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APRIL 20, 2011

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Steve Miller and Gregg Allman bring ’70s vibe to Huntington Center. Interview by Alan Sculley, Page 12

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2 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“NOBODY LOVES YOU THE WAY I DO.” — “THE STAKE,” STEVE MILLER


EXHIBITS: Disease at TMA 4 CONCERTS: Hymn to Her on the road 5 CONCERTS: Ragbirds at Finn’s 6 LIFE: Equality Ohio Lobby Day 10 ZELLERS: Rosy at Rosie’s 11 STAGE: ‘Stomp’ at Stranahan 13 HIP-HOP: Martini on dance 20 McGINNIS: GLaDOS and cake 22

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GREGG ALLMAN WITH STEVE MILLER AT HUNTINGTON CENTER • JANE BRADLEY’s NEW BOOK • TOLEDO TATTOOS APRIL 20, 2011 • Episode 2 Chapter 16 • Toledo Free Press Star, Toledo, OH: “I have suddenly found I am ready to settle down” — “True, Fine Love,” Steve Miller

Tropic Bombs ready to go off at Frankie’s By Mike Bauman Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer

Stars of the Week

TROPIC BOMBS

star@toledofreepress.com

Some of the best things in life happen by chance. That’s exactly where the story begins with former Promise of Tomorrow and The Devil and The Executive band mates and longtime friends Ryan Wayton and Jon Hammond. “It’s funny,” Tropic Bombs’ lead singer Ryan Wayton recalled on how his latest project got started. “It was actually an accident. It started as a two-man studio project. We were just jamming one day and we didn’t have a name. We didn’t even really know what we felt like doing. He went to do a reggae riff, and he forgot to click off his distortion pedal. Completely serious. He started making this distorted reggae riff, so jokingly I started doing double bass to it, which you never hear obviously in reggae, and it sounded really cool.” That jam session back in 2009 ended up becoming Tropic Bombs’ first son —“The Assassins of Abboneau”— and laid the foundation for the band’s name and its unique, “Heavy Reggae” sound, a fusion of reggae, rock and funk. Wayton and Hammond continued recording the music in the basement studio at Wayton’s home, deciding this past November that they wanted to take their funky grooves out of the studio and play live again. Having played in local bands for the better part of the last decade, the duo started putting their ideal lineup together for their latest project. After recruiting former The Devil and The Executive band mates Justin Crumley (guitar) and Jason Goss (drummer), former Decibel guitarist Ben Snyder and ex-OnceOver bassist Nick Archer, Tropic Bombs became a full band and will bring its sound live to the public for the first time April 23 at Frankie’s Inner City. It will headline a show that also features local rockers GOLD and The Fight Within, as well as Athens, Ohio’s Mindfish. “Basically, our goal for this show is not even just to have it be a show,” Wayton said. “We want to do this every month. That’s our goal is to do this every month, basically like a party. It’s just a gathering of people to rock out and have fun and hang out.”

Even though Tropic Bombs hasn’t played live yet, they’ve already generated some buzz this year. In addition to being featured on Fox Toledo News’ “Toledo Idol,” Tropic Bombs has also experienced some serious fan dedication. David Maxwell of West Palm Beach, Fla., got a tattoo of “Pimpy McBride,” the band’s symbol, which Hammond painted on the Tropic Bombs’ studio wall. As promised by Wayton, the feat earned Maxwell free Tropic Bombs merchandise for life. “We made good on our promise,” Wayton said. “We just got shirts made. That’s our first merchandise, and we sent one down to him first thing.” Having grown up in the Toledo music scene with one another, there is a friendship and collective creativity that binds the mem-

bers of Tropic Bombs together. The group is excited to share its sound live with the public and hopes it will refresh local music. “I think every once in a while you do need to hear something different, and I’m hoping that we’ll be a part of kind of helping give a breath of fresh air to the music scene,” Wayton said. “I want people to get excited again about going out and having fun at a show, rather than just going to any bar.” All ages are welcome for the show at Frankie’s Inner City. Doors open at 9 p.m. Tickets are $5 for ages 21 and older and $7 otherwise. For more information, visit www.frankiesinnercity. com or call (419) 693-5300. To check out Tropic Bombs music, you can visit them via Facebook, tropicbombs.bandcamp.com and myspace.com/tropicbombs. O


4. n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

”Goodbye to all my friends at home, goodbye to people I’ve trusted.” — “JET AIRLINER,” STEVE MILLER

Art and disease TMA exhibit focuses on the impact of disease on human life, including isolation, social stigma. By Jason Mack Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Disease is less glamorous than previous Toledo Museum of Art themes, but the exhibit “What’s Wrong with Me? Art and Disease” is as powerful as any to date. Art history students at the University of Toledo serve as curators for the exhibit, which opens April 22 in the Hitchcock Gallery at TMA. “Artists through time have covered the human condition, and disease is part of that,” said Teri Sharp, public relations manager at TMA. “There are a number of pieces in our collection that deal with disease and illness.” The class is part of a continuing collaboration between UT and the museum. Students work with personnel to gain hands-on training in the design of art exhibitions. Each semester the class features a new theme. “Some of the students have taken the class previously,” Sharp said. “They liked it so well and felt they learned so much they wanted to take it again with a different theme.” The exhibit opens April 22, but it will continue to progress throughout the semester. “It is going to be an installation in progress,” Sharp said. “When it opens on April 22, most of the prints will be up, but not all of the signage and labels are there. Students have through the end of the semester to finish their work, so if you come back you will see more notes about the objects as it progresses.” According to a press release, the three themes featured in the art are “disease is part of life; isolation and social stigma have accompanied various diseases at different times in human history; and disease can inspire hope, faith and compassion for one another.” “What the students learned in looking at various prints for the show, they found the Good Samaritan theme,” Sharp said. “When

others are ill it does bring out the best in us, the compassion of humanity, and that is illustrated in the works.” Along with finding the Good Samaritan theme, students found an 1861 print called “The Good Samaritan” by French artist Rodolphe Bresdin. Sharp said she was particularly moved by the piece “Krieg (War): The Parents” by German artist Käthe Kollwitz. “She’s an artist who lost two sons in World War I,” Sharp said. “The couple is obviously deep in grief. It is so powerful to look at. It’s quite moving.” The woodcut by Kollwitz is one of 30 pieces the students selected from the museum’s collection. The students also selected one work from outside the collection — the 13-minute video “A Fire in My Belly” by David Wojnarowicz. The film explores the inevitability of death and Wojnarowicz’s battle with AIDS. “We were approached by the class to make an exception, because typically we only use art from the museum’s collection,” Sharp said. “We asked them to make a curatorial case why they thought the video should be part of the exhibit. They made a compelling case in terms of the video being related to the theme. The video is on loan (from the PPOW Gallery in New York) just for this exhibition.” The video and many works in the exhibit feature disturbing imagery, so viewer discretion is advised. “There will be a disclaimer about disturbing imagery,” Sharp said. The free exhibit runs through August 7. The Toledo Museum of Art is located at 2445 Monroe St. O

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“There’s no answer to the questions that we find inside.” — “My friend,” STEVE MILLER

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 5

Cigar box guitar Hymn for Her plans a number of regional stops. By Alan Sculley Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Many albums rely on songwriting, the production approach or the personalities and abilities of the musicians to give them a unique sound. Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing, the duo that makes up the group Hymn For Her, can list some more tangible elements — namely a chain saw, an instrument made out of a cigar box and a broomstick, and a 1961 Airstream trailer. Those three things figure strongly into the new Hymn For Her CD, “Lucy & Wayne and The Amairican Stream.” It’s the second CD from the duo, but the seeds for the new CD actually go back a few years to a time when Tight and Waxing were on tour with their longtime group, the MPE Band (also known as Maggie, Pierce & EJ). Hymn For Her plays Detroit’s PJ’s Lager House April 22, Kalamazoo’s Bell’s Brewery April 23 and Cleveland’s Barking Spider on April 24. While on tour in Memphis, the band was helping a friend clear some fallen limbs from a storm. In a nutshell, there was an accident in which a chain saw bucked and hit one of the musicians with the MPE Band in the head. Before leaving Memphis, the friend gave the

group a unique thank you gift — a combination guitar and bass he had made using a cigar box for its body and a broomstick for its neck. For a good while, the cigar box guitar sat idle. “There were a lot of mixed feelings about the cigar box guitar,” Tight said in a recent phone interview. “Every time we’d pull it out, it kind of reminded us about the chain saw accident and [we’d think] do we want to play it? So it kept on going back in the closet. Then finally for some reason Wayne and I just took it with us and we said ‘You know what, we’ll play this thing one day when we have some time to learn it.’” That one day arrived after the MPE Band decided to take a break from touring following its 2008 CD, “Kahchee Moochee.” The cigar box guitar is now fully integrated into the duo’s live show, and Tight said it has added a major jolt of energy to what had at first been a fairly laid-back acoustic experience. The duo (which also plays a wide range of other instruments, including bass drum, guitar, banjo and ukulele) can faithfully re-create the studio versions of the new songs in concert “We’re pretty much able to pull them off exactly how they sound on the CD because we recorded most of the album live and it’s true to what we sound like,” Tight said. O

Lucy Tight and Wayne Waxing of Hymn for Her.

PHOTO COURTESY MICHELLE ROCHE MEDIA RELATIONS

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6 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

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From her teenage days of listening to Paul Simon, Peter Gabriel and Sting, worldly instruments have been a major influence in Erin Zindle’s music career. “My love for world music started around then, as a teenager. I started writing songs around then and as I’ve grown over the years, these sounds I’m so emerged in and in love with have kind of found their own way into my songs and my writing in one way or another,” she said. Zindle is the frontwoman, fiddler, banjo and mandolin player of the Ann Arbor based Ragbirds, who are set to play its 8:30 p.m. gig at Mickey Finn’s April 21. The Ragbirds are defined by its website as a fusion of folk rock with some danceable beats along with Zindle’s Celtic style fiddle playing. “[The audience] can expect to see a diverse range of music but there is also a common thread throughout, which mostly has to do with my vocal and violin parts,” Zindle said. “One may be a tango and the next is an African drum piece and the next is Latin. It keeps people interested and it’s a lot of fun for us.” While studying her family’s roots and culture, Zindle learned more about Celtic music, another influence. Aside from its typical song list, the Ragbirds bring styles such as Latin dance and African drum pieces. Each member plays a drum and Zindle said it helps establish communication between the band mates during the set. “The music is polyrhythmic and you have a whole bunch of people listening to each other really well to make the piece make sense,” she said. “It’s a good thing to learn. I found out the players change over the years, but every time we get a new player we teach them the African drum pieces and it’s just a good way to rehearse and tighten up as a band.”

Aside from Zindle, the Ragbirds is comprised of guitarist T.J. Zindle, brother of the frontwoman, Brian Crist on bass, Loren Kranz on drumset and Erin Zindle’s husband Randall Moore as a general percussionist. The married couple met prior to the formation of the Ragbirds while traveling in similar musical circles. Moore was a guest performer in Zindle’s former band. When that group split, the duo played in a few different bands together as well as street performing in Ann Arbor. “As we were dating we would perform in the street for tips in downtown Ann Arbor and get enough money for cocktails later in the night,” Moore said. “We definitely bonded over music.” The band name, coined by Zindle, comes from an unexplainable childhood fascination with birds. The band is raising funds for its fourth studio album, with help through the Kickstarter program. Kickstarter is the world’s largest fundraising project for artists ranging from literature to fine arts to performing musicians. Moore said the artist sets a fundraising goal and fans, friends and family are able to make pledges to help fund the project. “We used Kickstarter as a way to get our fans involved in the recording process and it also helped raise money to help us because we’re an independent band and we’re recording solely on our own is a very expensive process,” he said. “Instead of going into debt over it, we decided to use Kickstarter.” The Ragbirds’ goal of $10,000 was met recently and as of April 19, more than $13,000 has been raised, according to the band’s website. Moore said they were able to raise money quickly through an incentive program ranging from autographed albums to merchandise and the largest incentive being a private performance by the Ragbirds. “We’re really blessed by the amount of supporters,” Moore said. O


“You know the night is fallin’ and the music’s callin’ ...” — “SWINGTOWN,” STEVE MILLER

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 7

Toledo ink

Longtime tattoo business opens Rossford location.

By Mighty Wyte TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR STAFF WRITER star@toledofreepress.com

Established by Robert “Tattoo Bob” Gerrie in 1978, Toledo Tattoo Company (TTC) is opening a second location in Rossford this April. While much of TTC’s business is derived from return customers, tattoo artist Curtis Ely joked that TTC is growing because, “Tattoos and beer are recession-proof,” keeping the guys very busy. According to TTC’s current apprentice, known as “Booke,” people return to TTC because of the level of craftsmanship its artists display. “When I was a client, I wouldn’t go anywhere else,” Booke said. “Everyone here is personable and my art always came out how I wanted.” TTC artist Kodi said, “People will come in here just to hang out and relax, even if they’re not getting work done.” Owner and tattoo artist Billy Gunn added, “It’s like an old-school barber shop; people come in to talk and tell jokes. It’s a lot of fun here.” The new location is at 401 Superior St. in Rossford.

“We’ll be open seven days a week at the new location, from 9 a.m. until 8 p.m. and we’ll extend our hours once the new casino opens,” Gunn said. “We will have a grand opening as it gets warmer and we have plans to do something special, maybe knock prices back to what they were in ’78.” Gunn said he believes the TTC business formula is a winner. “We’re not changing anything with the new shop; everything will be exactly the same. It’s worked this long and I’m sure it will keep working at the new location,” he said. To maintain the Toledo Tattoo Company’s successful business formula, Gunn focuses heavily on TTC’s artists. “We look for people with a strong art background of course, but we’re interested in peoplefriendly artists with great communication skills,” he said. “It’s just as much about artistic skill as it is how well they get along with people.” O

Examples of work from Toledo Tattoo Company.

On the web

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8 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“SPEAK TO YOU OF THE POMPITOUS OF LOVE.” — “ENTER MAURICE,” STEVE MILLER

UT professor to read from new book It happens every day: People go missing. That horrific reality is the basis for Jane Bradley’s haunting new book, “You Believers,” a novel that grapples with living with loss and the redemptive power of love. The University of Toledo professor of English befriended her real estate agent, who shared the story about her daughter, Peggy Carr, who was carjacked and murdered. “She knew I was a writer when she met me, BRADLEY and when she kept telling me of the beautiful life and horrible end of her daughter,” Bradley said. “I kept thinking this would be an amazing story, but it felt too intrusive to ask to do such a thing. So I didn’t.” But then she had a dream that prompted her to ask, and Carr’s mother gave her blessing. “It was a much more difficult, painful and tricky venture than I had dreamed any writing could be. I’d start and stop,” Bradley said. “Then as life would have it, I lost two sisters, a brotherin-law and my dad in a very short period of time, and I had to move south to raise my niece who had lost both parents.” While dealing with her grief, she realized how she could tell Carr’s story. “I’d move it all to the South. I’d have to make it about the search for faith in a mortal world that

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can randomly stun us with loss,” she explained. “I had to learn from losing half my family, and I had to teach my niece how to push on. With this experience, I at last felt capable of writing a book of such a tangle of grief and hope, of love and sorrow, a story that shows that through loss we can not only survive, but grow.” Bradley will read from “You Believers” at 5:30 p.m. April 21 in Libbey Hall and then sign books. It took more than five years to write the 406page work, which she stressed is fiction. “This is not Peggy’s story. I had to respect her privacy and the privacy of her loved ones. So I made up a story inspired by Peggy’s story,” Bradley said. “And I can tell you that sometimes it takes a work of fiction to get at the truth. I didn’t want to give the true details of Peggy and her loved ones. I simply wanted to get at the truth of how the beautiful, powerful gift of life can be randomly snatched away. I wanted to tell the truth of how people can live through their worst nightmares and come through it not better maybe, but certainly and deeply changed. “The result is a novel about the struggle for faith in a random world of loss and violence. I worked to answer the questions of how we stay steady in a world of emotional earthquakes.” “You Believers,” Bradley’s fifth book, will be for sale at the reading and can purchased at the UT Bookstore. O — Vicki L. Kroll

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“YOU ARE THE SWEETEST THING IN THE SIGHT OF MORTAL MAN.” — “GET ON HOME,” STEVE MILLER

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 9

The Detroit Princess Riverboat Has Come-2- Toledo!

Enjoy our Spectacular Motown Dinner Cruise & Revue on the largest Riverboat in the Midwest! DINNER CRUISES This Friday and Saturday Evenings 6:30pm-8:30pm - April 22 & 23! Enjoy cocktails, delicious buffet dinner, dancing, cruising and the spectacular “Live Motown Review”.

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10 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“I’VE BEEN TOLD IF YOU KEEP ON DANCING YOU NEVER GET OLD,” — “DANCE, DANCE, DANCE,” STEVE MILLER

Epic intentions By Emily B. Gibb Toledo Free Press News Editor egibb@toledofreepress.com

Four years ago, a group of individuals were looking for a way to attract and retain Toledo’s young professionals while connecting them to senior community leaders. They wanted to combat the “brain drain” of Northwest Ohio. Through brainstorming and planning, plus support from the Toledo Regional Chamber of Commerce, they formed EPIC — Engaging People, Inspiring Change — in 2007. “People live in a community because it’s work, live and play, and we’re trying to be able to get them adapted to all three aspects of their life,” said COUSINO EPIC Toledo director Paulette Cousino. “That’s what makes young professionals stay in a region and that’s why we were formed — because people weren’t

staying in this region.” In conjunction with celebrating their recent four-year anniversary, EPIC leaders and corporate partners evaluated where they are now and what goals they are still working toward. “If you look at our corporate member list, it reads like the who’s who of Toledo and it’s really great to have that kind of support behind our organization. We wouldn’t be able to do it without them,” said Brian Niedzwiecki, 2011 EPIC chairman. EPIC adapted its direction to focus more closely on the three core values, or main pillars, of the organization that its corporate and individual members have come to expect: leadership and professional development, community impact and networking. “Over the course of the years, there have been a number of events we have done to help accomplish those goals of getting people connected to each other, to the area, to business leaders; to help foster the next generation of leaders in this area,” Niedzwiecki said. EPIC’s corporate members provide the base for bringing in individual members but membership also spreads by word of mouth,

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Amanda Geletka said. EPIC has grown to include 1,200 members. “We’re pulling them in from all different industries and walks of life,” Geletka said. As the membership and marketing chair, it’s her job to help plan the quarterly mixers — an easy task with important consequences, she said. At the mixers, they have about an hour to sum up for potential members what EPIC does while giving them that “feel-good feeling.” “It’s just the energy that’s in the room when you walk in. It’s the stories that you hear and the different relationships you make in just under an hour” that make people want to join, she said. While the membership has grown much faster than Vice Chair Stephanie Cousino expected, a strong bond has formed from the passion everyone has for seeing Toledo become more successful, she said. High interest in EPIC began at its first event at the Erie Street Market in 2007. Niedzwiecki said he passed a billboard advertising “a new group called EPIC” every day while driving to work and decided he would check it out. “I was floored by the hundreds of people that turned out for it. The energy that was in the room just blew me away,” he said. Niedzwiecki said everyone comes to EPIC for something slightly different and there are many different ways to stay active without an overwhelming pressure to be involved. EPIC Communications Coordinator Samantha Scott was “tossed into” EPIC in the beginning because she works for the Chamber of Commerce, but recently said that it was the best thing that could have happened to her on a professional level. “I’ve learned how to conduct myself, how to lead meetings and how to be a better businesswoman,” Scott said. She said her connections rapidly grew from about 50 people to about 2,000 people she can reach out to. Community Impact Co-chair Jeff Schaaf joined in 2008 because of a friend and also discovered many things about Toledo he didn’t know, despite being a “lifer.” “There’s not an easy way to get involved [in Toledo],” Schaaf said. “EPIC makes it easy.” It’s that accessibility to senior leaders and younger employees that makes EPIC unique, Niedzwiecki said. “It takes away some of the fear of the boardroom when you have that opportunity to interact,” he said. “It’s that kind of personal connection that you don’t get in bigger cities.” O

On the web

visit www.epictoledo.org for more information.

Equality Ohio plans Columbus trip for Lobby Day By Sarah Ottney Toledo Free Press SPECIAL SECTIONS EDITOR star@toledofreepress.com

Hundreds of Ohioans are expected to travel to the statehouse in Columbus on May 18 for the sixth annual Lobby Day, organized by Equality Ohio. Participants are updated on LGBT issues and then spend the day talking to elected officials from their districts about equal rights for all Ohioans regardless of sexual orientation and gender identity, said WELTER Kim Welter, director of programs and outreach for Equality Ohio. “Traditionally we have around 300 people every year,” Welter said. “There are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender as well as allied — straight people who support our issues — from all around the state.” Anyone is welcome, Welter said. “We never send anyone in to talk alone,” Welter said. “There’s always at least two people, one of whom is an experienced citizen lobbyist.” EqualityToledo Executive Director Sherry Tripepi said Lobby Day is fun and exciting. “I live in Toledo so I have always had the experience of talking with very supportive legislators,” Tripepi said. “It’s nice to have those conversations with people who are very supportive. Not everyone has those experiences, but that has been my experience. We really try to strategize and work together about how to get some things accomplished for equality.” EqualityToledo will organize a car pool for area residents to travel to Columbus. For information, email info@equalitytoledo.org. Rainbow Area Youth, a Toledo-based peer support group for self-identified LGBT and questioning teens, will coordinate a trip for youth, Tripepi said. This year’s Lobby Day will focus on promoting the Equal Housing and Employment Act and the Comprehensive Safe Schools Act, Welter said. The group is also pushing for the Comprehensive Safe Schools Act, a response to the Ohio Safe Schools Act that passed in 2006 and that the group feels was “deeply flawed.” The new legislation would require school anti-bullying and harassment policies to include sexual orientation and gender identity. Lobby Day is also a good chance to network with likeminded Ohioans, Welter said. Registration for Lobby Day closes May 13. Cost is free and children are welcome. An optional lunch is $10. For more information or to register, visit www.equalityohio.org. O


“ALL YOUR GOODNESS SLIPPED AWAY.” — “EVIL,” STEVE MILLER

Hot mama W

e went to Rosie’s Italian Grille knowing that it wasn’t going to be exactly like the “old” Rosie’s restaurants that were scattered about the Toledo area just a few short years ago. Of course, having a restaurant with “Rosie’s” in the name and not having pizza served in it would be Don like “Two and a Half Men” not having Charlie Sheen in it — ridiculous. So, yes, they still serve their great-tasting pizza. They also still have the famous “Rosie’s Hot Mama Bread” that at one time was so popular, they sold it in local grocery stores. While you will find many of your favorites from the past on the menu, the overall atmosphere is more elegant. The interior of the restaurant is lined with small booths separated by hanging draperies and burgundy valences creating an intimate, almost cozy atmosphere. The dining room’s fireplace adds to that feeling as do the ornate light fixtures hovering above the tables. The walls sport a faux brick look and are dotted with Greek and Italian murals adding an old-world feel to the décor. You have the option to experience the serenity of dining on Rosie’s Italian Grille’s Tuscanstyle outdoor patios during the summer months — or during the winter, thanks to the outdoor heating system. In addition to offering fine Italian food, Rosie’s has a nice array of seafood, steaks, baby lamb chops and some less formal Italian dishes

ZELLERS

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 11

Rosie’s Italian Grille offers pizza — and elegant favorites.

like pizza and stromboli. Daily specials provide additional choices, including the freshest seafood flown in daily from the Florida Keys, steaks from Chicago Stockyard, handmade pastas, soups and desserts. If you need help creating a unique combo of pizza toppings to challenge your palate, the “gourmet” pizza section should be right up your alley. These pizzas come on a thin cracker-ish cheese crust and feature some interesting pie toppers like spinach, artichokes, alfredo sauce, asiago cheese and, of course, feta. If you decide to order the “Spicy Papa’s Ultimate” from the gourmet section, a buck will go to “Chicks for Charity.” Tasty pizza. Good charity. Everyone wins. The gourmet mushroom appetizer is a must try for those among us who love the fungus. It’s a crostini-lined bowl filled with Smurf houses swimming in a garlic-infused cream broth. It was off the charts. My wife can’t stop raving about it. The soup of the day was conch chowder, which I enjoyed once years ago while wandering around Key West. However, I went with the Lobster bisque. Somehow I managed to go my whole life without ever having tried any sort of bisque until a few months ago — now I can’t get enough. The lobster was plentiful and fresh, but its flavor didn’t blend into the bisque as well as I would have liked. The seafood and tomato flavors were both very strong and seemed to battle for supremacy in my bowl.

FOOD GLORIOUS FOOD

After some serious internal debate, the I love getting lasagna when I go out to an Italian place. When they bring out that moun- panna cotta got the nod. I had never tried this tain of meat, cheese and noodles — all covered concoction, but its outward resemblance to in marinara sauce — it’s like Christmas Day 1978 chocolate mousse intrigued me. Panna cotta is for me. That’s when I got the “Star Wars” Death a popular Italian dessert made by simmering Star Space Station play set, rendering all subse- cream, milk and sugar together, mixing it with quent Christmas gifts of my childhood inferior. gelatin and letting it cool. Don’t let the gelatin scare you away from this tremendous treat. In other words, I am a pretty big fan of lasagna. Its consistency and taste are Well, this lasagna made me more like a mousse or a feel more like when I left cream pie filling than the theater after seeing a bowl of Jell-O. “Return of the Jedi” A crown of delifor the first time 606 N. McCord Road cious Frangelico — a little disapcream topped it pointed. It didn’t (419) 866-5007 • www.rosiesitaliangrille.com off nicely. taste bad, but the Open: Mon./Tues. 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; I have heard noodle-to-meat Wed./Thurs. 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; a few people say ratio was a bit off Fri. 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; that the prices are and it could have Sat. noon to 11 p.m.; Sun. 4 to 9 p.m. a bit high at Rosie’s been cheesier. Italian Grille, and I can On the flip side, I am understand where they are happy to report that the stromcoming from. However, the large porboli is still a cut above most “mortal” strombolis you will encounter. I used to make the tions, old-world décor and good service put it trip to Rosie’s specifically for some of their Italian on equal footing with other fine dining options bread dough packed with meat, cheese and veg- in the area. Plus, they offer deals throughout the gies. That practice will likely be resurrected after week to save you some dough. Every Wednesday is “Wino Wednesday” at rediscovering how good it is. Betsy Barone runs a pastry shop out of the Rosie’s, offering a good deal on the abundant selecrestaurant, “Betsie’s Pastries,” which offers out- tion of local and imported wines. Rosie’s offers $10 side catering and creates all the desserts at Rosie’s. off all bottles more than $29 for dining patrons. The bar offers half-off pizza and apIf you want a sweet finish to your meal, they will bring out a tray of Betsy’s award-winning delica- petizers Sunday through Thursday. That cies of decadence. Confections are created fresh might explain why that area was packed with myriad people jamming out to Michael daily and the choices change constantly. Betsy may be married to the owner, but Jackson’s “Rock With You” on a nondescript her pastries stand on their own. The delicious- Wednesday night in Toledo. O looking choices included key lime pie, tiramisu, panna cotta, coconut carrot cake and raspberry- Don Zellers is co-producer of “Fred LeFebvre and filled cannoli pastry puffs. Rosie’s also has a spu- the Morning News” and co-host of “The Benchmone and gellato bar for those looking for some- warmers” on News Talk 1370 WSPD. He is also the station’s Good Swill Ambassador. thing more in the ice cream realm.

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“I WAS BORN ON THIS ROCK AND I’VE BEEN TRAVELING THROUGH SPACE.” — “SPACE COWBOY,” STEVE MILLER

Miller time

Rock legend to play Huntington Center April 23. By Alan Sculley Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

A lot of people divide Steve Miller’s career into two distinct eras. There was the bluesy psychedelic rock/pop period from 1967 through 1972 that produced five albums that gained him considerable credibility as a songwriter and guitarist, but little in the way of commercial success. Then beginning with the 1973 album, “The Joker,” came the pop era that saw Miller become one of the most popular artists in rock music. With subsequent albums such as “Fly Like An Eagle,” “Book Of Dreams” and “Abracadabra,” Miller reeled off radio hit after radio hit, sold some 13 million records and went from playing theaters to stadiums. Miller, who will play the Huntington Center on April 23 with Gregg Allman, certainly considers “The Joker” album a turning point in his career. But he says the kind of pop songs that made him a king of radio — “Fly Like An Eagle,” “Jet Airliner,” “Jungle Love” and “Rockin’ Me” — were nothing new for him. The transition from blues-influenced rocker to master pop craftsman was something Miller had been working on since before he moved to San Francisco in the mid-1960s and became part of a Bay Area scene that was introducing the world to the likes of the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane. “I had been working on pop tunes and stuff from the early ‘60s (on),” Miller said in a recent phone interview. “I always liked pop-blues, R&B and Motown, anything that really sounded good. And there were lots of really great sounding hits ... So I was always writing four-part harmony tunes and working on stuff like that.” “The Joker” arrived at a time when Miller had nearly given up on becoming a major star. He had been on the road or in the studio pretty much nonstop for seven years, and the grind had taken its toll. He was selling about 200,000 albums a year — an impressive total — but he wasn’t on the radio or making enough money to enjoy anything resembling a good living. “I was just on the road all the time, but not really making enough money to buy a house or do anything,” Miller said. “The tax rate back then was 88 percent. It was insane. So I was keeping 12 cents on the dollar.” Before starting what he thought might be his final tour, Miller was told by someone at his record company that he thought “The Joker” was a hit. Miller brushed it aside. His major concern was that Capitol Records would have his albums in the stores in cities along his tour route — something that often didn’t happen on his previous tours. When he returned from the tour, Miller still didn’t know “The Joker” had become a hit single. “There was a check for $385,000 in my

mailbox when I got back,” Miller said, remembering his shock over his sudden financial windfall. He hasn’t had to worry about finances since, as albums like “Fly Like An Eagle,” “Book Of Dreams” and “Abracadabra,” gave him hit singles and a fan base that continues to fill amphitheaters every time Miller tours. Miller understands the lasting appeal of songs such as “Jet Airliner” and “Fly Like An Eagle.” “What it is, is it’s a great song that everybody could sing,” he said. “It’s got great harmony in it, it’s got a really good (basic) track and it’s fun. That’s what I was trying to do. I wasn’t trying to make something for radio. I was trying to make something that was going to make radio something good.” Miller isn’t just reflecting on the stadiumfilling days of his career these days. On April 19, he releases the CD “Let Your Hair Down,” which like his 2010 CD, “Bingo,” celebrates his roots in blues and R&B. Those were the styles of music that Miller first pursued after he arrived in Chicago in 1964, just as that city’s blues scene was in its final glory days. Miller has plenty of memories of the Chicago clubs, his gigs and especially seeing and getting to know blues greats such as Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and James Cotton, who played nightly in clubs that often held only 125 people or so. “They were just working every night,” Miller said. “I saw Muddy a hundred times, you know, I mean, ‘Wow!’” Miller and keyboardist Barry Goldberg formed a band and became a fixture in the clubs. Then the Miller-Goldberg Band was signed by Epic Records and went to New York for a few months. When he came back to Chicago around Christmas of 1965, the blues scene was dead, as all of the main stars had gotten the chance to go on tour. Miller acutely understood why the musicians left Chicago, and he quickly followed suit, relocating to San Francisco. “As soon as everybody got famous, they stopped working in clubs,” said Miller, noting fights and shootings were common during shows. “Who wants to work in a club? That was from nine at night until four in the morning for $200 a week if you were Muddy Waters and $125 a week if you were me. So everybody was really glad to get the hell out of there.” Needless to say, Miller has been playing his music in much more hospitable environments ever since his Chicago days, with theaters, arenas and outdoor amphitheaters again the common venues on this year’s tour. Miller’s exceptional band is back for this run, with singer Sonny Charles, formerly of the group the Checkmates, in the lineup. “He’s a great, great singer,” Miller said. “It’s kind of like having Otis Redding join the band. He’s that good.” Charles was part of the recording session

Steve Miller has been recording and touring since 1967. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO

three years ago that produced the material for both the “Let Your Hair Down” and “Bingo” CDs, as was harmonica player Norton Buffalo, Miller’s right hand man in his band for 33 years until he died of cancer in October of 2009. “We went into Skywalker Ranch in Marin County, (filmmaker George) Lucas’ place where he records all the ‘Star Wars’ soundtracks,” Miller said. “We got Andy Johns to be our engineer. He’s done all the Led Zeppelin and Rolling Stones albums. And we cut 41 of these tracks.” The 41 tracks are covers of blues and R&B songs that Miller selected specifically for the recording session. “Let Your Hair Down” features tracks by T-Bone Walker, Jimmy Reed, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Jimmy McCracklin and others.

Miller went into the session not even worrying about whether the recordings would ever be released, and he sat on the tracks until he found the right record deal for the two CDs — with Roadrunner/Loud & Proud Records. “My thinking was I just wanted to get these 41 great songs recorded. I wasn’t worried about whether they came out or what,” Miller said. “I had the band all dialed in. We had all the right amps and equipment. We were there to have a great time and we did. And when it came out, it was so much better than we thought it would be. “We’re kicking it,” he said. “Andy’s recording, it’s every guitar player’s dream to have Andy Johns record the band and it’s the biggest bass, drums and guitar sound you ever heard in your life.” O


“DO YOU REMEMBER ME? IT WAS NOT SO LONG AGO THAT YOU SET ME FREE.” — “WIDE RIVER,” STEVE MILLER

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 13

Simon says ‘Stomp’ Ohio native returns to Stranahan with lively show. By John Benson Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

The critically acclaimed percussive hit “Stomp” returns to Northwest Ohio with show veteran, native Buckeye and former University of Akron football player Elec Simon in tow April 26 and 27 at Stranahan Theater. Recently the Rayland, Ohio-born Simon witnessed the universal power of “Stomp.” “I just came back from my first tour of South America. The people loved it because they love music and they love percussion,” said Simon, 29, calling from a tour stop in Atlanta. “In Argentina you have tango and in Peru you have cajon. They love percussion and they appreciate the show so much, it’s not even funny. They’ve never seen anything like that before. They didn’t know that you could make music out of everyday objects. They’re not used to seeing people take trash cans and brooms and their bodies and make beautiful music out of it. We received a standing ovation after every single number. And while we were doing it, they’d stare with awe in their face the whole time.” Created in the early ’90s in the United Kingdom and an off-Broadway hit later in the decade, “Stomp” has grown into an international sensation during the past 14 years with performances in more than 350 cities in 36 countries. “Stomp” turns everyday objects into what has been described as an amazing musical experience. Whether it’s stiff-bristle brooms be-

coming a sweeping orchestra, Zippo lighters flipping open and closed to create a fiery fugue or wooden poles thumping and clacking in a rhythmic explosion, nothing is off limits in this show. Known in the past for trash cans, plastic bags, plungers, boots and hubcaps, Simon said “Stomp” has reinvented itself yet again. “You’ll see paint cans, where we’re throwing cans all over the place and catching them,” said Simon, who also acts as a motivational speaker talking to at-risk kids and in state prisons. “If you blink you might miss something. We have a number called ‘Donut’ where we’re playing with big tractor tire inner tubes wrapped around us like Kodo drumming. We put güiros in the show where they are hanging from the set and we’re way up high playing the pipes. We also have walkers we play at the end of the show.” This marks Simon’s second time around in “Stomp.” He left the touring production last May to direct “The Wiz” in Canton. Being away from “Stomp” proved positive for the performer considering just how demanding the role can be. However, just when he thought he was out, they pulled him back into the fold. “The show is a musical sport,” Simon said. “We’re walking with 55-gallon barrels on our leg every single night. We have to please thousands of people every night driving our bodies into the ground. We’re fighting each other with sticks and heavy lids and drumming nonstop. So every now and then you do need a break. I left and I came back You know, the show must go on. Once you’re in ‘Stomp,’ it’s like a family. You’re in forever.” O

Elec Simon is in his second tour of duty with the percussive production ‘Stomp.’ PHOTO COURTESY STOMP

Kentucky Derby Party Saturday, May 7, 2011 | 4–8 p.m. Peristyle & Museum Grounds toledomuseum.org/events/derbyparty Tickets: 419-255-8000 ext. 7432


14 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

Compiled by Whitney Meschke Events are subject to change.

MUSIC The Ark This small venue offers a showcase for lesser-known acts. 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor. (734) 761-1451, (734) 761-1800 or www.theark.org. O The Guggenheim Grotto: 8 p.m. April 20, $15. O Crooked Still, Mike & Ruthy: 8 p.m. April 21, $15. O The Paper Raincoat: 8 p.m. April 22, $15. O Brian Vander Ark: 8 p.m. April 23, $15. O Old Sledge: 8 p.m. April 26, free. O William Fitzsimmons, Slow Runner: 8 p.m. April 27, $15.

The Blarney Irish Pub

”Abra-abra-cadabra/I want to reach out and grab ya.” — “ABRACADABRA,” STEVE MILLER

Bronze Boar Be sure to check out this Warehouse District tavern’s namesake, overhead near the entrance. 20 S. Huron St. (419) 244-2627 or www.bronzeboar.com. O Jerod: Wednesdays and April 21. O Open mic night with Chris Knopp: Mondays. O Luke James: Tuesdays. O Stonehouse: April 22. O Crucial 420: April 23.

Caesars Windsor Consider hopping the Detroit River for this casino’s entertainment offerings. Ticket prices, in Canadian dollars, are for the cheapest seats; attendees must be 19 or older. Caesars Windsor Colosseum, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor, Ontario. (800) 991-7777 or www.caesarswindsor.com. O Craig Ferguson: 9 p.m. April 23, $30.

Catch local acts while taking in the pub’s modern Irish and American fare. 601 Monroe St. (419) 418-2339 or www. theblarneyirishpub.com. O Kyle White: April 21. O The Bridges: April 22-23.

Cheetah’s Den

Blind Pig

Club Soda

A variety of rock, soul, pop and alternative acts perform at this bar. 208 S. First St., Ann Arbor. $3-$20 unless noted. (734) 996-8555 or blindpigmusic.com. O Four Finger Five, Wolfie Complex, Christian Rock: 9 p.m. April 20. O Chris Bathgate, Hezekiah Jones, Samantha Crain: 9:30 p.m. April 21. O Junip, Acrylics: 9 p.m. April 22. O The Budos Band, Charles Bradley: 9 p.m. April 23. O XV, the Dean’s List, Brenton Duvall: 8 p.m. April 24. O Macklemore, Dante Lasalle, Mobil: 8 p.m. April 26. O Eoto, Sub Swara: 9 p.m. April 27.

This university hot spot from back in the day hosts entertainment Fridays and Saturdays. 3922 Secor Road. (419) 473-0062 or www.toledoclubsoda.com. O Skoobie Snaks: April 23-24.

Bretz Bar 2012 Adams St. (419) 243-1900. O Deja Dellataro and Felaciana Thunderpussy: ThursdaysSaturdays.

A different band performs each week. 702 E. Broadway St. (419) 754-1903. O DJ Lamont: Tuesdays. O Devious: Thursdays (also open mic night)-Saturdays.

Dégagé Jazz Café Signature drinks, such as pumpkin martinis, plus live local jazz performers. 301 River Road, Maumee. $5 weekends for cafe seating. (419) 794-8205 or www.degagejazzcafe.com. O Gene Parker & Friends: 7-10 p.m. April 20 and 27. O Jason Quick: April 21. O Joe Sneider Recital: 7:30-11:30 p.m. April 22-23. O Eric Dickey and the Zoar Musicians: 6 p.m. April 26.

O Name This Tune: 7:30 p.m. Sundays. O Kyle White: April 20. O Nine Lives: April 21-23. O Gregg Aranda: April 26. O Ben Barefoot: April 27.

O Tim Reynolds & TR3, Jason LaPorte, Ryan Dunlap: 9 p.m. April 20. O Between the Buried and Me, Job for a Cowboy, the Ocean, Measure the Redshift, Buried but Breathing: 7 p.m. April 22.

Doc Watson’s

Ice Restaurant & Bar

Named in honor of the owners’ forefather, this bar and restaurant serves a variety of dishes and entertainment. 1515 S. Byrne Road. (419) 389-6003 or docwatsonstoledo.com. O Jon Barile: 10 p.m. April 22. O Ryan Dunlap: April 23.

This local, family-owned enterprise offers food, drinks and music in a sleek atmosphere. 405 Madison Ave. (419) 2463339 or icerestaurantandbar.com. O Athena Johnson: 5 p.m. April 21. O C.J. Manning: 7 p.m. April 22. O Mark Harris: 8 p.m. April 23.

Fat Fish Blue Serving blues and similar sounds, as well as bayoustyle grub. Levis Commons, 6140 Levis Commons Blvd., Perrysburg. (419) 931-3474 or fatfishfunnybonetoledo.com. O Arctic Clam: 9:30 p.m. April 22 and 9 p.m. April 23.

Frankie’s Toledo’s venue for rock. 308 Main St. Tickets vary between $5 and $15, unless noted. (419) 693-5300 or www. FrankiesInnerCity.com. O Auto Tune karaoke: 9 p.m. Mondays, free. O Sixx Digit, Ghiftd, C-Fifth, Bolie, C-Low the Beast, J-Krew: 9 p.m. April 20. O Yeti Machete, S***** on Blatz, First Degree Arson, the Wretches: 9 p.m. April 21. O The Howlies, Joey & the Traitors, Static Rituals: 9 p.m. April 22. O Tropic Bombs, Gold, the Fight Within, Blindshift: 9 p.m. April 23.

French Quarter J. Pat’s Pub Live entertainment after 9:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Holiday Inn French Quarter, 10630 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg. (419) 874-3111 or www.hifq.com. O Noisy Neighbors: April 22-23.

The Distillery

Headliners

Karaoke is offered Tuesdays, but paid entertainers rock out Wednesdays-Saturdays. 4311 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 382-1444 or www.thedistilleryonline.com.

All ages, all genres are welcome. 4500 N. Detroit Ave. Ticket prices vary between $5 and $15, unless noted otherwise. (419) 269-4500 or www.headlinerstoledo.com.

Kerrytown Concert House This venue focuses on classical, jazz and opera artists and music. 415 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor. $5-$30, unless noted. (734) 769-2999 or www.kerrytownconcerthouse.com. O Schumann Festival Concert: 8 p.m. April 20. O Tumbao Bravo: 8 p.m. April 22. O Marcus Elliott Quartet: 8 p.m. April 23.

Mainstreet Bar and Grill Ronn Daniels performs weekly at this pub. 8-11 p.m. Thursdays, 141 Main St. (419) 697-6297 or www.toledomainstreet.com.

Manhattan’s This “slice of the Big Apple” in the Glass City provides entertainment most weekends. 1516 Adams St. (419) 243-6675 or www.manhattanstoledo.com. O Vytas and Steve: 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. O Open mic with Bread and Butter: 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Mondays. O Dick Lange Trio: 6 p.m. April 21. O Tom Tallitsch Trio: April 22. O Alan Smith & the Blues All Stars: April 23. O Tom & Kyle Turner: 6 p.m. April 26.

Mickey Finn’s A variety of genres to wash your drinks down with. Open mic nights, 9 p.m. Wednesdays, no cover; $5-$7 cover other nights. 602 Lagrange St. (419) 246-3466 or www.mickeyfinnspub.com. O Literature & Music nights (writers will read and bands will perform): 8 p.m. Thursdays in April.

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“I WAS BORN TO BE BLUE.” — “BORN TO BE BLUE,” STEVE MILLER Mickey Finn’s (cont.) O Boogie Matrix: 8:30 p.m. April 20. O The Ragbirds: 8:30 p.m. April 21. O This Is Everything, Capaul, Lapse, Pentimento: 8:30 p.m. April 22.

End venue hosts artists on the experimental end of the musical rainbow. 9 p.m., 2564 Robinwood Ave. $5 donation. www.toledobellows.wordpress.com. O Family Underground, Matthew De Gennaro: April 22.

O Miracle Vitamins, Lightning Love, Swimsuit, the Strong

Spicy Tuna

Talk: 8:30 p.m. April 23. O Athens Wheeler: 8 p.m. April 27.

This sushi bar offers occasional entertainment to accompany the fishy dishes. 7130 Airport Hwy. (419) 720-9333 or spicytunasushi.com. O DJ Jimmy James: 10 p.m. Fridays. O Karaoke: 10 p.m. Saturdays. O Monte: 7-11 p.m. April 21.

M.T. Loonies Last Born Sons Band performs at 9 p.m. Thursdays; DJs take over on Fridays and Saturdays. 6648 Lewis Ave., Temperance. (734) 847-7222 or mtloonies.net.

Murphy’s Place Jazz — straight, smooth, bebop or traditional — all kinds are played here. 151 Water St. (419) 241-7732 or www. murphysplacejazz.com. O Open mic: 8 p.m. Thursdays. O Anna Givens, Clifford Murphy and Claude Black: 8 p.m. April 20 and 27. O Atla DeChamplain: 9 p.m. April 22. O Jean Holden, Glenda Biddlestone: 9 p.m. April 23.

One2 Lounge at Treo Live music starts at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. 5703 Main St., Sylvania. (419) 882-2266 or treosylvania.com. O Slow Burn: April 22. O Old West End Records Jazz Ensemble: April 23 and 29.

Ottawa Tavern Casual meals with weekend entertainment. 1815 Adams St. (419) 725-5483 or www.otavern.com. O Blind Bobby Smith: 10 p.m. April 22.

Robinwood Concert House A home for the avant garde and untraditional, this Old West

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Tequila Sheila’s A corner bar-type hangout with DJ-provided tunes on Saturday nights. 702 Monroe St. (419) 241-1118. O Open mic with Jason Kelley: 9 p.m. Thursdays. O Hip-hop night: 9 p.m. Fridays.

The Village Idiot Tunes combined with pizza and booze, some would say it’s a perfect combination. 309 Conant St., Maumee. (419) 893-7281, (419) 740-2395 or www.villageidiotmaumee.com. O Old West End Records: Wednesdays. O Bob Rex: Sunday afternoons. O Frankie May, Ben Barefoot: Mondays. O Mark Mikel: Tuesdays. O Wilbur Shaw: April 21. O Social Bones: April 22. O Kentucky Chrome: April 23.

Wesley’s Bar & Grill A huge variety of beers helps wash down the entertainment. 1201 Adams St. (419) 255-3333 or wesleysbar.com. O DJs Folk, Mattimoe and Perrine: Fridays. O Russel Martin: April 23.

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 15

Woodchucks The place to go for an eclectic mix of people and music. 224 S. Erie St. (419) 241-3045. O Karaoke with Georgia Peach: Wednesdays.

Yeeha’s Country and rock with a little “Coyote Ugly” style. 3150 Navarre Ave., Oregon. (419) 691-8880 or www.yeehas.com. O My Sister Sarah: April 23.

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band Revival Party

8 p.m. Thursdays, South Briar Restaurant, 5147 S. Main St., Sylvania. (419) 517-1111 or (419) 708-0265.

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band All Stars Dancing is encouraged. 8-10:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Trotter’s Tavern, 5131 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-2079 or (419) 708-0265.

Bobby May This local legend and mentor of Crystal Bowersox has a

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“The Grateful Dead Movie” Fans can see Dead people on the big screen for the first time since 1977. An exclusive never-before-seen interview with Jerry Garcia conducted while he was directing the movie will be included. 7:30 p.m. April 20, Rave Motion Pictures Fallen Timbers 14, 2300 Village Dr. West, Maumee. $12.50. (419) 878-3898 or www. ravemotionpictures.com.

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April 20, St. Lucas Evangelical Lutheran Church, 745 Walbridge Ave. (419) 824-3772 or www. lourdes.edu/MajorsPrograms/Music.aspx.

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full slate of upcoming performances. Even more events are listed by venue. O With Jon Barile: April 20, Whale’s Tale, 5307 N. Summit St., (419) 727-0888. O With his trio: April 22, JoJo’s Nite Club, 115 E. Main St., Woodville, (419) 849-3257.

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Inducted into the Rock and Roll and Songwriter’s halls of fame, Browne has “written and performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.” 7:30 p.m. April 20, Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor. $76-$100.50. (734) 768-8397, (734) 668-8463 or www.michtheater.org.

O XASAX “Music at the Forefront” performance: 8 p.m.

UT concerts The university’s music students and friends will perform the pieces they’ve been perfecting. (419) 530-2375, (419) 5302452, (419) 530-2448 or www.utoledo.edu/as/music. O Symphony Orchestra: 8 p.m. April 21, Doermann Theater, University Hall, 2801 W. Bancroft St. O Symphonic Band & Wind Ensemble: 7 p.m. April 22, Doermann Theater, University Hall, 2801 W. Bancroft St.

TMA concerts Visual and audible arts combine for a new experience. Great Gallery (unless noted), 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org. O Charles Brown: 7 p.m. April 22 and 1 p.m. April 23, Gallery 24.

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Night Session will provide big-band music for dancers and listeners alike. A 30-minute dance lesson will precede the music. 5 p.m. April 24, Paulette’s Studio of Dance, 4853 Monroe St., Building B. $10. (419) 6543262 or www.dancetoledo.com.

This shop features fair trade foods and natural products, including talent, which will be featured in a series of musical brunches and dinnertime entertainment. 331 N. Main St., Bowling Green. (419) 352-0706 or www.happybadger.com. O Sam Gorman and friends: 6-7:30 p.m. April 21. O Estar Cohan, Indigo: 6-8 p.m. April 22 O Anthony TwoFeathers: Noon-2:30 April 23.

4–7 p.m. April 22, New Hope Christian Church, Holloway and Garden roads, Holland. $8. (419) 867-1535.

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This semester, the stargazers are focusing on shows that “connect astronomy and everyday life” that were created at the university. 8 p.m. Fridays and Tuesdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, Room 112, Physical Sciences Lab Building, near North College Drive and East Merry Avenue, Bowling Green. $1. (419) 372-8666 or physics.bgsu.edu/planetarium. O “The Seabird Show”: Puffins, penguins and more. April 24-May 6. O “The Little Star That Could,” 2 p.m. April 23. This venue offers weekly humor-fests (maybe to make up for the crankiness). Above the Easy Street Cafe, 104 S. Main St., Bowling Green. $3-$5. www.grumpydavespub.com. O Karaoke “Jenefit”: 9 p.m. April 23, $5 donation. O Kris Peters, Tim Rowlands: 9 p.m. April 26.

“You’re Beautiful” catapaulted this British singer/songwriter to the top of the charts; he’s bringing his soulful mix of tunes to the States for this tour. 7:30 p.m. April 27, Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor. $25-$45. (734) 768-8397, (734) 668-8463 or www.michtheater.org.

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Thomas Quasthoff and friends will perform collections of “Liebeslieder” (love songs) by Brahms and Schumann. 8 p.m. April 23, University of Michigan, Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor. $10-$50. (734) 764-2538 or ums.org.

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April 21, Bryan Recital Hall. O Praecepta: 6 p.m. April 23, Choral Rehearsal Hall. O Opera scenes: 8 p.m. April 24, Wooster Street Center, 1124 E. Wooster St. O Christine Kefferstan, piano master class: 2:30 p.m. April 25, Bryan Recital Hall.

MFA thesis exhibitions Students preparing to earn their master’s degrees in fine arts will display their efforts. Reception: 7-9 p.m. April 22; exhibition, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays (plus 6-9 p.m. Thursdays) and 1-4 p.m. Sundays, April 23-May 3 (closed April 24), Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, Fine Arts Center, between Ridge and Wooster streets, Bowling Green. (419) 937-2852 or art.bgsu.edu/galleries.

Wood County Historical Center & Museum

Check out this rural jewel’s exhibits and tour the buildings to see demonstrations using historic equipment. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays and 1-4 p.m. weekends through Oct. 30 (closed holidays), 13360 County Home Road, Bowling Green. $1-$4. (419) 352-0967 or www. woodcountyhistory.org. O

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Hindi film ‘Thank You’ The Dosti Foundation, South Asia Peace Foundation and ToledoHyderabad Sister City Committee are presenting the Hindi movie “Thank You” at 8 p.m. April 23 at the Maumee Indoor Theatre. The movie, directed by Anees Bazmee, is about a suave private detective who investigates husbands having affairs while he falls for a wife who hired him. It is being shown with English subtitles. Tickets are $10 for adults and $8 for students and seniors. Children younger than 5 are free. Proceeds go towards the presenting organizations. Tickets can be purchased by calling Dr. Ali, (419) 908-0440; Dr. Noor, (823) 876-8529; Sonia, (419) 320-5840; or Mithum, (567) 277-4596. The Maumee Indoor Theatre is located at 601 — Emily B. Gibb Conant St. O

BGSU’s Stroh Center schedules first event

Findlay walk-a-thon

Jacob Lawrence exhibit The Monroe County Community College Whitman Center is hosting the traveling informational art display Jacob Lawrence and “The Legend of John Brown” until April 30. The display, which opened April 19, features Lawrence digitized reproductions of Lawrence’s series of 22 silkscreen prints that tell the story of abolitionist John Brown and his crusade to end slavery. Informative text that details the life and times of both the artist and his subject accompany the pieces. Produced by the Wayne State University Library System in conjunction with the University Art Collection, which holds the original prints, the display is touring Michigan Libraries and other nonprofit organizations through August 2012. It was made possible by a grant from the Detroit Area Library Network. “I think it will be a good historical exhibit for people to see. It’s a different aspect or different side of the story that they might understand better. It’s interesting to see the story behind the pictures,” Rachel Lehr, spokeswoman for the Whitman Center, said. Jacob Lawrence and The Legend of John Brown is on display in the lobby just through the front doors and is free and open to the public. The Whitman Center is located at 7777 Lewis Ave., Temperance. For more information, call (734) 847-0559. O — Emily B. Gibb

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Instead of making sure their laces are tight, walkers in Findlay make sure their pumps have 4-inch heels. The third-annual “Walk A Mile In Her Shoes” walk-a-thon at Riverside Park in Findlay encourages men of surrounding counties to walk a onemile trek in high heels to stand up against domestic and rape violence. It’s the only fundraiser done all year by Open Arms, communications

coordinator Jodi DeVore said. DeVore said the event will be a familyfriendly, including food vendors and a play area where kids can meet SpongeBob SquarePants. There will also be prizes handed out, like the “Most Likely To Break A Heel” award. The event helps Open Arms, a domestic violence shelter in Findlay. It offers an outreach program and a help hotline for victims. It also has a 30-day shelter program where more than 4,000 people have stayed since it opened in 1981, according to openarmsfindlay.org. “Walk A Mile In Her Shoes” is an international men’s march with the nonprofit corporation Venture Humanity. Last year, Open Arms allowed women to participate, and this year women can once again walk. There is no age requirement to register for the walk. They had a four-year-old walker last year, DeVore said. The walk takes place April 30 at 10:30 a.m. It costs $10 for students and adults with their own heels and $20 for adults who need heels. One hundred and fifty people have already signed up, and DeVore expects 300 people to participate, which is double the amount of walkers last year. Anyone interested can register online at openarmsfindlay. org/2011Walk. O — Matt Liasse

R JA

Bowling Green State University’s Stroh Center will host Sanctus Real and Tenth Avenue North as the first bands to play at the new facility. The concert will be Aug. 13, after the Stroh Center officially opens on July 1. Greg Christopher, the director of athletics, said the idea to have the bands visit the campus stemmed from an “idle conversation in the office.” Scot Bressler, the assistant director of financial affairs, knows members from both bands, so booking them was easy. Sanctus Real is a Christian rock group from Toledo. Its most recent album, “Pieces of a Real Heart,” was released last year.

“We are honored to be a part of the opening of the Stroh Center, especially because this is so close to home for us,” Sanctus Real said in a statement through artist representative Dan Spencer. “We hope this kicks off a very successful history of events for Bowling Green State University and the Stroh Center.” The Stroh Center will host more concerts and events, although there are no plans for it to be a venue for huge acts, Christopher said. The Huntington Center in Toledo will be more recognized by Northwest Ohio concert-goers, he said. “[The Stroh Center] will bring events and concerts to the BG area,” Christopher said. The Stroh Center was built to accommodate events better than The Anderson Arena, the university’s former arena. There is more parking and more restrooms available, Christopher said. “It was built with performances in mind,” Christopher said. Other events are planned for the facility including the December graduation ceremony. O — Matt Liasse

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 17

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Holy lack of home viewing, Batman! By Jim Beard Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Biff! Bam! Zowie! It’s a mystery worthy of the deductive skills of the Caped Crusader: after 45 years as one of TV’s most popular shows, the 1966-68 “Batman” series has never been offered officially in any home-viewing medium. Why? Well, that’s something of a convoluted conundrum. At its most basic, it comes down to one word: rights. “Batman” involves a multitude of rights issues that would befuddle The Riddler. One of the factors that made the series so popular was its guest stars. Not only did it claim a galaxy of stars as “Special Guest Villains,” it ncluded a bevy of walk-ons and cameos, some of which involved characters owned by other license holders than those of Batman. There was Lurch from “The Addams Family,” and Col. Klink from “Hogan’s Heroes” and, of course, the Green Hornet ... you see the problem? Every single facet

of the show has its rights to be secured: production, actors, music, costuming, etc. Interestingly, the 1966 Batman feature film exists on VHS, DVD and Blu-Ray, but that’s because its original contracts included wording that covers its use in other medium, such as, yes, television. The TV show contracts, sadly, did not. Holy lack of foresight, Batman! But, why after all these years haven’t these issues been worked out? There is something of an “X” factor that also figures into the equation, one that remains elusive and has blocked progress on bringing the show into our livings rooms. That said, a new, forward-thinking regime is in place at DC Comics, owners of Batman, and I believe that there may never be a better chance for the show than now. Good luck, Caped Crusader! We hope to be receiving your show, its Bat-extras and Bat-commentaries soon! O Jim Beard will discuss his new book “Gotham City 14 Miles: 14 Essays on Why the 1960s Batman TV series Matters” at 6:30 p.m. April 26 at the Sylvania Branch Library. Registration is required to the free event; call (419) 882-2089.

PlayStation 3 revs up high-speed racing “Monster Jam: Path of Destruction” (Activision): Monster truck fans get 28 vehicles, eight authentic stadiums, 32 race events, and more than 20 freestyle events (90 seconds with possible 30 second bonus time) while having the ability to create their own monster truck. Use different strategies for events that include stunt challenges, stadium races, circuit races, time crunches and team races. No online play, but the multiplayer mode, authentic components and various stunts echo entertaining realism just like the real shows. Players must work for the rewards in career and multiplayer modes while mastering movement presents the greatest challenge. Control schemes include use of the left analog stick to steer the front wheels and the right stick to steer the rear wheels. Sharper graphics would improve the excitement, but the sound provides additional pros. Nintendo Wii and PlayStation3 versions available with Grave Digger Steering Wheel Peripheral with stickers (**1/2, rated E for mild violence, also available on Nintendo DS, PSP and Xbox 360). O “Moto GP 10/11” (Capcom): Motorcycle racing has never been better with one- and twoplayer modes with two to 20 player online modes. Players can record and upload their races. Green trails show if the direction, speed and other factors are “on track”. The challenging braking takes real effort — veterans of this game series have a definite advantage in this area. The online mode

includes messaging and friend invitations. Time trials have a ghost rider option while challenges offer a wide variety like slipstreaming, but the career mode provides the main appeal. Co-op play in this mode lets players take a detailed journey together involving sponsorships, reputation and other managerial elements. Game modes promote short sessions or extremely detailed experiences. For example, in world championship, play can range from a full season to a single race. The European music soundtrack pumps with energy (***, rated E, also available on Xbox 360). O “NASCAR 2011” (Activision): Improvements in vehicle damage, race logistics and proximity radar add to a highly authentic NASCAR experience for all skill levels in one- and two-player gameplay (two to 16 players online). Players can take the customization and immense options to a high level along with a limited number of “rewinds” to turn back the clock on crashes for another chance. Check the visuals for help, which include a brake indicator that shows alerts if turns are angled poorly or too fast. Game modes include career mode, race now, eliminator, invitational events, track testing and practice. Building skills and progression transfer to experience points that can lead to fun celebration burnouts and doughnuts for more bonus experience points. Look for an upcoming add-on content update with 2011 car models, paint schemes and more (***1/2, rated E for mild language, also available on Xbox 360). O — Michael Siebenaler


“WHEN I GO INTO A BAR, GIRLS FROM NEAR AND FAR, SAY I’M A GANGSTER.” — “GANGSTER OF LOVE,” STEVE MILLER

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / APRIL 20, 2011 n 19


20 . n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“I CAN’T IMAGINE HOW TO TELL MY STORY.” — “COOL MAGIC,” STEVE MILLER

Monique and the dance ‘Who Told You That You Could Dance’ hosts events.

H

ave you noticed that when the weather warms up, the dance shows and competitions come out? You can attend any urban event in Toledo, from church to hair shows, and I can guarantee there will be dancers. Toledo has long been a hotbed for budding talent like Disney Channel’s Alyson Stoner. If you know someone who enjoys a friendly battle resolved with synchronized dance, this is the event to attend. “Who Told You That You Could Dance? Midwest Dance Competition” at 8 p.m. April 22 at the Maumee Indoor Theatre. Show creator, New York native and now Toledo resident Monique Ward of Pozativ ProMotions has her hands full. Last-minute adjustments have been made due to a late overwhelming response to news of the competition. There will be 12 dance crews instead of the five she originally expected. Participating teams are Kim Jones Academy (Youngstown) Fynul Destination (Flint), Touch A Dream Studio (six teams from Sylvania) Winterfield Academy, Renegadez (two teams),  True MartianZ, Legally Talented, House of Adonis and Flatline. Ward was inspired by the great talent in Toledo and the Midwest when she noticed that after “friending” one dancer on Facebook she began getting friend requests from many more. “Dance has a whole world in Toledo that I did not even pay attention to,” Ward said. She realized she knew enough dancers to create an environment that would celebrate an often underappreciated art form. Conscious of providing a full show to at-

tendees, Pozativ ProMotions secured interesting artists to showcase various genres between dance performances. Toledo favorites like singer Jay Rush, who will properly start the event with the National Anthem, and Tracy, Hize, GiftD and JO2 will deliver R&B and Hip-Hop. Toledo School for the Arts’ talented Liz Croak will perform as well. Commentary during the event promises to be filled with laughs as it will be hosted by my fellow Star contributor lilD and Jahmal Garrett from The Juice FM 107.3. Contestants are fired up on all social networks in an effort to bring out supporters as they com pete for first, second and third-place trophies, cash prizes and bragging rights for the rest of the year. The competition will attract first-time visitors to the Glass City with talent ranging in age from 5 to 30. It is fitting that during the event there will be a special tribute by Mike Polk to the King of Pop (and dance), Michael Jackson. “Who Told You That You Could Dance?” will host a meet-and-greet for the talent, contestants, sponsors and media featuring 2010’s Ohio Hip-Hop Award-winning b-girl/dancer Billie Badazz. Billie will be there to speak, leaving soon after for Youngstown to open for national rap artist Trina. “What better way to work with, inspire and encourage?” Ward said. To find out more about “Who Told You That You Could Dance?” and Pozativ ProMotions events, log on to Facebook.com keywords “Who Told You That You Could Dance?” As we continue on ... O

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22 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

LISTEN TO ‘JEDI OF POP CULTURE’ Jeff McGinnis every Tuesday morning on 92.5 KISS-FM.

GLaDOS returns

W A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 2, No. 16 Established 2010. Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com Michael S. Miller, Editor in Chief mmiller@toledofreepress.com EDITORIAL

Mary Ann Stearns, Design Editor mastearns@toledofreepress.com James A. Molnar, Lead Designer jmolnar@toledofreepress.com Brandi Barhite, Associate Editor bbarhite@toledofreepress.com Emily Gibb, News Editor egibb@toledofreepress.com Sarah Ottney, Special Sections Editor sottney@toledofreepress.com Chris Schmidbauer, Sports Editor cschmidbauer@toledofreepress.com Andrew Farr, Bowling Green Editor afarr@toledofreepress.com Lisa Renee Ward, Web Editor star@toledofreepress.com ADMINISTRATION

Pam Burson, Business Manager pburson@toledofreepress.com CONTRIBUTORS star@toledofreepress.com Jim Beard • John Dorsey • Matt Feher • Jerry Gray Dustin Hostetler • Stacy Jurich • Vicki L. Kroll lilD • Martini • Jeff McGinnis • Whitney Meschke Rachel Richardson • Julie Webster • Don Zellers

Chris Kozak, Staff Writer Emeritus Lisa Renee Ward, Darcy Irons Sarah Ottney, Proofreaders ADVERTISING SALES

Renee Bergmooser, Sales Manager rbergmooser@toledofreepress.com Casey Fischer cfischer@toledofreepress.com Matt Mackowiak mmackowiak@toledofreepress.com Chick Reid creid@toledofreepress.com DISTRIBUTION

Charles Campos (419) 241-1700, Ext. 227 ccampos@toledofreepress.com

Toledo Free Press Star is published every Wednesday by Toledo Free Press, LLC, 605 Monroe St., Toledo, OH 43604 • (419) 241-1700 Fax: (419) 241-8828 www.toledofreepress.com. Subscription rate: $100 /year. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright 2011 with all rights reserved. Publication of ads does not imply endorsement of goods or services.

ith the release of “Portal 2” on April 19, gamers around the world are finally able to once again enter the world of Valve Software’s mindnumbing puzzles and genrebending game structure. But for many, the return of “Portal” is a cause for celebration for one very simple reason: It means GLaDOS is back. JEFF “Cake and grief counseling will be available at the end of the testing period.” When we first encountered her in the original “Portal,” released in 2007, GLaDOS certainly didn’t seem like a villain. In fact, she didn’t seem like a character at all. As gamers began exploring levels in the “science institute” that provided the game’s setting, an odd, automated voice accompanied them from room to room, providing guidance and information. Since the game’s structure and physics were unusual, her presence helped acclimate players to the new elements “Portal” was introducing. “Momentum, a function of mass and velocity, is conserved between portals. In layman’s terms, speedy thing goes in, speedy thing comes out.” But as time passed and players got deeper into the game, clues began to appear that their helpful guide was not all she seemed. Her attitude toward any peril the gamer experienced seemed flippant and uncaring. Her demeanor darkened, and more lethal traps were placed in the player’s way — all in the name of “scientific testing,” of course. And strange graffiti plastered everywhere — seemingly by a previous participant of “Portal’s” devious tests — informed that “She is watching you,” and, famously, that “The cake is a lie.” “At the end of the experiment, you will be baked, and then there will be cake.” It all led up to the game’s conclusion, where players learned that the voice was that of a sinister computer program named GLaDOS (Genetic Lifeform and Disk Operating System). She was, in fact, the only thing controlling the “testing” that went on at the lab, having apparently murdered the rest of the staff years earlier. “Good news. I figured what that thing you just incinerated did. It was a morality core they installed after I flooded the Enrichment Center with a deadly neurotoxin, to make me stop flooding the Enrichment Center with a deadly neurotoxin.” For all the gameplay innovations and intriguing puzzles provided by the original “Portal,” the game might have gone down as little more than a curious footnote if it had not been

for the addition of GLaDOS to the mix. As performed by the extraordinary Ellen McLain (her voice modified and mixed to make it sound more artificial) and written by the Valve Software team, the character is a nearly perfect mix of deadly antagonist and hilarious commentator. “Unbelievable. You, <subject name here>, must be the pride of <subject hometown here>.” Her demeanor and story arc have inspired comparisons to other famous computers-gone-mad, such as HAL in Stanley Kubrick’s immortal “2001: A Space Odyssey.” But I would argue — film purists, be braced — that GLaDOS is a more successful and engaging character than even HAL. “Well, you found me. Congratulations. Was it worth it? Because despite your violent

mCGINNIS

POP GOES THE

CULTURE

‘Portal 2’ has the greatest villain you may not know. behavior, the only thing you’ve managed to break so far ... is my heart.” HAL was also a computer that was simply following its programming to its logical conclusion — the mission was more important than the lives of the crew, so it was OK to kill them. But GLaDOS goes far deeper as a character, with her astoundingly witty dialogue and genuine malevolence giving her more levels than even Kubrick’s legendary foil. “You’ve been wrong about every single thing you’ve ever done, including this thing. You’re not smart. You’re not a scientist. You’re not a doctor. You’re not even a full-time employee!” And as “Portal 2” is unleashed on gamers worldwide, players will once more be confronted by the subtle-yet-powerful presence of its usually-unseen-yet-always-heard antagonist. And if the trailers and sound bites released in advance are any indication, GLaDOS’s remarkable personality has been fully retained and enhanced for the new game. She’s still as evil — and hilarious — as ever. And fans would have it no other way. “I think we can put our differences behind us. For science. You monster.” O Email Jeff at PopGoesJeff@gmail.com.

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24 n APRIL 20, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“REALLY LOVE YOUR PEACHES, WANNA SHAKE YOUR TREE.” — STEVE MILLER, “THE JOKER”

Toledo Free Press STAR – April 20, 2011  

The cover for this edition features Steve Miller, who will be performing with Gregg Allman at Huntington Center on April 23 (see page 12). O...

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