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2 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “Do I deserve what I got, what I got, what I got, what I got, what I got” — PAPA ROACH, “NEVER ENOUGH” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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CLUBS: Ashes of Soma at Frankie’s 4 CLUBS: Girls in a Coma make Toledo debut 5 TMA: Apollo Society marks 25 years 6 UNI-BROW: Jerry Gray on inspiration 7 GLASS CITY MUSE: John Dorsey on poetry 8 ACT: Rachel Richardson on Toledo pride 10 THE PULSE: Events calendar 14 THE WORD I HEARD: lilD on a frontline battle 18

Papa roach at the omni • GIRL IN A coma at frankie’s • GEORGIA WELLES of the Apollo Society • ‘The Social network’ OCT. 6, 2010 • Episode 1 Chapter 31 • Toledo Free Press Star, Toledo, OH: “Winter is an etching, spring a watercolor, summer an oil painting and autumn a mosaic of them all.” — Stanley Horowitz

Socialize with us!

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No reason to beat around the bush — ‘The Social Network’ will be the best movie of 2010. This is one of those magical moments where the talents of director, writer, actors and more have coalesced into a nearly perfect product. And it seems to do it all so effortlessly.” Review of ‘The Social Network’ by Jeff McGinnis, page 22

Chuck Vicinus, 1930-2010 Longtime theater professor directed more than 100 plays at UT.

W

hen news hit Facebook that veteran theater director Charles “Chuck” Vicinus had died Sept. 30 at age 80, the out-

pouring of shock, grief and loss was immediate (see page 13). Jennifer Rockwood, a faculty member of the Department of Theatre and Film, was a student when Vicinus first came to Toledo. “He was a great

colleague and a fabulous mentor,” she said. “He was very personal with each student, and let you call him by his first name. There are many talented people out there thanks to Chuck.” O


4 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “I HAD NINE LIVES AND I GOT ONE LEFT” — PAPA ROACH, “HARDER THAN A COFFIN NAIL” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Ashes to ashes By Mighty Wyte

TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR STAFF WRITER star@toledofreepress.com

Certain bits of information in life can be filed under the title of “common knowledge”: water and electricity don’t mix. Don’t challenge a cop to a fistfight. However, the fact that a band doesn’t need major-label support to be considered massively successful or wickedly entertaining has not quite made it onto the general public’s list of common knowledge. Welcome to Ashes of Soma. The Windsorbased four-piece will play Frankie’s on Oct. 9 and according to frontman Randy Gray, “success for us means being able to show up to places that aren’t your hometown and have people you’ve never met before showing up to see you.” The band hails from Canada but receives a great deal of support and love from American audiences. “We spend a lot more of our time in the U.S. than in Canada,” Gray said. “We play the states more often because we’re right on the border, close to big cities like Detroit, Chicago and the like.” While Ashes of Soma spends 100 to 150 days of any given year touring, Gray said, “We’ll spend a lot of time doing short runs, weekends or one week at a time. In the last couple of years we’ve toured with Tantric,

Ashes of Soma drifts into Frankie’s on Oct. 9.

Theory of A Deadman and Candlebox. We used to keep everything rigid and strict, now we try to be ourselves and do our thing, not try to do what labels tell us to do.” With a contemporary hard-rock sound, Ashes of Soma dominates its shows and gives its audience something to watch, not just hear. “We do what we want to do and have fun,” Gray said. “People say we sound a lot better live than we do on our record which is a huge compliment because the opposite of that is usually true with other bands.” Despite being unsigned and making shortruns, Ashes of Soma is determined to keep moving forward. “The record industry isn’t what it was, selling a million records isn’t common anymore,” Gray said. “We’re working on new material right now and we have 10 to 15 songs in various stages of writing and production. We’ll have 30 new songs done in the next couple of months.” Doors for the Ashes of Soma show will open at 9 p.m. Advance tickets can be purchased from Ramalama Records and Culture Clash Records, or Ticketmaster for $8. Tickets at the door will be $10. O

On the web

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Ashes of Soma will play at Frankie’s on Oct. 9. PHOTO COURTESY RANDY GRAY

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“DREAMERS HAVE BECOME AN ENDANGERED SPECIES” — PAPA ROACH, “BLANKET OF FEAR” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 5

Their first time Girl in a Coma makes Toledo debut at Frankie’s. By Hannah Nusser Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

After touring on and off for more than six years, all-girl rock trio Girl in a Coma will make its Toledo debut at Frankie’s on Oct. 8. On the road promoting its latest album “Adventures in Coverland,” Girl in a Coma will hit the stage with Murder by Death and Ninja Gun. Drummer Phanie Diaz said the band will play a blend of tracks from its albums, “Both Before I’m Gone” (2007), “Trio B.C.” (2009) and “Adventures in Coverland.” “We’re a rock ‘n’ roll band,” Diaz said. “We go everywhere. We have punk rock songs, rockabilly songs, we have ballads; it’s just a big mesh of different things.” “Coverland” was released in three volumes on 7-inch vinyl in April. The collection includes covers of famous songs by the likes of Selena, The Beatles, Patsy Cline and David Bowie. A CD version of “Coverland” will be released Oct. 19. The CD features three bonus tracks including an extra cover, an acoustic version of a formerly released song and a new track “Yo Oigo,” which was featured in Robert Rodriguez’s 2010 film “Machete.” Diaz said the band received rave reviews on

its latest album and she enjoys playing their versions of the famous tunes for fans. “A lot of people like our versions,” she said. “It’s a big mix so there’s something for everybody.” While her favorite song selections change on a whim, Diaz said right now she loves playing their fierce rendition of Selena’s “Si Una Vez.” “The original song is more of like a heartbroken love song, but we’ve turned it very fast and aggressive, more so that she’s angry versus heartbroken,” Phanie said. “I love the way we do it.” Band mates and best mates of 17 years, Jenn Alva and Phanie Diaz met in junior high in San Antonio, Texas. Guitarist Alva plays bass. Nina Diaz, Phanie’s younger sister, does most of the songwriting and all of the vocals. As an all-female, all-Latina group with two openly gay members, Diaz said, they started to draw crowds of great diversity at their shows. Girl in a Coma has toured throughout the U.S. and in Europe; they’ve played with Cyndi Lauper and opened for Pogues, Tegan and Sara and Social Distortion. Tickets are $13 in advance and can be purchased at Culture Clash Records and Ramalama Records. Tickets will be $15 at the door on the night of the show; all ages are welcome at this event and doors open at 9 p.m. O

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Girl in a Coma has a song on the soundtrack for the film “Machete.” PHOTO COURTESY PHANIE DIAZ

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6 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “DOES IT RUN IN YOUR BLOOD TO BETRAY THE ONES YOU LOVE?” — PAPA ROACH, “BLOOD” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Apollo 25

TMA exhibit celebrates 25 years of the Apollo Society. By Kristen Rapin Toledo Free Press Special Sections Editor krapin@toledofreepress.com

The Toledo Museum of Art (TMA) Apollo Society will celebrate its 25th anniversary with “Inspired Giving: The Apollo Society’s 25th Anniversary Exhibition,” which will feature the 47 pieces donated to the museum by the society in the past 25 years as well as an additional 17 pieces donated by society members during that time. “Patrons will be stupefied at how much and the quality of the works of art that have been donated,” said Lawrence Nichols, the exhibition’s curator. Nichols also serves as TMA’s WilWELLES liam Hutton curator of European and American painting and sculpture before 1900. “The giving is on par with the collection that the museum has done on its own. It’s not one century, one region or one medium; the collection is in all areas the museum collects.” While the pieces have been on display throughout the museum since they were donated, the artwork has only once been grouped together as an exhibit when the society was celebrating its 10th anniversary, Nichols said. Since that time a number of works have been acquired. Artworks from the society range from Greek gold of the 4th century to contemporary works of art and the curators designed the exhibit to be a visual experience, Nichols said. “I find this a great virtue of the collection, it makes a forced juxtaposition. A photograph next to gold jewelry, porcelain works next to a sculpture,” he said. “The installation is thrilling.” The Apollo Society was founded by Georgia

Welles and her late husband David as a way for museum members to be part of the selection process for artwork entering TMA’s collection. Each year a different curator from the museum presents works of art the museum hopes to acquire to the Apollo Society and members vote which piece or pieces to purchase for TMA. “I’m very proud that the members in the second year chose Chuck Close’s painting of Alex Katz. It’s a painting that has stood the test of time and which we would never have been able to purchase inw this day and age,” said Georgia Welles, chairwoman for the Apollo Society. Additional pieces purchased by the society include a 15th century Tibetan seated Buddha, a 250-150 BC diadem, the painting “Bonchurch, Isles of Wight” by Jasper Francis Cropsey and most recently the painting “Landscape Near Cava” by Achille Etna Michallon. The exhibit opens Oct. 15 and runs through Feb. 13 in the Canaday Gallery. On Oct. 15, the museum will host the Apollo Encounter, a free event to teach participants about how the Apollo Society selects works of art. Curators will present artwork and then the audience will participate in a mock vote. “The event is really important because we want the public to understand how the Apollo Society works,” Welles said. Reservations are required for the Apollo Encounter. To register, call (419) 255-8000 ext. 7432. Membership in the Apollo Society is open to members of the TMA at the president council level, Welles said. TMA is open Tuesdays to Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday noon to 6 p.m. Admission to the museum is free. For more information, visit the TMA website at www.toledomuseum.org. O

The 1787 Richmond Race Cup by John Scofield, a gift of the Apollo Society. PHOTO COURTESY TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART

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“WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE WORLD TODAY?” — PAPA ROACH, “INFEST” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 7

My dog ate my inspiration …

I

’m positive everybody out there has some iconic perceptions of artists and could probably give some wild examples of people they’ve known in different situations or that they have heard about acting and reacting in peculiar ways that just didn’t make sense to them. I’ve heard stories about fellow artists, including myself, referred to as mean, weird, dysfunctional, inappropriate, malnourished, poorly maintained, exciting, positive, soulful, hardworking, eloquent, lazy, influential, antisocial, sweethearts and/or the craziest person “someone” has ever known. I am assuming you have a similar story somewhere in your history or could easily think of a situation where you could discard a previous perception about an individual by simply realizing “they’re just a crazy artist,” or at least give them a little leeway because of this fact. As well you should in most cases. As many people who fancied themselves as artists in their youth realized, it’s tough to question your pertinence, your message, your lifestyle, your ideology and yourself as a whole on a daily basis when you are constantly pushing yourself to question and produce legitimate work that is able to speak to individuals on a mass scale, who may or may not really care. The struggle of an artist to make someone care can break many who

try. Even if they are attempting to merely keep themselves excited and interested in the work they are producing. Even the most prolific artists I’ve ever met have had challenging moments of creative frustration and trying times that have inhibited their production. Whether you’re working professionally or for enjoyment, the skeleton key to getting through this threshhold of discontent JERRY is to simply keep working and stay confident. Much like a manic individual who has moments of bliss and clarity and others of deep depression or numbing frustration it is much easier to say than do the majority of the time. Although inspiration in some respect can motivate an individual to produce work of influence and particular poignancy, I still believe that inspiration is overrated and acts as an easy crutch for artists who simply don’t feel like producing.

When you get up and are getting ready for work you usually aren’t worried about inspiration regarding your workday. You get up, get ready and go to your job realizing you are there for a purpose, even if your sole purpose is to pay your bills or earn a little extra cash to go enjoy copious amounts of libations, vacation or to afford the organic necessities that enrich your daily moments GRAY with ideas of internal understanding. You still get up and go. Too often, creatives utilize the old “my dog ate my inspiration” as an excuse to not produce the work that has motivated them through the majority of their life. This is just unacceptable. An artists work ethic should be perceived and appreciated the same way as a factory worker who has gotten up every day for the past thirty years to go to a job that has supported and nourished

Uni-

BROW

his/her family and their livelihood. This may sound simple enough, however for a creative spirit whose general happiness lies in their selfreflection and production of what they feel is the most important thing in their life, any amount of time lacking productive (inspired) work can be an agonizing state, both mentally and emotionally. However, many artists just don’t realize the only therapy for such a state is to keep working and discussing it with like minded and interested individuals whom they respect. I hope the artists out there reading this realize that if I am writing about anyone, it would be myself. I have found myself with this excuse almost rehearsed at times like a clever wornout greeting and it’s namely to myself that I am speaking. As with all internal arguments that fester in the soul of a creative, I just had to put it out there to share, finally. Keep up the work, figure out if it’s good later, just keep doing it like that old grizzled man who just won’t stop working until his day is done and feel the reward that comes along with a hard day’s/ life’s work. O Jerry Gray is an artist, writer, vocalist, bartender, gallery owner and advocate of the Toledo Potential, which promotes the retaining and featuring of artistic talent and culture in our city.

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8 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “I’M IN LOVE WITH TOO MANY THINGS” — PAPA ROACH, “LIFE IS A BULLET” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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o you have a burning passion for all things poetic? Do your friends roll their eyes at the mere mention of modern poetry? Well, they’re not alone, but the good news is — neither are you. I would much rather pine over the words of hopeless romantics than sit on pins and needles waiting for the score of the big game or the latest Hollywood gossip. When I agreed to write this column the one thing I knew is that it had to be more than just another regional arts calendar; those are just words. What I’m most interested in is your passion. Poetry is happening right now. I could take things a JOHN step further and say that somewhere in our fair city someone is holding a reading as I type this and I would probably be right. In future columns I plan to tackle issues like publishing, community unity, how to go about making a living as a modern American poet and how to make sonnets as exciting as your favorite cover band down the street. I’ll also highlight readings and events and put the spotlight on members of our local literary community. This time around though, I’d like us to get to know each other a bit. Can you remember how your love affair with words even got started? Was it a line from a particular literary lion? Was it the kind words of an encouraging friend or teacher? I realize that just opening up to another person can be scarier than the latest horror flick or celebrity mugshot, so I’ll get the ball rolling. I’m 12 years old and I’m sitting on the floor of my Aunt Debbie’s dusty attic in Pittsburgh and I am surrounded by a fortress of books — cookbooks, self-help books, big fat tomes on ethics, Eastern philosophy, art history, and most importantly as

it turned out, books of poetry. I started thumbing through a yellowed anthology looking for nothing and finding everything. It was in that sitting that I first came across the poem that changed everything for me, Hart Crane’s short but sweet “Black Tambourine.” I can’t remember right now what is was about that piece that made me break down in tears, but I will say that it wasn’t sadness. My father was a military man and I was always taught that poetry was something women wrote, maybe a few fragile men, an outlet for the weak, and until that moment I believed it. What I’ve learned since is that the power to truly open up and write poetry takes great strength. You may not know it, but you’re my superhero. Now, it’s your turn. What’s your story? You don’t have to say it out loud, but I want you to think about that first moment of power or true joy you felt due to the written word and then get in your car or on your bicycle or just start walking as fast as you can toward a reading, your public library or your local bookstore. Remember, words are a weapon and a gift. Can’t think of anything to read? Here’s my current list. O “Up is up, but so is down,” New York’s Downtown Literary Scene, 1974-1992. Edited by Brandon Stosuy. New York University Press. O “The Broken and The Damned” by Jason Hardung, Epic Rites Press. O “Single Out” by Ruth Weiss, D’Aurora Press. O “The Step” by Ron Loewinsohn, Black Sparrow. O “Zero Star Hotel” by Anselm Berrigan, Edge. Until next time ... keep your pencil sharp. O

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John Dorsey resides in Toledo’s Old West End. His work is widely published and has been nominated several times for the yearly Pushcart Prize.

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“THE STORY IS IN YOUR EYES” — PAPA ROACH, “THE WORLD AROUND YOU” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 9

Villains push heroes aside in today’s comics Sometimes the world’s a dark place, and sometimes comics reflect that. Today’s titles weave stories wherein crime sometimes does pay and ordinary people might be the worst monsters of all. New offerings on the racks this and next week prove this shocking point. Take “Action Comics” No. 893: no Superman here, just his lifelong enemy Lex Luthor. That’s right — the industry’s longestrunning title stars a villain, not a hero. Villain-centric titles have been done before but DC Comics is making strides by showing bad — and bald — can be beautiful, too. It clicks for Ed Katschke of Monarch Cards & Comics, who calls the issue “a fascinating character study of one truly bad guy using the whole of the DC Universe as a colorful and exciting backdrop.” “Back in June, comics and television writer Paul Cornell and artist Pete Woods took over the title,” Katschke said. “Comics starring the bad guys rarely work for me, but in this case spotlighting Luthor on one of his various quests for unlim-

ited power, all the while butting heads against other DC super villain luminaries such as Deathstroke and Gorilla Grodd, has been a real revelation. The upcoming appearance of Death, a member of the Endless originally introduced in Hugo Award-winning author Neil Gaiman’s critically acclaimed ‘Sandman,’ promises to pay off big time in comic entertainment dividends.” If all goes well and the comic-scheduling gods smile upon us, that ultra-rare appearance by the sweet little goth girl who just happens to be Death should materialize in shops by Halloween. To hold you over until then, Katschke conjures up “Alan Moore’s Neonomicon” No. 2, from Avatar Press. “At once prosaic and spooky, Moore utilizes aspects of H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu mythology to weave a perfect blend of horror and police procedural,” Katschke said. “Artist Jacen Burrows does a great job of translating Moore’s discomfiting scripts into an uneasy and mysterious tableau. I, for one, can’t wait to see where the agent’s investigations lead them although, knowing Moore, I fear for the world.” O — Jim Beard


10 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “Yo, it’s kinda funny how you’re runnin’ your mouth man” — PAPA ROACH, “SNAKES” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Strength in numbers C

amaraderie is where it’s at! There is strength in numbers! United we stand! Divided, we can’t get squat done! The more the merrier! Kumba-freakin’-YA! Perhaps you’ve heard that Toledo is the coolest and most revolutionary city in the Midwest? If not, you haven’t been hanging out Downtown with the world changers, which means you may not know that in some of the particularly happening spots, you will always find several people wearing Toledo gear (I’m wearing my Shine 419, “Portland doesn’t need you” shirt as I write this), drinking out of pint glasses emblazoned with logos of local nonprofits (designed by talented, long-time friends), or fantasizing about buying (better yet, actually buying) the local art on the walls. We’re shouting it from the rooftops! Well, actually, from our Facebook pages ... but still, this place has some serious spirit. And do you know why? Because it is very easy to get behind and show support for people and places that are trying to improve the state of things, and who are really good at it, and who are having a really good time doing it. Here are some examples. The Ottawa Tavern on Adams Street has live bands six out of seven nights a week for free. They also hold regular fundraising events for things like teachers trying to supply their classrooms or community members

with outrageous medical bills. Wesley’s Bar and Grill, also on Adams Street, hosts the best weekly dance party you’ve ever seen and also hosts regular fundraisers for friendly politicians and nonprofits. The Glass City Rollers are a team of athletic personalities who are easy to love, even if you don’t think you like sports. They also donate half of their 50/50 raffle winnings to local nonprofits at each of their home bouts. Old West End Records Rachel represents so much musical talent that I could write an entire column about the different combos it turns out to play each week. They also donated sound equipment and know-how to a memorial celebration of the life of Dr. Robert Brundage during the summer. Toledo GROWs is creating community gardens and teaching urban populations about sustainability. The Center for Choice is providing women

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Local artists show Toledo pride. next time you see local artist Anthony McCarty, he’ll be wearing a Devicious T-shirt (the one with the sunglasses seems to be his favorite). Cross promotion does not begin to describe what is going on here. We are all so proud of each other and are so moved by each other’s work that we can’t help ourselves but to gush over and laud what everyone else has going on, which buoys the spirit that much more. The hope that we are making our contemporaries proud has become a certain fuel that we run on. Productivity seems to be growing exponentially. It’s as if we were all born at the exact right time to do this very thing. And of course we were. So, what’s your cause? You have one. We all do. I know a woman who recently lost a dear friend to breast cancer. In the six months or so since her friend passed away, she has established a memorial fund and built and raced a team in her honor during this year’s Race for the Cure. She could not help herself but to answer a problem with something positive and powerful. It’s in the water in Toledo! Together, we really are changing our corner of the world. We cannot help ourselves. O Rachel Richardson is an activist, musician and a product of Toledo. E-mail her at artcornertoledo@gmail.com.

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“I’M A RECKLESS SON OF A ****” — PAPA ROACH, “RECKLESS” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 11

‘Metroid: Other M’ offers quick action, origin of Samus Aran This Nintendo Wii exclusive game continues the Metroid action game series in an exciting pick-up-and-play format with a detailed storyline set between the events of Super Metroid and Metroid Fusion. This one-player experience ebbs with fluid movements and high-quality graphics. Varying camera angles and different control schemes enhance each action which focuses on attacks, scans, puzzles and special maneuvers. First-person view appears when using the remote-only scheme, which contains more challenges like hidden areas and missile attacks while the third-person perspective concentrates on movement and basic weapon attacks. Players can easily switch between these two schemes as they rip through levels or methodically find each secret and item. Players cannot move when using the first person view, but can restore weapons and increase their concentration level by pointing the remote up and holding the A button. The visceral finishing moves like lethal strikes and overblasts really pack a punch while the colored blood keeps the rating to a Teen instead of an M. The story focuses more on the origins of the heroine Samus Aran as she finds herself on the

“Bottle Ship” and encounters Madeline, Anthony and Adam Malkovich, a commanding officer in the Galactic Federation. The extended cinematic cut scenes, supported by great graphics, set the stage for some intriguing insight into Samus’ personality. Her dialogue increases while the action follows a more cinematic format. Her weaknesses in key scenes establish how she eventually became the stoic, dominating heroine known to hard-core fans. The linear action sequences and revealing character background on Samus represent the notable changes from previous Metroid games while game developers retain the smooth, kinetic movements and fighting scenarios. The musical elements are less prominent and feature some themes from previous installments. Players should expect double digit hours to conquer this great game, which eventually yields special bonuses including a cinematic mode showing all the cut scenes in an approximately two-hour sequence. Online options would be great for the next installment, which will be the 12th in the series (***1/2, rated T for animated blood and violence). O — Michael Siebenaler

Arturo Rodriguez exhibit at Terhune Gallery Arturo Rodriguez is a rising star. The renowned mixed media artist’s highly anticipated exhibition “Marielito” is set to display in Owens Community College’s Terhune Gallery through Oct. 23 and he couldn’t be happier. In addition to the exhibit, which includes paintings, prints and other mixed mediums, Rodriguez will give a lecture about his work on Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. in the Fine and Performing Arts Center’s Studio Theatre Room 111. Rodriguez, who was born in Cuba, left the island with his mother as a young child as part of the Mariel boatlift in 1980. “One of the things that I plan to talk about in my lecture, in addition to the evolution of work itself, is my own cultural identity and its impact on my work as an artist. Growing up in Miami, we talked about all of the wonderful things in the United States. In Cuba I would watch old cartoons like Betty Boop, Heckel and Jeckel, and early Disney; America was the ideal,” he said. Rodriguez received a bachelor’s degree in painting/printmaking from the Kansas City Art Institute and a master’s degree in printmaking from Indiana University. He has served as an associate professor of art/printmaking at the University of Toledo for the past nine years. “For a long time I thought it was a cop out to include anything about my heritage in my work, but it was just that it was really painful for me to deal with and talk about,” he said. “When we came to this country, my father wasn’t able to come right away and had to wait like a year to join us and for a while I thought I might never see my dad again and I was trying to figure out who I was. It was a really hard time. “I wanted to be American for so long. I myself have a son now though and he’s half Cuban and part of wanting to put together this exhibit and giving the lecture, was that I knew that I really needed to reconnect with my heritage. I think my work has a sense of humor and a message, I also think it’s approachable and that people can read into it.” In addition to its appearance on the Toledo-area Campus, the “Marielito” exhibit will be showcased in the Library Gallery on the Findlay-area Campus, Oct. 27 to Nov. 19. For more information, call 1-800-GO-OWENS, Ext.2721 or visit www.owens.edu. O — John Dorsey

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12 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “LIFE’S NOT FAIR” — PAPA ROACH, “SHE LOVES ME NOT” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Papa Roach follows ‘roller coaster ride’ to The Omni. By Mighty Wyte TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR STAFF WRITER star@toledofreepress.com

Success is a gateway drug. “The first time I heard my song on the radio, that was huge,” said Papa Roach frontman Jacoby Shaddix. But the “hugeness” of hearing his songs on the radio only further spurred the rocker’s lust for eminence: “After hearing that song on the radio all the time, I wanted to sell out theaters, then arenas.” Shaddix said. “I’m a junkie for it. I’m always looking for that next high.” After 10-plus years of connecting to audiences around the globe, Shaddix said, “I look back now and we’re still making music that affects people.” The current lineup of Papa Roach consists of Shaddix delivering vocals, Jerry Horton on lead guitar and backing vocals, Tobin Esperance on bass and Tony Palermo on drums. The addition of Palermo, the first roster change since Papa Roach signed with a major label, came as a result

of former Papa Roach drummer Dave Buckner’s departure in 2008. According to Shaddix, the roster changes and years of touring haven’t had a major effect on the band’s writing process. “It’s always evolved,” he said. “It has a lot to do with what we’re listening to and what’s going on in our personal lives. For this new album we really delved into classic rock, Queen, Zepplin, AC/DC and let it affect how we write music.” Papa Roach’s seventh album, “Time for Annihilation,” released in August, is a split between new music and live recordings. “I couldn’t wait to play the new songs live,” Shaddix said. “Combine the anticipation and excitement of a new tour and playing the new stuff live and it makes for one restless rock ‘n’ roller.” The current Papa Roach tour, which will make a stop at The Omni on Oct. 13, will encompass music from the band’s long history of charttopping hits as well as the new material. “We’re playing the new songs and it’s a release,” Shaddix said.

With gold records, countless tours and fans from around the world, Shaddix describes the success of the band as a “roller coaster ride.” “When this started we were just kids, and we just wanted to have fun. After that it became a job and it was real, we decided we wanted to do this for a living,” Shaddix said. “Where we are now is leaps and bounds beyond anything I imagined. We figured we’d sell maybe 100,000 records, build a grassroots following. Then we released our record and it was a rocket ship to the top.” Even with the ups and downs and some trouble with former record labels, Shaddix said, “We’re on top again, so it’s bangin’.” In June, Papa Roach’s former label Geffen Records released “To Be Loved: The Best of Papa Roach” against the band’s wishes. Because of the band’s ownership arrangement with its former label, it was not set to make any money from this release and asked fans not to buy the record. “It ultimately confused our fan base and it was a level of confusion we weren’t excited

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about,” Shaddix said. Despite the release, Shaddix said he wasn’t disillusioned by the music business. “I didn’t join a band to sell pieces of plastic,” Shaddix said. “I joined to make music and pack concert halls and get people buzzin’ to our energy, and at the end of the day, that’s what I got.” From the days of being an upstart high school band to being a rock behemoth that still sells out shows and continues to release new music, Papa Roach owes its success to its loyal fans. “Our fans are everyone from the punk rock kid to the emo girl,” Shaddix said, “to the fans that have been with us for 10 years, to the 40 and over crowd, they’re what we call the ‘Angels and Insects’.” Why should someone come out on a weeknight for a Papa Roach show? “C’mon, what else are you going to do on a Wednesday night?” Shaddix said. “Sit at home and play video games? You’ve done that a million times!” Doors for The Omni show open at 6 p.m. Advance tickets can be purchased from any Ticketmaster outlet. O

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“DESPAIR IS BECOMING MY FRIEND” — PAPA ROACH, “BLACK CLOUDS” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 13

Longtime UT theater professor Vicinus dies By Amy Biolchini Toledo Free Press Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Charles “Chuck” Vicinus directed 198 shows during his career. His Sept. 30 death means he will fall two plays shy of 200, his personal career goal. Vicinus, professor emeritus of theatre at the University of Toledo, where he dircted more than 100 of those plays, died in his Holderness, New Hampshire summer home at the age of 80. He was recovering from an Aug. 19 open heart surgery and appeared to be on the mend, his wife Joan said. Vicinus had just returned from a road trip to New York City to visit his daughter, Julia Fowler. The two saw a performance Sept. 29 by one of Chuck’s favorite singers, Barbara Cook with Michael Feinstein, at Feinstein’s nightclub at Loew’s Regency Hotel on Park Avenue. He drove back to New Hampshire after a lunch meeting with a former student on Sept. 30. Joan was at home in Toledo when she said Chuck called her around 8 p.m. to let her know he was home safely from New York City, but he was tired and was going to bed. When Joan called the next day, there was no answer. “It was presumably a heart attack,” Joan said. Married for 49 years, Joan and Chuck met in Yellow Springs, Ohio. A graduate from Antioch College, Vicinus served in the Navy before he returned to Yellow Springs to work at the Antioch Press. After he was asked to run a small theater outside of Dayton, Vicinus realized his passion for the dramatic arts and went back to school. He received his MFA from Yale Drama School and went on to teach at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minn., Florida Atlantic University and SUNY Stony Brook before joining the staff at UT in 1978. Vicinus’ initial project was launching Summerstage in 1979, which quickly became a smash hit. He went on to become chair of the Department of Theatre and Film for six years. Jennifer Rockwood, director of UT’s First Year Experience and faculty member of the Department of Theatre and Film, was a student

when Vicinus first came to Toledo. “I was his student and then his colleague and we were office mates for years,” Rockwood said. The two directed the Governor’s Gifted Summer Institute for 13 years, which provided Ohio students the chance to act in Shakespeare plays. According to Rockwood, many of Vicinus’ students went on to professional acting and directing careers. “He was a great colleague and a fabulous mentor,” Rockwood said. “He was very personal with each student, and let you call him by his first name. There are many talented people out there thanks to Chuck.” The last show Vicinus directed for UT, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” was one of the first shows to appear at the old Valentine Theater when it reopened 10 years ago. According to UT Theatre Department Chair Holly Monsos, Vicinus continued to work after he was named a professor emeritus and retired in 2000. Monsos said she met Vicinus when she started working at the university 19 years ago. “Chuck was passionate about theater, and taught acting and directing. He was an amazing man,” Monsos said. “I’m still a little in shock.” Ray Wohl, one of Vicinus’ first students at UT who now lives in Chicago, wrote in a tribute: “Chuck Vicinus was a positive creative force of nature in our lives. His spirit endures long after our mutual association ... Chuck cried at rehearsal and laughed out loud during performances. He was compassionate, encouraging, professional, dedicated, wise, kind, and a friend.” “He loved working with students,” Joan said. “He loved teaching and he stayed in touch with a lot of his former students.” In addition to directing SummerStage in collaboration with the city of Toledo, Vicinus was involved with the American College Theatre Festival at the state and national level. He helped create the Performing Arts Council of Toledo (PACT) and was co-artistic director from 1994 to 2002 of the First Night Toledo program, which was performed Downtown on New Year’s Eve. He continued to serve on the board of the Toledo Repertoire Theatre.

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Charles “Chuck” Vicinus at UT in the mid-1990s. PHOTO BY Bill Hartough, COURTESY UT

Joan said Chuck would want to be remembered most for loving his students, his five grandchildren, his daughter Julia Fowler and son, Adam Vicinus, 37. A photography buff, Chuck traveled extensively to England, Japan, Russia and France with Joan. The couple has especially fond memories of Florence, Italy and of their log home in New Hampshire, which Vicinus helped to construct. After purchasing the land in 1971, construction began in 1986 of what Joan termed a “very enhanced log cabin.” At the time, Joan was working in Toledo while Chuck completed most of the interior work to the home in New Hampshire. “I had not seen the house, and I was walking down the path,” Joan said, describing one of her favorite memories of her husband. “The look of pride of his face of ‘Look what I’ve done’ as he

was walking down the path to greet me. It’s a fantastic house right on the lake.” “It’s in and out right now,” Joan said of how she’s handling the shock. “It was totally unexpected ... his heart was on the mend.” Vicinus directed his 198th show, “Lurid Love in Luristan,” at the end of July 2010 at The Little Church Theater in Holderness, New Hampshire. “He was very proud of the fact that he directed so much,” Joan said. However, one of Joan Vicinus’ favorite memories of her late husband was on stage, not off it. Chuck played the role of Dr. Martin Dysart, a child psychiatrist, in UT’s production of “Equus.” “He had a terrible time remembering lines. He was probably close to 70,” Joan said. “It amazed me that he could do it.” Funeral and memorial arrangements for Vicinus are pending. O


14 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “IN THE MIRROR, THERE’S A STRANGER” — PAPA ROACH, “STOP LOOKING” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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OCT. 6-13, 2010

What’s what, where and when in NW Ohio

Compiled by Whitney Meschke Events are subject to change.

O Murder by Death, Girl in a Coma, Ninja Gun: 9 p.m. Oct. 8. O Ashes of Soma, Rotation, Once Over, 8th Street, Jeff

River for this casino’s entertainment offerings. Ticket prices, in Canadian dollars, are for the cheapest seats; attendees must be 19 or older. Caesars Windsor Colosseum, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor, Ontario. (800) 991-7777 or www. caesarswindsor.com. O UB40: 8 p.m. Oct. 7, $20. O Engelbert Humperdinck: 9 p.m. Oct. 15, $46.

MUSIC The Blarney Irish Pub: Catch local acts while taking in the pub’s modern Irish and American fare. 601 Monroe St. (419) 418-2339 or www. theblarneyirishpub.com. O Rick Whited: Oct. 7. O MAS FiNA: Oct. 8. O Kentucky Chrome: Oct. 9. O Jeff Stewart: Oct. 14. O Toast & Jam: Oct. 15. O Tru Brew: Oct. 16.

French Quarter J. Pat’s Pub: Live entertainment at 9:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Holiday Inn, 10630 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg. (419) 874-3111 or www.hifq.com. O Late Show: Oct. 8-9. O Larry Kane: Oct. 15-16.

Signature drinks, such as pumpkin martinis, plus live local jazz performers. 301 River Road, Maumee. $5 TuesdaysThursdays. (419) 794-8205 or www.degagejazzcafe.com. O Gene Parker: Wednesdays.

Ground Level Coffeehouse:

The Distillery:

Mix your beans with some music for an eclectic brew. Open mic on Monday nights. 2636 W. Central Ave. (419) 671-6272 or www.groundleveltoledo.com. O Comedy open mic: 7 p.m. Oct. 6. O Estar Cohen and the Power of the Plume: 7 p.m. Oct. 8. O I of Radio, Ashley Kohn: 7 p.m. Oct. 9. O Village Voice Soultry Cafe: 7 p.m. Oct. 14, $3.

Karaoke is offered Tuesdays, but paid entertainers rock out Wednesdays-Saturdays. 4311 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 382-1444 or www.thedistilleryonline.com. O Tony & Lyle: Oct. 6. O The Bridges: Oct. 7-9. O Ronn Daniels: Oct. 12. O Marc Cogman: Oct. 13. O 56 Daze: Oct. 14-15. O The Menus: Oct. 16.

Brooklyn’s Daily Grind:

Frankie’s:

Coffee and music, what more can one want? If a snack is the answer, this is your spot. 723 Airport Hwy., Holland. (419) 724-1433 or www.brooklynscafe.com. O Argentinean tango: 6:30-9 p.m. Oct. 7.

Toledo’s venue for rock. 308 Main St. Tickets vary between $5 and $15, unless noted. (419) 693-5300 or www. FrankiesInnerCity.com. O Auto Tune karaoke: 9 p.m. Mondays. O It Boys, Summerfield: 6 p.m. Oct. 6. O The Slackers, Green Room Rockers, DJ 100 DBS, El Blanco Diablo: 8 p.m. Oct. 7.

Caesars Windsor: If you have your passport, consider hopping the Detroit

This local, family-owned enterprise offers food, drinks and music in a sleek atmosphere. 405 Madison Ave. (419) 2463339 or icerestaurantandbar.com. O Hoozier Daddy: 5 p.m. Oct. 7. O Ronn Daniels: 8 p.m. Oct. 8. O John Barile and Bobby May: 8 p.m. Oct. 9. O Athena Johnson: 5 p.m. Oct. 14. O Joe Sneider Trio: 7 p.m. Oct. 15. O Dan and Don: 9 p.m. Oct. 16.

Chaos, Antebellum, Seven Remedies, the Shame Game: 6 p.m. Oct. 17.

Dégagé Jazz Cafe:

Be sure to check out this Warehouse District tavern’s namesake, overhead near the entrance. 20 S. Huron St. (419) 244-2627 or www.bronzeboar.com. O Jerod: Wednesdays. O Danny & Dave: Thursdays. O Open mic night with Chris Knopp: Mondays. O Karaoke: Tuesdays. O Crucial 420: Oct. 8. O Mojo Pin: Oct. 9. O Sean Mullady: Oct. 13-14. O The Ravens: Oct. 15. O Bush League: Oct. 16.

Ice Restaurant & Bar:

Brett: 9 p.m. Oct. 14.

A different band performs each week. 702 E. Broadway St. (419) 754-1903. O DJ Lamont: Tuesdays. O Devious: Thursdays-Saturdays.

Bronze Boar:

Bugert: 9 p.m. Oct. 9.

O The Infernal Names, Nicoffeine: 9 p.m. Oct. 12, $2-$4. O Ivoryline, Miles Before Sleep, Zenadare: 6 p.m. Oct. 13. O Polkadot Cadaver, Ideaman, Test to the Theory, Van Allen O Jucifer, Megaton Hammer, Peregrine: 9 p.m. Oct. 16. O Ice Nine Kills, Not Without a Fight, In Reverence of

Cheetah’s Den:

Headliners: All ages, all genres are welcome. 4500 N. Detroit Ave. Ticket prices vary between $5 and $15, unless noted otherwise. (419) 269-4500 or www.headlinerstoledo.com. O Will Hoge: 7 p.m. Oct. 9. O Hank III, Assjack: 8 p.m. Oct. 14, $18-$22. O Whitechapel, Impending Doom, Miss May I, Oceano, I Declare War, Vivian Banks, the Plot in You: 6 p.m. Oct. 15, $15-$18. O The Black Dahlia Murder, Goatwhore, Arkaik: 6 p.m. Oct. 16.

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Manhattan’s: This “slice of the Big Apple” in the Glass City puts on a show for the weekends. 1516 Adams St. (419) 243-6675 or www. manhattanstoledo.com. O Noah Leibel Trio: 6 p.m. Oct. 7. O Frostbite: Oct. 8. O Quartet Bernadette: Oct. 9. O Quick Trio: 6 p.m. Oct. 14. O Sarah Cohen & Friends: Oct. 15. O John Barile: Oct. 16.

Mickey Finn’s: A variety of genres to wash your drinks down with. Open mic nights, 9 p.m. Wednesdays, no cover; $5-$7 cover other nights. 602 Lagrange St. (419) 246-3466 or www.mickeyfinnspub.com. O Asa, Bekah and Mary Danekind Family Jam, K Hab, Jay O and Lucien T: 8:30 p.m. Oct. 7, free. O This Is Everything, Lance Murdock: 8:30 p.m. Oct. 8. O Keelhaul, PB Army, Disconnected: 8 p.m. Oct. 9. O Dan Deacon Ensemble, Lightning Bolt, Flamtronic: 8:30 p.m. Oct. 11, $10. O boom. (mixtape dance party): 9 p.m. Oct. 14. O CL1, Ego and the Maniacs, First Offense: 8:30 p.m. Oct. 16.


“CUZ MY STYLE IS YO, IS UNDERGROUND” — PAPA RAOCH, “REVENGE” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 15 Murphy’s Place:

The Village Idiot:

Jazz — straight, smooth, bebop or traditional — all kinds are played here. Open mic nights start at 8 p.m. on Thursdays. 151 Water St. (419) 241-7732 or www. murphysplacejazz.com. O Clifford Murphy and Claude Black: 8 p.m. Oct. 6, 11-13. O Chris Neal, saxophone: 9 p.m. Oct. 8-9. O Christian Howes, violin: 9 p.m. Oct. 15. O Murphy’s Trio: 9 p.m. Oct. 16.

Tunes combined with pizza and booze, some would say it’s a perfect combination. 309 Conant St., Maumee. (419) 8937281 or www.villageidiotmaumee.com. O 5 Neat Guys: Wednesdays. O Mark Mikel: Friday afternoons and Tuesday nights. O Bob Rex: Sunday afternoons. O Frankie May, Ben Barefoot: Mondays. O Rusted Root’s, Michael Glabiki: Oct. 8. O The Nutones: Oct. 15.

The Omni season pass winners Toledo Free Press Star is teaming with The Omni to provide readers with a 2010-11 Concert Series Pass. Each pass is good for two people to all Omni Tribute Concerts (does not include national acts). The following people all won a two-person season pass: Julia Brumley O Katie Hofbauer Bob Middleton O Lonnie Nitschke Patricia Presser O Wayne Smith Winners will be notified by e-mail of how to pick up their seaon passes. Visit www.omnimidwest.com for Omni show schedules. O

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Omni: This club is a venue for music (and music lovers) of all types. 2567 W. Bancroft St. (419) 5356664 or omnimidwest.com. O Winds of Thor (Led Zepplin tribute): 8 p.m. Oct. 8; $7. O Papa Roach/Skillet: 6 p.m. Oct. 13. O Frontiers (Journey tribute): 8 p.m. Oct. 15; $7. O Permanently Scarred’s Club Tattoo Halloween Bash: Oct. 16; $7.

Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m. ‘Sophie Scholl: The Final Days’ Named in memory of Dorothy and Lillian Gish, the Gish Film Theater hosts screenings of international and arthouse movies and matinees of popular films of the past. BGSU’s Hanna Hall, East Wooster Street, Bowling Green. (419) 372-4474 or www.bgsu.edu/gish.

Ottawa Tavern: Casual meals with weekend entertainment. 1815 Adams St. (419) 725-5483 or www.otavern.com. O The Very Knees, Fangs Out: Oct. 8. O Death by Rodeo, Minglewood Labor Camp: Oct. 9. O Jack Klatt: Oct. 14. O APB: 10 p.m. Oct. 15. O Lemuria, Unsinkable Molly Brown: 10 p.m. Oct. 17.

Wesley’s Bar & Grill: A huge variety of beers helps wash down the entertainment. 1201 Adams St. (419) 255-3333. O DJs Folks, Mattimoe and Perrine: Fridays. O Jeff Stewart: Oct. 16.

Woodchucks:

O Robert Ballinger faculty piano recital: 4 p.m. Oct.

MAS FiNA:

17, Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall, Tower View Boulevard and West Campus Drive.

This ubiquitous band is known for its rock covers. O Oct. 9, Copper Bar, 105 N. Turkeyfoot, Malinta; (419) 885-8146. O Oct. 16, Yeeha’s Buckin’ Bar & Grill, 3150 Navarre Ave., Oregon; (419) 691-8880.

TMA concerts:

The place to go for an eclectic mix of people and music. 224 S. Erie St. (419) 241-3045. O Karaoke with The Georgia Peach: Wednesdays. O The Ruiners (Detroit), Bathhousebetty (Toledo), The Foreclosed (Toledo): Oct. 9. Doors at 9 p.m.; 10 p.m. 18 and older. $5 Cover.

Visual and audible arts combine for a new experience. Great Gallery (unless noted), 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org. O Soprano Joan Layne and pianist Kevin Bylsma will be joined the Masterworks Chorale for a performance of German lieder and Brahms’ Liebeslieder waltzes. 3 p.m. Oct. 10.

UT concerts:

8 p.m. Thursdays, South Briar Restaurant, 5147 S. Main St., Sylvania. (419) 517-1111 or (419) 708-0265.

The university’s music students and friends will perform the pieces they’ve been perfecting. (419) 530-2452, (419) 5302448 or www.utoledo.edu/as/music. O UT Symphony Orchestra: 8 p.m. Oct. 7, Doermann Theater, University Hall, 2801 W. Bancroft St.

rdowns 5131 HeToleatdo,he Ohio 419-381-2079

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band Revival Party:

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band All Stars: 8 p.m. Tuesdays, Trotter’s Tavern, 5131 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-2079 or (419) 708-0265.

Goo Goo Dolls: With a dozen top 10 recordings to its credit, this band will perform tunes from “Something for the Rest of Us.” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. $35-$45. (419) 381-8851 or www.stranahantheater.com.

Apollo’s Fire: Also known as the Cleveland Baroque Orchestra, this ensemble will perform Monteverdi’s “Vespers of 1610.” Pre-concert lecture, 6:45 p.m. Oct. 6; concert, 7:30 p.m., Rosary Cathedral, 2535 Collingwood Blvd. $10-$20. (419) 246-8000, (800) 348-1253 or www. toledosymphony.com.

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Rave Cinema Classics – Levis Commons Oct. 18, 2010: “The Big Trees”

is a Kirk Douglas Western with Eve Miller. Tickets are $2 for the Cinema Classics series, which runs Mondays at 1 p.m. The lobby opens half an hour before the show. The Rave Motion Pictures Cinema Classics series is sponsored by Toledo Free Press Star and the Area Office on Aging. JB’s Sarnie Shoppe at Levis Commons will join Toledo Free Press Star in a social networking promotion that will award a weekly winner with free lunch for two. For more information, call (419) 874-2154 and watch www.facebook.com/toledofreepress for contest and weekly promotion details. O

Gary Allan: This California-born country singer will be joined by Randy Houser and Jerrod Neimann. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 7, Huntington Center, 500 Jefferson Ave. $35. (419) 321-5007, (800) 7453000 or www.huntingtoncentertoledo.com.

Doc Severinson and the San Miguel 5: The former “Tonight Show” bandleader and friends will combine Spanish music and jazz for this performance. 8 p.m. Oct. 9, Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. $21-$60. (419) 246-8000, www.toledosymphony.com or www.stranahantheater.com.

Music in the Grand Manor: Tunes and a buffet luncheon will be offered in the metropark’s manor house. 10:30 a.m. Oct. 15, Wildwood Preserve Metropark, 5100 W. Central Ave. $10. metroparkstoledo.com. Reservations: (419) 407-9700.

BGSU concerts:

The Toledo Symphony, led by Julian Kuerti, will perform pieces by Barber, Mozart and Tchaikovsky. 8 p.m. Oct. 1516, Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle, 2445 Monroe St. $20$50. (419) 246-8000, (800) 348-1253 or www.toledosymphony.com.

The university’s ensembles, choirs, quartets and more — and their friends — will present the music they’ve been perfecting. Halls are located in Moore Musical Arts Center, Willard Drive and Ridge Street, Bowling Green. (419) 3728171, (800) 589-2224, (419) 372-8888 or www.bgsu.edu/ colleges/music. O Kevin Schempf, clarinet: 8 p.m. Oct. 6, Bryan Recital Hall. O Branford Marsalis: Questions and answers, 4 p.m. Oct. 6, Kobacker Hall; preconcert lecture, 7:15 p.m. Oct. 7, Bryan Recital Hall; 8 p.m. Oct. 7, Kobacker Hall, $25-$47. O Garik Pedersen, piano, and Dan Foster, violin: 8 p.m. Oct. 8, Bryan Recital Hall. O Ann Corrigan, soprano; Tina Bunce, mezzo-soprano; and Kevin Bylsma, pianist: 8 p.m. Oct. 13, Bryan Recital Hall. O Vocal Jazz Ensemble: 8 p.m. Oct. 14, Bryan Recital Hall. O String Chamber Music Festival: Oct. 15-16, Kobacker Hall; (419) 372-2186. O “Wishing on a Star”: Students from the musical theater program will perform songs from Disney movies. 11 a.m. Oct. 16, $1-$2. O University Choirs: 8 p.m. Oct. 16, Kobacker Hall; call for ticket prices. O Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble: 8 p.m. Oct. 17, Bryan Recital Hall. O Just Jazz Young People’s Concert: Nov. 13, $1-$2. O Holiday Brass Young People’s Concert: Dec. 4, $1-$2. O Serenade Young People’s Concert: Feb. 12, $1-$2. O Renaissance Festival Young People’s Concert: April 9, $1-$2.

Celebrating 101 years of Jazz celebration:

The After 5 Jazz Ensemble will provide the soundtrack for a party honoring pianist Art Tatum. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16, Toledo Lucas County Main Library, 325 N. Michigan St. $30-$50. (419) 259-5207, (419) 259-5430 or toledolibrary.org.

Artie Shaw Orchestra:

Glass City Opry show:

This pianist is known for his interpretations of Vince Guaraldi’s works as well as ethereal compositions of his own. 3 p.m. Oct. 17, Collingwood Arts Center, 2413 Collingwood Blvd. $15-$20. (419) 244-2787 or www. collingwoodartscenter.org.

The Glass Slipper Revue:

Papa Roach and Skillet:

This event aims to celebrate the area’s female performing artists. Scheduled entertainers include: jazz singers Ramona

These bands will be joined by Trapt and My Darkest Days. 6 p.m. Oct. 13, The Omni, 2567 Bancroft St.

Flame on the River hosts re-opening

A Downtown Toledo restaurant will host its grand re-opening Oct. 8, unveiling a new name and a new menu. The former Boody House, located at 152 N. Summit St., is now Flame on the River and will offer a spread of authentic Pakistani dishes. Starting at 5 p.m., customers can order from a special event menu of appetizers, salad, a dessert and four main dishes including seekh kebabs, chicken tikka, nihari and chicken biryani. On opening day, co-owner Nasir Tausif said customers can enjoy a 20 percent discount on food items. Tausif was brought in to make over the dining room in hopes of attracting more business. Originally from Pakistan, Tausif said he has extensive experience in the fine dining industry and is knowledgeable about his country’s cuisine. The dishes are made with fresh ingredients like ginger and garlic, he said, and the food is a healthy choice. “It’s a unique food to the local Toledo people,” he said. “People love to go out and eat different dishes and try our Pakistani ethnic food. It’s something new.” Flame on the River is currently holding its soft opening, serving lunch from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dinner is from 5 to 10 p.m. and the bar is open until 2 a.m. — Hannah Nusser

Dosti Foundation offers ‘Anjaana Anjaani’ Sajid Nadiawala’s “Anjaana Anjaani’ is the next movie in the Dosti Foundation’s Hindi movie showings at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at Maumee Indoor Theater on Conant Street. Starring Ranbir Kappor and Priyanka Chopra, the movie’s tagline is “All the greatest love stories are between strangers.” Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for students and children younger than 5 are free. For more information, call (419) 897-8902. — Amy Biolchini

BG & MORE

BOWLING GREEN and surrounding area

Powerful Pairings:

Collins and Theresa Harris; barbershop quartet Breathless; the Manhattan Dance Company; the Children’s Theatre Workshop; saxophonist Katrina Barnhill; poet Ophelia Thompson; and viola-and-flute duo Jillian Logsdon and Kayla Hite. 3-5:30 p.m. Oct. 10, Collingwood Arts Center, 2413 Collingwood Blvd. $15. (419) 244-2787 or www. collingwoodartscenter.org. David Davis and the Warrior River Boys will perform. 7 p.m. Oct. 11, Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. $15. (419) 897-8902 or www.glasscityopry.com.

1960s. 3 p.m. Oct. 17, Way Public Library, 101 E. Indiana Ave., Perrysburg. (419) 874-3135 or www.waylibrary.info.

This big band will perform classic pop music of the 1930s, ’40s and ’50s (“Begin the Beguine” and “Moonglow”) from the “King of Swing.” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 16, Central Auditorium, 200 W. Main Cross St., Findlay. $18-$23. (419) 422-4624 or www.artspartnership.com.

George Winston:

Dave Kilbride: The guitarist and singer will perform music of the 1940s to

Ethnic food fair and craft show

St. George Orthodox Cathedral in Rossford will host a craft show and ethnic food fair from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 23. Food at the event includes baked chicken and rice, kielbasa, stuffed cabbage and sweet and sour cabbage as well as ethnic pastries like baklava, strudel, mekeetsee, village bread and klachi. Admission to the event is free and church tours will be offered at 1 p.m. For more information, call Joanne Pentsos at (419) 698-1884. — AB

Cool Cat Strut Cool Cat Strut, a Halloween costume party and fundraiser for the PAWS and Whiskers Cat Shelter, will take place from 7 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Oct. 22 at St. Clement’s Hall. The event includes dinner, DJ’d music, a cash bar, costume contest with cash prizes and a silent auction. For more information, visit www.coolcatstrut.com. — AB

Country Garden Holiday Trunk Show The Carranor Hunt and Polo Club in Perrysburg will host the Country Garden Club Holiday Trunk Show Oct. 11, 12 and 13. This year’s show will feature Bird Dog Bay handmade silk bowties, which are hand printed in Chicago. From 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 11 there will be a preview party with a cash bar. The $30 admission ticket includes a 7:30 p.m. dinner and entrance to the remainder of the Holiday Trunk Show events. A $10 lunch is offered at the Carranor Café from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. both days. Champagne and shopping from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. is available Oct. 12 for a $5 admission, with an additional $5 admission to the Carranor Café’s appetizer buffet. Proceeds from the Holiday Trunk Show benefit local community projects adopted by the Country Garden Club. For more information, e-mail TrunkShow10@aol.com. — AB

‘Alice and Wonderland, A Rock Opera’

Owens Community College’s Center for Fine and Performing Arts presents “Alice and Wonderland, A Rock Opera” at 3 p.m. Oct. 10 at the college’s Mainstage Theatre in Perrysburg Township. The show is a rock concert interpretation of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice in Wonderland” in the style of The Who’s Broadway musical “Tommy.” Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at www. owens.edu or the Center for Fine and Performing Arts at (567) 661-2787 or 1-800-GO-OWENS, ext. 2787. — AB

Art sale to benefit Bowsher students Bowsher High School’s art department and Boosters club will host an arts and crafts sale on Oct. 30 from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the high school, 2200 Arlington Ave. Entrance to the sale is free and open to the public. Money raised from the sale of student artwork will go toward a scholarship fund and purchasing art equipment, said Bowsher art teacher Diane Thorpe. In conjunction with the art sale, Bowsher’s Boosters club will hold a pancake breakfast from 8:30 a.m. to noon. For more information or to sign up, e-mail diane.thorpe@tps.org. — Sarah Ottney

Way Library to show Departures’ The Way Public Library in Perrysburg continues its Art & Foreign Film series with the 2008 film, “Departures.” This Japanese-made film concerns a newly unemployed cellist who moves back to his old hometown and takes a job preparing the dead for funerals. The picture won an Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film of 2008. This Japanese-language film with English subtitles will be shown at 7 p.m. Oct. 15. Admission and refreshments are free. The library is located at 101 E. Indiana Avenue in Perrysburg. For further information call (419) 874-3135. — SO


“I’m paranoid laying crouched in a room” — PAPA ROACH, “829” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 n 17 Gish Film Theater: Named in memory of Dorothy and Lillian Gish, this theater hosts screenings of international and arthouse movies and matinees of popular films of the past. BGSU’s Hanna Hall, East Wooster Street, Bowling Green. Free. (419) 372-4474 or www.bgsu.edu/gish. O International Film Series: “Sophie Scholl: The Final Days,” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 14. O Sunday matinees: “An Unseen Enemy” and “The Trip to Bountiful,” 3 p.m. Oct. 17.

Wood County Historical Center & Museum:

Check out this rural jewel’s new exhibits and tour the museum and buildings to see blacksmith forge demonstrations and historic equipment. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. TuesdaysFridays and 1-4 p.m. weekends (closed holidays), Wood County Historical Center & Museum, 13360 County Home Road, Bowling Green. $1-$4. (419) 352-0967 or www. woodcountyhistory.org. O “Between Fences” Smithsonian exhibit: The exhibit looks at fences, both physical and figurative, and its representation as a division of race, culture or class. O “German-Americans in the First World War: Suspicion and Loyalty.” Michael McMaster will talk about the actions of Germans and German-Americans during World War I, and BGSU’s German Club will provide samples of Teutonic foods. 7 p.m. Oct. 6. O Folklore Tea: Spooky stories from around northwest Ohio will be told. 7 p.m. Oct. 14, $3-$12. Reservations requested.

“100 @100: 100 Works of Art by Alumni Artists to Celebrate BGSU’s Centennial.”

Each of the four studio areas in the School of Art

(graphic design, 2-D, 3-D and digital art) will select 25 works by outstanding alumni to represent the school’s accomplishments. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays (plus 6-9 p.m. Thursdays) and 1-4 p.m. Sundays through Nov. 17, Dorothy Uber Bryan Gallery, Fine Arts Center, between Ridge and Wooster streets, Bowling Green. (419) 372-8525 or art.bgsu.edu/galleries.

Mushrooms: Anyone interested in eating wild fungi should get to know the basic characteristics of the species, some of which bear frightening names like “death cap” and “destroying angel.” These educational classes will include mushroom searches. Second part, 5:457:30 p.m. Oct. 6, Cedar Creeks Preserve, 4526 Walbridge Road, Northwood. Register: (419) 661-1697 or reservations.woodcountyparkdistrict.org.

Bubblin’ Brew progressive tea party: If you find the “to go” option distasteful, this tea party isn’t for you. Sippers will start off at Calico Sage & Thyme (115 Clay St., Bowling Green, (419) 352-5417 or calicosageandthyme.com), then go to The Summer Kitchen (4702 W. Route 6, Helena, (419) 638-4205 or www.summerkitcheninteriors.com), and finally head on over to Beeker’s General Store (226 E. Front St., Pemberville, (419) 287-3274 or beekersgeneralstore. com), trying tea, treats and entertainment at each location. 6 p.m. Oct. 14. $12.

Check out Bowling Green and surrounding area listings online at www.toledofreepress.com

Comments & tweets from TFP readers on Twitter, Facebook & the website. Compiled by Mike Driehorst, Toledo Free Press Star Social Networking Manager

Twitter:

MaumeeMom One of my pet peeves — when people say that there is nothing to do in #Toledo. We spent a great day at the Toledo Botanical Garden — FREE! Oct 3rd via web Maumee Mom

Hahaha

NickMoore_1 TouchdownnnN lanceeee moooreee...with the ball tuck as the endzone dance!

Oct 3rd via ÜberTwitter Nick Moore, former UT football player and brother of former UT Rocket, Lance Moore, who is now playing for the New Orleans Saints

Facebook:

Michael McGraw, response to Oct. 3 article, “Latta weighs in on Republican ‘Pledge to America’”: “Funny, if he could have written this with his eyes closed why did they hire a long time industry lobbyist and insider to write it with little to no actual input from their much hyped website?”

ToledoFreePress.com:

Libbey 1951, response to Sept. 3 Michael S. Miller column on the closing of Libbey High School: “Sorry I could not be there. I’m in complete harmony with Orris Tabner’s comment. It was a great 4 years. We had friends and classmates and didn’t think about differences. The guys I played ball with were team mates, and buddies. Our dislikes were turned to folks at Waite, Woodward, Scott, DeVilbiss, Central, and even Macomber, because Libbey was the best school in Toledo.”

Funfest offers Halloween folklore, games, music Families with children of all ages are invited to attend the free Halloween Folklore and Funfest at the Wood County Historical Center and Museum on Oct. 16 from 4-9 p.m. The Historical Center and Museum, located at 13660 County Home Road, partnered with the Wood County Parks District to host this spookily fun festival with free admission and free parking. While the Funfest will be geared toward families and young children, anyone is welcome to attend, said Kelli Kling, Historical Center marketing coordinator. The Folklore and Funfest is a rain or shine event with Halloween-themed games and activities. “It’s one of the most fun events we have because it is so laid back and casual,” Kling said. “It’s fun to watch the kids too, they’re so cute in their costumes.” Small children can play games in “Booville,” visit the storytelling booth and, for a small fee, folks can get snacks at the Coffin Café. Costumes are welcome, but not required. All-ages activities include free horse-drawn wagon rides and cider pressing. Starting at 5 p.m., museum guides will take curious participants on the ever-popular Folklore Tour through the Old County Infirmary.

Other activities from past years that are likely to pop up again include pumpkin rolling, ghost bowling, a DJ spinning spooky tunes in the disco dungeon and a monster theater, screening friendly Halloween flicks. “The apple cider press and the horse drawn wagon rides are my two favorite [activities] just because it’s not something you get to do every day,” Kling said of the fest, which has been put on annually for the past 15 years. Renell Simrau, Wood County parks event coordinator, said she is hopeful this year’s turnout will reflect last year’s attendance numbers, which topped 800; two years ago, more than 1200 trick-and-treat seeking patrons attended. There will also be a scarecrow contest for cash prizes. Registration is free; participants must bring their best scarecrow to the museum by Oct. 5 for judging. For the less-thanprofessional scarecrow builder, a workshop will be held on Oct. 5 at the Museum from 6-7:30 p.m.; bring clothes, props and poles for your scarecrow and they will provide the stuffing. For more information on the Halloween Folklore and Funfest, visit www. woodcountyhistory.org. O — Hannah Nusser

Lakeside, Marblehead Lighthouse host fall festival The Lakeside Association, Lakeside, is pairing with Marblehead Lighthouse State Park to host a fall festival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 9. “It’s a cherished fall tradition,” said Judy Balsom, executive assistant for the Marblehead Peninsula Chamber of Commerce. “It includes so many different kinds of activities for the entire family to enjoy.” Throughout the day, visitors to Lakeside can enjoy a farmers market, arts and crafts vendors, hayrides and a free historic walking tour leaving from the Heritage Hall Museum at 10:30 a.m. Lakeside’s Central Park offers free miniature golf and shuffleboard and charges an admission of $1 per child into inflatable play areas. For $3 children can participate in fall-themed crafts, including pumpkin decorating and making pinecone birdfeeders. Activities at Lakeside’s Hoover Auditorium Porch include live entertainment at noon, followed by a pie contest and pie auction. Food will be served from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Walnut Avenue by the men of Lakeside United Methodist Church, at Wesley Lodge by

the Marblehead Peninsula Chamber of Commerce and at Traveler’s Café on Third Street. “Nanny McPhee Returns” will be shown at Orchestra Hall at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. Admission is $6 for adults and $3 for children 12 years and younger. “The purpose of the event is to promote the Marblehead Peninsula. We’re tying to bring people together to the region in the offseason,” said Alexandrea Kontos, marketing director for the Lakeside Association. Located on the tip of Marblehead Peninsula 50 miles east of Toledo, Marblehead Lighthouse is the oldest lighthouse in continuous operation on the Great Lakes. Although no shuttle will be offered this year between Lakeside and the lighthouse, the trip is six minutes by car. According to Kontos, the weekend of Oct. 9 is the last time lighthouse tours are available for the season. The tour runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with $2 admission per person. The neighboring Wolcott House, home to the first three keepers of the Marblehead Lighthouse, will offer free tours from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Although Lakeside is a private community, visitors will not have to pay the gate pass fee the day of the event. For a complete list of events, visit lakesideohio.com. O — Amy Biolchini


18 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “TONIGHT IS OUR LAST DANCE” — PAPA ROACH, “SCARS” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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Let the battle begin Naul Spits takes on D. Cardi at Frontline Battles.

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obody remembers who came in second place. Hi p - Ho p was partially founded on the art of lyrical competition, whether it was debating where the art form started, defending one’s pride or simply deciding who the better MC was. On Oct. 2, two Toledo rappers brought the art of battling to the forefront of the Hip-Hop community. LIL Frontline Battles was conceptualized by Anthony “Chief ” Turner and rapper Naul Spits. They’re hoping to make this a monthly event. It was sponsored by Toledo businesses The Fac Enterprises, LLC, iWax Magazine, iamsincere.com, and cuntryonline.com. Trazon Harris, owner of JJ Express, was generous enough to allow two MCs and

w o M e n ’ s

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their supporters to gather in her building in anticipation of the best rapper battle in the city. Toledoans from every part of the city hugged, exchanged salutations and took pictures, showing admiration and respect for one another. There were no arguments, no confrontations and no negativity. An empty warehouse was transformed into a scene from Eminem’s movie “Eight Mile,” complete with a nonbiased host, two rappers and an honest crowd. Three threeminute rounds would determine whose lyrical abilities were supreme. The first contender was Naul Spits. He’s known for his wordplay, and is no stranger to battling. n BATTLE CONTINUES ON 19

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n BATTLE CONTINUED FROM 18 He definitely came to compete, throwing shots at his competition like, “I don’t care about my weight/Just make sure your dudes are in shape, to carry you at your wake.” Then it was his competition’s turn. D. Cardi, also no stranger to the Toledo Hip-Hop scene, came prepared as well. One of his best lines of the first round was “This bad boy will beat you with the Ciroc until you’re Puffy.” The first round was a very close call, but Naul Spits had a slight edge over D. Cardi. The crowd calmed down and prepared for the second round. Naul Spits challenged D. Cardi’s manhood in the second round, but forgot the rest of his lyrics. His rhymes weren’t as memorable as his first round, and when he “choked,” it was the nail in the coffin. D. Cardi took full advantage of Naul’s mistake. He spent the round making fun of Naul’s plussize frame, saying “he’s mad because chicks have to wear blindfolds on his blind dates.” The round clearly went to D. Cardi, who not only remembered all of his lyrics, but executed them perfectly. It was time for the last round. The last three minutes to prove superiority. The last chance to sway the crowd’s opinion. Anticipation was at its peak. Naul Spits started off ... and then forgot his lyrics — again. He had almost hit his three-minute mark, and the crowd may not have noticed that he forgot his lyrics had he not announced it. But when the camera is on, along with immense pressure, the first reaction may not be the best reaction. D. Cardi was ready. He insulted every physical inch of Naul Spits, saying, “I will not lose to a

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22 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / CATCH JEFF McGINNIS TUESDAYS ON ‘THE ANDREW Z SHOW’ ON 92.5 KISS FM ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Facebook’s first steps ‘Social Network’ is the year’s best film.

A A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 1, No. 31. Established 2010. Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com Michael S. Miller, Editor in Chief mmiller@toledofreepress.com EDITORIAL

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young man and woman sit in a crowded campus restaurant. The man, clearly very intelligent, is treating the conversation like a tennis match, trying to score points. He’s constantly adding new things, correcting, doubling back, changing course and then reversing again. The woman, who is no intellectual JEFF slouch, is trying heroically to keep up, but his brain and ego are on fast-forward. When she tells him she’s breaking up with him, it takes him a minute to register that she’s serious. This is the opening scene of “The Social Network,” and it quickly establishes many important things. It sets in motion all the events which are to follow. It demonstrates the remarkable nature of screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s dialogue, which is intelligent and complicated without being too complex. And it gives the first glimpse of Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), the anti-social misfit who will change the way the world interacts socially. No reason to beat around the bush — “The Social Network” will be the best movie of 2010. This is one of those magical moments where the talents of director, writer, actors and more have coalesced into a nearly perfect product, and it seems to do it all so effortlessly. The year is 2003. After his disastrous date, Harvard undergrad Zuckerberg walks back to his room and begins feverishly working on a website where students will vote on how hot female classmates are. He cobbles the site together with the help of his best friend, Eduardo Saverin (Andrew Garfield). Within four hours, the site has so much traffic it crashes Harvard’s servers. Zuckerberg gets into big trouble. But he also thinks he’s onto something. So do the Winklevoss twins (both played by Armie Hammer), who have an idea for a website where Harvard students will interact socially. What makes it different from Friendster or MySpace, Zuckerberg asks? Exclusivity, answer the twin athletes, who are a few pegs above Zuckerberg in the Harvard social order. He agrees to work with them. Then Zuckerberg almost immediately throws out their concept and develops his own, funded by his friend Saverin — Facebook. Did he rip the Winklevosses off? “The Social Network” wisely never really tries to answer that question. The film’s narrative structure is built on two depositions for two separate lawsuits levied at Zuckerberg. The testimony acts as narration for the film, which follows the founding

of Facebook and its rise from Harvard fad to worldwide phenomenon. The film lets everyone involved have their say, and leaves it to the audience to decide what to think. The key to the whole movie lies in the relationships between the characters. Saverin is supportive and wants to help Zuckerberg make money off of his — or, rather, their — creation. Zuckerberg is resistant to change, doesn’t want his baby to lose its “cool” factor. The conflict is exacerbated by the arrival of Napster founder Sean Parker (played amazingly well by Justin Timberlake), who Zuckerberg idolizes like a rock star. Saverin, rightly, sees him as competition. As brilliantly played by Eisenberg, the Zuckerberg character remains an enigma, as he should be.

mCGINNIS

POP GOES THE

CULTURE

He’s not likeable by any stretch of the imagination. Little in director David Fincher’s resume would have indicated how smoothly this film plays. He’s always been a remarkably interesting director, but the movie has none of the visual flourishes that often mark his work. Instead, he uses his camera to establish the look and feel of the campus world that his characters inhabit, which is contrasted with the cold, corporate world which is to come. The result feels 100 percent authentic from all angles, aided by the remarkable script by Aaron Sorkin, who will surely win an Oscar for his work. Some have called into question “The Social Network’s” version of events, saying the real story is far different. This may be true, but that is irrelevant. “True stories” in the movies are never really true. “Citizen Kane,” based largely on the life of William Randolph Hearst, wasn’t exactly accurate, either. But what we have here is a film that feels emotionally true, and plays with remarkable power. As with “Kane,” “The Social Network” ends with a man who has unbelievable wealth, but lacks the one thing that would make him happy. He has all the friends in the world but he’s totally alone. O E-mail Jeff at PopGoesJeff@gmail.com.

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24 n WEDNESDAY, OCT. 6, 2010 / “I get down for my crown and I don’t crack under stress” — PAPA ROACH, “LIQUID DIET” TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

It’s Not Too Late, Call Today!


Toledo Free Press STAR – October 6, 2010