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TOM FRYER 1


Contents

YSoA 2219b Craft, Materials, and Computer-Aided Artistry Instructor Kevin Rotheroe Semester 6, Spring 2012

2


Architecture

Visualization + Fabrication

Surface Translations

6

Writing

Blue Murder Studios Partition Wall

72

DIY Lesson / Oyster Magazine

94

Seam

10

Visualization II

74

Late Inversions / Peter Eisenman

96

Move

16

Visualization III

76

MetaRegionalism / Retrospecta 2010 - 11

98

Replication

20

Visualization IV

80

Yale Building Project

28

Architecture and Books

82

The Yale Contemporary

36

Rome: Continuity And Change

86

Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

46

Inner Worlds

88

CoLocation Tower

64

Interruption For Anna Zmyslowska

90

Brooklyn-Queens Waterway

68

Other Works Mute Magazine

102

Anime Lighting System

104

Atelier Van Lieshout, 2002

106

Workshopped

108

Tomato For Kenwood

110

Nelson Traveling Scholarship

112

Tom Fryer is interested in exploring the potential of architecture and urbanism to both represent and alter contemporary conditions. Coming from a fine arts and design background, Tom decided to pursue architecture following a period of living and studying in Tokyo, a city where both the legacy of urban thinking, and lack thereof, is writ large. He is currently a student in the MArch I program at The Yale School of Architecture, due to graduate in 2012. Tom,s work has been exhibited in Australia, Japan, Italy and the United States. His work has been published in wallpaper*, Object, Monument, Mute and Yale,s Retrospecta. info@tomfryer.com www.tomfryer.com 203.449.3344

TOM FRYER 3


YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Peter de Breteville Semester 2, Spring 2010

4


Architecture

5


Surface Translations

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

1/8” = 1’ Model

6


Architecture

'HVLJQHGIRUDJHQHULFVLWHWKHIRUPXVHVDVLQJOHĂ DWFRUWHQVXUIDFH which is subdivided, cut and folded to spatially amplify prevailing weather conditions in a self supporting structure. Within the minimal structure, precincts are generated to observe the verticality of rainwater passage, the horizontality of wind movement, and the slow interplay of shadow movement upon the complex surfaces. 7


Surface Translations

a a

section aa

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

8


Architecture

b

b section bb

Sections

9


Seam

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009


GR

ID

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BT E

RR AN

EA

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AT R

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SE CT I

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A

A

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LT E

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Architecture

SEAM called for a landscape treatment and kayak rental facility for Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens.

Above Programmatic Diagram

Opposite Pedestrian Circulation Analysis With A. Forman

This proposal generates a new transitional topography between the East River and the park. The decomposition of an implied super lattice of repeated modular forms in relation to topographic surface generates moments of legibility, emergence, and spatial containment. 11


Seam

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

Section AA

12


Architecture

View From East River Towards Park

13


Seam

1

3

2

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

Matrix Assembly In Folded Steel 1 and Concrete 2 Long Span Part In Concrete 3

14


Architecture

Lower, Left And Right 1/64” = 1’ Model in CNC Milled Foam

Top Right Waterfront Perspective

15


Move

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

1/32” = 1’ Sectional Model

16


Architecture

1/64” = 1’ Model

17


Move

1011a Design Studio Instructor Joyce Hsiang Semester 1, Fall 2009

Perspective - Main Courtyard

18


Architecture

Transverse and Logtitudinal Sections

19


Replication

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Peter de Breteville Semester 2, Spring 2010

20


Architecture

Using the precedent of the anomylous municipal brick vernacular found in traditional New Haven stick frame neighborhoods, this proposal confronts issues of privacy, membership and access in a residential concept for at risk youth.

Tectonic / Circulation Diagrams

21


Replication

SUPERVISOR APARTMENT

SENIOR ROOMS

SENIOR ROOMS

COMMON ROOM JUNIOR ROOMS

BATHROOM LEVEL DINING / MEETING ROOM KITCHEN (SPLIT) STAIRS

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Peter de Breteville Semester 2, Spring 2010

Left Sectional Perspective

22

STUDY

Above New Haven Brick Structure Precedents


Architecture

WEST STREET

IN SH WA

ON GT

The typical New Haven neighborhood is comprised of wood-frame constructed houses. There are prominent exceptions to this rule in the form of brick buildings, of a similar scale to residential structures, but usually conceived as club houses, meeting places, certain small businesses.

E

NU

E AV

The requirements of a home for children who are living in close proximity to abusive parents or relatives are unique. This New Haven prcedent is an excellent type to be deployed for this brief. The brick communicates the status of the home as performing a particular service within the community, and speaking to structural integrity. While fostering a domestic environment, this project negotiates the line between a public and private program. In compensation for the opaque materiality of the envelope, a light-filled frontal volume is achieved with a triple height space and a frosted, glazed street facade. Tectonically, the structure is informed by a requisite fire wall on the eastern lot line. From this wall, the new envelope spans across the short dimension of the lot, establishing a wrapping logic. Toward the rear of the building, the envelope flares open to catch the southern light.

Site Plan

23


Replication

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Peter de Breteville Semester 2, Spring 2010

Sections

24


Architecture Architecture

Above Exterior (Night) Perspective

Model Photos

25


Replication

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Peter de Breteville Semester 2, Spring 2010

Interior Perspective

26


Architecture

 

 1

3

 

 2

4

Plans - Ground to Fourth Floors

27


Yale Building Project 2010

1012b Building Project Instructors Alan Organschi, Adam Hopfner, Paul Brouard Semester 2, Spring 2010

1/16” = 1’ model

28

Team D approached the design of their house from the perspective of accessibility. A spatial sequence was articulated with a shaped ceiling WKDWKRXVHGWZROLJKWPRQLWRUV7KHÀUVWÁRRUSODQFDSLWDOL]HVRQD simple layout that expands in both front and rear to become wheelchairaccesible outdoor areas.


Architecture

The ceiling reinforces public and private moments by spatially FRPSUHVVLQJDQGGHFRPSUHVVLQJ$VPDOOVHFRQGĂ RRUDOFRYHLV Provided for the able bodied inhabitants, while retaining a visual DQGVSDWLDOFRQQHFWLRQWRWKHĂ€UVWĂ RRUOLYLQJDUHD

7KHXSSHUĂ RRUGHVLJQHGWREHUHQWHGE\WKHRZQHULVDJHQHURXV apartment arranged in a T-shaped plan to create a long living area/ kitchen and a bedroom (extending perpendicular to the living area) that generates the dormer.

29


Yale Building Project 2010

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1012b Building Project Instructors Alan Organschi, Adam Hopfner, Paul Brouard Semester 2, Spring 2010

Framing Diagrams

30

 !

First Floor Plan / Board

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Architecture

Second Floor Plan

0

31

5

15


Yale Building Project 2010

1012b Building Project Instructors Alan Organschi, Adam Hopfner, Paul Brouard Semester 2, Spring 2010

32

A

B

C

D

A

B

C

D

West Elevation


Architecture AA 

BB 

CC 

DD 





Sectional Progression

33


Yale Building Project 2010 Build Out

1012b Building Project instructors Adam Hopfner, Paul Brouard Semester 2, spring 2010

http://www.architecture.yale.edu/sites/BuildingProject/bp10/

34


Architecture

First Year MArch I Participation: May - June 2010 Completion (BP Interns): July - August 2010

35


Yale Contemporary Art Museum

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Mimi Hoang Semester 3, Fall 2010

Perspective - York Street

36


Architecture

The design for the Yale Contemporary divides the programmatic agenda into two distinct branches. The museum contains an archival sequence that houses temporary exhibitions in addition to a contemporary sequence that houses the permanent collection. These sequences of the two programmatic spaces alternate across a central atrium via a set of crossing staircases.

The exterior of the building is massive folded concrete form that invites exploration and interaction from the street. The atrium occurs at the apex of the fold, where the concrete breaks to expose the programmatic crossover space above the atrium. Circulation becomes event, with visitors moving beneath the belly of museum, up into its broken interior, or through the site from York to High Streets. 37


Yale Contemporary Art Museum ATRIUM / CROSSOVER SPACE

HIGH STREET CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 2

YORK STREET CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 3

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 4

ADMIN / ARCHIVE

MAIN CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 1

LECTURE THEATER

LOBBY / CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

YSoA 1021a Advanced Design Studio Instructor Mimi Hoang Semester 3, Fall 2010

Above SpatIal Sequencing Diagram Right Preliminary Sketch Model in Plywwod and Plexi

38


Architecture

The two sequences, contemporary (permanent) and archival (always FKDQJLQJ GHĂ&#x20AC;QHWZRGLVWLQFWW\SHVRIVSDFH7KHFRQVHUYDWRULDO requirements of exhibiting pieces from the archive call for spaces with DUWLĂ&#x20AC;FLDOOLJKWDQGFOLPDWHFRQWURO7KH\DUHQHXWUDODQGFKDQJHDEOH

The contemporary sequence inhabits the interstices between the archival galleries, and are therefore articulates the structure of the EXLOGLQJXVLQJOHVVUHĂ&#x20AC;QHGPDWHULDOVDQGĂ&#x20AC;QLVKHVDQGUHTXLULQJPRUH robust systems to support the extreme loads of modern sculpture.

Interior Perspective, High Street Contemporary Gallery

39


Yale Contemporary Art Museum

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Mimi Hoang Semester 3, Fall 2010

Perspective - Rear Courtyard

40


Architecture

GROUND

Ground Floor Plan

41


Yale Contemporary Art Museum

2F

2F 3F

3F

3F

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Mimi Hoang Semester 3, Fall 2010

42


Architecture

4F

4F

4F

3F

3F

5F

Floor Plans

43


Yale Contemporary Art Museum

YORK STREET CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 4

ARCHIVAL GALLERY 1

LECTURE THEATER

ATRIUM

LOBBY / CONTEMPORARY GALLERY

YSoA 1021a Design Studio Instructor Mimi Hoang Semester 3, Fall 2010

Unfolded Section

44


Architecture

Yale University holds one of the most important private collections of art in the world. Using the renaissance notion of the wunderkammer (cabinet of curiosities), this museum proposes a radical program for the display of contemporary artworks by displaying them alongside pieces from the Yale collection. The contemporary sequence uses generous, open plan spaces to exhibit works on loan by prominent artists at the cutting edge of practice today. The archival sequence curates fully self-contained exhibitions from the yale archive in a series of more intimate, contemplative spaces. These shows also act in concert with the contemporary curation, allowing the public to view works in parallel, across architectural space.

vessels.

maritime form in precolombian america

Transverse Section

45


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

The scheme proposes the removal of the existing baths and an occupation of the new topography, the newly exposed edges, corners and surfaces of which are used to reconnect the severed seafront paths and establish a new type of promenade. Bluffs are inhabited, stairs traverse granite faces and paths carve and ramp over the surface of the land. 46

6WUXFWXUHVĂ&#x20AC;QGDSURWHFWLYHH[SUHVVLRQKHUHFODPSLQJWRWKHURFN against the power of the wind and the sea, cradling and enfolding their occupants as they enter and exit.


Architecture

Top Concept Collage

Right 1:500 Site Model

Above Excavation Study Model

47


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

LONG SECTION

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

Both Pages Site Plan

48


Architecture

49


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

LONG SECTION

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

above long section opposite street level entry

50


Architecture

20M

10M

5M

0

1M

51


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

AA

BB

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

CC

Above Plans - Changing Pavilions Opposite Sections - Changing Pavilions

52


Architecture

AA

CC

BB

20M

10M

5M

0

1M

53


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

Perspective - Main Pool Deck

54


Architecture

55


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

1:50 Concept Model Collage (MidTerm)

56


Architecture

Pathwalking is a linear activity, as is swimming laps. As the interface between these two modes of movement, the pavilions on the site seek to achieve rapid repositionings of bodies in space.

The transition from the relatively protected, clothed state to the exposed mode of swimming is sudden but made comfortable by simple amenities - ample sunlight, control of air via operable devices, heated Ă RRUVODEVDQGDVKLHOGLQJDUFKLWHFWXUHWKDWPHGLDWHVWKHH[SRVHG windward fringes of the site.

Charting a position between preservation and performative intervention, the remnant landscape is engaged as a key component RIWKHVLWHZKHUHDQXQFXUDWHGVHOHFWLRQRIORFDOĂ RUDVHOIRUJDQL]HV WRIRUPDVLWHVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FDQGRSSRUWXQLVWLFJDUGHQ,WLVDODQGVFDSHWKDW is inaccessible but monitored; advocating observation of an experimental condition. 57


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

Perspective From Sea

58


Architecture

59


Dun Laoghaire Public Baths

1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

1/16” = 1’ Sectional Model

60


Architecture

Perspective - Changing Pavilion Interior

61


INTRODUCTION

ARCHITECTURAL

CoLocation Tower

CONCEPT COLOCATION

INTRODUCTION

CONCEPT COLOCATION

MODULE

INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION

CONCEPT COLOCATION

CONCEPT COLOCATION

DATA FARM

Microsofts Gen4 Data Facility In Dublin consists of a series of containers, essentially parked and stacked amid other modular equipment with no roof or walls.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR TECHNOLOGICAL IMPLEMENTATION [SOLAR UPDRAFT TOWER]

The New York Times June 8, 2009

2211a Structures and Facades for Tall Buildings Instructors Kyoung Sun Moon Semester 5, Fall 2011

The New York Times June 8, 2009

On-Screen Presentation

62


COLOCATION TOWER / CHICAGO

NIGHT PERSPECTIVE

Colocation describes the physical adjacency of servers to a dedicated, custom data cable to achieve an extremely high rate of data transfers, LQRUGHUWR\LHOGWKHSURÀWVWKDWDPLFURVHFRQGFDQHQJHQGHU7KH FRORFDWLRQRIKLJKHQGÀQDQFLDOVHUYLFHVZLWKKLJKVSHHGGDWDWUDQVIHU represents a new typology in the evolution of very tall buildings. The main issue with such systems is cooling.

Perspective from Lake Michigan

with Steve Dinnen

63


CoLocation Tower

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2211a Structures and Facades for Tall Buildings Instructors Kyoung Sun Moon Semester 5, Fall 2011

Data Circulation Diagram

35(9$,/,1*:,1' ',5(&7,21 )/225

)/225

64


Architecture

7<3,&$/)/225>@

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Perspective - Changing Pavilion Interior 65


COLOCATION TOWER / CHICAGO

SKY LOBBY PERSPECTIVE

CoLocation Tower

ERFACE

core

diagrid structure

Ă RRUSODWHV

2211a Structures and Facades for Tall Buildings Instructors Kyoung Sun Moon Semester 5, Fall 2011

Systems Diagram and Programming

assembly

Top Perspective - Sky Lobby Bottom Perspective - From Street Level

66


Architecture

This project develops a formal and programmatic response to the requirements of colocation, for the Chicago Spire site. There, prevailing winds are exploited to cool the server banks, with the core of the tower reaching beyond the envelope, creating an intake for air from outside.

$IWHUWKHVHUYHUVWKHDLULVPRYHGWKURXJKĂ RRUWDOOFKLPQH\V to generate electricity. The modularity of server systems and their frequent upgrades necessitate a dedicated vertical transit corridor that accesses two opposing facades and their associated winds.

Perspective - From Lake Michigan

67


Brooklyn-Queens Waterway

4226a Ecological Urban Design Instructors Alexander J. Felson Semester 5, Fall 2011

Top Left Sectional Study Of Brooklyn-Queens Expressway Top Right Strategic Mapping Opposite Gateway Underpass Reconnecting Hope Street, Brooklyn

68

To be Published in Retrospecta 2011 / 2012


Architecture

This project proposes the transformation of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway into a peak event stormwater infrastructure. The anachronistic highway is rebuilt as an elevated expressway above the old road, which is transformed into a storm water canal. This canal seeks to mitigate peak storm effects in the lower catchments of Brooklyn, particularly seeking to dissipate the impact of future tidal storm surges.

At the same time, the canal deploys architectural and ecological devices that will reconnect neighborhoods severed by the BQE, provide green space in a highly urban environment, and initiate ecological urban experimentation sites.

with Christine Dang-Vu, Brian Tang and Dinah Zhan

69


YSoA 2211a Structures and Facades for Tall Buildings Instructor Kyoung Sun Moon Semester 5, Fall 2011

70


Visualization + Fabrication

71


Blue Murder Studios Partition Wall

Fabrication < Freelance > Client Blue Murder Studios Summer 2004

72


Visualization + Fabrication

When the owner of Blue Murder Studios, a photographic studio, relocated to an ex-industrial space, he obtained a tenuous lease. I was commissioned to design and fabricate a modular wall that could be primarily assembled as required to partition the space. In the event of eviction, the system was also required to easily disassemble for transportation in his small car to a new space. 73


Infinite Periodic Minimal Surface (IPMS) Drawing

1213a Visualization II Instructors Sunil Bald, Kent Bloomer Semester 1, Fall 2009

74


Visualization + Fabrication

7KH,QÀQLWH3HULRGLF0LQLPDO6XUIDFHLVDKLJKO\HIÀFLHQWDQGVFDODEOH system for creating a single surface that also holds spatial properties. This drawing combines the precision of modelling software with the sublety of hand shading.

75


AC Parasite

1022b Visualization III Instructors Ben Pell, John Eberhart Semester 2, Spring 2010

76


Visualization + Fabrication

x2 x2

x1 x1

7KH$&3DUDVLWHUHVSRQGVWRWKHRYHU]HDORXVDLUFRQGLWLRQLQJLQ 5XGROSK+DOOFOLSSLQJLQWRWKHH[LVWLQJDLUVWULSLQWKHVRĂ&#x20AC;W

$VKDSHGSHUIRUDWHGEDIĂ HVOLGHVWRFRQWUROWKHGRZQZDUGĂ RZRIDLUWR GHVNVEHORZWKHDLUVWULS7KHIRUPHFRQRPL]HVLQLWVXVHRIGLJLWDOO\FXW sheet materials - mild steel and polyethylene.

with Diana Nee

77


Multiples

1022b Visualization III Instructors Ben Pell, John Eberhart Semester 2, Spring 2010

78


Visualization + Fabrication

A repeating unit is designed for tectonic aggregation, with CNC milling SURFHVVHVXWLOL]HGWRGHYHORSDPROG ULJKW 

with Will Fox

7KHÀQDOSLHFHLVFDVWLQSODVWHUDQGFRQFUHWHYHUVLRQV

79


Urban / Interior Proposal for New Haven (2)

1022b Visualization IV Instructors George Knight, Brennan Buck, John Eberhart Summer 2010

80


Visualization + Fabrication

Imagined interior - Panorama for New Haven Power Station.

with Marcus Hooks.

81


Architecture and Books

1213a Architecture and Books Instructor Luke Bulman Semester 3, Fall 2010

Published in Retrospecta 2010 / 2011

Books and Architecture. 82


Zone and Anti-Zone

83


Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Norway Oman Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines

ARTICLE IV

THE TREATY ON THE NON-PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

including the international exchange of nuclear material and equipment for the processing, use or production of nuclear material for peaceful purposes in accordance with the provisions of this Article and the principle of safeguarding set forth in the Preamble of the Treaty. 4. Non-nuclear-weapon States Party to the Treaty shall conclude agreements with the International Atomic Energy Agency to meet the requirements of this Article either individually or together with other States in accordance with the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Negotiation of such agreements shall commence within 180 days from the original entry into force of this Treaty. 1RWKLQJLQWKLV7UHDW\VKDOOEHLQWHUSUHWHGDVDàHFWLQJ the inalienable right of all the Parties to the Treaty to develop research, production and use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes without discrimination and in conformity with Articles I and II of this Treaty.

Turkmenistan Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Yemen Zambia

84 1213a Architecture and Books Instructor Luke Bulman Semester 3, Fall 2010 THE TREATY ON THE NON-PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

achieve the discontinuance of all test explosions of nuclear weapons for all time and to continue negotiations to this end,

ARTICLE IX

Desiring to further the easing of international tension and the strengthening of trust between States in order to facilitate the cessation of the manufacture of nuclear weapons, the liquidation of all their existing stockpiles, and the elimination from national arsenals of nuclear weapons and the means of their delivery pursuant to a Treaty on general and complete GLVDUPDPHQWXQGHUVWULFWDQGHàHFWLYHLQWHUQDWLRQDOFRQWURO Recalling that, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, States must refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the Purposes of the United Nations, and that the establishment and maintenance of international peace and security are to be promoted with the least diversion for armaments of the world’s human and economic resources,

9

5

Have agreed as follows: 2. All the Parties to the Treaty undertake to facilitate, and have the right to participate in, the fullest possible exchange RI HTXLSPHQWPDWHULDOVDQGVFLHQWLáFDQGWHFKQRORJLFDO information for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Parties to the Treaty in a position to do so shall also co-operate in contributing alone or together with other States or international organizations to the further development of the applications of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, especially in the territories of non-nuclear-weapon States Party to the Treaty, with due consideration for the needs of the developing areas of the world.

ARTICLE V

Each nuclear-weapon State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to transfer to any recipient whatsoever nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or control over such weapons or explosive devices directly, or indirectly; and not in any way to assist, encourage, or induce any non-nuclear-weapon State to manufacture or otherwise acquire nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices, or control over such weapons or explosive devices.

Each Party to the Treaty undertakes to take appropriate measures to ensure that, in accordance with this Treaty, under appropriate international observation and through DSSURSULDWHLQWHUQDWLRQDOSURFHGXUHVSRWHQWLDOEHQHáWVIURP

Each non-nuclear-weapon State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to receive the transfer from any transferor whatsoever of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or of control over such weapons or explosive devices JULY 1, 1968

JULY 1, 1968

Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Central African Republic Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Congo Democratic Republic of Congo Costa Rica Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea

JULY 1, 1968

JULY 1, 1968

ARTICLE II

London, Moscow, Washington

5. The Depositary Governments shall promptly inform all signatory and acceding States of the date of each signature, WKHGDWHRI GHSRVLWRI HDFKLQVWUXPHQWRI UDWLáFDWLRQRURI  accession, the date of the entry into force of this Treaty, and )RU6WDWHVZKRVHLQVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQRUDFFHVVLRQ are deposited subsequent to the entry into force of this Treaty, it shall enter into force on the date of the deposit of their LQVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQRUDFFHVVLRQ

ARTICLE I

7KLV7UHDW\VKDOOHQWHULQWRIRUFHDåWHULWVUDWLáFDWLRQE\WKH States, the Governments of which are designated Depositaries of the Treaty, and forty other States signatory to this Treaty DQGWKHGHSRVLWRI WKHLULQVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQ)RUWKH purposes of this Treaty, a nuclear-weapon State is one which has manufactured and exploded a nuclear weapon or other nuclear explosive device prior to 1 January 1967. 7KLV7UHDW\VKDOOEHVXEMHFWWRUDWLáFDWLRQE\VLJQDWRU\6WDWHV ,QVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQDQGLQVWUXPHQWVRI DFFHVVLRQVKDOO be deposited with the Governments of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America, which are hereby designated the Depositary Governments.

WITHDRAWN STATES

Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea

13

1. This Treaty shall be open to all States for signature. Any State which does not sign the Treaty before its entry into force in accordance with paragraph 3 of this Article may accede to it at any time. LQVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQE\DPDMRULW\RI DOOWKH3DUWLHV LQFOXGLQJWKHLQVWUXPHQWVRI UDWLáFDWLRQRI DOOQXFOHDU weapon States Party to the Treaty and all other Parties which, on the date the amendment is circulated, are members of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Architecture and Books

THE TREATY ON THE NON-PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS

THE TREATY ON THE NON-PROLIFERATION OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS


Visualization + Fabrication

Left 16 Page Pamphlet (from Single 11x17 sheet)

Above One or Many

85


Palazzo Massimo as Urban Intervention

1291c Rome: Continuity And Change Instructors Alec Purves, Stephen Harby and Victor Agran Summer 2011

86


Visualization + Fabrication

Axonometric Section: Palazzo Massiomo al Colone

Rome: Continuity and Change prioritizes study through observation. As such, this drawing interprets the known against the unknown aspects of the site.

thoroughfare until the 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. The interior remains private (unknown) and as such is rendered as the urban scale poche that organizes the sequence and experience of passage through the Palazzo.

The plan of the Palazzo Massimo all Colonne follows, and probably reuses, the foundations of a Roman Odeon. This is known but unprovable. The building is the architecturalization of an urban corridor between the Campo di Fiori and the Piazza Novonna, and remained a public 87


Spatial Divider

1215b Inner Worlds Instructor Brennan Buck Semester 4, Spring 2011

88


Visualization + Fabrication

Inner Worlds culminated in the design and fabrication of an intervention IRUDVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;FVSDFHLQ3DXO5XGROSK+DOO2XUSLHFHZDVLQWHQGHGWR DFWDVDVSDWLDOVHSDUDWLRQDQGDPSOLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQGHYLFHXVLQJIRUPFRORU FDVWLQJUHĂ HFWLRQDQGUHIUDFWLRQWRDIIHFWDGMDFHQWVSDFHV

A smooth, organic surface is delineated by 3000 yards of draped yarn, creating a phenomenological counterpoint to the relentlessness of concrete walls.

with Nancy Putnam

Featured on suckerpunch daily http://www.suckerpunchdaily.com/2011/06/02/ from-phenomenology-to-sensation/#more-14679 89


Interruption

Fabrication < Freelance > Client Anna Zmyslowska Spring 2012

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Visualization + Fabrication

Installation in Situ

7KLVSURMHFWLQYROYHGWKHGLJLWDOIDEULFDWLRQRIEODQNVWREHSDLQWHGDQG assembled in an installation in Tokyo. The outlines were supplied as hand drawings from the artist, then developed into three dimensional Ã&#x20AC;OHV7KHSLHFHVZHUHIDEULFDWHGXVLQJPXOWLSOHGLJLWDOIDEULFDWLRQ SURFHGXUHVD[LVPLOOLQJZDWHUMHWFXWWLQJDQGODVHUFXWWLQJ

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YSoA 2211a Structures and Facades for Tall Buildings Instructor Kyoung Sun Moon Semester 5, Fall 2011

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Writing

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DIY LESSON

The Barbapapas are a family of multicoloured blobs

in a French childrens book. They have the type of       E    adventures that one might expect from a family       F2   "  of shape-shifters. Their most exciting escapade,      )   ,     2   !   $    however, involved their decision to build their own      #$ )  #   house. It was undertaken with their usual abandon.          /  $ The Barbapapas simply mixed up some cement,             set themselves up in the most voluminous fashion   $&/ #    possible, and poured cement over each other. Part       of their bodies always protruded, creating doorways   #  $    and windows (and ensuring    they werent permanently     $ entombed). Bigger spaces were a group effort,  $&        $ with Mama, Papa and the kids all pitching in and  )   $         $     forming a super-negative of themselves. The family        managed to achieve an unexpectedly stylish and anti-establishment organic style in what looked like a fairly conservative Parisian neighbourhood.

 #   "  $ !      #     Practicalities notwithstanding, is there a superior        #   building concept? One that could   truly become       $ integral to the fabric of our homes? Atelier van     $% (  # Lieshouts (AVL) environments and other projects         

somehow recall the Barbapapas and their world, where people are free to make the useful things in their lives the important stuff more relevant to themselves. In 5 years, AVL has built quite a reputation, from subverting the stolid state of product and spatial design, to engaging an intrigued art world with experiments in living and creating. The atelier was formed, and is currently headed by Joep van Lieshout. Calling AVL his brainchild is an enormous understatement.

WRITING

Writing < Freelance > DIY

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š June-­July

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š June - July 2002, Issue 40 Issue

 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š40

The organisation was conceived, evolved and nourished by van Lieshouts fetishes. Its obvious. With an instantly recognisable language of material, form and themes, AVLs creative output is some of the most recognisable of recent arttime. If you ever glanced more than fleetingly at the huge, brightly coloured fibreglass forms in any design or art tome, and at once realised it to be part of a fully operational mobile home, modular house, or toilet block, chances are it was AVL. The aesthetic is honed as only an obsession could be. And the aesthetic has brought together a team of broadly skilled workers, who enact AVL projects on a 9-5, Monday to Friday basis in an old pepperstorage warehouse in the seedier part of Rotterdams sprawling docklands. The AVL team numbers oscillate around 20 mainly carpenters, inventors, metalworkers, furnituremakers and a steady stream of student-volunteers. Installation teams are currently in, or due to leave for, Antwerp, Switzerland and Sao Paulo. They are also on the way to Sydney for this years Biennale. No one is saying what will be on show in Sydney, but the Atelier once published a book with chapters describing how to slaughter a pig at home, alongside details of fibreglass construction processes. This company sees itself as your guide to the wealth of modern living, and a history of strange and improbable projects seems to justify their inclusion in this years Biennale program. Van Lieshout has always created useful art. There is a pragmatism that lends a particular, obsessive honesty to his work. Consider the fibreglass room parasitically connected to the exterior of Utrechts Central Museum (Clip-on, 1997), giving its inhabitants a new office, or an old truck converted into a mobile home replete with womb-like sleeping area, wall-to-wall cow-hide carpeting and a curvaceously hybridised toilet/shower recess. Just prior to this he developed sink units, much like the generic models cast in polyester and sold throughout suburban Australia. No adornment, no faux-marbling. Van Lieshout took the old designers maxim of honesty to materials and got embarrassingly fundamental with it.

An

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 â&#x20AC;¨â&#x20AC;Š2002. 94

You could see this work for what it was, and the sinks looked like the ones from your old science classroom, finished in play-doh hues. And there is a different honesty to the enormous Multiwoman Beds made for 16 and equipped with alcohol dispensers designed to accommodate orgies. Executed with brutally sturdy construction (unfinished pine beams reinforced with welded steel corners), they evoke the Black & Decker DIY Fabrication of clandestine dungeons. Things changed in the mid-1990s when van Lieshout evolved beyond his role as solitary artist-maker, to form AVL, recognising that factory-style had come to dominate his work. Soon after, the Autocrat portable cabin for survival in the wilderness (modelled on the nineteenth century American Shaker principles of comfort in proto-Minimalism) was created, with facilities for sleeping, eating and the slaughter of livestock. Chasing themes of self-sustainability, AVL set about creating beautifully simple butchers blocks, shelving, chairs and tables in the new AVL survivalist style. Like a mushrooming network of related services, a hospital (AVL Spitaal) and the Workshop for Arms and Bombs were created both inside old shipping containers. When AVL was invited to submit a plan for Almere, a rapidly growing Dutch city, they suggested a free state populated by mobile homes and services. The city, on an island, would be isolated with its own economy revolving around such activities as alcohol, drug and weapon production, prostitution and counterfeiting. Almere city council declined, and AVL, unswayed, set about the construction of what was to become AVL-ville, in Rotterdam. This compound was supposed to further the creation of AVL work and create an environment where likeminded individuals could play. AVL-ville eventually came to encompass a restaurant, farm, the weapons factory, distillery, and various facilities for leisure, most with varying degrees of disrespect for the laws of the government of the Netherlands. All were completed in the AVL style, now encompassing basic 2 by 4 construction, raw plywood surfaces, polyester-reinforced fibreglass for durability and an assortment of off-the-shelf fittings and attachments. The result was a fantasy land of brutal but playful architecture. It drew specialists and students from


around the world, wishing to contribute to and participate in the AVL-ville lifestyle experiment. The atelier/commune ran successfully for almost a year, until last year when the restaurant was shut down by the authorities and much of AVL-villes land was reclaimed by Rotterdam council. People in the art world either really like AVLs arresting tactics, or write them off as juvenile. Designers seem irritated that they didnt think of AVL-ville first. Whatever AVL is, its on a grand scale, and the swelling repertoire of the AVLs operations show no sign of relenting. Which is how the company that designs art will probably exhibit at Junes Biennale with no spiel, no manifesto. If its high-concept catharsis youre looking for, give AVLs work in Sydney a miss. It is art on a human level, to be lived in, used and abused. AVL goes where architects fear to tread, because AVL has no aspirations for the inhabitants of its environments. These habitats do not mould their inhabitants by introducing lofty ideals into their immediate surroundings. Instead, they are the required spaces, created through human observation, fresh from the fleshy mould. While architects ask us us to reconsider our views and realign our priorities accordingly, AVL recognizes the human tendency towards darker, less cerebral practises. An environment, a vehicle, and illegal still, or a simple chair all state an interest in providing or allowing for the pursuit of all kinds of real human activity. Art facilitates life. Van Lieshout has always produced work that responded to his place in the Dutch urban environment. Now in the AVL aesthetic there is a sharp distaste for the chintzy, overly comfortable and altogether Dutch home. Wallpaper, knick-knacks and pet photos of any kind are discarded, replaced by a type of hyper-pragmatism refined, irreverent and dangerous. An AVL-built chair is designed for someone who wants a seat, not for someone who wants their home accesorised. Recently AVL was commissioned to design a reproductive health clinic for the Dutch Women on Waves project. The clinic is ultimately intended to operate on a ship that will sit in international waters just off countries where abortion is illegal.

Writingoneself into an entity better equipped to experience Function rules here, sometimes. Yet other works include rigid 10 metre tall figures gallery fare. AVL and relish the physical. The jail accepts the violence questions equally the usefulness of art, and the married to feats of physical endurance. The toilet, in uselessness of everything that is not art. no uncertain terms, reminds the occupant that this is the underworld. The zeitgeist has been on a long, slow trajectory towards AVL. It is part of a backlash against a Ascending the staircase at one end of the platform, media preoccupied with presenting the urban as a very different scene unfolds. A row of some 15 one extreme (in which we reside) against a rural immaculate beds lie freshly made along the length of foil (which we retire to periodically). AVL seems the wooden floor. At the termination of the platform to suggest a melding of the two notions, or at least a cabin conceals the compost toilet. The finish provides the means of importing one extreme into is rustic, but the concept seems more deliberate. the other. People warm to such fundamentally As an environment concerned with the body, it is contrasting objectives. The imagination is stirred executed on a completely alien scale. It is as though when one examines the meeting point of the knotted, its creators were Herculean, and built this place deeply grained cheap plywood and its neighbouring from the crudest materials, with their bare hands. polyester: reinforced fibreglass, perfectly finished. Sportopia becomes like some strange monolithic The three monthly inevitability of emptying your machine, dedicated to preoccupations with the body, Compost Toilet (2001) now matter how enlightening pumped up like a gym junkie an idea taken too far. or grounding is also at odds with interiors designed only for the most debauched excess. AVL design See AVLs work at the Biennale. First, you realise speaks of a duality that we can neither make sense that whatever it is, you can make it yourself. AVL of, nor defeat a duality so inherent in modern life wants this. The ability to inspire has always been that it almost defines the term itself. Wanting paramount in art, and your interest gives you the the country, being in the city. Needing a career, plasticity of a Barbapapa eager to provide for knowing that a career is a crock. The desire for the oneself. Then you see that to do so is to remove hippie archetype of free love and living from the yourself from the worsening syndromes of the land clashes violently with the possible eventuality designer as god, and the artist as something beyond of having to defend yourself with home-made god. As the person most keenly aware of what you armaments. want, you come to understand why doing it yourself Earth 2002. is art. But its addictive, and as AVL (and some imaginary shape-shifters) help remind us, big things AVL-ville is currently concerned with commissions come from realising the beauty and strength in and exhibiting globally. The Atelier has numerous knowing how to build. made-to-order works ranging from car/chicken coop hybrids to gigantic fibreglass sculptures. One recent work is Sportopia (2002). It is comprised of a massive oblong scaffolding platform, almost 3 metres high, defining two related spaces. Underneath the platform, lit by bare bulbs, is a Hades equipped with a working gym, eating facilities, upholstered furniture that might pass for gynaecological examination chairs (or props in more sordid activities), torture racks and the ubiquitous AVL spirit dispensers. In one corner the blue polyester shaft of a compost toilet protrudes through the ceiling from above. Next to it, vertical scaffolds create a small prison cell. Here, one subjects himself to a punishing physical regime, or is subjected to one. Tables, chairs and cutlery exist only as a means of fuelling a body, maintaining momentum, building 95


Difference, Authenticity & Meta-Regionalism

Today we see the evolution of regionalist tropes in contemporary architecture, but the output is different, at times even projecting the globalising agenda that critical regionalists once charged architecture with resisting. Regionalism is now carried forward by a new intelligence that accepts the inherent relationship of architecture to change and progress. The new regionalism may define the region differently; while retaining a desire to articulate manifold identities and difference through architecture. Importantly, it is increasingly is inflected by the methodologies and theory of practitioners who may seem unlikely inheritors of the regionalist mantle, yet who provide powerful ideaologies for use in a globalized economic space. This paper seeks to examine both those that influence and those who are actively seeking to advance a new, meta-regionalism. In the face of the radically changed circumstances of the modern world, with its seemingly singular trajectory towards a mode of capitalist production that promotes a flattening and sameness of culture by progress, Colquhoun asks how we might define the new architecture of now, and how it differs from preceding eras. He argues that regionalism, embedded in the modern from the end of the nineteenth century has always sought to preserve culture that was perceived as threatened. While a lack of difference defines the contemporary architectural context, Colquhoun finds new moments of difference in local examples, a new way to define the region (as equivalent to the nation-state) - and places where nationhood...coincide(s) with living cultural traditions - particularly in the cases of rapidly developing, yet ancient, civilizations. In these exceptions to a culture of sameness, we see the various futures of regionalism. These examples of a new regionalism are informed by globalized architectural practice far removed from the polemics of Framptons Critical Regionalism. Instead, the common YSoA 1021a Theory II intelligence that connects Instructor Marta Caldeira them is that these new regionalisms underwritten by technology and show Semester 4, are Spring 2011 little interest in preserving doomed or vestigial culture, instead extrapolating new hybrids according to their economic, political and environmental contexts.

The hybrid foundations of meta-regionalism are as much the hyperactive rationalism and dramatic scalar ambitions of Koolhaasian urbanism, as the implementation of sustainability through technology and the reassessment of vernacular architectures once insufficiently critical for Framptons definition. Meta-regionalism offers an enlivening of tired and outdated notions of regionalism, where the players are no longer constricted by scale or by physical vernacular exemplars. Meta-regionalism understands architecture and building as authentic in and of itself, in its responsiveness to an era. Meta-regionalism is unafraid to cross boundaries or borrow succesful strategies to serve its ambitions; the ends justify the means where righteousness once substituted for a lack of applicable principles. Of consistent relevance to any definition of regionalism is authenticity. Yet when digital global culture implies that all things are available to all people at all times, when an increasingly immersive environment of technology and media occupies our senses, what is authenticity? Alofsins notion of constructive regionalism updates this with a precursor to the new regionalism - one which finds a central place for technology. From the early 1980s (or as Mumford believed, from the Bay Regional School), a divergent thread of regionalism has insisted that opportunities exist for new technologies to create interesting synergies based on regionalist theory. Colquhoun wonders whether technology is able to exist without friction in any place except the West, where it has the longest history. OMAs China Central Television Building is one example of the complexities and successes that arise with the emergence of a technologically informed nation-state regionalism in the developing world. OMAs 2008 building for CCTV represents the new regionalism as created under nation-state as region. Colquhoun sees the emerging nations of the East as being a compelling testing grounds for a new regionalism - a moment where ancient cultures and globalization coincide.

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But, how are we to understand this as an authentic regional - as opposed to a universal - contemporary architecture? Contemporary China is in some ways the anti-region. It defies the status of its component regions as being culturally or climatically autonomous zones. Instead, a central agenda is decreed from Beijing, often overriding the specific historical, cultural and even environmental characteristics of smaller regions. Yet China is a contained region in itself. It does have prevailing cultural characteristics in its politics (the single party state) and ethnicity (the predominance of the Han Chinese). Above all, China advocates contemporary market-driven capitalist competition. In new guises of regionalism, emerging regions compete against each other on the field of capitalism, instead of opposing the universal forces of capitalism and the architecture inherent to it. China is emblematic of this, as a communist state that has ceded economically to market capitalism. A new region is therefore defined by the way in which its competitive approach differs to that of others, with architecture becoming a potent tool in the large scale iconography of power. The construction technology required to design and erect the CCTV building challenges prevailing structural wisdom. At the level of detail, older bioregionalist tropes are evident, for example in the fenestration of the facade. Here, horizontal loads are articulated by the local shaping of the diagrid - which is sparse or dense as structurally required. Thus, within a global architectonic context, moments of regional specificity are brought to the fore. In the CCTV Building technology becomes the driving force of the programmatic, architectonic and symbolic objectives. Bjarke Ingels and his office, BIG, can be seen as hereditary to Koolhaas and OMA; the adoption of an avant-garde position, a diagrammatic, rationalist approach and an interest in what Leach calls mock realities. Yet in his interview with Inaba, Ingels advances an explicitly regionalist preoccupation. In this interview we see an approach closely aligned to Framptons vision of a performative architecture, stripped bare of mechanical systems, but updated to rely upon sophisticated modelling software to inform


massing, glazing and orientation decisions. Similarly, in the same interview, Ingels aligns with Frampton regarding the inability of modernism to adapt to local conditions; and offers instead the alternative of a fast-track evolutionary model of architecture, enabled by software. Here we find another iteration of technologically-informed regionalism, but while an interest in bio-regionalist thinking is evident, Ingels flirtations with science are carefully construed to alleviate what he calls a vulnerability that architecture has in its economic interactions with investors, developers or users. In this way, BIG orients itself to the global economy as well as looking to older notions of regionalism to inform its practice. Thus, in answer to Colquhouns question about the kinds of architecture that are emerging, we can look to BIGs specifically topographic approach. BIG makes architectural mountains, shapes its publicity image as a mountain, and names itself to invoke mountainous size. At a zoomed in scale, what seems to be an almost normative rationalist spatial and formal approach, is aggregated and altered to generate a new artificial topography. This is an architecture that exceeds even the ambitions of OMAs buildings as cities. BIG pursues building as landform, and doing this is Denmark, where mountains are rare, becomes an act of global power - a specific, compensatory regionalism that refuses to accept the inherent character or limitations of the traditional region, and instead generates the place that could be, rather than reinforcing the place that is.

Published in Retrospecta 2010 / 2011

In keeping with OMAs approach, older notions of authenticity are passe, but the authenticity of urban experience is at a premium, in keeping with an urbanized and ever-urbanizing global context. The same digital global culture is increasingly unworried by once-percieved limitations imposed by place (scale) and culture. A fantastical, utopian urban vision acknowleges sustainability (high density occupation, green roofs), but in the service of concepts that in terms of scale much more closely resemble the urban-scale megastructures of OMA, than that of Framptons regionalist protagonists Aalto, Utzon or Murcutt.

With BIGs approach there is a sense that globalWriting predominance of Hollywood illusionism, tricks and issues faced today will not be resolved at the scale sentimentality in favour of more authentic modes of of free-standing residential dwellings. Instead, with cinematic expression. Van Toorn goes on to compare Mountain Dwellings, we see the bucolic urban fringe the rough wooden finishes in Onixs projects to the of Copenhagen acts as incubator for urban ideas that rough cuts and hand-held camera aesthetic of the might be applied where Colquhoun sees so much Dogma filmmakers. In the service of their particular potential for regionalist tactics - the developing brand of regionalism, Onix has implemented a farworld. Again, technology is at the fore, this time at reaching new application of an old type. Drawn to the design stage with parametric modelling. In the the informal nature, simplicity of construction and completed building it is again possible to discern materiality of the barn typology, Onix has morphed a global frame that seeks to engage with large and aggregated the barn into a suburban plan. scale economic machinations, and an embedded regionalism that satisfies local human interests. The wooden city concept is the ultimate phase of ongoing experimentation with wood for Onix, a trope that could be interpreted as resistant to the Onix is an office based in Groningen, the homogeneity and ubiquity of concrete construction Netherlands, that produces urban-scale projects, for larger scale projects. The introduction to the predominantly using wood. In this way, they update Wood Architecture monograph posits wood in Framptons point on the Visual Versus the Tactile. In opposition to other more formal materials - the fact, the priveleging of timber in their architecture, informality of wood being what appealed to Onix and their challenging of its material properties, most. In this we see a narrative of resistance, suggests a convincing evolution of regionalist tropes and one that touches more informal or vernacular through scalar changes and a new, technologicallytraditions. enabled implementation of vernacular materials and forms. Onix takes this unique typology and creates a circuit with it - allowing its inhabitants a local inside from Yet in opposition to the advocates of existing where to resist the modern infinity of the outside. concepts of the vernacular, or even those responsible Onix purposefully takes a type in order to elaborate for later concepts of critical regionalism, Onix on their origins but remain vital and socially mixed assume the role of the avant garde. The extending residential and working communities, based on of their polemic to occupy a position relative to a small-scale activities. What appears initially to larger social region is evident in their issuing of a be a project of resistance depends on the pursuit manifesto. of major profits and project development founded on land speculation to make way for a continual The Onix Dogma, as cited by van Toorn is: (1) The transformation of the ribbon on a small-scale basis. design is made specifically for the location. (2) In this way, the architects propose a reinvigorated Facades are never designed independently of ground type that depends on the savvy creation of a plans and vice versa. (3) Drawings and models are vigorous real estate market environment to retain its made by hand. (4) Materials are used in their natural dynamism. state. (5) Illustrations in drawings and reference images are prohibited. (6) The building should not In the work of Onyx we see the ways in which contain any referential or unnecessary ornaments. regionalism promises to fold intelligent local (7) Architecture takes place here and now. (8) All principles into new architecture. While not a new drawings are done by the architect. (9) Stylised concept, the self-allignment of the architects at both designs are not accepted. (10) The architect is not poles of the economic spectrum - with avant-garde referred to as such. Danish filmakers at one extreme, and the suburban Dutch real estate industry at the other, highlights an With this brief charter, we understand a series of inherently dualistic position. particular positions. Primarily, van Toorn identifies a kinship with the iconoclastic Danish Dogma group of movie directors, who redpudiated the universal

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Late Inversions; Le Corbusier and Saint Marie de la Tourette In the Convent of Saint Marie de la Tourette (Eveux-sur-Arbresle, France, constructed 195760), Le Corbusier exhibits a disciplined approach to his late preoccupations of figurative playfulness, the implementation of Modulor proportions, and a plastic aesthetic based on exposed concrete. Yet he also returns to, or reconciles some of his earliest themes. The structure responds to the uniqueness of the site in a way that earlier buildings denied. The establishment of elevated circulation, relatively high in the scheme, reverses the orthodoxy of upward vertical movement through architectural space, in a way that is suggestive of his unrealized urban designs for Montevideo (1929) and the Obus plan for Algiers (1930). Within this greater top-down scheme, the architect again challenges his spatial innovations of the 1920s and 30s, returning to orthodoxy that he had previously questioned. In this work we see the interaction of the architects honed volumetric tactics and figurative interplay. The five points of architecture are evident, but are applied, combined and integrated in a pastiche that approaches the emergence of a new rhetoric. Of particular interest is the way in which plan libre and facade libre are implemented in the monastery, creating a complexity of interior spaces, as well as externally articulating the top-down approach and its corresponding inversion of visual weight. In addition to an analysis of the above, this paper will also consider how the architects visit to Le Thoronet Abbey in Provence (at the suggestion of his client) inspired a careful reinterpretation of the monastery type. The interplay of heavy walls, cavernous, solemn interior volumes and natural lighting of this tightly massed Cistercian Abbey were to provide Le Corbusier with an array of insights into the architectural representation of the monastic order. Throughout, the paper examines the degree to which the architect remained faithful to, or departed from these formal strategies, through his selective YSoA 801a. Formal Analysis application of the Five Points. Instructor Peter Eisenman Semester 1, Fall 2011

The drawings are explanations of the key moments in the scheme.

Drawing 1 Approach and the Square The uphill approach to the convent is instructive in any formal analysis of the building. The angle of approach denies a frontal reading of the Western facade, instead visually favoring the Northern facade. The void between church and residential wings is not read, ensuring that the two structures are perceived as compounded (Rowe, p224). Rowe invites a comparison between this corner-oriented approach and that of the Parthenon, which Le Corbusier held to be a scheme designed to be seen from a distance (Le Corbusier, p52). Like the Parthenon, the corner approach perspectivally diminishes the long dimension, in the case of La Tourette suggesting an imagined square plan that adheres to that of a traditional Cistercian garth. Le Corbusier articulated more of his understanding of Le Thoronet. Unlike Fontenay, with its discrete, well distributed buildings, Le Thoronet is a study in containment. Massed around a central, unseen courtyard, the various volumes are unified by the formal and material relationships. From the corner approach, the perspectival coalescence of the distant piloti and supporting walls beneath the Western facade also encourages a reading of the La Tourette as a singular massive block. The drawing describes how Le Corbusier was able to harness the potent formal articulation of the Parthenon to describe the Cistercian underpinnings of La Tourette. With the approaching visitor able to perceive the square plan, while not registering the floating upper structure of the building, the entire form beyond the Northern facade is read as a singular event in the landscape. Drawing 2 Blank Wall, Organic Entrance The blank Northern facade offers no clue as to the entry for the building. The first time visitor is compelled to continue their movement uphill, past it and the subtle curved wall and sculptural light cannonsof the crypt. Using the official entrance at the high Eastern facade, the entrance is marked by a discrete concrete frame, which the visitor passes through and then on to the reception office which is articulated by its polylobed walls.

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With the crypt and the reception, curvilinear volumes define both at the initial arrival point of the church, and the main entrance of the building. Together, the two can be seen as an evolution of Le Corbusiers organic recessed entrances, initiated at the Maison Cook (1926) and developed at the Villa Savoye (1928). This drawing describes the evolution of the curvilinear entrance grammar that Le Corbusier deployed in these three projects. The late iteration at La Tourette exhibits an organic freedom of form and approaching path that von Moos associates with ever more desperately forceful images (von Moos, p166), but can equally be related to the time when the receptive female form first manifested in Le Corbusiers painting in the early 1930s (Gans, p 29). Drawing 3 Pinwheel and Stabilizer The journey past the Northern face achieves a number of spatial objectives, breaking open the external barriers, and revealing the complex as open at the center, and cleaved into two main volumetric forms. This occurs along a visual East West axis that connects the viewing platform adjacent to the visitors office to the valley below through the void between the residential wings and the church. The variety of supporting conditions, the restlessness of the external facades and the dynamic interplay of courtyard figures suggests a pinwheel formation, rotating, according to Baker, about the atrium (Baker, p289). Above the sacristy, the trapezoid projections of the light guns are canted, reinforcing the direction of rotation. I suggest that the atrium participates in the pinwheel, not as the point of rotation, but as an affected, directional figure, with the same articulated clockwise movement as the light guns and the sliced cylindrical stair mass. This drawing describes the point of rotation as being in the void between the oratory and atrium, creating a sense of a vortex at the center of the complex, dissipating into solidity in an upward, clockwise motion. The loggia of the dormitory cells on the outer walls distend as they are pushed by the outward force of the rotation. Against this motion the church, deeply rooted in place, acts as a stabilizer, arresting the movement.


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Drawing 4

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The pinwheeling motion of the courtyard initiates a circulatory progression from the reception area and viewing platform into the residential wings, establishing the beginning of one of La Tourettes primary routes - around the U-shaped dormitory block. This route is defined by the widening, narrowing and spatial shifts of the corridor, as it weaves through around the three wings. The corridor is the circulatory manifestation of the plan libre, where the shifting walls remain strictly separate from all columnar supports. The drawing describes how three distinct structural grids fail to affect the placement of walls, which instead freely generate a serpentine pathway further delineated by specific window conditions and the concrete flowers that mark the terminating points of corridors on external walls.

lowest part of the valley, where to look outwards means looking upward into the landscape, with the eventual and inevitable return of the gaze to the valley and, metaphorically, to ones self (Heald, p24). At the convent, as with the Beistegui apartment (1933) in Paris, Le Corbusier denied the views of the occupants with a wall of Modulor height of 1.83 metres.

Drawing 5 Cruciform Circulation and Inverted Gardens Von Moos suggests that the genesis of the circulatory approach at La Tourette lay in Le Corbusiers unrealized urban scale proposal for Montevideo in 1929 a city built from the top down, not from the bottom up (von Moos, p164). The Montevideo scheme proposed a massive horizontal highway emerging from the citys surrounding mountains and terminating in the bay. Beneath the highway forms the roof of the building below, proposed as a vast business center. The clearly articulated idea of a raised level for circulation that spans the entire building can be seen in the architects sketches for Montevideo, as well as the Obus plan for Algiers (1930). Le Corbusier redefines the Cistercian cloister by detaching it from its traditional position on the innerwall of the courtyard, and establishing it as a cruciform network of ramped conduits (Potie, p45) on piloti. These connect the atrium, the sacristy, the church and the lowest level of the residential block, and reinterpret the traditional open loggia with ondulatories glazed colonnades of irregular spacing. However, the most faithful realization of the Drawing

 

1 cloister is the roof garden, where the architect gave the inhabitants access, recreating the traditionally enclosed courtyard space as an unfolded, grassed roofscape. With this approach Le Corbusier further challenged Dominican conventions.

If, over the course of his career Le Corbusier had come to use the roof garden as a laboratory for experimentation with forms that contrasted stern geometry with playful counteraction of free forms(Potie, p100), the roof at La Tourette must be seen as having a dramatically different role. Here, only the geometry is perceived. Yet the original inversion - the top-down program that La Corbusier implemented - reveals the space beneath the residential wings as the site of the interplay between fantastical forms. There, between the slope of the earth and the underside of the building, a forest of piloti of varying types and species (Potie, p46) as well as structural walls and other extrusions define a unique space. This drawing proposes a return of all elements to their original positions in the vertical hierarchy. Drawing 6 From the reception and viewing platform, the visitor may move upward in the building, or downward, but the bulk of the building is above the entry level. That the dormitory level is above the entry level is in fact a return to an orthodox grammar, after experiments with with locating bedrooms in the lower part of the residence, below living areas, such as at the Maison Cook (1926). In this way, La Tourette inverts this element of Le Corbusiers early spatial discoveries. But in the way that the volumes inform spatial sequence for the visitor, La Tourette defines a new rhetoric, with an elevated entrance and a downward movement through spaces. Structurally, while the living wings are a Poissy-type sandwich, the church is a Tokyo-type megaron, (Rowe, p200). From the North facade of the church, where the architect pitches the top horizontal line of the wall, a false right angle (Rowe, p230) is created. This has the effect of compensating for the steepness of the site by visually lifting the center of gravity of the entire building.

of the form, defined by the northern elevation of the church, is raised above the entry level. On the Eastern, Southern and Western facades, the cantilevered loggia of the monks cells further highlight the sense of a top-heavy mass. This drawing aligns the heaviness of these facades with their corresponding interior conditions, which exhibit a repetitive cellular approach where structural supports and spatial divisions are indivisible. A downward movement through the building corresponds with a move toward the open plan, which culminates in the double height spaces of the lower Eastern wing, where prominent structural columns and minimal, detached walls describe light, open volumes. Drawing 7 The Axial Church of Light The church is a strictly prismatic box of Cistercian authority (Moos, p 103), and the medieval influence is formally apparent. The building lies along a central axis that is articulated on the floor of the church as a paved line, and on the exterior in the form of the centered organ housing. The structure is rooted wholly in the ground, an uncompromising block of concrete from which its interior forms are carved, and to which the two abstracted wings of the nave are anchored along the axis of the transept. In contrast to the orthodoxy of the layout, natural light is harnessed in a multitude of ways, giving rise to two broad categories of inlet the sculptural and the tectonic. While retaining the sensitive Cistercian treatment of light, La Tourette represents an evolution of the sculptural lighting that Le Corbusier had explored extensively, perhaps most famously at his chapel at Ronchamp (1954). The light canons (von Moos, p166) of the crypt and light guns of the sacristy are fine, angular details in contrast to the massive orthogonality of the church mass. Perhaps more interesting, however, is how the plastic properties of concrete were harnessed to integrate natural lighting into the tectonic of the building. These elements, while not as formally distinct as the sculptural, are legible as a series of angled cuts through, and folds of the church,s structural walls.

ulated

 

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1101a Advanced Design Studio Instructors Yvonne Farrell, Shelley McNamara Semester 5, Fall 2011

1/16â&#x20AC;? = 1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Sectional Model

100


Other Works

101


Mute Magazine

01

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Graphic Design and Typography Client Mute Magazine 1999

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m ute l on do n

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sp r e ad : issu e 1 3

g rap hi c de s i gn e r

102

1999 / 2000

mut e l ond o n gr ap hi c desi g ner

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Other Works

Mute magazine was founded in 1994 to discuss the interrelationship of art and new technologies when the World Wide Web was newborn. But, as mass participation in computer mediated communications has become more integral to contemporary capitalism, its coverage has expanded to engage with the broader implications of this shift. Mutes investigation of the social, economic, political and cultural formations of network societies maintains an accent on the relationship between technology and the production of new social relations. At the same time, the magazines remit has grown broader and now includes analyses of geopolitics, culture and contemporary labour that, while necessarily inflected by contemporary developments in technology, go far beyond this.

http://www.metamute.org/ 01

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Anime Lighting System

College of Fine Arts Fourth Year Studio Instructor Wendy Parker Semester 8, Summer 2000

104


Other Works

The Anime Lighting System is an explorations of the future of objects in the domestic environment. The lights reflect on themes of biotechnology, virtuality and everyware, to manifest a skin and bone aesthetic. The first series of forms were prototyped in acrylic skeleton, nylon skin with a universal porecelain plug. Anime was the Object Gallery New Design prize winner in 2001.

FURNITURE & LIGHTING anime

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portfolio_princeton.indd 23

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105

11/25/08 3:48:43 PM


Various Works Atelier van Lieshout is a multidisciplinary firm that designs, manufactures and installs functional artworks for private, gallery and municipal clients. In 2002 I worked primarily in the wood workshop, but also oversaw polyester-fiberglass and metal projects. I was responsible for interpreting and developing design details on the workshop floor, and supervised the installation of large-scale installations in prominent galleries such as the Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam. The images above represent a selection of the projects that I collaborated on. Notable projects were the AVL Franchise Unit for which I was a detail and construction team member, and the Interpolis headquarters interior where I was on the carpentry team working specifically on structural elements.

Various Works Employer Joep van Lieshout 2002

106


Other Works

http://www.ateliervanlieshout.com/

107


Nesting Table Concept for .ixc / Cassina

A furniture concept for contemporary office spaces, developed over an 18 month period in conjunction with the design department at ixc., Cassinas Japanese arm. The table is designed to be used in the common spaces of the Japanese office, where it facilitates spontaneous and informal meetings. The varying heights, footprint and transparent surfaces were specified to allow quick repositioning, group member interchangeability and the visible storage of devices. The aesthetic references natural elements and an atmosphere of informality into the office, stimulating creativity. Two differently proportioned tables nest together to allow quick flexibility for meetings. The computer models were developed and submitted to the manufacturer in Rhino. Renderings were completed in 3DS Max.

Tokyo Geidai Second Year Studio Project Instructor Seiichi Onobori Semester 3, Summer 2007

108


Other Works

http://www.cassina-ixc.com/

109


Tomato



Product Design < Tomato Audio Concept > Client Kenwood Tokyo Summer 2007

Presentation Boards

110


Other Works carry webbing: neoprene

A furniture concept for contemporary office spaces, developed over an 18 month period in conjunction with the design department at ixc., Cassinas Japanese arm.

The table is designed to be used in the common spaces of the Japanese office, where it facilitates spontaneous and informal meetings. The varying heights, footprint and transparent surfaces were specified to allow quick repositioning, group member interchangeability and the visible storage of devices. The aesthetic references natural elements and an atmosphere of informality into the office, stimulating creativity.

main case: ABS

speaker caps: polymer

outer band: polymer

'HYHORSHGGXULQJDWZRPRQWKLQWHUQVKLSDW.HQZRRG7RN\RWKH Tomato system was designed as a portible speaker system to compliment the iPod. The form was developed in Rhino, and the UHQGHULQJVZHUHFUHDWHGLQ'6WXGLR0D[

Presented at Apple Headquarters, Cupertino, California

111


Rogelio Salmona and the Trajectory of Urban-Social Intervention in Colombia

This research examines the degree to which we can attribute the post-millennial rebirth of Bogota with the architectural and urban-social interventions of the preceding forty years. In doing so, any architectural research in Colombia must confront the resolution of social, economic and physical segregation, issues of public and private urban spaces and the legacy of utopian urban proposals versus the realities of massive growth and (frequently informal) settlement.

George Nelson Scholarship Yale School of Architecture 2011 - 12

112


Other Works

113


FRYER_2012