphus fistulosus (joe-pye weed) Eupatorium perfoliatum (boneset) Juncus canadensis (Canada rush) Lilium canadense (Canada lily, wild yellow lily) Lobelia siphilitica (great blue lobelia) Mimulus ringens (Allegheny monkeyflower) Spartina cynosuroides (big cordgrass) Verbena hastata (swamp verbena, blue verbena)

Plants for the dryer outer edge Juniperus horizontalis (blue rug juniper) Clethra alnifolia (sweet pepperbush) Potentilla arguta (tall cinquefoil) Sedum ternatum (woodland stonecrop) Geranium maculatum (wild geranium) Anemone canadensis (windflower) Lobelia spicata (spiked lobelia) Symphyotrichum novae-angliae (New England aster) Helenium autumnale (perennial sunflower)

Greywater

from gaia’s garden by toby hemenway,at least 70 to 80% of a greywater system should be made of these plants: Scirpus validus (bulrush) Typha spp. (cattail) Juncus effusus (soft rush)

Shade Rain Garden

20 to 30% of a greywater system can be made of these: Sagittaria spp. (arrowhead) Aronia spp. (chokeberry) Symphytum officinale (comfrey) Vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) Sambucus spp. (elderberry) Vaccinium corymbosum (highbush blueberry) Vaccinium trilobum (highbush cranberry) Equisetum spp. (horsetail) Nelumbo lutea (lotus) Matteuccia pennsylvanica (ostrich fern) Pontederia cordata (pickerel weed) Lowbush blueberry Carex spp. (sedge) Eleocharis spp. (spike rush)

Plant PALETTE

Plants for the wetter, shadier center Magnolia virginiana (sweetbay magnolia) Rhododendron canadense (native rhododendron) Ledum groenlandicum (Labrador tea) Ilex verticillata (winterberry) Asarum canadense (Canadian wildginger) Osmunda regalis (royal fern) Matteuccia struthiopteris (ostrich fern) Adiantum pedatum (northern maidenhair fern) Aquilegia canadensis (native columbine) Onoclea sensibilis (sensitive fern) Lobelia cardinalis (cardinal flower) Chelone glabra (turtlehead) Actaea rubra (red baneberry) Marsh marigold

Windflower

Bearberry

Cardinal flower

Full-Sun Rain Garden

Plants for the wetter center Clethra alnifolia (summersweet) Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood)

(continued on following page) Wood lily

L I LY JACO B SO N • TO M JA N D E R N OA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

Baneberry

9/25 Ostrich fern

Bayberry

Red chokeberry

Wild bergamot

Shadblow serviceberry

Inkberry

Beach plum Photo source: www.wikimedia.com

Common buttonbush

Blue flag iris

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan

LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

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ALTERNATIVE DESIGNS

Fruit & Nut Tree Orchard

The preferred design in the preceding pages was developed after earlier schematic alternative design drafts. There is no single answer for what sustainability means for a particular site like this one, or for what it means to teach about sustainability. The following pages contain the earlier schematic alternative design drafts, which explore various ideas about what sustainability and sustainability education and demonstration could mean for the NGS/U Center and Institute for Sustainability. They are included here as food for thought.

Oyster Pond

Native Wild Rice

Evergreen Tree Wind Break

}

Native Edible Shrub

Edible Forest Garden

Long House

Cottage House

1: KEEP IT LOCAL

Transportation of goods accounts for 28 percent of global energy use and associated consequences. Industrial agriculture accounts for another 17 percent, as well as contributing to myriad other problems, such as erosion, loss of soil fertility, water pollution, and loss of habitat and biodiversity. This design explores how to demonstrate better practices for meeting human needs—producing food and other goods at the same time as enhancing wildlife habitat, water quality, soil fertility, and slope stability, and capturing renewable energy to meet the site’s energy needs rather than relying on fossil fuels. In this schematic alternative, wind turbines on the hilltop capture wind energy. Solar panels on the White House and the visitor center also help to power the property. An evergreen stand north of the White House blocks cold winter wind to reduce heating needs. Cisterns catch rainwater from all the buildings to irrigate the landscape. Edible plants grow throughout the landscape—native fruit trees, nut trees, and fruiting shrubs on the Point and the northern slope, a complex edible forest garden on the northeast slope, water-loving native edible shrubs in the low wet part of the bowl, native wild rice around the edge of the pond, mixed edible native shrubs and ground cover around the buildings, and terraced vegetable and herb gardens on steep slopes. The terraces and vegetated on-contour swales and berms on steep slopes help to slow and infiltrate rainwater. The four-stall garage has been removed to increase the area available for growing food. Native flowering plants throughout the landscape attract pollinators. The swimming pool has been replaced with an aquaponics demonstration greenhouse. If implemented, this alternative could produce a large amount of the food consumed on the property, at the

Root Cellar

A'

Compost Solar Panel Greenhouse

White House

Green Roof

Solar Wet-loving Native Edibles

ane wa L a n O Rainwater Diverse Native Catchment Insectary Species

A

Aquaculture & Greenhouse

Terrace Gardens

Wind Turbines

Section

20'20’10'10’ 0'0’

(Not to Scale)

A

Native wild rice cultivation

Edible Polyculture

White house, with solar hot water panels

20’ 20'

40’ 40'

A'

Perennial polyculture

Edible Pervious terrace drivegarden way

same time providing wildlife habitat, slowing and filtering stormwater runoff, stabilizing slopes, and providing other ecological services. Caring for such a landscape would take a lot of time. Removing a building would require the clients

Water-loving perennials

Edible forest garden

Fruit and nut trees

to rethink their proposed building uses. This schematic alternative proposes replacing pavement with land uses that are more ecologically valuable—habitat and food production—but provides only one or two parking spaces.

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan 10

Thoma s Jandernoa l a n d s c a p e d e s i g n a n d p l a n n i n g

LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

10/25


ALTERNATIVE DESIGNS

Oyster Pond

Wetland Species

Boardwalk & Observation Dock

2: REVERSE THE IMPACT

An important aspect of global ecological change is the loss of biodiversity in every part of the world. As ecosystems lose species, they lose complexity developed over millions of years, and they lose stability. The effects of that destabilization ripple throughout the ecosystems, from disease to species extinctions. The degradation and destruction of native ecosystems and habitat is one of the main ways that biodiversity is lost. This design explores how to demonstrate restoring and creating as much habitat as possible, minimizing human impact, and educating about ecology through direct access and observation. In this schematic alternative, trees connect in larger swaths, filling in canopy around the site. Small existing stands of evergreens, mixed hardwoods, American holly, pitch pines, and scrub oaks have all expanded. The low, wet part of the bowl in the east of the property is a wet meadow. Various wetland species grow around the edge of the pond. Areas of former lawn that have not been planted with trees have been replaced with mixed native grasses, ground covers, and herbaceous species, maintaining openness in much of the eastern part of the property. The four eastern buildings have been removed to provide as much area as possible for habitat—the tree stands, meadow, and herbaceous species described above. Habitat is further enhanced with an owl house, bat houses, a beehive, and an osprey stand. There are three new buildings: a greenhouse over the former swimming pool, housing a living machine to treat sewage biologically, as well as a nursery for rare native plants; a carport built into the hillside east of the White House; and a visitor center in the northeast corner of the property, where views of the property and Oyster Pond are expansive. Sinuous paths flow through the property, extended into Oyster Pond with boardwalks and observation decks. The area of the driveway has been reduced, with access through the property primarily pedestrian, emphasizing observation spots. A wind turbine captures energy on the property’s southern slope. This alternative devotes as much space as possible to restoring the ecosystem and creating habitat, with many opportunities for up-close observing and learning about local ecology. The living machine and native rare plant nursery proposed are unusual features and would offer special learning opportunities. If implemented, this would

Evergreen Tree Wind Break

Osprey Stand

Green Roof Visitors Center Foot Path

A'

Mixed Native Grasses, Ground Cover, Herbaceous Species Various Wildlife Habitat (Bat House, Owl House, etc.)

White House

ane wa L a n O

A

American Green Roof Holly Stand Car Port Living Machine & Rare Native Plant Nursery

Wind Turbine

Wet Meadow

Hardwood Stand

Mixed Tree Stand 20'20’10'10’ 0'0’

20’ 40’ 20' 40'

Section

(Not to Scale)

A

A'

White house Car port Wetland grasses

Pervious driveway

be a low-maintenance landscape over time. This design could reduce impervious surfaces on the property by up to about seventy-five percent. However, like “Keep It Local,” it only provides a few parking spaces. Removing the eastern buildings would mean a vast reduction in energy use and

Wet meadow

Foot path

cost on the property from maintaining buildings, as well as more space available to the natural ecosystem. Removing the buildings would also require the clients to hold most indoor functions in the White House and substantially change their plans for the building uses.

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey

NATIONAL GRADUATE SCHOOL OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT CENTER AND INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY Landscape Master Plan

LILY JACOB SON • TOM JANDERNOA Conway School of Landscape Design, Spring 2010

11/25

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project summary

Almost all food consumed in the United States moves through a large-scale, industrial agriculture system, where an average meal can travel 1,500 miles and change hands half a dozen times before reaching the dinner table. This global system supplies a tremendous amount of food and has remained affordable to Americans for over fifty years; but, it is wrought with unseen costs such as environmental degradation and dependence on precarious fossil fuel availability. The global supply of non-renewable fossil fuels cannot last forever, and higher fuel prices will jeopardize food supplies. Communities across the globe are seeking solutions to the pressing question: What does it take for a community to grow food locally and sustainably, relying less on fossil fuel inputs? A team of students from the Conway School of Landscape Design investigates this question for the city of Northampton, Massachusetts. This report outlines the social, political, economic, and environmental challenges to creating a local food system, and goes on to recommend a model that responds to these challenges. Tools are offered for inventorying land and community assets, and for envisioning what is possible in Northampton.

Global Food System; international food imports supplying Northampton, as well as exports from the fertile soils of the meadows along the Connecticut River. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa.

Prepared for the Northampton Food Security Group, Northampton, Massachusetts Abrah Dresdale, Tom Jandernoa, Josiah Simpson, Michael Yoken Conway School of Landscape Design April 20, 2010

my role in feed northampton

The Feed Northampton team of students shared the responsibilities of creating this report, and each student contributed to every aspect of the project. My primary focus throughout the process of the project lied heavily in the visual aspects of the report and presentations, such as conceiving the logo design, hand and computer rendered illustrations, and layout and cover design for the report. Furthermore, I prepared the slide shows for presentations, assisted in conducting research, generated GIS maps for city-scale analysis of Northampton’s land and infrastructure, and helped in facilitation of client meetings and a stakeholder charrette. The following are select pages from the final, 83 page report.

Front cover art, 8.5 x 11 in., portrait format. Cover and logo design courtesy of Tom Jandernoa. 12

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the functions of a food system As central as cultivation is to providing food, a food system involves much more. Typically before they can be consumed by people, crops must also be processed, stored, and distributed. Any wastes that develop along the way must be dealt with, and there are certain cultural activities, like advertising and schooling, that are needed to support and perpetuate the system. Together these broad functions—cultivation, processing, distribution, waste management, and education—make up a food system. As suggested above, conventional food systems are problematic for numerous reasons:

Conventional cultivation In the U.S. today, the conventional model for cultivation is a large-scale, private venture where industrial methods have in many ways replaced human labor. Most farms currently in operation have become specialized factory-oriented monocultures at war with pests, diseases, and weeds, needing large machinery to operate (Imhoff 2003).

Conventional processing Almost all farms supplying the conventional food system send their raw products (from milk to meat to maize) to centralized processing hubs, managed almost entirely by large-scale corporate conglomerates. They are usually massive facilities that clean, prepare, and package enormous amounts of food for distribution (Pollan 2008).

Conventional distribution The conventional processing hubs and the farms that feed them are coupled with a global economy where food, among many other things, is distributed from across the world to meet consumer demand. This distribution of food from the far corners of the earth via air, sea, and land has allowed consumers to eat

almost any kind of food regardless of season or climate.

Conventional waste management Wastes are generated as by-products of each step of the conventional food system. Farms, processing hubs, and distribution networks all produce a variety of wastes, in quantity. The conventional strategy for managing some agricultural waste is generally to remove it and send it away. “Away” can sometimes mean waste goes into holding ponds, waterways, air, or landfills.

Conventional education People’s knowledge about conventional agriculture has proven insufficient on many levels. Studies cited in Dan Yunk’s book Milk Comes From A Cow? show that most schoolchildren think milk comes from supermarkets rather than from cows. Yunk suggests that children lack an understanding of where food in general comes from, but adults also tend to have misinformation about where and how food is produced (Yunk 2007). Education about food production is important because there are real environmental and social costs related to agriculture that are otherwise hidden from consumers who are taught to care only about cost.

Figure 1. The five functions of an effective local food system are rooted in a particular locale. The emphasis of this report is on the most central function—cultivation. Original illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa.

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A Process for Understanding Land Capacity In Northampton, as in many towns, the landscape is a mosaic of mixed uses and diverse topography. If only existing agricultural lands were considered for the purposes of food cultivation, then just a portion of the town’s potential cultivation would be visible. Sites other than traditional farmland can be cultivated too, and much opportunity is lost when these less traditional opportunities are disregarded. Examining features of a town’s natural and built environment—for this study these include topography, hydrology, soils, conservation open areas, development patterns, zoning, transportation, and existing farmland (see figure 2)—can reveal otherwise unseen cultivation potential. In this report, each of these layers of information is first studied in isolation for Northampton as a whole, to reveal distinct characteristics that could shape cultivation. The layers are then recombined to show interrelationships, including possible opportunities or obstacles. The maps of topography, hydrology, and impervious surfaces have been selected to form a composite analysis (see figure 3): changes in topography offer different constraints to cultivation strategies; hydrology affects soils and legal buffers; impervious surfaces point to density and zoning restrictions. Finally, boundaries have been drawn between broad areas with different characteristics. These boundaries occur when the topography, hydrology, or development patterns change significantly. The contiguous swaths of land with similar characteristics in Northampton are grouped into four zones or districts—rural, suburban, urban, and agricultural (see figure 4). Recommendations are then made for particular food cultivation strategies appropriate to each district.

Figure 3. Northampton composite analysis. GIS map courtesy of Abrah Dresdale and Josiah Simpson

Figure 2. Layers of Northampton analyses. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa

Figure 4. Northampton districts. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa 14

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1 mi

2 mi

4 mi


inventory and analyses Silt/clay

SOILS

Loam

Soils in Northampton are generally in one of three categories: sandy till, alluvial clay/silt, and outwash loam. Sandy till exists on 65% of the land in Northampton, and is concentrated in the hills to the west and north. Alluvial clay/silt makes up 20% of the soil, with the largest deposit along the Connecticut River. Other deposits are scattered along the Mill River and smaller streams throughout the municipality. Outwash loam is the least common of the three soil types, constituting about 15% of Northampton’s soils. It is found mostly in the center of the municipality under suburban development.

Sand/glacial till Quarry City dump Lake

C

O

Implications

NN

EC

TIC

UT RIVE R

• Sandy till is the least productive soil type for cultivation; however, it can be used for growing perennial crops and well-managed grazing. • Alluvial clay/silt is fertile, yet drains poorly; crops accustomed to wet conditions can be successfully cultivated in this soil type. • Outwash loam is less fertile than alluvial clay/silt, but drains well, which allows for greatest crop variety. • Northampton’s three soil types can each support different types of food cultivation, and thus constitute an important natural resource for supporting local food security.

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GIS map of northampton soils. Original map generated by Josiah Simpson, edited by Tom Jandernoa

10

5

1 mi

2 mi

4 mi

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Districts In this section, four districts—Rural, Suburban, Urban, and Agricultural (see figure 4 on previous page, and figure 5 right)—are introduced for Northampton and suggestions made for how cultivation could be conceived and implemented that is appropriate to the unique characteristics of each district. Prototypes for feeder farms are identified to model food cultivation strategies that respond to each district’s particular conditions. The preceding analyses reveal Northampton to be a diverse landscape with a variety of assets for and constraints to establishing and sustaining a local food system. Dividing Northampton into districts helps simplify some of the complex relationships between the town, its residents, the land, and food production. The defining patterns for each district follow. The districts are not intended to be self-contained food-producing areas, but instead to interact to support a larger town-wide system. While the strategies proposed for each district are most applicable to that district, they may also be adapted to work in similar conditions found in other districts.

Agricultural • Special Conservancy zoning restricts development and preserves farmland • Rich soils; lies within the 100-year floodplain of the Connecticut River • Many different owners of farm lots, very few residents

• Shares an abrupt boundary edge with the Urban District

Rural

• Sparsely populated district, mostly 5 to 8 miles from urban centers • Steep, hilly slopes generally have poor soils and 90% forest cover

• Lot sizes generally greater than in the Suburban and Urban Districts. • Several large conservation areas make up 9% of the district’s area, protecting wetlands and wildlife

Suburban

• Low density, non-urban zoning, with poor interconnected residential development inside the Suburban District, and to the Urban District • Largely built in the last 60 years on old farmland, with some remaining farmland pockets • Few areas of contiguous forest (forested areas greater than 30 acres) • No defined town center, central gathering places, or parks

Urban

• Diverse zoning types, institutions, and businesses, and the majority of the town’s population • Density of district ranges from 5-story mixed-use buildings to medium light residential neighborhoods • Impervious surfaces, with several concentrated pockets of open land • Lot sizes tend to be small, between 1/8 and 1/4 acres

Figure 5. Photos courtesy of Envisioning Sustainable Northampton (2008) and Wikimedia Commons. Middle column illustration by Leon Krier.

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suburban district Constraints

Existing Conditions

• A culture that values large lawns instead of front yard gardens, with assumptions that food cultivation and residential living are mutually exclusive.

The Suburban District borders the urban centers of downtown Northampton, Florence, and Leeds, and is zoned suburban residential. Interlaced between neighborhoods are pockets of woodlands and open fields. There is a relatively uniform character to Northampton’s suburban neighborhoods in the district—large lawns, houses grouped together in pockets isolated from other neighborhoods, and often centered around a cul-de-sac. The type of development that has occurred in this district is representative of national trends over the past sixty years.

• Due to, among other things, the separations large lawns cause and other cultural norms, suburban neighbors tend to interact less than their urban counterparts and have less public space in which they can fraternize, collectively care for, or mutually benefit from. • Development has encroached on agriculture land. • Lack of sidewalks, bike lanes, buses, and other alternatives to automobile transportation decreases car-free accessibility to supermarkets downtown. Suburban Northampton displaying a residential neighborhood, pocket of woodlands, and open fields. Photo courtesy of Abrah Dresdale.

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Opportunities • Expansive, flat lawns offer optimal conditions for food cultivation. • Over 300 acres of Northampton State Hospital Land is under an Agriculture Preservation Restriction (APR) and could accommodate food cultivation.

District Capacity for cultivation (The following are estimated figures)

• 5,500 acres of land, of which roughly 850 acres are open fields currently used as farmland or could provide suitable conditions for large-scale cultivation 66

• 200 to 500 acres of lawn space 10

5

1 mi Graphic displaying suburban district. Graphic courtesy of Tom Jandernoa.

2 mi

• Primary soil type: outwash loam, fairly well-suited for food cultivation • Majority of slopes: 0 - 8%, appropriate for food cultivation

Northampton suburban neighborhood with cul-de-sac and expansive lawn space. Photo courtesy of Tom Jandernoa. Thoma s Jandernoa l a n dsc ape de s ig n a n d pl a n n i ng

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suburban district

Implications

Summary Analysis

The typical suburban neighborhood in Northampton consists of expansive, flat, quarter- to one-acre lawns surrounding residences. The primary soil type in this district is an outwash loam, which is fairly well-suited for cultivating food.

Suburban development Farmland Major Roads

1 mi

Key Question

Summary analysis displaying farmland being developed into residential neighborhoods. Illustration courtesy of Josiah Simpson.

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What could Northampton do to begin to produce and consume more food locally in the Suburban District? In other communities, people are

The Suburban District of Northampton once looked very similar to the Agricultural District, but farmland has diminished steadily over the past sixty years as development has spread out from downtown Northampton. Conventional farmland has been lost to residential development, but some features of residential development may create opportunities for food production.

Residential development, largely along the main roads and old farm land (see figure 6), has created a patchwork landscape of open spaces, woodlands, and neighborhood pockets. This pattern of development results in neighborhoods clustered together in pods. An opportunity exists to bring residents of these neighborhoods together to cultivate food.

2 mi Figure 6. Loss of farmland to residential housing. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa.

types of strategies can residents use that take advantage of the fact that residences are clustered together in pockets with other residences? The

reconsidering the way they use their front yards following case studies are examples of success and cultivating them. Although not everyone in stories for cultivation strategies in suburban areas the Suburban District will be interested in growing of other municipalities. the diversity of foods they currently consume, what

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Suburban neighborhoods tend to be miles from supermarkets and commercial urban centers, making automobile transportation necessary to access food. If fuel costs increase drastically as supplies dwindle, the option of driving whenever take-out or groceries are needed may be unavailable, and having food accessible within walking distance will become increasingly important.


suburban district : CASE STUDIES Edible estates A project called Edible Estates, created by Fritz Haeg, provides an example of the possibilities for food cultivation in the Suburban District. The Foti family of Lakewood, California, has reconsidered how they use the space around their house, and transformed their front lawn into a garden. Not only are they able to feed themselves, they have been able to cultivate enough food that they often can give some away. Everyone who comes in contact

with their suburban front yard garden is forced to reconsider how they occupy their own property. Transforming one’s lawn into a site for food cultivation makes food available to residents in the Suburban District. The Foti family has invested in a better quality of life through growing healthy food and growing their community simultaneously. A similar example is happening in Northampton. Ann Renee Larouche, a Northampton resident, has been growing a highly productive vegetable garden, fruit trees, and berry bushes in her front yard.

“Pure beauty for the sake of beauty is a luxury I’m not certain we can afford any more. What is to say that edibles aren’t beautiful?” —Ann Renee Larouche Ann’s landscape is not only providing food, but is a work of art and has drawn attention from her neighbors who have asked her to grow food on their properties, too. Single- handedly, she has created over a dozen edible gardens in the neighborhood, making local, healthy food available to the residents via their own front lawns.

The Foti Family has transformed their lawn into a site for food cultivation. Photos courtesy of Fritz Haeg and the Edible Estates project.

Landshare The basic concept of Landshare, a successful project started in the United Kingdom, is to connect landowners with growers through an online database (see figure 7). If a property owner has an open lawn that they are willing to have cultivated but do not have the time, knowledge, physical ability, or resources, they offer their land through the Landshare network. Conversely, people who wish to garden and lack lawns themselves, as in the case of those who live in apartment complexes or rent where gardening is not permitted, or who want to increase the amount of land they cultivate can access the land offered through Landshare. Often, part of the food cultivated on these sites is given to the landowner in exchange for offering up property to the gardener. The project already involves over 46,000 people and is growing.

1 You

a grower, landowner, or helper

2 Post a listing

tell others where you are, and what you are looking for, or offering

3 Get responses

use a mail system to send and receive messages

4 Connect

Figure 7. Adapted from Landshare.net. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa. Thoma s Jandernoa l a n dsc ape de s ig n a n d pl a n n i ng

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suburban district Lawn Cultivation

PROTOTYPE There are many opportunities for selecting a prototype for the Suburban District. It should be a place that allows multiple strategies to be applied to a single neighborhood. Such a prototype will respond to the district’s primary constraint—the pervasive lawns that surround homes and that were formerly farmland. The prototype takes advantage of the sprawling, flat lawns and turns them into optimal places to implement the cultivation strategies practiced by the Foti Family and Ann Renee Larouche, transforming lawns into oases of abundance. And for those residents who do not wish to garden but want to participate in the transformation of the neighborhood, they could offer their yards through a locally adapted Landshare program. Such a prototype could include the island of greenery found in the center of some cul-de-sacs. This island could become a prototype for a neighborhood central commons. This typically unused circle of land could serve as a micro-hub, housing neighborhood infrastructure needed to support front yard food cultivation, such as a greenhouse for extending the growing season, a shed for storing community tools and resources, and a neighborhood compost structure.

Private property can be utilized for:

• Growing annual and perennial fruits, vegetables, and herbs • Raising livestock for meat, eggs, and dairy • Raising bees for honey

• Sharing with growers through a Landshare program Lawn transformed into site for food cultivation. Photo courtesy of Fritz Haeg and the Edible Estates project.

Cul-de-sac commons

Cul-de-sacs and public open spaces could be used for:

• Greenhouse to extend growing season

• Storage space for tools and shared resources • Community compost structure

• Rainwater catchment to be used for greenhouse

• Demonstration garden beds and open space to hold workshops

compost

greenhouse

tool shed

demonstration garden beds

bean trellis

Cultivation Strategies The ultimate vision for this model neighborhood is shared community harvest, where each resident becomes especially adept at growing quantities of one type of food, and then food is swapped with neighbors to gather a rich variety. This type of practice is efficient because each household only need invest in the learning and resources required for one type of cultivation, although residents may of course opt to grow an annual vegetable garden or have additional berry bushes. In practice, one neighbor might invest in bee-keeping equipment and skills needed to have an apiary to produce a surplus of honey beyond personal consumption. Another neighbor may take a permaculture course and buy fruit and nut trees to plant a food forest. A third neighbor may invest in a chicken coop and hens for laying eggs. Residents could then take the surplus they generate and share it with neighbors just down the street as an efficient way to achieve a greater variety of locally available foods and foster meaningful social ties. Cul-de-sac Commons. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa. 20

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rainwater catchment barrel


suburban district CiVIC Recommendation

crop Palette / Yield

“Nationwide we convert more than one million acres per year for urban sprawl and other development, while the number of farms in America has  declined from 30 million to fewer than 2 million in the past century.” (Growing Together, PVPC) The town of Northampton could change zoning so that new development is clustered, leaving shared open space that could be cultivated (Arendt). This can reduce sprawl’s impact of converting farmland to non-agricultural uses. The city should amend zoning in suburban areas to encourage denser development and infill projects recommended in Notre Dame School of Architecture’s Envisioning Sustainable Northampton (2008).

canopy tree

yield

Chinese Chestnut Shagbark Hickory American Persimmon

86-240 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (37,462 lbs. per acre) 4-6 lbs per 100 sq ft. (1,742 lbs. per acre) 30-92 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (13,068 lbs. per acre)

mid-story trees European Plum Filbert (Hazelnut) Peach Pear Quince

64-184 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (27,878 lbs. per acre) 15.7-67.4 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (6,839 lbs. per acre) 88-176 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (38,333 lbs. per acre) 92-276 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (40,075 lbs. per acre) 30-92 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (13068 lbs. per acre)

Currant High Bush Blueberry Raspberry

156-625 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (67,954 lbs. per acre) 3-12 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (1307 lbs. per acre) .95-3.8 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (414 lbs. per acre)

shrubs

herbaceous Blueberry

Peaches

Asparagus shoots

Asparagus Jerusalem Artichoke

6-22 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (2,600 lbs. per acre) 100-460 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (43,560 lbs. per acre)

ground cover Strawberry

Jerusalem artichoke

Plum

Strawberry

4-1.6 lbs. per 100 sq ft. (174 lbs. per acre)

(John Jeavons, How to Grow More Vegetables (7th edition), Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, Ca) (Dave Jacke, E. Toensmeier, Edible Forest Gardens, Ecological Vision, Theory, Design, and Practice for Temperate Climate Permaculture, Chelsea Green Publishing, White River Junction, VT 2007)

Photos above courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

SEEDS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH • Identify farmland that is likely to be sold, assess its vulnerability to development, and consider means of protecting it. • Refer to Envisioning Sustainable Northampton Plan (2008) to direct future development away from protected and potential farmland, and toward the urban core. Illustration courtesy of Tom Jandernoa. Thoma s Jandernoa l a n dsc ape de s ig n a n d pl a n n i ng

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DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301

TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deer field Rd., Conway, MA

Front cover art, 11 x 17 in., landscape format

project summary Donna Johnson hired the Conway School of Landscape Design because she was seeking a creative, alternative solution to the typical sprawling, suburban lawn. Her one-acre property consisted of a turf grass front yard, and a backyard that was blanketed with tall, annually mowed grasses. When Donna moved into her home, she was looking

goals forward to developing the wild appearance of her backyard and having less lawn to mow and rake. She was unsure of exactly what she wanted, but she requested the design to be low maintenance and include a small vegetable garden. The goals of this project emerged through further conversation and analyses of the property.

• Establish a vegetable garden to grow food for personal use • Increase the use and enjoyment of a low-maintenance landscape • Create a natural, private space for relaxing and entertaining • Solve puddling problem in the front yard The following are select pages from the final plan set.

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Equinoxes (March 21, Sept. 21)

Summer solstice (June 21)

ANALYSIS 6: SUN & SHADE In this analysis three dates are chosen, the summer solstice and the exquinoxes, to display the amount of shade being cast on the landscape from the treeline and house during the growing season. The shadows are cast at four different times, 9AM, 12PM, 3PM, and 6PM. In many ways the equinoxes represent the commencement and conclusion to the growing season with shorter days and more extreme shadow lengths. The otherwise shady backyard is quite sunny during the summer months, as the high angle of the sun shortens tree shadows. The darker spaces outlined in blue do not receive much sunlight throughout the year. Gold outlines indicate areas that receive full sun, six to eight or more hours throughout the day. Areas on the landscape not within the gold or blue outlines receive from three to six hours of sun.

Design DIRECTIVES 3D Models created in Google SketchUp

N

0 10 20

40 ft.

LEGEND Full Sun (6 - 8+ hours) Least Sun (0 - 3 hours)

DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301

It’s possible to take advantage of the full sun areas by planting vegetation that requires more sun. These areas are also the ideal location for a vegetable garden that would require full sun. Conversely, vegetation near the treeline should be shade-tolerant. Entertaining and/or relaxing on the deck in the summer will benefit from a structure, such as a pergola, that provides shade from the approximately four to six hours of sun light.

TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design

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332 S. Deerfield Rd., Conway, MA

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SUMMARY ANALYSIS

LEGEND Drainage Direction

Roof Drainage

VEGETATION

The landscape is open around the house with an abrupt edge between the surrounding mixed conifer and deciduous forest and the yard.

SOIL and DRAINAGE

Most of the soil on the property is well draining sandy loam.

Saturated Area

There is a saturated area to the southwest of the house. The slope in front of the house directs runoff towards the house, creating a puddling problem.

Views Out From House

VIEWS

Views out to the front are open to Cherry Drive.

Views Into Property

Views from the sun room and deck look out on the wall of trees and wild yard.

Vehicle Traffic

Views into the backyard from Cherry Drive decrease privacy.

ACCESS & CIRCULATION Infrequent

The landscape is rarely used.

Foot Traffic

Lack of clear paths discourages circulation in the backyard.

Frequent Foot

Goals

Traffic Full Sun (6 - 8+ hours)

Vegetable garden to grow food for personal use Increase the use and enjoyment of a low maintenance landscape Create a natural, private space for relaxing and entertaining Solve puddling problem in the front yard

N

0

10 20

40 ft.

DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301 24

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TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Rd., Conway, MA

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I : Meadow Encompasses Orchard

II : Enriched Circulation

Features

Features

B

A

H

C

F G

IVE RY D R

H

A

J

D F

E

C

I H

0

the treeline to create a gradual transitional edge. I On warm summer days Donna and her visitors can stroll down the winding footpath that bisects the orchard. J Raised vegetable, herb and flower planters receive six to eight or more hours of full sun, create a beautiful entrance to the path, and are an easy height and size to maintain. K For convenience, the storage shed has been attached to the

20

40 ft.

garage and is more readily accessible.

drawbacks

• Lawn is reduced in the front, but not much overall with the introduction of a more traditional backyard lawn surrounding the deck and outdoor living space. • A successful orchard needs attention and maintenance.

G

IVE RY D R

CHER

K

Donna and her guests enjoy the meandering path that circulates the property from the front entry, A along the rain garden that improves views and solves the puddling problem in the front. B The path continues under the trellis with flowering vine and through the ornamental evergreen shrubs that function as a screen to the backyard and as an inviting entrance. The path is constructed with local stone or a more permeable material such as crushed stone/recycled gravel, or various types of organic matter. C During the warmer months of the year, the path is lined with an attractive, low-maintenance ground cover and winds among tall swathes of native grasses and wild flowers. D Evergreen shrubs and trees along the path add winter interest and help to screen the view of the shed. E A mixed vegetable, herb and flower garden acts as a focal point and sanctuary for Donna in the section of the property that receives the most sun throughout the year. F Donna enjoys more of her time in the gardens or relaxing under the pergola cloaked in a vine such as climbing hydrangea or trumpet flower that provides shade in the summer. G Less of her time is spent mowing

CHER

Donna and her guests enjoy the improved entrance along Cherry Drive and the driveway lined with low-maintenance, salt-tolerant ground covers such as bearberry, columbine, blue fescue, little bluestem, and blue lyme grass. B Flowering evergreen shrubs to the south of the house and conifer trees to the northeast of the house screen views into the backyard. C Sun- and water-loving evergreen shrubs and herbaceous species help absorb rainwater runoff before it reaches the puddling area close to the house. Adding evergreen shrubs also increases winter interest in the front yard. D A more conventional design is implemented around the N deck and sun room with a small patch of lawn close to the house, E enclosed by a swooping perennial garden bed. F Beyond the garden bed, a low ground cover transitions into a meadow of native grasses and wildflowers, G that encompass the centralized orchard that provides productive and attractive views of various native fruit and nut trees. H The meadow borders the shrubs that have been introduced along A

ALTERNATIVE DESIGNS

G

D

A

F D E

C

B

D

H

H

H

N 0

and watering the lawn, which has been reduced significantly. H A nature walk through the southern wooded area of the property and along the southeastern edge of the property leads visitors to berry bushes that have been planted for forage.

20

40 ft.

drawbacks

• Higher cost and initial maintenance to establish meadow, perennial gardens, rain garden, and nature walk. • The nature walk needs regular maintenance and attention.

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey.

DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301

TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design

25

332 S. Deerfield Rd., Conway, MA

Thoma s Jandernoa l a n dsc ape de s ig n a n d pl a n n i ng

25


Design Summary

FINAL DESIGN

The final plan proposes an alternative to the conventional flat, open landscape. Views from all angles of the property are improved with the use of various textures, colors, shapes and heights of vegetation. A considerable amount of lawn space is replaced with drought-tolerant ground covers, herbaceous perennials and shrubs. In turn, there is a reduction in water, gas and fertilizer consumption and time devoted to mowing and raking. Once established, the low-maintenance perennial gardens and annually mown meadow requires less time and money than a traditional turf lawn.

A RAISED Vegetable bed encloses fire pit

Donna enjoys relaxing and working on her raised mixed vegetable, herb and flower garden bed that confines the fire pit with a two-foot tall stone wall. A semi-enclosed space is created, giving Donna easy access to maintain the garden and providing sitting space around the fire pit. Lowbush blueberries, lavender, and daylilies surrounding the exterior of the raised beds, stone wall and fire pit, invite Donna and her guests to enjoy this space.

E

D

C Gradual transition to mature woods

A

Assorted drought-tolerant and shade-tolerant evergreen shrubs and small trees line the meadow, creating a transitional edge into the mature mixed evergreen and deciduous forest. The diverse array of vegetation attracts birds and small mammals by providing food and cover for nesting, and escape from predators. Diverse flowering vegetation attracts butterflies and beneficial insects such as bees.

Perspective of colorful meadow, specimen tree and outdoor living space.

F Rain garden

F

H

B

E Y DRIV

A post and rail wooden fence separates the outdoor living space from a native grass and colorful wildflower meadow which is mown annually. An attractive redbud tree, receiving full sun for most of the year presents itself as the focal point of the meadow in this design, centralized and within view from all points of the backyard.

CHERR

B Colorful Meadow

E

G

Rainwater runoff that is directed down slope toward the house is intercepted by a rain garden that absorbs and redirects water to the north and south. A culvert is installed under the driveway to direct water north, toward the existing rainwater retention basin. The sun-loving rain garden plants create beautiful swathes of color directly in front of the entrance. A small vegetable garden on the edge of the rain garden gives Donna a chance to grow food in the front and wave to the passing neighbors, creating a neighborly atmosphere.

G Footpath to Secluded refuge

C

Guests are drawn past the front entrance on a winding path of permeable crushed stone around the corner of the house. They travel under the trellis with climbing hydrangea bordered by sweetbay and flowering perennial evergreen shrubs that screen views into the secluded backyard. To the left, the guests observe a rain/rock garden, abundant with shade- and water-loving ferns, grasses, and flowering ground covers.

B C

D Compost, Shed and rainwater catchment

A compost bin is conveniently located close to the perennial and vegetable beds, next to the storage shed that has been relocated for easier access to the garden tools. Three rain barrels, hidden behind the shrubs to the north, capture roof runoff from the house for on-site use in the gardens.

N

0

10 20

40 ft.

H Outdoor living space

E Inviting Entrance

Ornamental, salt-tolerant grasses, and perennial flowers line the driveway.

Transitional edge

Specimen Deck shaded by Rain garden Inviting tree pergola entrance Outdoor living Cherry Colorful Donna’s house Front lawn space Drive meadow

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey.

DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301 26

Thoma s Jandernoa l a n d s c a p e d e s i g n a n d p l a n n i n g

The path, lined with blue fescue on the left and perennial garden beds on the right, continues to draw the viewer toward the outdoor living space. A circular patio with fire pit connects to the deck, shaded by a pergola with trumpet creeper that will attract hummingbirds. Fragrant perennials in the surrounding gardens will also enhance the outdoor living experience.

TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design 332 S. Deerfield Rd., Conway, MA

26


Leyland cypress

Bearberry

D

PLANTING PLAN A

A

Sheep fescue Blue huckleberry

Wood spurge Dog violet

Redosier dogwood

Black huckleberry

Turtlehead

Trailing arbutus

Redosier dogwood

Trumpet creeper

Sheep fescue Lowbush blueberry

Mixed perennial container

Lavender

Mountain mint

Turf grass Swamp milkweed

American holly

Daylily

Blue rug juniper

B

Wild strawberry

Daylily

E Y DRIV

Vegetable, herb and flower bed Mayapple

Lavender

Blue flag iris

CHERR

D

Winterberry (female) Winterberry (male)

Dog violet

Autumn joy

Blue flag iris

Summersweet

Blue flag iris

Lowbush blueberry

Orange butterfly weed

Autumn joy

Blue star-Arkansas

Wild geranium Redbud

Sheep fescue

C

Great laurel, Catawba rhododendron Switchgrass, Wild bergamot, Black-eyed susan

Sheep fescue

White spruce

B Mountain laurel, Highland doghobble

Climbing hydrangea vine Sheep fescue

Hairy alumroot

Indian grass

Pennsylvania sedge Wavy hairgrass

Autumn fern Bearberry

Autumn joy

C Lavender

Native rhododendron Sweetbay magnolia

Blue spruce

Native columbine Canadian wildginger

Royal fern Baneberry

Ostrich fern Sensitive fern Canadian wildginger

Northern maidenhair fern

Barren strawberry

Barren strawberry Vegetable, herb and flower bed Summersweet

Cardinal flower Blue star-Arkansas

Windflower

Autumn joy Blue flag iris

Stepping stones Summersweet Autumn joy Summersweet Wavy hairgrass Sheep fescue Spiked lobelia Autumn joy Eastern teaberry Switchgrass Lavender Wavy hairgrass

Windflower Blue flag iris Blue star-Arkansas Wild bergamot Beebalm Orange butterfly weed Beebalm Summersweet

Black-eyed susan

Sheep fescue Native rhododendron

Winterberry (female)

Winterberry (male)

Not for construction. This drawing is part of a student project and is not based on a legal survey.

DONNA JOHNSON, RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE PLAN 39 CHERRY DRIVE, GREENFIELD, MA 01301

TOM JANDERNOA

FALL 2009

Conway School of Landscape Design

27

332 S. Deerfield Rd., Conway, MA

Thoma s Jandernoa l a n dsc ape de s ig n a n d pl a n n i ng

27


g r a p h i c d e s i g n

28

marketing kit

Designed for Levy Restaurants, a corporation affiliated with 90 restaurants, stadiums, arenas, and amphitheaters in North America. Produced to promote their capabilities to potential clients.

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n


stadium menu

Designed for various motor speedways around the U.S. affiliated with Levy Restaurants. Depicted are the cover, and select pages from the menu.

2 0 0 8 RACING LUXURY S U I T E M E N U

Front and back cover

Thoma s Jandernoa g raph ic de s ig n

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restaurant menu

UUUUUU UUUU UU UU UU UU UU U U

UU UUUU UUUUU UU UU UU UU U UU U

UUUUUUUUUUU UU UU UU UU UU U U

Designed for Café Spiaggia, Chicago’s only four-star Italian restaurant. The 11 x 17" menu design provides a blank white space, giving the head chef the ability to print an updated menu every day.

Carta del Giorno

Antipasto

POLIPO AL FORNO CON CIPOLLE, PATATE E SEDANO Wood roasted baby octopus with cipollini onions, potatoes and celery 12.00

RICOTTA AL FORNO CON BIETOLA Wood baked ricotta cheese with marinated beets, mint, thyme and chili flakes 14.00

TARTARE DI TONNO CON FAGIOLI NANI

UUUUUUUUUUU UU UU UU UU UU U U

Tuna tartar with olives, capers and marinated rice beans 14.00

FETTUNTA CON SARDE Marinated sardines on a crostini with salsa verde and fennel 12.00

MOZZARELLA DI BUFALA Buffalo mozzarella with wood roasted olivesand soppressata 12.00

FUNGHI AL FORNO

Benvenuto, Buon appetite!

Wood roasted mushrooms with creamy polenta, sweet garlic and shaved Parmigiano Reggiano 14.00

980 N.

30

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n

CARPACCIO CON RUCOLA E PARMIGIANO REGGIANO Thin slices of raw beef with lemon dressing, crisp arugula and rosemary 12.00

Insalata INSALATA ITALIANA Assorted Italian greens with ricotta salata, shaved onions and Chianti vinaigrette 10.00

INSALATA DI RUCOLA Arugula salad with trumpet royale mushrooms, Parmigiano Reggiano and lemon vinaigrette 9.00

INSALATA DI CAVOLO NERO Tuscan kale with a warm pancetta vinaigrette and pecorino Romano 12.00

Zuppa PAPPA AL POMODORO San Marzano tomato and bread soup with basil, Parmigiano Reggiano and extra virgin olive oil 8.00

ZUPPA GRAN FARRO Tuscan bean soup with wheat berries 7.00

Cena-Dinner Piatti Principali AGNELLO AL FORNO Wood roasted lamb loin with cannellini beans, San Marzano tomatoes and olives 26.00

TROTA AL FORNO CON CARCIOFI, PATATE, FAGIOLINI

E SCALOGNO A RROSTITO Wood roasted rainbow trout with artichokes, giant Tuscan beans, roasted shallots and crispy potatoes 23.00

PORCHETTA CON POLENTA E RAPINI Slow roasted pork with creamy yellow polenta, roasted rapini, Calabrian peppers and garlic 22.00

PESCE DI LAGO AL FORNO CON POLENTA E FUNGHI Wild walleye pike with grilled cipollini onions, oyster mushrooms, crispy polenta and parsley 26.00

POLLETTO AL MATTONE CON GRAPPA Grappa marinated half chicken roasted under a brick with roasted potatoes and braised Tuscan greens 22.00

VITELLO AL FORNO Crispy veal breast with butternut squash, farro and cipollini onions 25.00

ZUPPA DI PESCE AL ZAFFERANO North Atlantic cod, clams and mussels in a saffron orange broth with fennel, potatoes and escarole 25.00

MANZO AL FORNO Wood roasted trattoria steak with olive oil smashed potato, arugula, lemon and shaved Parmigiano Reggiano 26.00

CONTORNI Side 1 Side 2 Side 3

Chef E Socio Titolare Tony Mantuano Chef Esecutivo Missy Robbins

Pasta

GNOCCHI AL RAGU DI CINGHIALE Hand crafted potato gnocchi with wild boar ragu and Parmigiano Reggiano 17.00

SPAGHETTI ALLA CHITARRA CON TONNO, OLIVE E CAPPERI Hand crafted guitar string pasta with olive oil poached tuna, capers, olives and oregano 17.00

CAPPELLACCI DI ZUCCA CON PARMIGIANO E SALVIA Hand crafted butternut squash filled pasta with amaretti, Parmigiano Reggiano and sage 16.00

PERCIATELLE ALL’ AMATRICIANA Thin hollow pasta with guanciale, onions, garlic, cherry tomatoes, basil and Calabrian peppers 16.00

LINGUINE CON VONGOLE Long pasta strands with clams, white wine, garlic and chilis 16.00

CRESPELLE DI RICOTTA Wood oven baked ricotta filled crepes with green onions, basil, garlic and tomatoes 17.00

Speciali

Wednesday, February 12, 2007 INSALATINA DI GRANCHIO

Alaskan king crab with shaved fennel, sea beans, orange segments with lemon vinaigrette 12.00

TAGLIATELLE CON TREVISO E GUANCIALE Handcrafted pasta ribbons with treviso, guanciale, pine nuts and ricotta salata 16.00

SALSICCIA DI CERVO AL FORNO Wood roasted venison sausage with creamy polenta, cippolini onions, watercress and reduced balsamic vinegar 26.00

The Private Dining Rooms of Spiaggia are ideal for private events, meetings and corporate receptions. 312.280.3300 A 20% service charge will be added to parties of 6 or more


posters and fliers Designed for various clients.

wo m e n ’ s history m o n t h

m a r c h

2

0

0

5

Coordinated by the University of Dayton Women’s Center

11 x 17" flier design to promote a permaculture design course being held at the Punta Mona Center for Sustainable Living and Education

Visit www.seeal.org to get involved

17 x 34" poster design for the SOS campaign initiated by SEEAL, the Southeastern Environmental Education Alliance of Massachusetts.

22 x 34" poster design for the University of Dayton Women’s Center, for women’s history month March of 2005.

Thoma s Jandernoa g raph ic de s ig n

31


logos

Designed for various clients.

spark

Teacher Education Institute A project of Post Oil Solutions

LEMONADE

32

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n

STAND


HI D6

:8

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6I =6

JI

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HD

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Thoma s Jandernoa g raph ic de s ig n

33


package and label

Designed for a student project to invent a bottled water company and develop the concept behind the packaging and label design.

34

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n


sweatshirt, tote bag, logo, flier & program Designed for the Renew Conference on Social and Ecological Renewal. The conference took place at the School for International Training, and was organized by a group of graduate students and professors in the SIT Environmental Working Group.

Thoma s Jandernoa g raph ic de s ig n

35


wedding invitations

Designed for Green Letter Press, an invitation design company driven to provide more sustainable options to the wedding industry. All illustrations shown are original.

Please join us for the wedding ceremony of

Patricia Ann Doyle & Robert David Rossman Saturday, the 16th of July Two thousand and ten At three oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock in the afternoon Fair Winds Farm 436 West Harrison Boulevard Springfield, Vermont

Please join us for  the wedding ceremony of

Patricia Ann Doyle & vid Rossman Da ert Rob Saturday, the 16th of July Two thousand and ten At three oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock in the afternoon St. Thomas Roman Catholic Church 436 West Harrison Boulebard Chicago, Illinois Reception To Follow

3OHDVHMRLQXVIRU WKHZHGGLQJFHUHPRQ\RI

Patricia Ann Doyle & Robert David Rossman 6DWXUGD\WKHWKRI-XO\

7ZRWKRXVDQGDQGWHQ $WWKUHHR¡FORFNLQWKHDIWHUQRRQ 6W7KRPDV5RPDQ&DWKROLF&KXUFK :HVW+DUULVRQ%RXOHEDUG &KLFDJR,OOLQRLV

5HFHSWLRQ7R)ROORZ

36

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n

Reception To Follow


greeting cards

Designed for Levy Restaurants and an independent buyer.

Front

SAVOR THE DAY

Inside spread

r Than k you fo

Than k you for

your Celebrating

Celebrating yo ur

with us. SPECIAL DAY

Front

SPECIAL DAY with us.

Inside spread Front

Inside spread

Thoma s Jandernoa g raph ic de s ig n

37


business collateral, logo, packaging, poster, post card and signage

Designed for a student project to invent a museum and develop appropriate design materials.

Gift shop items including posters, post cards, and packaging

Informational, under water exploration time line / banner to be displayed vertically in museum lobby, 20 x 100 in.

38

Thoma s Jandernoa G r a p h i c d e s i g n

Business card, envelope and letterhead


t h o m a s j a n d e r n oa m . a . s u sta i n a b l e l a n d s c a pe d e s i g n + pl a n n i n g b. f. a . g ra ph i c d e s i g n 616.450.12 86

j a n d e r n oa 10 @ c s l d. e d u


Landscape Design and Planning, Portfolio & Resume for Tom Jandernoa