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‘‘ ‘‘

Censorship is telling a man he can’t have a steak just because a baby can’t chew it.” — Anon

‘‘

To choose a good book, look in an inquisitor’s prohibited list.” — John Aikin

Obscenity is not a quality inherent in a book or picture, but is solely and exclusively a contribution of the reading mind, and hence cannot be defined in terms of the qualities of a book or picture.” — Theodore Schroeder

SEPT. 22, 2010 • Episode 1 Chapter 29 • Toledo Free Press Star, Toledo, OH

Socialize with us!

‘‘

Facebook.com/ToledoFreePress Twitter.com/ToledoFreePress

We are not afraid to entrust the American people with unpleasant facts, foreign ideas, alien philosophies, and competitive values. For a nation that is afraid to let its people judge the truth and falsehood in an open market is a nation that is afraid of its people.” — John F. Kennedy, 35th president of the United States of America

C

Censorship sucks UT event puts spotlight on banned and censored books.

ensorship is one of the longest-standing and most time-honored forms of evil. Controling information that allows other people to educate themselves is a form of

Check out the all

slavery. For more than a decade, UT journalism professor Paulette Kilmer has led a yearly campaign to make Toledoans aware of the challenges to freedom of expression

N

E

W

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that squirm like a cancer in our libraries and schools. If you are unable to attend UT’s banned books vigil, do the next best thing: read a banned book. O

f t


4 n WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / EVERY DAY IS A HUSTLE ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Intelligent pop-rock

New Collisions brings Boston flavor to Frankie’s on Sept. 24.

By Amy Biolchini Toledo Free Press Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Not many new bands can say they’ve toured with The B-52’s and Blondie, or have collaborated with The Cars’ synth player Greg Hawkes. New Collisions can. Rocking the Boston music scene since spring 2009, New Collisions of Cambridge, Mass. went from playing for hundreds of people to thousands within three months. Having played with bands like The Morning Benders and Owl City, guitarist Scott Guild describes their changing style as “neo-mod, post-punk pop.” “We wanted to create an intelligent pop-rock project,” Scott said. “The music was thoughtful and insightful, and very fun and danceable.” Founded by Scott and lead singer Sarah Guild, Scott’s wife, New Collisions consists of bassist Alex Stern, drummer Zak Kahn from British pop band The Sterns and Casey Gruttadauria on organ. Gruttadauria used to play a combination of an organ, an 88-key piano and three synthesizers, Scott said. “He [Gruttadauria] would build this spaceship onstage. Really now he just plays organ. Our entire lives have been this mission to let them know there’s no synthesizers anymore,” Scott said. Inspired by guitar-driven pop music like The Kinks, The Smiths and Elvis Costello, New Collisions features a powerful female vocal part reminiscent of The Go-Gos and Blondie. “We’re usually singing about the economy or Western Civilization as a whole, and making it sound bouncy,” Scott said. New Collisions got their break when Scott was looking for a keyboarder and sent Greg Hawkes of The Cars a message on Myspace. After discovering Hawkes lived 10 miles away, Scott invited him to a show. Hawkes enjoyed the show and made a lot of people pay atten-

SARAH GUILD tion, Scott said. New Collisions will appear at Frankie’s Inner City Sept. 24. Tickets are $8 in advance, available at Culture Clash, Ramalama Records and Ticketmaster outlets. At the door, tickets are $10. The show is scheduled to start at 10 p.m. This is the band’s third time playing Frankie’s. “It has a wonderful built-in crowd. People in the crowd actually dance. That doesn’t happen that much in the Northeast,” Scott said.

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Scott said he doesn’t remember how New Collisions got their name, but it seems to fit their lifestyle now. The band has had its share of popped tires and auto collisions after completing five national tours its first year. “It’s not about making it big. It’s about being sustaining, because we like what we do and want to do it as long as possible,” Scott said. Its first official album, “The Optimist,” debuts Oct. 5. Scott and his wife put together an EP in

2009, with many of the now-band members as guests. Although their fans say they sound the same, Scott said there is a significant difference between the two albums artistically. “That tour feels like about 10 years ago. Our band has become very associated with that tour,” Scott said. “What we’re trying to do right now is create an artistic base for what we’re doing. Our most recent album is a reflection of what we actually sound like.” O

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Graveface never sleeps By Mighty Wyte TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR STAFF WRITER star@toledofreepress.com

Multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, vocalist, label owner, insomniac, Toledo native. All are accurate descriptions of one Ryan Graveface, but even when combined they barely scratch the proverbial surface when describing the workobsessed virtuoso. Graveface, owner of the aptly named Graveface Records (The Appleseed Cast, Black Moth Super Rainbow, Monster Movie and gobs of others) is the sole proprietor of the Chicagobased label and one half of the eerily fascinating band DREAMEND, which is scheduled to play our fair city on Sept. 23. “I don’t remember why I moved to Chicago,” Graveface laughed. “I’ve been asking my family and friends why I moved here and I have no recollection. Everyone said I moved here for music, although I don’t know exactly what that means.” The first 19 years of Graveface’s life were spent in Toledo when he “wasn’t really interested in music per se,” a strange statement coming from a man who now operates a successful record label and writes some seriously engaging music. “I used to play basketball and I thought I was

pretty good, but when I got into high school, I found that I really didn’t like the people I was playing with. So, my dad rented me a guitar. I had no idea how to play, I had very little interest in playing and I never took lessons,” Graveface said. After a couple of years of just toying around with sis rented instrument, Graveface started his first band at the age of 17. “It was my first batch of songs. It was kind of fun, kind of embarrassing and pretty noisy,” he said. Graveface moved to Chicago after high school, launched his record label and began writing furiously. “DREAMEND came about out of the same ridiculousness that births my songs,” Graveface said. “I thought it was going to be a one-off album but it stuck for some reason. It encompasses all the songs I write while I’m asleep. I sleep so infrequently that when I do get rest my mind goes nuts with ideas. I have a crappy recorder on my iPhone, and I’ll wake up in the middle of the night and record my ideas and when I listen back I don’t even recall some of the things I record.” With Graveface responsible for vocals, guitars and in many instances banjo, and drummer Mike Mularz handling percussion, DREAMEND

The ‘poppy indie-folk’ band DREAMEND will play at Mickey Finn’s Sept. 23. PHOTO COURTESY GRAVEFACE RECORDS

generates tones that can be described as organic, earthy and spatial. “The new record is banjo-heavy, but not country per se,” Graveface said. “I guess it’s indie-folk, but very poppy.” Regardless of how DREAMEND is defined, its sound is perfectly fit for eclectic cinematic

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soundscapes or scores, and Graveface describes the live shows as “fast and loud.” DREAMEND will play Mickey Finn’s on Sept. 23 with Junk Culture and Tobacco. Doors for the show open at 8 p.m. Advanced tickets can be purchased for $10 at the website www. mickeyfinnspub.com. O

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Caffeine addiction Punk underground pop band Choking Susan started when vocalist Colleen Caffeine pretended to have her own band to impress a guy that looked like a member of Aerosmith. “It’s based on a lie and a cute guy,” Caffeine said. “I think I’m gonna write a song about that.” Choking Susan, which took its name from a 1960s porno, has a Ramones-inspired style fueled by Caffeine’s espresso dependency. Caffeine writes the majority of songs with guitarist Killer Keith. Drummer J-44 and Paul Bearer on bass round out the group. “We like to have a ton of energy, kind of like a freight train. Sometimes it crashes, sometimes it doesn’t,” Caffeine said. “It’s a total fun, party atmosphere.” Woodchuck’s will host Choking Susan at 9 p.m. Sept. 25 with a $5 cover charge. The Dugouts and The Grubs, both of Toledo, will open the show. Choking Susan is about to release their fourth album, “Desperately Choking Susan.” A 10-year veteran of the Detroit punk scene, Choking Susan has toured across the U.S. and was able to play CBGB’s in New York. The band has also traveled to international venues including Spain, France, Canada and play shows in the U.K. every year. O — Amy Biolchini

Choking Susan crashes Woodchuck’s on Sept. 25.

‘Dabangg’ film showing The film “Arbaaz Khan’s Dabangg,” will be shown at 7 p.m. Sept. 24 at the Maumee Indoor Theater at 601 Conant St., Maumee. Admission is $9 with a discount for seniors and students. The showing of the film, a 2010 Hindi action movie, is sponsored by Dosti Foundation, Pak-India Friendship Assoc. and Toledo-Hyderabad Sister City Committee. For information, call (419) 320-5840. O

Equality Ohio film tour Equality Ohio is sponsoring two regional showings of “Fish out of Water,” directed by Ky Dickens. The film is a documentary that, according to a news release, “closely examines the seven Bible verses most used to condemn homosexuality. Using a mixture of cartoon animation and real life footage, the documentary tackles the complicated issues that arise with Biblical interpretation as it pertains to the LGBT community.” O “Fish Out Of Water” — Toledo The Village Church, 3992 Monroe St. (at Central Avenue), Toledo, 7 p.m. Oct. 2 with The Village Church and Equality Toledo O “Fish Out Of Water” — Findlay Unitarian Universalist Church of Blanchard Valley, 2415B N. Main St., Findlay, 7 p.m. Oct. 1 with New Hope Community Church. For information, call (614) 224-0400. O

Choking Susan tooks its name from a 1960s adult film. PHOTO COURTESY SOUNDCHECK MAGAZINE

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Gilmore, happy By Hannah Nusser Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

He’s a journalist, actor, director, producer and up-and-coming author. But if there’s one thing Toledo native Jason Gilmore, 33, is focused on at the moment, it’s the success of his latest short film. Gilmore’s independent film, “Individualized Education Plan,” (“IEP”) will be screened at the International Black Film Festival in Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 29 through Oct. 3. Of being chosen for the film festival, Gilmore said, “It was a nice affirmation any time that any festival says, ‘Hey, we saw your film and we want you to be a part of what we represent’.” “IEP,” which premiered at the LA Shorts Fest this year on July 28, is the fictional story of a harsh reality in the Los Angeles school system. The fictional film looks at Xavier, an 8-year-old African-American boy who, because of behavioral problems at school, is under scrutiny and at risk of being put in special education and the ramifications of that situation. The script for “IEP” was written by actress, school psychologist and Gilmore’s wife, Trenekia Danielle. As a psychologist for the LA Unified School District, Danielle became upset by what she witnessed happening to children, particularly young black males, in the school system. “My focus was always with acting [and] singing, those kinds of performances, I would write more for myself almost like my own little diary but I never saw it as something I would pursue professionally,” Danielle said. “So that was my way of letting go of that situation.” The film is not based on a specific child, but the big issues Danielle dealt with, she added. Gilmore said after researching the topic, he wanted to shed light on the problems. “I looked at it [the script] and said ‘this is something we should do’,” Gilmore said. “Unfor-

tunately it’s one of those things that most people don’t know about unless it happens to someone they know.” Still, the common thread in all of Gilmore’s short films has been relationship issues. Gilmore has written, directed and starred in a number of short films, including “How Shawn Parker Fell in Love,” “Something Borrowed” and “Straight from the Heart.” Choosing one area of expertise is not likely with Gilmore’s aspirations. He said he’s always been a writer first and foremost; whatever the project in motion, his ideas are born when his pen hits the paper. “In high school I wrote a lot of different poems, short stories and raps – I was all over the place, and I just never stopped,” he said. “I just go where I’m interested.” Gilmore was inspired by the work of Gordon Parks, a famous photographer, filmmaker, composer and writer. “That kind of validated that I could do this,” Gilmore said of his multifaceted idol. After graduating from Maumee Valley Country Day School, Gilmore attended the University of Pittsburgh, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in film. Creativity is a passion taken very seriously with the married couple, who live in Los Angeles, where all Gilmore’s films have been shot. “When we put our minds to something that’s creative we’re pretty successful at it … we become very focused and very driven about it so we can do the very best we can in that art form … I think [Jason’s] drive is what pushes his talent,” Danielle said. Up next for Gilmore: tackling a feature-length film which he hopes to have finished as early as next year. He’s also been working on a comingof-age novel, “Somewhere Between Here and There,” which is in the works to be published. To watch Gilmore’s short films, visit www. vimeo.com/jasongilmore. O

Toledo native’s films combine creativity with a cause.

Toledo native Jason Gilmore’s new film debuted at the LA Shorts Fest in July. PHOTO COURTESY Damion Byrd

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BGSU kicks off theater season with operas By John Dorsey TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER jdorsey@toledofreepress.com

There will be music in the air when Bowling Green State University presents an evening of opera with Mozart’s “The Impresario” and Handel’s “Acis and Galatea.” The double bill opens in Kobacker Hall’s Moore Musical Arts Center on Sept. 24. “The Impresario” features a libretto by Stephanie the Younger and a cast that includes Rachel Snitzer, Rebecca Eaddy, Darin Kerr, Ryan P. Jones and John M. Carmack. Understudies include Kristen Basore, Joel B. Trisel and Eric S. Blair. The production was directed by Darin Kerr and Ronald Shields, chair of the Department of Theatre and Film. “Though these are shorter productions, their music is very difficult, demanding, and challenging. I think these two pieces speak to each other; they have certain design logic,” Shields said. “I think opera itself contains big ideas which are deeply felt, a lofty combination of music and poetry. We learn something about ourselves, there is a transformation.” “The Impresario” was composed by Mozart in 1786 as an entry for a musical competition sponsored by Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II. The piece centers on Dr. Scruples, who, frustrated with the failing finances of his opera company, contemplates turning his back on art and becoming a farmer. “Acis and Galatea” features a libretto by John Hughes, John Gay and Alexander Pope and a cast that includes Jake Wilder, Amanda DeBoer, Franklin Brewer, Benjamin J. Popson, Marissa Wenning, Greg Ashe, Jing Lin, Kayleigh Butcher, McKayela Collins, Nathan Kendrick, Sean Manterfield and Stephen Maus. The production also includes a large offstage chorus. The piece was directed by Shields and Michael Ellison. Ellison also provided the choreography. The libretto for “Acis and Galatea” is based on John Dryden’s adaptation of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses.” The piece, which first appeared in 1718, tells the tale of separated young lovers. “On both of these productions I provided the visual logic,” Shields said. “The most difficult part was creating a coherent story that audiences could follow, because these pieces are really just an excuse to do the music. I think the fact that they are being sung in English may make them more accessible. They offer a unique gift, a forum for artistic expression, a joy to the ear, mind, and heart.” The show will begin at 8 p.m. on Sept. 24, and at 3 p.m. on Sept. 26. For more information, call the Box Office at (419) 372-2719 or visit www.bgsu.edu. ✯

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Sharing your talent W

hat is your talent? This is a question I always ask a person I’m trying to get to know better. When they say, “I don’t know ... I don’t think I have one ... � I roll my eyes and insist that there is, at least, one thing that they are really good at. By the way, that’s when they learn that I’m the kind of person who will roll my eyes at someone I am trying to get to know. So, maybe their talent is not something that is often associated with creativity or performance, but is a unique thing that only he or she has to give. I know a woman who can state the obvious with such concise clarity (and often humor) that she manages to focus everyone’s attention in such a way that they cannot deny the truth of what they may have all been ignoring. That is a talent. I also know people who are really good at math. They are like aliens to me, but I recognize that talent nonetheless. My point here is that everyone has something that no one else has, a contribution to this existence that is completely peculiar to them. Writers know this because they are compelled to put pen to paper. Visual artists know this because they are compelled to paint or sculpt or make a piece of tangible beauty.

The thing that differentiates those with untapped or “hidden� talents from ts fro om so-called “artists� is that at artists feel they have no choice but to create and, beyond that, have the guts ts to present those creations to the world. The guts are required uired because every artist is laying aying themselves bare to some degree to show all of us gawkers kers (hereafter, I will refer to uss as “enthusiasts�) what it is that they need to express. So, their talents are realized ized and displayed, but they are still just a human with something hing RACHEL to give. Just like the enthusiast. siast. And these two humans need each other. It’s no secret that I have placed myself, invited or otherwise, directly in the middle ddle of every artist I can find,, in order to promote the amount of creative talent we have in Toledo. It just so happens that I am a musician. So, on a level, I have something in

Local artists are waiting to welcome you to the party.

common with this community whose party I’ve crashed I feel compelled to ccra purge my inner conversapu tions tio in a public venue with the t hope that my expression will w cause an audience to feel something. ssom But, I can also relate to the enthusiast who wishes t like like crazy they could tell a story sto with one photograph or design and craft just the perfect handle for a custom pe ceramic mug. c Having a foot in each world helps me underw stand the necessary relas tionship between the two. ti Trust that there is room for everyone here. Important to understand, for the enthusiast, s is that art is never over your you head. You don’t have to understand a thing about it. un You simply need to be open to the possibility of feeling something and recognize that the act of expression and its byprod-

RICHARDSON

ACT

ucts are intrinsically beautiful. One of the most wonderful things about Toledo at this very moment in time is that you’re invited to the party! The atmosphere of art galleries and related events is that of welcoming cooperation and community. It is never about pretention or high society. Not only are your local artists anxiously awaiting your arrival, but there is even an infrastructure in place to deliver you to the good stuff. The Arts Commission of Greater Toledo is serving all of this amazing talent to you on a silver platter through a number of different programs including Artomatic 419! and periodic Gallery Loops. One that I hope you take advantage of this week is the perfect introduction for a person who is intimidated but also intrigued by the idea of seeking out art. This Sept. 23 is the final Art Walk of the 2010 season. It is certainly not too late to experience the energy of Downtown during one of these events and to participate in a very accessible display of what your local artists have been up to. âœŻ Rachel Richardson is an activist, musician and a product of Toledo. E-mail her at artcornertoledo@ gmail.com.

This Month, Warren Thomas Communications Honors and Promotes These Local Entrepreneur’s: Call 419-87 3-6117 “I am proud to be an entrepreneur and a job creator. Usually when something sounds too good to be true, it isn’t true. This is not the case with Warren Thomas Communications, they are an exception to the rule and they are proving it. They create chance and opportunity. They bring new sales and foot trafďŹ c to local businesses. In this economy, this is an amazing thing. They not only have integrity and did everything they said they would do, they did more. They are problem solvers and are truly an exception to the rule. I believe they are a phenomena.â€?

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A love affair with Toledo The Glass City is a special, family-oriented community.

W

hat defines a place? The climate, location, population, infrastructure, political and social history, and some claim to fame, like pickles and hot dogs. Most of all, it is the people that have the ability to change a city into a commmunity and give each place a certain distinction. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to give the impression that I havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t met amazing people along my travels. There are wonderful people walking all over this planet, and I am blessed to have made lifelong friends in many places. But always in the back of my mind was, â&#x20AC;&#x153;this isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t home.â&#x20AC;? I left Toledo not necessarily in search of anything but with the knowledge STACY that there is a lot more outside of this gritty town on the Maumee River worth exploring. After two weeks in Guatemala, two weeks in Mexico and two months in Hawaii, I was already homesick. When I eventually decided to return home, I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get past anyone without them asking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re leaving Hawaii to go to Toledo!?â&#x20AC;? I thought about this. How could I miss Ohio when I was living on a private and sacred piece of land, chopping open a fresh coconut each day, drinking coffee Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d harvested from wild trees up the river valley in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;living roomâ&#x20AC;? on the sand, looking out from Molokai to Maui and Lanai? Good question. Toledo is often referred to as a small town in a city. I prefer to maneuver through this small town via bicycle, so I can take in the people and streetscapes up close. Similarly, the Amish choose not to use automobiles because it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow them to connect with neighbors as they pass by; everything in between point A and point B is missed. If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not too distracted by dodging potholes on the road I am able to notice a lot of details of the city that would otherwise go unnoticed. Like the colorful flowers and plant varieties, quite similar looking to some I saw in exotic Hawaii. I ride along the river and see people, snakes, fish, birds, fishermen (and women) and the river itself, which

holds a lot of potential and beauty for this city if we take care of it. People move about with their families, a highly-regarded element for Midwesterners. There is something about the people at farmers markets that really gets me going. Here, people connect face to face, an interaction that is so rare in a day of making new friends and communicating with a glaring computer screen. News is exchanged the old-fashioned way. Neighbors are supporting neighbors and market-goers are receiving fresh, healthy food for nourishing friends and family. Fortunately, the farmers markets in the greater Toledo area are going strong and once again becoming a staple in the community. Toledoans are special in that we are generally very community and family oriented. There are constantly fundraisers and benefits happening to support nonprofits, charities or a family member in need. For a town struggling economically as much as any other place, we still find it in us to make donations, knowing others would do the same for us. Toledoans give of themselves for the betterment of the city, often doing more work than we are monetarily compensated for yet feeling satisfied to make a contribution to others. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;travel bugâ&#x20AC;? and curiosity to explore are still alive and loud in me, and in between more distant travels I am happy to be home in Toledo, Ohio, still exploring the city and surrounding Midwest. I am fortunate to have a place and friends to call home. That is something that we cannot take for granted. As the uncertainties of the future seem to increase it is very important to have a community to rely on. Toledo is located on Western Lake Erie and the Maumee River flows through the Oak Openings region. It is an area with a diverse and rare ecosystem and large populations of fish and birds. Toledo is home to resourceful, selfless, creative and welcoming people. â&#x153;Ż

JURICH WANDERING

ROOTS

E-mail Stacy Jurich at star@toledofreepress.com.

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THE RETURN

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star@toledofreepress.com

As they say, fish gotta swim and birds gotta fly — and Harlan Ellison had to return to comic books. The Grand Master himself, one of the greatest living writers of imaginative and speculative fiction, has kicked off a new four-part series with IDW Publishing, “Phoenix Without Ashes,” which marks the culmination of a decades-long journey. The Game Room’s Paul Shiple couldn’t be more excited about Ellison’s reunion with the medium, the Ohio native’s first all-new comic project of the 21st century. “It was originally developed as a teleplay in 1973 for the television show ‘The Starlost,’” Shiple said. “But the series producers so badly mangled the production, Ellison removed his name from the credits and refused to take part any further in the series.  Fast-forward 37 years. Ellison, in collaboration with artist Alan Robinson, resurrected the story and has

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finally restored his intended vision. Fans of any genre will enjoy the result: a fully realized piece of SF storytelling.” The ill-fated “The Starlost” featured “2001: A Space Odyssey” star Keir Dullea. After Ellison’s walk-out, Ellison was billed under his well-known pseudonym Cordwainer Bird. The oftencontroversial writer is no stranger to comics; his work in the industry stretches back to a 1971 story in Marvel Comics’ “Avengers” and includes such diverse properties as Batman, the X-Men, the Hulk and the 1991 “Twilight Zone” title. Ellison’s popular “Dream Corridor” series with Dark Horse is at four volumes and still counting. His prose stories have been adapted by such famous illustrators as Jim Steranko, William Stout, Moebius and Alfredo Alcala. “Phoenix Without Ashes” No. 1 begins the tale of Devon, a 28th century farmer who must make his way as an outcast in an everconfounding world. IDW plans for the series to be released monthly for the next three months, and all issues will most likely be collected in one volume at a later date. O — Jim Beard

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Terrelle Pryor, the Buckeye junior starting quarterback and Heisman Trophy hopeful helped lead second ranked Ohio State to a 43-7 victory Ohio University in front of 105,075 fans at Buckeye Stadium. He was 22 of 29 for 235 yards and 2 TDS and also rushed for a score. Ohio State will host Eastern next weekend in Columbus. We congratulate Terrelle Pryor and the Ohio State Buckeye’s for their outstanding performance.

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EVER DANCE WITH THE DEVIL IN THE PALE MOONLIGHT? TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 n 13

Rave kicks off Cinema Classics fall series with a ‘Vengeance’ Rave Cinema Classics – Levis Commons Sept. 27, 2010

Dec. 6, 2010

Oct. 4, 2010

Dec. 13, 2010

“Vengeance Valley” “Vengeance Valley,” a 1951 Western starring Burt Lancaster and Robert Walker, kicks off the Rave Cinema Classics series Sept. 27 at Rave Motion Pictures at Levis Commons. Based on a novel by Luke Short and directed by Richard Thorpe, the 83-minute film was filmed in Canon City, Colo. Tickets are $2 for the Cinema Classics series, which runs Mondays at 1 p.m. The lobby opens half an hour before the show. The Rave Motion Pictures Cinema Classics series is sponsored by Toledo Free Press Star and the Area Office on Aging. There will be special veterans promotions for the Dec. 13 showing of “White Christmas,” sponsored by Columbia Gas of Ohio. A FOX Toledo charity event will take place at the Dec. 20 showing of “It’s a Wonderful Life.” JB’s Sarnie Shoppe at Levis Commons will join Toledo Free Press Star in a social networking promotion that will award a weekly winner with free lunch for two. For more information, call (419) 874-2154 and watch www.facebook.com/toledofreepress for contest and weekly promotion details. O — Amy Biolchini

“His Girl Friday” Oct. 11, 2010

Holiday – No Showing Oct. 18, 2010

“Big Trees” Oct. 25, 2010

“Africa Screams” Nov. 8, 2010

“My Dear Secretary” Nov. 15, 2010

“The Time Of Your Life” Nov. 22, 2010

“Scrooge – A Christmas Carol” “White Christmas”

Dec. 20, 2010

“It’s A Wonderful Life” Dec. 27, 2010

Holiday Week – No Showing Jan. 3, 2010

“Gung Ho” Jan. 10, 2010

“Heartbreak” Jan. 17, 2010

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PS3 ‘Little League’ offers major league power Baseball fans can enjoy big league power in the Little League format on PlayStation 3 (PS3) and Xbox 360 now with “Little League World Series 2010”. Activision and Now Productions now expand this quality series beyond the Nintendo Wii. Authentic action-seeking players can rejoice that developers include the new PlayStation Move controller option. Move controller owners definitely have an advantage, with greater movement sensitivity, gameplay is a bit more challenging with a regular PS3 controller. The worldwide teams and appealing visuals provide nice variety for players who play offline co-op mode and up to four players in the multiplayer mode. Full tournaments are another great option while special one-time use cards, which work like power-up abilities and activated talents based on a special meter, provide some variable gameplay elements. Players can learn terms and concepts of the game through some thoughtful commentary

from Gary Thorne and Brent Musberger. The announcers also comment on each player’s data when boy and girl players step up to home plate. Inexperienced players should try the tutorial and skill challenges. Batting works smoothly while aiming hits becomes more challenging. Players can also tweak the pitching and fielding options between easy and technical. Camera angles can be challenging, but players can easily snag fly balls. Pitching controls present the most challenge as hurlers have a limited cache of change-up, two-seam fastballs or four-seam fastballs. The sizable tournament mode, exhibition mode, and mini games work well while online features include leader boards, achievements and trophies. It would be great to see a full gameplay mode online in the next installment (***, rated E, available on PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360). O — Michael Siebenaler

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14 n WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / “The dirtiest book of all is the expurgated book.” — Walt Whitman TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Leader of the Banned UT observes Banned Books Week By Amy Biolchini Toledo Free Press Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

P

aulette Kilmer remembers being sent home from school for bringing “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” into the classroom. Although her teachers had not read the book, they labeled it inappropriate. “I remember thinking, ‘People really are afraid’,” Kilmer said. Kilmer, the founder of the Banned Books Week event at the University of Toledo, said approximately 500 students participated in the vigil last year. This is the 13th year UT will host the event. Prior to having the vigil on campus, Kilmer said she used to take her students to a Banned Books Week reading at Thackeray’s Books. “The basic freedom — our whole way of life, our democracy, our culture, is built from this right to read and think freely. If we can’t read freely then someone can manipulate us like we’re robots. We can be programmed,” Kilmer said. UT will host its Banned Books Week Vigil Program Sept. 30. The event begins at 9 a.m. in Sullivan Hall, room 2030, and ends with a song performance at 5:30 p.m. Speakers from various university departments and the local community will address historic and contemporary issues surrounding the First Amendment and censorship. A banned book will be given away every half hour.

According to the Office for Intellectual Freedom, 460 challenges to books and literature were reported in 2009. None of the infractions were in Northwest Ohio. “Books are powerful — I think ideas are powerful. We need to engage with those ideas,” Jones said. “It really doesn’t help you to ban a book — it doesn’t solve your problem or keep your kids away from these ideas either. Parents want to prevent their children from reading about drugs. Chances are, in the 21st century, children are going to find out about drugs.”

Freedom to think

Engaging discussion

Recurring themes in many banned books include sex, abuse, rape and homosexuality, said Glenn Sheldon, honors professor of humanities in the honors college at UT. Sheldon is the keynote speaker for the Sept. 30 event.

Think for yourself

Sept. 25 to Oct. 2 marks the American Library Association’s (ALA) celebration of Banned Books Week. The week’s slogan is, “Think for yourself and let others do the same.” “The purpose of Banned Books Week is to remind people that their freedom to read is a right all Americans should hold dearly and not take for granted,” said Barbara Jones, director of the Office of Intellectual Freedom for the ALA in Chicago.

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“Every year, something else is going on. Last year we were talking a lot about the Harry Potter cutting parties,” Kilmer said. “The battle is never over.” Jones, Kilmer and Sheldon discussed the national attention Pastor Terry Jones of Gainesville, Fla. garnered for threatening to burn the Quran. “To burn a book, it doesn’t get rid of that idea,” Jones said. “People turn mean, and they want a scapegoat. They want something and someone to blame. If they can target a book, that’s something concrete. They can take out all their frustration and anger,” Kilmer said.

worry about sex and people engaging in sex too early,” Jones said. “Any books with the n-word, like ‘To Kill a Mockingbird,’ which has the word 58 times.” Brian Hickam, former librarian for UT’s College of Health Science and Human Services, has been involved with the university’s Banned Books Week since he joined the staff in 2004. “It’s about more than books. The freedom to view, listen, think,” Hickam said. “We need to uphold our freedoms and remember that censorship is always a possibility.” This year’s event is dedicated to Hickam, who is leaving the university. O

Censorship in schools

Sheldon said most books are banned and challenged in K-12 school districts when the content of reading material is questioned. Sex, drugs, religion, politics and language continue to be the primary objections parents have with books their children read in school, Jones said. About two-thirds of the challenges between 2001 and 2009 were in schools and liPaulette Kilmer braries; 48 percent of all chalfounded UT’s lenges came from parents. “Some things never change. Banned Book Vigil. I would say in this country, poTOLEDO FREE PRESS litical books usually don’t get PHOTO BY CHARLIE LONGTON censored. People continue to

Please remember you can designate all or part of your United Way donation to the Kidney Foundation of Northwest Ohio by writing our name and Toledo, Ohio on the United Way pledge form under Option C – or you can donate directly to us online at our new website: www.KFNWO.org.


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“Every burned book enlightens the world.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 n 15

13th Annual UT Banned Books Week Vigil Program Sept. 30, Sullivan Hall room 2030 Door prizes every half hour, snacks and coffee all day, finger food 11:30 a.m. and pizza 4:30 p.m.

9 a.m. “Greetings” — Dr. Marcia Suter, Director of Library Service, General Libraries “Speech, Reading & the Banning of Thoughts” — Dr. Jim Benjamin, Chair, Communication “The First Amendment and 9:30 the Public Interest Standard”  — David Tucker, Communication 10 “Unfortunate Candor: Banning Walt Whitman” — Tom Barden, Honors Program Director 10:30 “Keep the Interwebs Neutral: Non Neutrality and Censorship on the Web” — Paul Many, Communication 11 “We Are Strangers” — Warren Woodbury, Toledo author 11:30  “Remembering Rane Arroyo, Passionate Poet, Professor, and Friend” — Barbara Mann, English Noon Keynote Address (Original Poem): “The Story of Giles Corey” — Glenn Sheldon, Honors Program 1 p.m. “Postcards from Prison: Censorship and the Penal System” — Renee Heberle, Political Science “Civil Rights, Civil Liberties, 1:30 and the Two Faces of American Culture” — Carter Wilson, Political Science & Law and Social Thought “Book Burning in Nazi Germany” 2 — Larry Wilcox, History “How to Ban a Book!” 2:30 — Ben Pryor, Learning Ventures 3 Comments from UT President Lloyd Jacobs Jeopardy! 3:30 — Hasan Dudar & Jason Mack, Independent Collegian 4 “Remembering Judith Krug: Librarian & Founder of Banned Books Week” — Elaine Reeves, University Libraries 4:30 “Sexuality in Children’s Books” — Sharon Barnes, Women’s and Gender Studies “In Moderation: Censoring Public 5 Website Comments” — Michael S. Miller, editor in chief, Toledo Free Press 5:30 “Three Troubled Tunes” — Edmund Lingan, Theatre and Film, & Risa Beth Cohen

Top 10

Most frequently challenged books of 2009

1

“TTYL;” “TTFN;” “L8R, G8R” (series) by Lauren Myracle. Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs

2 3

“And Tango Makes Three” by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson. Reasons: Homosexuality

4 5

“The Perks of Being A Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky. Reasons: Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Anti-Family, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee. Reasons: Racism, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group “Twilight” (series) by Stephenie Meyer. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group

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8

“The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big, Round Things” by Carolyn Mackler. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

9 10

“The Color Purple” by Alice Walker. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

“My Sister’s Keeper” by Jodi Picoult. Reasons: Sexism, Homosexuality, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Religious Viewpoint, Unsuited to Age Group, Drugs, Suicide, Violence

“The Chocolate War” by Robert Cormier. Reasons: Nudity, Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group As reported to the Office for Intellectual Freedom

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“Catcher in the Rye” by J.D. Salinger. Reasons: Sexually Explicit, Offensive Language, Unsuited to Age Group

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16 n WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / THE SIGN OUTSIDE THE FIRE-DAMAGED ORIGINAL PANCAKE HOUSE: “CLOSED FOR REMODELING” ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

((((((((((((( THE PULSE

SEPT. 22-29, 2010

What’s what, where and when in NW Ohio

Compiled by Whitney Meschke Events are subject to change.

MUSIC The Blarney Irish Pub:

O Bobby Vinton: 9 p.m. Sept. 24, $25. O Justin Lo, Gary Chaw: 8 p.m. Sept. 25, $55. O Lisa Lampanelli: 8 p.m. Sept. 26, $25. O LL Cool J: 9 p.m. Oct. 2, $35.

Dégagé Jazz Cafe:

Catch local acts while taking in the pub’s modern Irish and American fare. 601 Monroe St. (419) 418-2339 or www.theblarneyirishpub.com. O Ronn Daniels: Sept. 23. O The Bridges: Sept. 24-25. O Ad Astra: Sept. 30. O Oktoberfest: Oct. 1-2.

Signature drinks, such as pumpkin martinis, plus live local jazz performers. 301 River Road, Maumee. $5 Tuesdays-Thursdays. (419) 7948205 or www.degagejazzcafe.com. O Gene Parker: Wednesdays. O Jason Quick: Sept. 23. O Paul Vornhagen: Sept. 24-25. O David Lux: Sept. 28.

Bronze Boar:

The Distillery:

Be sure to check out this Warehouse District tavern’s namesake, overhead near the entrance. 20 S. Huron St. (419) 244-2627 or www.bronzeboar.com. O Jerod: Wednesdays. O Danny & Dave: Thursdays. O Open mic night with Chris Knopp: Mondays. O Karaoke: Tuesdays. O Stone House: Sept 24. O Gutter Flowers: Sept. 25. O 427 Band: Oct. 1.

Brooklyn’s Daily Grind:

Coffee and music, what more can one want? If a snack is the answer, this is your spot. 723 Airport Hwy., Holland. (419) 724-1433 or www. brooklynscafe.com. O Tom Harms: 8 p.m. Sept. 24.

Caesars Windsor:

If you have your passport, consider hopping the Detroit River for this casino’s entertainment offerings. Ticket prices, in Canadian dollars, are for the cheapest seats; attendees must be 19 or older. Caesars Windsor Colosseum, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor, Ontario. (800) 9917777 or www.caesarswindsor.com.

Karaoke is offered Tuesdays, but paid entertainers rock out Wednesdays-Saturdays. 4311 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 382-1444 or www. thedistilleryonline.com. O Nathan Cogan: Sept. 22. O 56 Daze: Sept. 23-24. O Swagg: Sept. 25. O Greg Aranda: Sept. 28. O Ronn Daniels: Sept. 29. O The Ravens: Sept. 30. O Velvet Jones: Oct. 1-2.

Frankie’s:

Toledo’s venue for rock. 308 Main St. Tickets vary between $5 and $15, unless noted. (419) 6935300 or www.FrankiesInnerCity.com. O Seabird, Aaron Valdiviez: 6 p.m. Sept. 22. O Trainwreck, Secret Stones: 9 p.m. Sept. 23. O Rediscover, CDVR, Sleep Sound, the New Collisions: 6 p.m. Sept. 24. O Highbinder, Deadbeat Moms: 9 p.m. Sept. 25. O Like Moths to Flames, Legion, Torrance, Lost in the Light, Mortuary: 6 p.m. Sept. 26. O Kiros: 6 p.m. Sept. 28. O C-Fifth, Low E, We Launch Rockets: 9 p.m. Oct. 1. O Red Wanting Blue, Brett & the Cougar Ex-

press: 9 p.m. Oct. 2.

O David Dondero, the Wildman Ian Thomas, Aaron Brosia, Darran Hanlon: 9 p.m. Oct. 3.

French Quarter J. Pat’s Pub:

Live entertainment at 9:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Holiday Inn, 10630 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg. (419) 874-3111 or www.hifq.com. O Jackpot: Sept. 24-25 and Oct. 1-2.

Ground Level Coffeehouse:

Mix your beans with some music for an eclectic brew. Open mic on Monday nights. 2636 W. Central Ave. (419) 671-6272 or www. groundleveltoledo.com. O The E-Zone Erotic Poetry Night featuring Lethal: 7 p.m. Sept. 23, $3. O The ART Show: All Ranges of Thought, featuring Fatal Prose, HuntorPrey, Phaize, Prysless, Zone, IllPoetic. 7 p.m. Sept. 24, $3. O Jazz Lounge, hosted by Melvin Johnson: 7 p.m. Sept. 25. O Spoken word showcase featuring Searius Add, Suspicious, T Miller: 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30, $5.

Headliners:

All ages, all genres are welcome. 4500 N. Detroit Ave. Ticket prices vary between $5 and $15, unless noted otherwise. (419) 269-4500 or www. headlinerstoledo.com. O Cavo, American Bang, Atom Smash, Shamans Harvest, Grindline: 7 p.m. Sept. 24. O Ryan Michaels Band, Cetan Clawson, the Broken, Ben Barefoot: 8 p.m. Sept. 25.

Ice Restaurant & Bar:

This local, family-owned enterprise offers food, drinks and music in a sleek atmosphere. 405 Madison Ave. (419) 246-3339 or icerestaurantandbar.com. O Dick Lange Trio: 8 p.m. Sept. 24. O Postmodern Blues Band: 8 p.m. Sept. 25.

Manhattan’s:

This “slice of the Big Apple” in the Glass City puts on a show for the weekends. 1516 Adams St. (419) 243-6675 or www. manhattanstoledo.com. O Vytas & Steve: Sept. 22 and 29. O Noah Leibel Trio: Sept. 23. O Jeff Williams Group: Sept. 24. O Stonehouse: Sept. 25. O Quick Trio: 6 p.m. Sept. 30. O Tom Turner & Slowburn: Oct. 1. O Vytas & His Eclectic Outfit: Oct. 2.

Mickey Finn’s:

A variety of genres to wash your drinks down with. Open mic nights, 8 p.m. Wednesdays, no cover; $5-$7 cover other nights. 602 Lagrange St. (419) 246-3466 or www. mickeyfinnspub.com. O Tobacco, Junk Culture, Dreamend: 8:30 p.m. Sept. 23, $10. O Minglewood Labor Camp: 8:30 p.m. Sept. 24. O Sea Wolf, Sera Cahoone, Patrick Park: 9 p.m. Sept. 25, $10. O Star Fucking Hipsters, Full Scale Panic: 8 p.m. Sept. 27, $8. O Oh My God, Analog Graveyard: 8:30 p.m. Sept. 30. O Nachtmystium, Zoroaster, Dark Castle, Atlas Moth, Nails: 8 p.m. Oct. 1, $12.

Murphy’s Place:

Jazz — straight, smooth, bebop or traditional — all kinds are played here. 151 Water St. (419) 2417732 or www.murphysplacejazz.com. O Clifford Murphy and Claude Black: 8 p.m. Sept. 22 and 27-29. O Donna Bailey Sauer: 8 p.m. Sept. 23. O Ellie Martin: 9 p.m. Sept. 24 and Oct. 1. O Glenda McFarlin: 9 p.m. Sept. 25. O Murphy’s Trio: 9 p.m. Oct. 2.

www.TAS1.com


KNOCK YOURSELF OUT ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 n 17

Omni:

This club is a venue for music (and music lovers) of all types. 2567 W. Bancroft St. (419) 535-6664 or omnimidwest.com. O Local Anesthetic, Fire, Shadows in Redd: 8 p.m. Sept. 25, $5-$7. O Battery (Metallica tribute): 8 p.m. Oct. 1. Casual meals with weekend entertainment. 1815 Adams St. (419) 7255483 or www.otavern.com. O Carjack, GoLab: 10 p.m. Sept. 24. O Frank & Jesse, Unsinkable Molly Brown: 10 p.m. Sept. 25. O “Dig!”: 8 p.m. Sept. 28. O Univox, the Forest: 10 p.m. Sept. 30. O Electric Grandmother, Skeetones, Faux Paus: Oct. 1. O Coltrane Motion, Karate Coyote: Oct. 2.

In addition to Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring,” the Toledo Symphony will perform Leonard Bernstein’s “Candide” overture and Igor Stravinsky’s “The Firebird.” 8 p.m. Sept. 24-25, TMA’s Peristyle, 2445 Monroe St. $20-$50. (419) 246-8000, (800) 348-1253 or www. toledosymphony.com.

((((((

Ottawa Tavern:

“Simple Gifts”:

Tequila Sheila’s Downtown:

702 Monroe St. (419) 241-1118. O Devious: 10 p.m. Thursdays. O Johnny Reed & the House Rockers: 10 p.m. Fridays.

FREE FOR ALL

This 1960s doo-wop group will perform. 8 p.m. Sept. 25, Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. $20. (419) 897-8902 or www.greateasterntheatres.com/ maumeehome.asp.

Sept. 23, 6-9 p.m.

Play with the Machine:

Art Walk

Peek at what artists are working on in their studios, what new items are on display in galleries and how art is transforming the Glass City. Various locations in downtown Toledo; maps available at www.acgt.org.

The Village Idiot:

Tunes combined with pizza and booze, some would say it’s a perfect combination. 309 Conant St., Maumee. (419) 893-7281 or www.villageidiotmaumee.com. O 5 Neat Guys, Wilburshaw: Wednesdays. O Mark Mikel: Friday afternoons and Tuesday nights. O The Bob Rex Band: Sunday afternoons. O Frankie May, Barefoot Ben: Mondays. O Deadstring Brothers: Sept. 23. O Mojo Flow: Sept. 24. O Baked Potato: Sept. 25. O Whitey Morgan & the 78s: Sept. 29. O Loco Weed: Sept. 30. O Bobby Bare Jr., Blue Giant: Oct. 1. O Hullabaloo: Oct. 2.

Vintage City Music

1724 South Reynolds. O The Fairly Handsome Band: 3 p.m. Sept. 26.

Wesley’s Bar & Grill:

A huge variety of beers helps wash down the entertainment. Boccie ball is a bonus! 1201 Adams St. (419) 255-3333. O DJs Folks, Mattimoe and Perrine: Fridays. O Charlie Slick, Gold, Joey & the Traitors: Sept. 23.

Woodchucks:

The place to go for an eclectic mix of people and music. 224 S. Erie St. (419) 241-3045. O Karaoke with The Georgia Peach: Wednesdays.

The Contours:

A unique performance that incorporates the sound of UT’s Ritter Observatory dome rotating with live, improvised music. 3 p.m. Sept. 26, TMA’s Great Gallery, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org.

UT concerts:

The university’s music students and friends will perform the pieces they’ve been perfecting. (419) 530-2452 or www.utoledo. edu/as/music. O Guest pianist Pamela Howland, “Remembering Frederic”: 3 p.m. Sept. 26, Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall, Tower View Boulevard and West Campus Drive. O UT Symphonic Band & Wind Ensemble: 8 p.m. Sept. 29, Doermann Theater, University Hall, 2801 W. Bancroft St. O Choral concert: 3 p.m. Oct. 3, Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall, Tower View Boulevard and West Campus Drive.

Club Friday:

Tony Rios. Some of the city’s most talented performers entertain museum-goers during TMA’s It’s Friday events. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Oct. 1, Cloister, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 2558000 or toledomuseum.org.

Once Upon a Time in a Far Away Land:

The Pride of Toledo Chorus Sweet Adelines barbershop-style group will perform, along with the Bustin’ Loose Quartet. 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2, Owens Community College, Center for Fine and Performing Arts, 30335 Oregon Road, Perrysburg. $12-$15. (419) 666-2668 or www.prideoftoledo.org.

TMA concerts:

8 p.m. Thursdays, South Briar Restaurant, 5147 S. Main St., Sylvania. (419) 517-1111 or (419) 708-0265.

Visual and audible arts combine for a new experience. Great Gallery (unless noted), 2445 Monroe St. (419) 2558000 or toledomuseum.org. O Denise Fink, Roselyn Smith (flute) and Dean Bell (piano) present a concert of composers including Faure, Liszt and Persichetti. 3 p.m. Oct. 3.

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band All Stars:

BOWLING GREEN and surrounding area

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band Revival Party:

8 p.m. Tuesdays, Trotter’s Tavern, 5131 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-2079 or (419) 708-0265.

Big band dance party:

Jeff McDonald’s Swingmania orchestra will provide the tunes, you provide the moves. Snacks and a cash bar will be available. 7-11 p.m. Sept. 24, Stranahan Theater Great Hall, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. $5. (888) 891-0707 or www.stranahantheater.com.

BG & MORE

BGSU concerts:

The university’s ensembles, choirs, quartets and more — and their friends — will present the music they’ve been perfecting. Halls are located in Moore Musical Arts Center, Willard Drive and Ridge Street, Bowling Green. (419) 372-8171, (800) 589-2224, (419) 372-8888 or www.bgsu.edu/colleges/music. O Megan Fergusson, viola: 8 p.m. Sept. 22, Bryan Recital Hall.

Rockets top Broncos; Purdue up next Toledo improved to 2-0 on the road after defeating Mid-American Conference West Division foe Western Michigan 37-24 in Kalamazoo on Sept. 18, ending a fourgame losing streak to the Broncos. The Rockets are now 2-0 in conference play heading into this week’s matchup with Purdue. The defense again led the way for Toledo (2-1, 2-0 MAC) in week three, registering four interceptions and seven sacks in addition to forcing two fumbles against Western Michigan (1-2, 0-1 MAC) en route to the victory. Senior cornerback Desmond Marrow collected the first two interceptions of his Rockets’ career in the contest, returning one for a touchdown as Toledo registered 17

points off of the Broncos’ turnovers in the win. This week, the Rockets will travel to West Lafayette, Ind. to face the Boilermakers (2-1, 0-0 Big Ten) for a thirdstraight road game. Purdue took down MAC West Division member Ball State (1-2, 0-0 MAC) 24-13 last week, piling up 403 yards of total offense while forcing two Cardinals’ interceptions in the contest. The Boilermakers defeated Toledo 52-36 at home in the season opener last year. The Rockets will do battle with Purdue in Ross-Ade Stadium this Saturday at noon. The game will be broadcast on 1370 AM WSPD radio, as well as on TV via the Big Ten Network. O — Mike Bauman

PREVIEW


18 n WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / HEY, KIDS! LET’S PUT ON A SHOW! TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

BGSU concerts (cont.):

Green. $3-$5. www.grumpydavespub.com.

O Student Jazz Combos: 8 p.m. Sept. 23, Bryan

O Mike Malone, Shannon Thompson: Sept. 28.

Recital Hall. O “Acis & Galatea” and “The Impresario”: Bowling Green Opera Theater will present these works by Handel and Mozart, respectively. 8 p.m. Sept. 24 and 3 p.m. Sept. 26, Kobacker Hall; $12. O Ronald Barron: This trombonist has held the principal spot with the Boston Symphony Orchestra since 1975. 8 p.m. Sept. 28, Bryan Recital Hall. O Bowling Green Philharmonia: Directed by Emily Freeman Brown, this orchestra will celebrate Liszt. 8 p.m. Sept. 29, Kobacker Hall. O Jazz Spotlight: Guest bassist Rodney Whitaker will perform with the Jazz Lab Band I, directed by David Bixler. 8 p.m. Sept. 30, Kobacker Hall.

Wood County Historical Center & Museum:

Check out this rural jewel’s new exhibits and tour the museum and buildings to see blacksmith forge demonstrations and historic equipment. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. TuesdaysFridays and 1-4 p.m. weekends (closed holidays), Wood County Historical Center & Museum, 13360 County Home Road, Bowling Green. $1-$4. (419) 352-0967 or www.woodcountyhistory.org. O “Between Fences” Smithsonian exhibit: The exhibit looks at fences, both physical and figurative, and its representation as a division of race, culture or class.

BGSU football:

“Reimagining the Distaff Toolkit”:

The Falcons will use their talons on their gridiron opponents. Doyt Perry Stadium, Wooster St., Bowling Green. $14-$18; season tickets, $65$112. (877) 247-8842 or www.bgsufalcons.com. O Buffalo: 3:30 p.m. Oct. 2.

Artists transform tools that were important for women’s domestic labor into contemporary works of art. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays (plus 6-9 p.m. Thursdays) and 1-4 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 26, Willard Wankleman Gallery, Fine Arts Center, between Ridge and Wooster streets, Bowling Green. (419) 3728525 or art.bgsu.edu/galleries.

Cla-Zel Theater:

Julie Webster with a “¡Viva Toledo!” T-shirt she designed. TOLEDO FREE PRESS PHOTO BY AMY BIOLCHINI

Toledo City Council honors ACGT and 2010 Art Walk By Amy Biolchini Toledo Free Press Staff Writer news@toledofreepress.com

Julie Webster, owner of Shine Ceramics, read a letter she wrote about her “Chicago Doesn’t Need YOU! ¡VIVA TOLEDO!” T-shirt campaign into the public record at the Sept. 14 Toledo City Council meeting. “I wanted to share with Council members that many Toledo ‘creatives,’ including myself, are actively working towards building a culturally and economically vibrant community, intended to retain and attract young artists and professionals to the Northwest Ohio area.” In her letter to City Council, Webster wrote: “In the past two years, I have heard many individuals complain that ‘the market’ in Toledo isn’t conducive to the sorts of enterprises for which they’d like to work for or to invest. The success and popularity of these shirts, and my other business projects ... is a testament to the economic and developmental possibilities created when an individual chooses to influence the market, instead of letting the market influence the individual.” At the meeting, Council passed a resolution recognizing The Arts Commission of Greater Toledo (ACGT) and the 2010 Art Walk series. The resolution praised ACGT for the revitalization of the arts, the hundreds of visitors brought Downtown for the Art Walk and the

resulting economic development. Webster was mentioned in the resolution for her promotion of the arts Downtown, as well as the EPIC Cultural Arts Action Team. The resolution was sponsored by Council members Mike Craig, Michael Ashford and Tom Waniewski. Waniewski said, “I was surprised to hear the number of local artists in the area and the amount of local economic development they contribute. They’re a tremendous economic development engine.” After Webster presented one of the “¡VIVA TOLEDO!” T-shirts to Representative Marcy Kaptur at a fundraiser Aug. 18, Craig took notice and talked to Webster about the campaign. “I thought it was a great idea because it is hard to keep young people in Toledo,” Councilman Craig said. Webster said the “¡VIVA TOLEDO!” Tshirt campaign began in the spring of 2010 in response to young professionals and creativeminded individuals leaving Toledo for supposedly more promising markets like Chicago or Portland. Sales and demand for the T-shirts have exceeded her expectations, Webster said. The shirts are designed by Webster’s business, Shine 419, and are printed by Max Reddish of Reddish Printing. Webster will debut a regular column about the arts scene in an upcoming edition of Toledo Free Press Star. O

This venue has been rocking BGSU students (and others) for years. 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. (419) 353-5000 or www.clazel.net. O My Dear Disco, Phantasmagoria: 9 p.m. Sept. 23, $10-$12. O Exit 179, Jennie Snyder & Scott Shaull: 8 p.m. Sept. 25, $4. O Konkrete Jungle, Outrage, Exodus, Sierra, Ekem: 9 p.m. Sept. 28, $5. O The Macpodz: 8 p.m. Sept. 30, $10-$12. O The Cla-Zels: 8 p.m. Oct. 1, $8-10. O Dark Side of the Moon: 8 p.m. Oct. 2, $5.

“The Curious Savage”:

A widow is sent to a sanitarium so her children can find her legacy before she “squanders” it on her plan to fund average people’s dreams. 8 p.m. Sept. 24-25 and 2 p.m. Sept. 26, First United Methodist Church Theatre, 1506 E. Wooster St., Bowling Green. (419) 352-9337, (419) 575-2259 or www. blackswampplayers.org.

Gish Film Theater:

Family Fun Astronomy Night:

Named in memory of Dorothy and Lillian Gish, this theater hosts screenings of international and arthouse movies and matinees of popular films of the past. BGSU’s Hanna Hall, East Wooster Street, Bowling Green. Free. (419) 372-4474 or www.bgsu.edu/gish. O International Film Series: “Okuribito,” 7:30 p.m. Sept. 23; “Young Torless,” 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30. O Tuesdays at the Gish: “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!” 7:30 p.m. Sept. 28.

Activities will share night-sky knowledge before participants look for constellations and planets. 7-9 p.m. Sept. 25, Beaver Creek Preserve astronomy deck, 23028 Long Judson Road, Grand Rapids. Register: (419) 661-1697 or reservations.wood countyparkdistrict.org.

Hitch Up the Wagon:

Visitors are invited for a wagon ride through the farm’s woodlot with homemade pie at the end. 6:30-8 p.m. Sept. 30, Carter-Loomis Farm Park, 18331 Carter Road, Bowling Green. Register: (419) 661-1697 or reservations. woodcountyparkdistrict.org.

Grumpy Dave’s Comedy Nights:

This venue offers weekly humor-fests (maybe to make up for the crankiness). Above the Easy Street Cafe, 104 S. Main St., Bowling

{

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HAVE YOU SEEN OUR CAR KEYS? TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 n 19

New CD releases at Ramalama Records

O You Get What You Give Brown, Zac [2] O Mobile Chateau Costa, Matt O Pattern and Grid World Flying Lotus O The Sound of Sunshine Franti, Michael

O Indispensable Lucero [1] O Buzzard Margot & the Nuclear So and So’s O Opeth: In Live Concert at the Royal Albert Hall [5 Discs] [2 DVDS/3 CDS] Opeth

General Guinness Band:

This group combines Irish ballads with fiddle tunes and step dancing. 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2, Pemberville Opera House, 115 Main St., Pemberville. $12. (419) 287-3274, (877) 287-4848 or www. pembervilleoperahouse.org. ETC.

ETC.

Zing Zang Zoom:

The Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus will ward off “the cynical Mr. Gravity and his team of Heavies who try to bring everyone down.” Pre-shows will offer the chance to meet the animals and clowns an hour before each show. 7 p.m. Sept. 22-24; 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sept. 25; and 1 and 5 p.m. Sept. 26, Huntington Center, 500 Jefferson Ave. $12-$70. (419) 321-5007, (800) 745-3000 or www.huntingtoncentertoledo.com.

Art Walk:

Peek at what artists are working on in their studios, what new items are on display in galleries and how art is transforming the Glass City. 6-9 p.m. Sept. 23, various locations in Downtown Toledo; maps available at www.acgt.org.

“Freestyle: The Art of the Rhyme”:

The Media Decompression Collective is sponsoring this al fresco film, featuring a who’s who of hip-hop figures — MC Supernatural, Mos Def, Roots members Black Thought & Questlove, Notorious B.I.G., Tupac Shakur and more. Discussion to follow; lawn chairs welcome. Sunset (about 7:30 p.m.) Sept. 23, Bozarts Fine Art & Music Gallery, 51 S. St. Clair St. (419) 464-5785 or tinyurl.com/28oc9v6.

O Wake Up! Roots [1] O Guitar Heaven: The Greatest Guitar Classics of All Time Santana O My Father Will Guide Me Up a Rope to the Sky Swans [1]

“Gidget” Film Festival:

Comments & tweets from TFP readers on Twitter, Facebook & the website. Compiled by Mike Driehorst, Toledo Free Press Star Social Networking Manager

Twitter:

coachbeckman Thanks to all the loyal Rocket fans at Western Michigan this past weekend. You were definitely the 12th man for the Rockets! Sept. 20th via Twitter for BlackBerry® Tim Beckman

A documentary about a Malibu girl who inspired a book, series of movies and television show about surfing with the guys in the 1950s and ’60s and clips from the series and movies will be shown. The “original” Gidget, Kathy Kohner Zuckerman, will be on hand to greet attendees. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sept. 23-24, Maumee Indoor Theater, 601 Conant St., Maumee. $15-$18. Reservations: (419) 893-5805. (419) 897-8902 or www. greateasterntheatres.com/maumeehome.asp.

ToledoWalleye ONE MONTH UNTIL OPENING NIGHT, Walleye fans! Are you ready for some ‘T-Town Hockey’?!

Roche de Boeuf Festival:

Facebook:

Commemorating the meeting of local tribes fighting Gen. Anthony Wayne and his troops, this party will feature carnival rides, a car show, entertainment, a parade and more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 25, downtown Waterville. (419) 878-5188 or www.watervillechamber.com.

Middlegrounds Walk open house:

Visitors can walk the metroparks’ newest property, along the Maumee in Downtown Toledo, while learning of its natural and historical importance. 1-3 p.m. Sept. 25, Ottawa and Clayton streets. Reservations: (419) 407-9700 or reservations.metroparkstoledo.com.

Art of Japanese Kimono:

Visitors can bring their cameras, try on a kimono and bring their own for identification, as well as take in an assortment of this traditional garb. 10 a.m. Sept. 28, Wildwood Preserve Metropark manor house, 5100 W. Central Ave. (419) 4079700 or metroparkstoledo.com.

Check out Bowling Green and surrounding area listings online at www.toledofreepress.com

SIDELINES

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Sep 16th via HootSuite Toledo Walleye

cbrennansports More from #NFL reminder: “Women reporters are professionals...when in your locker room, they are there in a professional capacity.” #sainz Sep 14th via TweetDeck Christine Brennan, Toledo native and long-time sports reporter/columnist

djgeekdout ITS GONE! Pour out a little syrup... the Original Pancake House on Secor & Central just burned to the ground. Traffic is paying its respects Sep 14th via Twitterrific DJGeekdOut

D Ellen Critchley, reflecting on the Original Pancake House after a Sept. 14 fire: “It was a Howard Johnson’s back in the day — there’s a HJ logo in the tiles in the floor. Original has the best French toast & bacon in the universe — and I hope they’ll be able to come back strong.”

Don Lee, in response to a Sept. 19 letter to the editor from Alex Johnson, CEO of Midwest Terminals of Toledo-International (“Sweet and sour notes in Shanghai”): “Maybe Bell is doing a good thing; my family remaining in the Toledo area certainly speak more highly of him than they did Ford or His Cartiness. But Alex m’boy, you’re way out of line saying the mayor’s critics should shut up (“This needs to stop.”). They may be wrong, they may be right, but they have the right. Try explaining to your Chinese hosts we have something called the right of the individual to speak his or her mind. Represent the best of America to China.”

ToledoFreePress.com:

Avinsurer, comment in response to same letter to editor as above “I certainly hope he touts the airport as a cargo transportation hub since he surely didn’t use it to fly out Toledo’s airport… Overall, I think it’s a good thing to establish relationships in all parts of the world. Even if it brings a little investment from over there, I would consider it worth the trip. The ‘secrecy’ issue could’ve been handled differently.”


20 ■ WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / MEET ME AT THE TRAIN STATION AT 9 P.M. FRIDAY ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

The winner is ... Ohio Hip-Hop Awards receive mixed reviews.

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ticks and stones may break your bones, but these words will hurt your feelings. Many natives of Toledo call the Ohio Hip-Hop Awards the “Cleveland Awards,” since the show is held there, and it seems that hat Cleveland artists win the majority of the awards. s. But to their credit, several Cincinnati artists won awards ards as well this year. The Awards were held d the weekend of Sept. 17-19, with the actual award show Sept. 18 at Club Dream. Yes, a club. LIL There were no chairs, tables, ables, or stools for any spectator or to sit. Unless you were media, dia, a nominee, or presenter, you’d better have brought some comfortable shoes. The attendance was overwhelming; each major city ity in Ohio was represented d with nominees and sup-porters squeezing into the he insufficiently-prepared building to cheer on their hometown heroes. Other than the lack of seating or room to breathe, the ceremony itself was pretty decent. Toledo’s own DJ One 1x TyMe was the house DJ, and Hot 97-3’s Big Eddie Bauer co-hosted, along with Robyn Simone, a Cleveland radio personality. Toledo music legend DJ Lyte-N-Rod was also present; he said he’ll be at the Awards every year “because [he] feels like Midwest is next up.” Rod moved to Nashville last year because he felt like he had “done all [he] could in Toledo, and needed to be challenged.” He won the Lifetime Achievement Award, so his efforts are definitely not going unrecognized. Speaking of recognition, the Ohio Hip-Hop Awards couldn’t leave out Toledo crooner Jay Rush. No longer only known as the little brother of Lyfe Jennings, Rush is a star in his own right. Having traveled the country with Ohio legends, platinum-selling rap group Bone Thugs N Harmony, and telling me “the [record] deal is coming up,” Jay Rush won in both categories in which he was nominated, Best Male Vocalist, and Best Collaboration for a song he did with Bizzy Bone, who made a special appearance. Jay Rush said it meant a lot to him “for someone to actually sit on a computer and vote.” Cleveland’s radio station WENZ beat the other stations in Ohio to earn the award for Best Radio Station. No one even seemed surprised by this, which was odd, because the Cincinnati nominee has higher ratings. Toledo Hip-Hop group The 419ers were also present, and though they didn’t win Best New Artist, they have huge plans in the works. They’re

planning a class-reunion-like concert with all of the popular Toledo artists from 1998-2006 to throw a concert for the city. th They’ll definitely be the best b new artists in Toledo if they pull that off. There was a special appearance by Lady Rerun, pe star sta of the Safe Auto commercials, and daughter of m the th late Fred Berry, who played the character p “Rerun” from the hit ’70s “ show “What’s Happenin’?” s Tracy may not have won the award, but we all know he had the best album. And he made strong connections and a lasting impression while there, so the p plaque didn’t matter. p Perhaps the biggest winner from Toledo was the Master of Ceremonies, rapper and show e host Cuntry. He won Best h Host, and won a plaque, H but bu he also won the performance showcase and won a three-day trip to Atlanta to record. For all the Toledoans who think the Awards are rigged, Cuntry won the showcase in Cleveland, by a unanimous decision. Perhaps you rappers should take note instead of complaining. The Ohio Hip-Hop Awards may have been slightly unorganized, warm and uncomfortable, but they’re doing something that other people just talk about: recognizing the people of their state. So instead of complaining about their faults, embrace their assets. ✯

D THE

WORD I HEARD

5131 Heatherdowns Toledo, Ohio

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THURSDAY

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IMPORTANT INFORMATION IS ON THIS SPACE ON PAGE 29 ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 â&#x2013;  21

ACGT hosts last Art Walk of season By Kristen Rapin TOLEDO FREE PRESS SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR krapin@toledofreepress.com

The Arts Commission of Greater Toledo (ACGT) is hosting its last Art Walk Series event of the season Sept. 23. The Art Walk is aimed at showcasing the creativity that happens in Toledo, said Michelle Carlson, program coordinator for ACGT. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great opportunity once a month to meet artists and visit galleries and see that there is a lot of culture here in Toledo,â&#x20AC;? she said. Each Art Walk features different galleries and exhibits so no two Art Walks are the same, Carlson said. In addition to exhibits, many street performers will be performing between locations, she said. More than 21 galleries have participated in the Art Walk series, including, 20 North Gallery, Madhouse Gallery, Studio M Printmakers as well as Gallerie 333 at Toledo School for the Arts. The walk is from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. in Downtown Toledo. The ACGT will also host its fall Gallery Loop from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Oct. 15. The Gallery loop is similar to the Art Walk but provides individuals with transportation from venue to venue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice when it gets a little more chilly,â&#x20AC;? Carlson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It shakes it up and makes it a little

different. It also allows new guests to attend different venues that may be a little farther out.â&#x20AC;? The ACGT is working to have more performing arts as part of its Gallery Loop, Carlson said. On Sept. 14, Toledo City Council passed a resolution recognizing the ACGTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution to Toledo through the Art Walk. For more information and a list of all participating galleries, visit www.acgt.org.

Scrap 4 Art teaches tricks Scrap 4 Art will host a two Halloween crafts workshops, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make Your Own Halloween &Fall Decorationsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tricks for Making Halloween Costumes,â&#x20AC;? on Oct. 2. Make Your Own Halloween & Fall Decorations is from 10 a.m. to noon. Those in attendance get to construct two crafts during the workshop. Crafts include pop bottle bats, monster hands and candle stick holders. Tricks for Making Halloween Costumes is from noon to 2 p.m. During that time individuals will learn techniques that make creating a Halloween costume easy and then be able to make their own costumes. Scrap 4 Art is a nonprofit arts center that reuses supplies donated by members of the community in arts and crafts projects. Scrap 4 Art is located at 1501 Adams St. Each workshop is $12 a person. For more information, call (419) 720-2978.

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Destination Toledo Arts Escape Destination Toledo will offer special deals on theater, symphony and opera tickets as well as special hotel packages as part of its Arts Escape. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The reason weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing this we want to remind people what a great art community this is,â&#x20AC;? said Cathy Miller, interim president of Destination Toledo. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great way to remind locals and draw visitors in from surrounding communities.â&#x20AC;? From now until Dec. 11 individuals can take advantage of two-for-one ticket pricing on performances by the Toledo Opera, Toledo Symphony, Toledo Repertoire Theatre as well as shows at the Valentine Theatre. In addition, area hotels are offering special romance packages, which include champagne and breakfast for two. The Destination Toledo website also lists exhibits at the Toledo Museum of Art so individuals can dedicate a whole weekend to the arts, Miller said. For more information and to take advantage of special deals, visit www.dotoledo.org.

Rhythm on the River features singer Sir Charles The Grand Rapids Historical Society will present singer Sir Charles, Charles A. Ewing, as part of its Rhythm on the River series Sept. 26.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;People can come out and hear all their favorite old tunes and enjoy the beautiful setting there,â&#x20AC;? said Lynne Long, board member for the Grand Rapids Historical Society. Sir Charles, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;crooner,â&#x20AC;? sings music from Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett and Nat King Cole, Long said. The performance begins at 4 p.m. at the Wright Pavilion, located between the canal and the Maumee River at the end of Lincoln Street. The event is free and open to the public. Those who attend are encouraged to bring blankets and chairs, as the pavilion has no seating.

CAC celebrating its 25th anniversary at Raceway Park The Collingwood Arts Center (CAC) celebration fundraiser at Raceway Park on Sept. 25 will feature live music, painting, art auctions and more by some of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most celebrated talents. Tickets for the fundraiser are $40 for singles and $70 per couple. All proceeds will go directly to the facilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operating costs. The Collingwood Arts Center is a 501(c) 3 nonprofit organization. Tickets for the fundraiser may be purchased by calling (419) 244-2787 or by visiting the CAC business office weekdays between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. For more information, call (419) 476-7751 or visit www.racewayparktoledo.com. â&#x153;Ż

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erdos Mediterranean Restaurant rose which is served on a skewer. I found the Arayes from the ashes of its previous incarnation, to be pretty good, but not as satisfying as the which also took its name from the Arabic lamb meat grape leaves I also ordered as part of my appetizer sampler. word meaning “Paradise.” The hummus had a good consistency and In February of 2005, an arsonist burnt down the little family-run restaurant. However, Maher was a nice blend of garlic and lemon. It didn’t that overpowered the rest, like Barazi, who has owned Ferdos for or the past 11 have one flavor th hummus I’ve gotten elseyears, did not let his dream m die. A hum where that was so “garlicky’ year and a half after the fire, wh Barazi reopened the resI could’ve knocked out Dracula with my breath. taurant in its new form. Dra The pita bread was soft It didn’t seem dramatiiand very fresh. You could tell cally different inside than I reBarazi, who is Syrian, takes member from my UT days a deBar great cade ago. It felt a bit smaller than grea pride in the bread. As far he knows, Ferdos is the only the original, more intimate. as h place in town that makes its You can tell Barazi hass a pl own. He said there are even passion for what he does just ust ow a few other restaurants that by watching him interact with DON his patrons. Now, I’ve seen sserve Ferdos’ bread, but was several restaurant managers gers ssecretive as to which ones. I was starting to get full, and occasionally some owners ners “work the room” at their essso I wasn’t feeling too ambitious about dessert. But tablishments, but it seemed med bi sitting in a Mediterranean different here, more sincere. e. sit restaurant, I felt compelled One thing I noticed was res that Ferdos was ridiculously ously tto order some baklava. If clean. During my chat with yyou’ve never had it, baklava is a delicious treat made of Barazi, he boasted to me that phyllo dough and chopped you could “eat off thee ph nuts. It generally comes in kitchen floor” and even nu invited me to have ave a look small pieces, sm pieces and is sticky from drizzled honey. I got a for myself. The waitresses ses were piece for only a buck. It was aamazing, and had attentive and had a enough honey on it genuine pleasantanteno to complement the ness about them. m. nuts but not so Not like somee n much that your servers who referr m 3065 W. Bancroft St. ngers were dripto you as hun’ n’ fi (419) 535-9494 ping with it. and sweetie and d p www.ferdosrestaurant.com Ferdos ofpretend to be your ur fers about 20 difbest friend. At Ferdos I was ferent kinds of wine, able to check out their take including vintages from on some of my favorites Spain, avorites and try Italy, France, Lebanon, L a few new ones too, lik like b baba and among others. Before now, I b ghanoush. h h d Germany, G h Baba ghanoush. It’s an extremely fun word to thought that Germans only liked making beer, say, but has kind of an odd taste to it. It has a and I didn’t know they mass produced any type strong lemon and somewhat bitter flavor on its of alcohol in Lebanon. own, but I found that the experience is enhanced Prices seemed in line with other similar style quite a bit when you dunk some falafel in it. restaurants; about $6-$10 for appetizers, salads, Another first timer for me was the kafta. and sandwiches and about $5 more for most of Kafta (often spelled “kofta”) is very popular in the entrées. the Middle East and Southern Asia and also Ferdos is closed on Sundays, but the owner told common in Central Europe and India as well. It me you can rent out the place for parties and special is generally made up of minced or ground meat events. It holds about 90 people, so you can have that — usually beef or lamb — mixed with a variety over-the-top sweet 16 party for your daughter and of different spices. The spices used and the kafta’s she won’t have to be picky on the invites. On second form (meatball, patty, cylindrical, etc.) depend thought, just throw a party for yourself — you deon what part of the world you are eating it in. serve a taste of “paradise,” don’t you? ✯ Ferdos serves kafta in a couple different ways. For my entrée, I tried the “Arayes,” which Don Zellers is co-producer of “Fred LeFebvre and is grilled, beef, and in pattie form. It comes the Morning News” and co-host of “The Benchtucked inside pita bread, and served with a side warmers” on News Talk 1370 WSPD. He is also of hummus. You can also get the “Shish Kafta”, the station’s Good Swill Ambassador.


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26 ■ WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / CATCH JEFF McGINNIS TUESDAYS ON ‘THE ANDREW Z SHOW’ ON 92.5 KISS FM ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Walk the punch line A A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 1, No. 29. Established 2010. Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com Michael S. Miller, Editor in Chief mmiller@toledofreepress.com EDITORIAL

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s Robin Williams said in reference to the late Andy Kaufman, “A n d y made himself the premise and the rest of the world was the punch line.” I almost called Kaufman a “comedian,” but was comedy really the point? He was a gifted performer, no doubt, and crafted many hilarious moments during his time on JEFF stage. But just as often, his goal was much more complex and incendiary than that. Making people laugh was easy. Making them puzzled — even to the point of hate — and then making them laugh, now there’s a challenge. Kaufman’s performances borrowed much from the wrestlers he lampooned and emulated in his work. Whether they love or loathe me, they’re passionate about me, and that’s enough. But beyond even his stage persona, the work he did offstage was even more puzzling and eccentric. He created a loathsome lounge singer persona named Tony Clifton, who would insult the audience to the point of riots. Then, he secretly passed the character off to his friend and writer, Bob Zmuda, who played Clifton from then on, though everyone thought it was still Kaufman. Why? Maybe just because it fooled us. When he was “injured” in a wrestling match, he spent time in a legitimate hospital recovering from his fake wounds. He created make-believe brawls in clubs and on television shows. His scams became so frequent that when Kaufman was dying of cancer, some people laughed, assuming it was yet another joke. He became the comic who cried wolf. I’ve thought about Kaufman a lot during the past few days, as the latest chapters of the Joaquin Phoenix saga have played out. For two years, we have watched this gifted performerturned-wannabe-rapper seemingly self-destructing. From the heights of Hollywood’s Alist to the depths of pity and scorn, wrapped in a swath of arrogance and ludicrous facial hair. His memorably awkward 2009 appearance on David Letterman cemented the idea that he had lost his mind. People viewed Phoenix’s public behavior the same way people view a car accident. We shouldn’t look, but we couldn’t help it. But there was always doubt. Were we being fooled? Was the wool being pulled over our eyes, in classic Kaufman fashion? Casey Affleck, it was admitted, was following Phoenix everywhere with a camera crew, filming a documentary of his transition from movies to ... uh ... music(?). Was this a scam, an elaborate hoax? Affleck’s film, “I’m Still Here,” opened Sept. 10 in limited release, to mixed reviews and audience response. When confronted by the

filmed evidence, opinion was equally mixed on the question of its authenticity. If it’s real, some said, it’s a sad and terribly morbid film. If it’s fake, what’s the point? Finally, speculation and controversy crystallized into admissions and, in some cases, outrage. Director Affleck, claiming to be stunned at the anger his film had engendered, admitted in an interview with The New York Times this week that it was fiction — all of it. Or, rather, performance art. “It’s a terrific performance, it’s the performance of his career,” Affleck said of the two-year pseudo-deception. As if to bolster the point, Phoenix has made public appearances recently, looking clean shaven and back-to-normal. He will appear once more on Letterman Sept. 22, his first post-supposed-meltdown appearance — one of which, Letterman writer Bill Scheft admitted in an interview with nuvo.net, was indeed all an

MCGINNIS

POP GOES THE

CULTURE

‘I’m Still Here’ hoax raises more questions.

act, and one which Dave was in on. But if the past two years of Joaquin Phoenix’s public life was indeed a grand charade, the larger question remains — why? What was the point of Phoenix and Affleck’s plan? Just to make the movie? The same probably could have been accomplished without Phoenix playing his role so brazenly in public, wrecking an image that he must now work to repair. And if the “performance” was to create intrigue in the documentary, why come out now, and seemingly destroy that intrigue while the movie is just opening? Maybe the point was an analysis and satire of the way the media and public view celebrity self-destruction. We gawked at Joaquin, just as we gawked at Britney and others. We love to build people up, and we love to tear them down. Maybe there was a more subtle plan in place with Affleck’s film, but it ended up spiraling out of their control, leaving Phoenix in the lurch, but still oddly committed to his cause. Or maybe they did it just for the hell of it. We, as an audience, as with much conceptual art, are left to debate the value of what Affleck and Phoenix did — and whether it should have been done at all. Joaquin made himself the premise. Time will tell what the punch line really is. ✯ E-mail Jeff at PopGoesJeff@gmail.com.

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WISH YOU WERE HERE ... TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 n 27

TIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME

NEW ’10 COROLLA LE

$134

• Air Conditioning • Anti-Lock Brakes • Power Locks • Cruise Control • Keyless Entry • Power Windows • AM/FM/6Disc CD • Tilt Steering Wheel

per mo.*

00.9% 9% for up to

60 months

• VSC • Side Air Bags • All Weather Package

2YR FREE

MAINTENANCE°

NEW ’11 CAMRY LE

$154

• Air Conditioning • Anti-Lock Brakes • Power Windows • AM/FM/CD • VSC • 6 Speed Auto TRANS • Cruise • Keyless Entry

’10 Mazda 3i Sport

per mo.*

00.9% 9% for up to

60 months

• Auto Transmission

2YR FREE

MAINTENANCE°

NEW ’10 PRIUS II

$192 • Air Conditioning • Anti-Lock Brakes • Power Windows • Power Locks • Cruise • Smart Entry • AM/FM/CD • Tilt Steering Wheel • Hybird Synergy Drive

per mo.*

$135

2YR FREE

MAINTENANCE°

*36 Months 12,000 miles per year. $2500 due at signing including $190 doc fee. Payment plus tax. Security deposit waived. Tier 1+credit. °All customers will receive a 2-year free TAC premium plan with any purchase or lease of a Toyota. LIFETIME WARRANTY IS A NON-FACTORY WARRANTY AND IS EXCLUSIVE TO ELITE MOTORMALL. Sale ends 9/30/10.

0% 0 % ’10 VW Jetta TDI for up to

60 months

• Automatic • 10 to choose from • ABS • AM/FM/CD/Radio • Stability Control • Side airbags

*24 Months 10,000 miles per year, $1500 total due at signing, plus payments, tax, title, plates, $190 doc fee. Tier 1+ credit. Security deposit waived. Sale ends 9/30/10.

’10 Mazda 6i Sport

$99

per mo.*

0% 0 % for up to

60 months

$289

0% 0 %

per mo.***

• 42 MPG • Alloy • Automatic • Leatherette • AM/FM/CD

for up to

60 months

3 YEAR YEAR

FFREE MAINTENANCE on all Volkswagen

ax Title doc fees and Plates. Plates Tier 1 *** 36 Mo. 10,000 miles per year, $1,500 total down, plus Tax,Title +Credit. 0% for up to 60 mos. Sale ends 9/30/10

• Keyless entry • Automatic • ABS • Pwr Windows, locks • Traction Control • Side airbags • Cruise • AM/FM/CD/Radio

’10 VW Golf 2 Dr.

*24 Months 10,000 miles per year, $1500 total due at signing, plus payments, tax, title, plates, $190 doc fee. Tier 1+ credit. Security deposit waived. Sale ends 9/30/10.

’10 Mazda CX-7 SV

$245

• VSC • Side Air Bags

per mo.*

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME

$209 • Power Windows • Locks • 5 Speed Manual • ABS • AM/FM/CD

per mo.**

• Automatic • ABS • Pwr Windows, Locks • AM/FM/CD/RADIO • Side Air Bags • Stability Control • Cruise

**36 Months 10,000 miles per year, $1500 total due at signing, plus payments, tax, title, plates, $190 doc fee. Tier 1+ credit. Security deposit waived. Sale ends 9/30/10.

per mo.***

• 2Dr/Great MPG

0% 0 % for up to

60 months

3Y YEAR EAR

FFREE MAINTENANCE on all Volkswagen

***36 month 10,000 miles per year. $1500 total down payment Plus Tax, Title, Doc Fee And Plate. Tier 1 + Credit. In Stock Vehicles only. 0% for up to 60 mos. Sale ends 9/30/10.

ELITE PRE-OWNED ELITE PRE-OWNED ELITE PRE-OWNED ELITE PRE-OWNED

2008 KIA RIO Auto, Air Clean ...................................................$5,995 1996 MERC. GRAND MARQUIS 1-OWNER, Clean ...............$5,995 2002 TOYOTA CAMRY LE 1-OWNER......................................$6,988 2007 DODGE CALIBER SXT Keyless/Entry,Extra Clean .........$7,995 2002 VW BEETLE Roof,Leather, Sporty ....................................$7,995 2003 VW BEETLE Auto, Air, Cruise ...........................................$8,995

2005 VW PASSAT Auto, Air, Cruise ..........................................$9,875 2006 FORD FUSION v6, Alloys ................................................$9,975 2008 COROLLA Auto, Air, Power Windows/Locks ......................$9,995 2003 FORD SPORT TRAC V6, Cruise, XLT ..............................$9,873 2005 CHEVY MALIBU V6, LT, Moonroof ............................... $10,990 2006 PONTIAC G6 Auto, Power, 4 Door ................................ $10,995

MAZDA TOYOTA SCION VOLKSWAGEN 1-800-968-4933

734-242-3900

14975 S. Dixie Hwy. Monroe, MI 48161

SHOP US 24 HOURS AT WWW.BEST2BUYAUTO .COM

POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFETIME POWERTRAIN WARRANTY • HOME OF THE LIFE


28 n WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22, 2010 / SEE YOU NEXT WEEK! TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Classes start October 6!


Toledo Free Press STAR – September 22, 2010