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CLUBS: Maumee’s Club Hype offers place for teens 4 EXHIBITS: Parkwood Gallery looks at landscapes 6 GIRL VS. FOOD: Watch the sweet stuff 9 WANDERING ROOTS: Common unity economy 10 THE PULSE: Events calendar 14 THE WORD I HEARD: Ron G isn’t a typical DJ 19 VIDEO GAMES: A Sim-sational game 21 POP GOES THE CULTURE: The horror! 22

CLub Hype in Maumee • HUMAN Torch, R.I.P. (for now) • DJ Ron G is a renaissance man • The SIms 3 for Nintendo DS FEB. 2, 2011 • Episode 2 Chapter 5 • Toledo Free Press Star, Toledo, OH: “Nobody ever told me, I found out for myself.” — Ozzy Osbourne, “I Don’t Know”

Stars of the Week

Red Wanting Blue brings ‘honest music’ to Frankie’s By Mighty Wyte TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR STAFF WRITER star@toledofreepress.com

Red Wanting Blue plays Frankie’s on Feb. 4, and according to vocalist Scott Terry, “The songs we play are personal, the songs are our lives. We don’t make shit up.” While using the descriptive “Americana” or “American Rock” is vague, Terry describes RWB’s art as “honest music played by honest musicians.” RWB, hailing from Columbus, is a workdriven band that has toured heavily for the past 10 years without the support of any major label. “The songs are the direct result of the environment we’ve been in, being on the road,” Terry said. “The songs are about dealing with the shards of what’s left of a personal life and the strange nuclear family that we’ve become.” After touring the country for a decade, RWB signed with Fanatic Records in March of 2009. Fortunately for RWB, this affiliation has not had a negative impact on how fans view the band. “They want us to move forward and make Ohio proud and make good on the promise,” Terry said. “Hopefully the people that have tattoos of our logo don’t have to explain that away to their kids someday. “We love our fans. I think we’ve been blessed with some of the most loyal fans in the world.” RWB fans have been very supportive of its move to a record label. “It’s not like we’re hanging with the hipster

elite, we haven’t changed and the music remains the same,” he said. “The label is very supportive of us keeping things how we like it.” RWB fans aren’t bandwagoneers. RWB has earned its loyal fan base by touring heavily and writing music that connects to the listener on many levels. “I’m a million dollars away from being a millionaire,” Terry laughed. “We don’t give ourselves any real downtime. Indie bands are like sharks, meaning you have to keep moving.” RWB certainly owns its sound. While there are familiar elements in its music, the sound is original and appealing. “We don’t play modern rock,” said Terry, and the sound is quite unlike anything else that is permeating the music scene right now. If you’re not familiar with its sound (myspace.com/redwantingblue), think Counting Crows meets Pearl Jam, meets pop country played by some very talented musicians. What should you expect from an RWB show at Frankies? “The songs all matter to us and we perform them with the same care that we took in writing them in the first place,” Terry said. “You’re not going to get a lot of special effects when we play, but we’re very happy to get sweaty and involved. We’re very passionate about our music.” Doors for the Red Wanting Blue show open at 9 p.m. Advance tickets are $8 and can be purchased from Culture Clash or Ramalama Records. Tickets the night of the show will be $10. O

Red Wanting Blue hails from Columbus. PHOTO COURTESY FANATIC RECORDS

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“I’M IN LOVE WITH ALL YOUR DANGER.” — SLASH, “BEAUTIFUL DANGEROUS”

Positive recreation By Matt Liasse Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Like most clubs, Club Hype features a dance floor, flashing lights and a disc jockey. What makes this new Maumee venue different is its patrons. Club Hype, a club for teenagers, opened in September with a goal to keep young adults off the streets. Penta Career Center student Brooke Thomas said Club Hype is a popular subject with people her age and she often hears about Club Hype in school hallways. She said during days later in the week, she often hears others ask, “Are you going to Club Hype this weekend?” Owner Stephanie Emch said she came up with the idea for a teenage club to give that age group a more positive recreation option. “They have nothing positive to do in their lives,” Emch said of teenagers partaking in drugs and alcohol. “[Club Hype] offers the kids something to do.” The club is much like an adult club, with a dance floor and bar area. A live DJ plays loud Hip-Hop, techno and pop music. The atmosphere is aimed at ages 14-18, so the only drinks offered are energy drinks and nonalcoholic mixed drinks. Emch said she was inspired when the gym where she worked out closed. Looking at the gym, she said it was the perfect fit for a nightclub. Her family put their heads together when the gym went out of business, converting it to Club Hype. The club met some controversy during Halloween. Many news outlets in the area reported that some of the teenagers attending the club were dancing suggestively and not wearing appropriate clothing. Maumee police investigated photographs of these teenagers when they were posted on Facebook. But Emch said it was a one-time mistake. “We had no problems prior to Halloween,” Emch said. “Nothing after.” Emch explained the incident on Halloween was a small problem that was made into a bigger problem than it had to be. She said none of the

news outlets followed up in the following weeks. “It was a big setback,” Emch said. Amidst all of the controversy, the area’s Cedar Creek Church used the club as a venue for its Vertical youth group’s kick off for the new semester on Jan. 9. Student Ministries Director Steven Whitlow contacted owners Stephanie and Mike Emch after hearing about Club Hype and the news that surrounded it. “There were certainly questions we had to ask,” Whitlow said, referring to booking the club as a venue for their church service. “We want our parents to trust us.” Whitlow said that he was confident with the owners and the security; the club’s official website explains there are always two to four uniformed security guards on duty during open hours. “They were incredibly accommodating,” Whitlow said. “What goes on at Club Hype is no different than what goes on at homecoming … [though] I don’t condone or support what goes on at homecoming.” Whitlow said he was very pleased with the event, which he held at the club in order for people who didn’t regularly attend church services to feel more comfortable. It welcomed close to 350 teenagers after only advertising on Facebook and through word-of-mouth. Thomas, who attended the church’s event at the club, thought it was “really cool” but didn’t agree with the concept of a teenage club. “Letting [teenagers] have a clubbing experience before they are legal … it just causes conflict,” Thomas said. She said she debated if it was “morally OK.” “It’s an alternative for a house party,” Emch said. “It’s safe. It’s a place to meet new people. It’s a place to dance.” Emch said working with the church was fantastic and she can’t wait to work with them again. She has also sponsored a concert at the club, partnering with Toledo radio station 92.5 KISS FM, and is planning a prom for young people with autism in March. Club Hype is located at 1703 Tollgate Drive in Maumee. It is open from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m on Saturdays. Online: hypetoledo.com. O

Club Hype moves beyond Halloween controversy.

Bret Hernandez dances freestyle at Club Hype on Jan. 29.

TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR PHOTO BY CHARLIE LONGTON

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“BROKEN WINGS CAN’T HOLD ME DOWN.” — OZZY, “GOODBYE TO ROMANCE”

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / FEB. 2, 2011 n 5

‘Romance of the Ring’ gala at Opera The Toledo Opera will present the work of Richard Wagner at its 2011 Opera Gala, “The Romance of the Ring.” Performed at the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle, the opera will be presented in concert, said Renay Conlin, general and artistic director for the Toledo Opera. “This is an opera that we couldn’t do at a Valentine, it’s an epic cycle of four operas that would require a much larger stage and pit,” Conlin said. “Doing this performance at the Peristyle in concert allows us to present Wagner’s music to a Toledo audience.” Soloists will sing in front of the orchestra and an English translation of the opera will be displayed on a screen. “The story Wagner envisioned is part fairy

tale and allegory, and it’s important that the audience understands,” Conlin said. Wagner created the musical drama and wanted the music and story to be experienced together, she said. Soloists for “The Romance of the Ring” are soprano Deborah Mayer, tenor Michael Hayes and bass Gustav Andreassen. Toledo Symphony Orchestra will accompany the singers. Conlin said the audience will instantly recognize Wagner’s work since it’s been featured in numerous films and commercials. “The Romance of the Ring” is Feb. 12 at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $30, with senior citizens and group discounts available. For tickets, call (419) 255-7464, or visit toledoopera.org. O — Kristen Criswell

Dance Club offers lessons, open dance The Northwest Ohio Dance Club (NWODC) will host a dance lesson and open dancing Feb. 5. Individuals will put the finishing touches on a West Coast Swing flash mob dance taught by instructors Mark and Lois Ferris. The dance lesson is the final installment of a three-part session. Individuals who understand West Coast Swing basics, such as the right side pass and a whip, could be familiar with the dance in one lesson, but those with no background in the dance could be overwhelmed, said Janet Frederick, NWODC promotions chairwoman. The lesson is from 7 to 8 p.m. with open dancing following from 8 p.m. to 11p.m. at the Toledo Yacht Club, 3900 N. Summit St. Open dancing features DJ Carol Ann Howell playing various music genres. Lessons are free for members and $5 for guest members. Open dancing is $5 for members and

$10 for nonmembers. NWODC is also kicking off a yearlong series of lessons taught by Toledo’s professional dance instructors Feb. 26. “The NWODC Dance Instruction Committee realizes that the club lessons are helpful, fun and most reasonable but they are not a substitute for a weekly lesson from a trained professional,” Frederick said. “The club wishes to support all the professional instructors in the area. The intention is to introduce area instructors to our members and event members through three consecutive lessons focusing on a specific dance.” Alfredo Horna, of Alfredo’s Studio of Dance, will kick off the series with fox trot lessons. For information about NWODC, visit north westohiodanceclub.shutterfly.com. O — Kristen Criswell

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“i refuse to let the hands of fate unfold.” — SLASH, “I HOLD ON”

A different light By Matt Liasse Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

University of Toledo student Aubrey Kirkendall found her calling in a cemetery. Kirkendall put together a collection of photos for her “Special Topics: Light and Landscape” advanced photography class at UT. Later, the professor of the class, Seder Burns, entered Kirkendall, along with eight other students’ work, to be part of an exhibition at the Parkwood Gallery in Toledo. The gallery displays the art, including some of Burns’ own, in the exhibition, “The Glass City Landscape: the Urban Landscape of Toledo.” “With the progression of the course, students were producing great work,” Burns said. Kirkendall originally wanted to do her project on pollution. While visiting the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, she took a picture of a cemetery. The picture shows a collection of gravestones with smoke from the plant in the background. When Kirkendall showed Burns the photo, he encouraged her to continue looking for cemeteries with such backgrounds. Kirkendall then went to nine or 10 different graveyards. “[I was looking] for harmful structures we come in contact with daily,” Kirkendall said. “I wanted to juxtapose the cemeteries with harmful structures in the background. Some are ironic.” For the class, Burns assigned his students to work with a landscape theme for their projects.

Interpreting Toledo’s ‘landscape.’

He said the theme was open to interpretation. The students created a variety of work, Burns said. Burns contacted the Parkwood Gallery about creating an exhibition because he had worked with them in the past. After that, Burns and the students had just a couple days to write proposals for the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo, a nonprofit organization that served as the selection committee. Burns’ students were selected in the competitive process. “I was very pleased; it’s a testament to the students’ work,” Burns said. “For most of them, this is their first show, so they are particularly excited.” Student Katy Payne is excited her work is displayed in the gallery. She is wishing to debunk the idea that Toledo is run down with her photos. “I got pretty sick of that view,” Payne said. “I kind of wanted to show life here [in Toledo].” Her project consists of 20 images of restaurants taken at night. “Toledo is known for its incredible amount of eating establishments,” Payne said. Payne took pictures of different restaurants in Toledo including Rally’s and Waffle House. Payne said the photos show people interacting in the restaurants bright with neon lights. “It’s a different light to see Toledo in,” Payne said. “People brought life to the landscapes.” Their work is on display at the gallery until Feb. 25. There will be a reception on Feb. 4 from 6 to 8 p.m. where all the artists will be in attendance. O

‘Death By ...’ on display at the Parkwood Gallery, 1838 Parkwood Ave. PHOTO BY AUBREY KIRKENDALL

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The sweet stuff

R

ecently, I saw a very young girl filling her iced tea with packet upon packet of Sweet ‘n Low. It took every ounce of patience I have to prevent me from yelling out in sheer terror. I kid you not. Clearly, the girl’s mother was not aware of exactly what is in one of those flashy pink packets of goodness (or dare I say gruesomeness). This distressing incident got me thinking, just how many people are aware of what those sensational sugar replacements contain? The average American consumes 22 teaspoons of sugar a day, while we only actually need six to nine. It only seems logical to replace the white, granulated stuff with a substitute. All of those replacements must be a better alternative, right? Splenda, Sweet ‘n Low and/or NutraSweet are all readily available at every coffee shop and grocery store, so they must be OK, right? Best of all, these alternatives to sugar are calorie-free, so you’re making a healthy choice, right? Wrong, wrong, wrong. Truth be told (and what a shocking truth it is), the regular, white grainy stuff is much better than the majority of the sugar posers out there. This is due to the fact that most of the alternatives contain a substance known as aspartame. Aspartame is a non-saccharin sweetener that is used as an artificial sugar substitute. Sounds harmless enough. The most famous brand is

NutraSweet, which I am sure we have all consumed at some point. It has been said that your body is not able to recognize this substance as a calorie, making it one of the most appealing diet-food additives around (diet soda, sugar-free goodies, etc.). Newsflash: Just because your body doesn’t register this mysterious matter as a calorie doesn’t mean it is harmless. While I am not a scientist, Monica I have done some research, and uncovered enough information to want to stop my use of aspartame altogether. Some people have consumed enough artificial substances from foods to start a small chemical laboratory, and feel safe because it is the latest diet trend. However, I am not going to walk around sucking down antifreeze if the diet industry has adds it to its new product line. If it is not recognized as a calorie, or a unit of energy, then what is it? Specific research has directly linked aspar-

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eners you have stashed in your drawers and cupboards (I hope), what can you use to replace them? Honestly, white granulated sugar is always a better alternative, and an even better alternative is known as Xylitol. Xylitol is a sweetener that occurs naturally in berries and other fruits, and our bodies even produce it during the metabolic process. In its natural form (which can be purchased at health food Stores such as Claudia’s or Bassett’s) it is sweeter than sugar, and (gasp!) good for us. And, get this; it can actually prevent tooth decay. Our bodies most certainly recognize and welcome this long-lost friend. I encourage you to form your own opinion on this topic. Our bodies are, by far, one of our most valuable possessions, and, like it or not, will be sticking with us (like snazzy little barnacles) for the rest of our lives. Don’t you want your one and only bod to be happy, healthy and functioning atits highest capacity? I do. I’m pretty sure we all do. So, step away from the Sweet ‘n Low. O Monica Mikolajczyk is a yoga instructor, firm believer in always choosing local, and a holistic health advocate who believes we all have the potential to grow and change if we simply allow ourselves the space to do so. E-mail her at star@ toledofreepress.com.

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“I had to say I loved you just to try aND keep the peace.” — SLASH, “good to be alive”

Common unity economy A

s a first-year college student at Ohio State University I joined Free the Planet!, a club whose mission is to free the planet. This influenced my life as an activist, and my economics courses influenced my opinion that common-sense economics and creating local living economies is the most sustainable model. I recall a moment when in and out of the classroom study overlapped, pondering why people (or a company) would cut down trees to make a product to sell for money. But if we don’t have trees — and thus cannot sustain life — then what good is money? A simple concept, I thought — common sense. Aren’t the trees a little more important? No, tree hugger, they’re not. The current model of economics says cut down the trees, use them to make stuff to sell for money. We are capitalists and you need to make (paper) money so you can buy stuff. “The Story of Stuff ” is a 20-minute video by Annie Leonard that describes how our linear materials economy is rapidly eliminating our natural resources: trees, mountains, water, animals, air; the underlying necessities of life. And when I say eliminating, I mean: O In the past three decades, one-third of the planet’s natural resource space has been consumed . O In the U.S., less than 4 percent of original forests remain. O 40 percent of waterways are undrinkable.

O The U.S. has 5 percent of world’s population but is using 30 percent of world’s resources and creating 30 percent of global waste. O 75 percent of global fisheries are fished at or beyond capacity. O The Amazon is losing 2,000 trees each minute (that’s the size of 7 football fields). O 80 percent of the planet’s original forests are gone. This natural resource exploitation is supposedly validated STACY by the creation of stuff. After World War II, corporations and the government were trying to figure out how to re-boost the economy, and people like retailing analyst Victor LeBeaux and President Eisenhower’s Council of Economic Advisors chairman decided that we should make consumption our way of life, and that the American economy’s ultimate purpose is to produce more consumer goods. At this time, planned obsolescence was born. Products were (and still are) designed to be useless

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Let’s see if this makes sense yet. We unsustainably mine and harvest natural resources to create products with the utmost inefficiency around the globe, and in the process create waste, pollution and toxins. We buy these goods and then throw them away, creating more garbage and pollution, thus destroying the natural resources that remain. Activist Julia Butterfly Hill compares the words “ecologics” and “economics,” the studies of the roles of ecology and economy in our ecos, or home (lives). Notice where the word “logic” is found, implying the only way our economy will “make sense” is if it is rooted in ecology being of primary importance. “There are no jobs on a planet that can no longer sustain us because we have taken more than our share,” Hill said. I might be described using Italian Marxist and revolutionary thinker Antonio Gramsci’s phrase “pessimism of intellect, optimism of will.” “The Story of Stuff ” suggests that we “unplug the TV and Internet and plug in the community.” The collective conscious can and is creating an economy based on common unity, gaining wealth through human interactions and ecological restoration, and sharing comfort and safety knowing our basic needs are and will be met. Light bulbs are going off, literally and figuratively ... What’s your story? O

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so we would discard it and replace it with a new one (plastic bags, coffee cups, electronics). 99 percent of the stuff we buy is trashed within six months after purchase! That adds up to about 4.5 pounds of garbage per person, per day. Additionally, waste amounting to approximately 70 garbage cans per person per day is created “upstream” during the production stages of our stuff. Youngsters in the U.S. practically have full-time jobs in front of the screen ... 40 hours a week spent in front of a computer, television, iTHIS and iTHAT. We spend so much time working for money for the stuff, that we don’t have time for leisure. Many Americans are stuck in a freaky scary cycle — work, TV (which says buy more), shop, work to pay for shopping, TV, shop ... it’s no surprise our “national happiness” is at its lowest since the 1950s, when capitalism and planned obsolescence was born.

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12 n FEB. 2, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“Hoping when all is said and done we can learn to love and be as one.” — SLASH, “STARLIGHT”

DOuble TrOu Still screaming: Ozzy not ready to leave music By Alan Sculley Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Ozzy Osbourne has openly admitted he’s done a few things he regrets — something that isn’t surprising for a man whose former drinking habit took on legendary proportions and who lived up to his “Prince of Darkness” image through infamous incidents such as his decapitation of a bat with his own teeth during a concert in Des Moines, Iowa. More recently, Osbourne has come to wish he hadn’t made statements to USA Today in 2008 that he would make two more albums and retire. “Once upon a time, when I was 22, I said ‘You know what, I don’t think I’m going to live until after 40.’ That was OK until I was 39 and a half,’” Osbourne said during a recent telephone interview. “I suppose I could have been in a very depressed mood [when I talked about retirement], I don’t know. I’m not going to retire yet.” Osbourne certainly isn’t acting like someone who wants to exit stage left anytime soon. His newest CD, “Scream,” reached No. 4 on the U.S. charts and he is resuming the stateside leg of what promises to be an ambitious and extended world tour, including a stop with Slash Feb. 12 at the Palace of Auburn Hills. It’s not the kind of behavior one expects from an artist intent on winding down his career. If the music on “Scream” will sound familiar to those acquainted with Osbourne’s past work, the making of the CD was different in a couple of significant ways. Unlike previous albums, “Scream” was written entirely in the studio, with Osbourne collaborating with his producer, Kevin Churko, in writing and arranging the songs. “We would do the music together,” Osbourne said. “He would say ‘What do you think of this?’ And I’d say it would be better if you did this and that. We just worked things out. It was great. I mean, when it comes to lyrics, I ain’t the best lyricist, so I like to have someone to bounce [ideas] off of. He’s very clever and it’s good for me to bounce off him.” “Scream” also marks the debut of guitarist Gus G. It’s a major change, considering that over the years Osbourne’s guitarists have been the focal point of his bands, as well as Osbourne’s main songwriting collaborators on his albums. Slots with Osbourne have made stars out of past ax men, such as the late Randy Rhoads and most recently Zakk Wylde. But as Osbourne was getting ready to make “Scream,” it was clear that Wylde, who fronts his own band, Black Label Society, wasn’t going to be involved in the project. That was the main reason

Churko stepped in as such a key contributor to the album’s songwriting. “Zakk had gotten sick with blood clots,” Osbourne said, referring to the health issue that forced Wylde to cancel tour dates in summer 2009. “He’d been doing double duty. He’d been doing my gig and his own. I knew eventually I’d have to get somewhat of a permanent replacement for Zakk, and so now was the time, because people were saying I was starting to sound like Black Label Society, which is very possible because he is Black Label Society. And you know what, Zakk’s a [bleeping] fine player, one of the greatest players I ever worked with in my life. And he’s still a good mate of mine. We still communicate.” Fans should get a good chance to judge Gus G., as Osbourne continues what is supposed to be 18 months of touring. The tour started with a string of six Ozzfest dates in the summer — the first time the tour had happened since 2007. For the 2007 Ozzfest tour, organizer (and wife of Osbourne) Sharon Osbourne broke ground by making Ozzfest free. Some saw it as a last-ditch attempt to save the festival, which had seen declining attendance in years leading up to that 2007 run. In 2008, Ozzfest returned for a single show in Dallas, and then was absent from the concert scene in 2009. The brief sixdate trial run for Ozzfest in 2010 was how Ozzy Osbourne wanted it. Now back headlining, Osbourne is promising some musical surprises in his show. “I mean, I’m not going to just play the [usual] Sabbath songs like ‘Iron Man,’ ‘War Pigs’ and ‘Paranoid,’” he said. “I’ve got choices on this one. Whatever songs I want to pull up instead of the classic songs I always do, I’m playing some of my solo songs. I’m playing a couple of songs I haven’t played on stage for a long, long time. “I’m not going to tell you what they are because it would kill the surprise.” O

Taking the lead: Slash in By Alan Sculley Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

Slash’s band, Velvet still be looking for the But the guitarist d same problem when it cently released self-title He found 13 of them. Slash recruited a of vocalists, each of w lead vocals on on CD (except for M of Alter Bridge, of the tracks.) And he sai of the “Slash smoothly d many vocalis sonalities invo “It was a ve cord to make,” known as Saul Hu Social Security Administr a recent phone interview. “It w cated and it wasn’t fraught with problems or anything like th very, sort of casual and rela Just coming in and doin out for awhile and take o of those things that coul real hassle, but it wasn’t. Slash said the idea t of album first began t singer Scott Weiland volver in spring 200 forcing that band to But even when the tive, Slash had been play guitar on albu other artists. Slash said he re have made a CD of the spotlight s talents, but that excite him. “Everybody ably imagine, to do an instru lot of guitar sol said. “I couldn thing that wo uninteresting The fact i lot of outside


“Three thousand sails on high are straining in the wind.” — OZZY, “S.A.T.O.”

uble

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / FEB. 2, 2011 n 13

Ozzy Osbourne, Slash to play The Palace on Feb. 12.

: control of solo projects.

Revolver, may right singer. didn’t have the came to his reed solo album.

baker’s dozen whom took on ne song on his Myles Kennedy who sang two

id the making h” CD went despite the sts and perolved. ery simple rethe guitarist Hudson to the ration said in wasn’t complih issues or ego hat. It was very, atively simple. ng it, hanging off. It was one ld have been a .” to do this sort to form before left Velvet Re008, essentially o the sidelines. band was acn in demand to um projects by

ealizes he could that put more squarely on his thought didn’t

y would proboh, he’s going umental with a olos on it,” Slash n’t think of anyould be more g for me to do.” is, even with a e involvement,

the CD was very much Slash’s project. “I hired the producer, I hired the band and everybody else involved,” he said. “Then I would just call up the singers who would come down and sort of write. It was sort of like my crazy little excursion.” And the project very much started with Slash, who took the lead as the songwriter. “I just sat down and wrote a bunch of music,” he said. “Then I would listen to the music and it would sort of dictate to me who would be the appropriate singer. And then I would seek out the vocalists, song by song, and send them the demo and sort of impress upon them that it was a completely open forum, that they could do whatever they wanted with the material and it was subject to their interpretation and all that kind of stuff.” The amount of input each singer offered varied, Slash said. “Like with Fergie (of the Black Eyed Peas), we did the music exactly the way I wrote it,” Slash said. “She sang to exactly what I wrote. We didn’t change anything. That happened a lot on the record. But then with Kid Rock, with M Shadows (of Avenged Sevenfold), we worked on those songs from the ground up. They really had an idea of the parts they wanted to do. When we did ‘By The Sword’ with Andrew Stockdale (of Wolfmother), he came up with these really great chord changes for the sort of chorus section of the song. So every song had a different input from the singer.” The songs that made the “Slash” CD show surprising variety from the guitarist. “Crucify The Dead” (featuring Ozzy Osbourne) is the kind of eerie rocker one might expect on one of the former Black Sabbath singer’s own albums. “Beautiful Dangerous” (featuring a full-throated performance by Fergie) is a stomping dancerocker. Meanwhile, “Promise,” puts Soundgarden’s Chris Cornell into a brooding but hooky pop-rock setting. And Iggy Pop cuts loose on “We’re All Gonna Die,” a track that merges garage rock and moody metal. Slash, of course, was a key figure in Guns N’ Roses’ fast rise to the forefront of the hard rock scene on its 1988 debut album, “Appetite For Destruction” (18 million copies sold in the United States alone) and the two-CD 1991 follow-up “Use Your Illusion I/Use Your Illusion II.” His searing guitar work was one of Guns N’ Roses’ main signatures. But Axl Rose was the leader of the band, and as relationships began to sour, the members of the band’s classic lineup were all fired or left, with

Slash bowing out to form his own band, Slash’s Snakepit, in 1995. In 2002, Slash and his former Guns N’ Roses bandmates, bassist Duff McKagan and drummer Matt Sorum, decided to form a new group, Velvet Revolver. Things came together with the addition of guitarist Dave Kushner and especially former Stone Temple Pilots singer Weiland. Eventually, though, conflicts with Weiland emerged and the singer returned to Stone Temple Pilots. Velvet Revolver, though, never broke up and has been compiling audition tapes from singers for the past couple of years. Slash said Velvet Revolver could return to action later this year. The group got together in October to review audition tapes for a new singer, and there are reports that the band may have zeroed in on its new vocalist. “Once we find a singer, that will really sort of dictate what the future of the band’s going to be,” Slash said. As for Guns N’ Roses, rumors of a reunion of the classic lineup continue to pop up from time to time, despite what appears to be pretty much a nonexistent relationship between Rose and the other former band members. The fact that the band will be eligible for induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2013 has spurred speculation that it might at the least regroup to perform at the ceremony. Slash wasn’t going to show his hand when it came to the Hall of Fame or prospects of some sort of reunion. “I know we’ll be eligible, and when that time comes, we’ll deal with it (performing) then,” he said. For now, Slash’s main priority is touring. His band includes Kennedy on vocals, Bobby Schneck on guitar, Todd Kerns on bass and Brent Fitz on drums, and Slash said he likes what he hears on stage. He will open for Ozzy Osbourne Feb. 12 at the Palace of Auburn Hills. The live set encompasses Slash’s entire career, from Guns N’ Roses through Snakepit, Velvet Revolver and the self-titled solo album. “It’s cool because since it’s my solo tour, I can do whatever I want and I can play stuff from my entire catalog, whereas in Velvet Revolver and even Snakepit, I have to concentrate on that particular band,” Slash said. O

Cover photo: AP/Photo Illustration by James A. Molnar


14 n FEB. 2, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“NOW THE CRUEL WORLD IS GONNA TRY AND CHANGE YOU.’ — SLASH, “PROMISE”

((((((((((((( THE PULSE

FEB. 2-9, 2011

What’s what, where and when in NW Ohio

Compiled by Whitney Meschke Events are subject to change.

The Ark

MUSIC

(734) 996-8555 or blindpigmusic.com.

O Devious: Thursdays (also open mic night)-Saturdays.

O Chris Webby, Gameboi, the DSB: 8 p.m. Feb. 2. O The Appleseed Collective, Maray Fuego, Del Brutto,

Club Soda

Brandon Weiner: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 3.

O Ann Arbor Soul Club, Robert Wells, Brad Hales: Feb. 4. O Bob Marley birthday bash featuring Universal Xpression:

This small venue offers a showcase for lesser-known acts. 316 S. Main St., Ann Arbor. (734) 761-1451, (734) 761-1800 or www.theark.org. O Frank Vignola, Vinny Raniolo, Julien Labro: 8 p.m. Feb. 2, $20. O Ann Doyle, Doug Howell: 8 p.m. Feb. 3, $15. O Hoots and Hellmouth: 8 p.m. Feb. 4, $17.50. O Yiddishe Cup: 8 p.m. Feb. 5, $20. O Caravan of Thieves: 8 p.m. Feb. 7, $12.50. O Kurt Elling: 8 p.m. Feb. 8, $30. O The Wailers: 8 p.m. Feb. 9, $30. O The Battlefield Band: 8 p.m. Feb. 10, $20. O The Kruger Brothers: 8 p.m. Feb. 11, $15.

8 p.m. Feb. 5. O Nights on Secor, Exit Stick, Jake Ousley, the JHD: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 8. O Luke Jackson, Avienne, Ohh Ahh: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 9. O Ultraviolet Hippopotamus, Jimkata: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 10. O The Macpodz, Dan Piccolo, Dan Bennett, Jamie Register, Kyle Hunter, Kadence, Nickie P.: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Feb. 11.

Bretz Bar 2012 Adams St. (419) 243-1900. O Deja D’Delatarro and Felaciana Thunderpussy: Thursdays-Saturdays. O Danyel Vasquez: Feb. 5.

This university hot spot from back in the day hosts entertainment Fridays and Saturdays. 3922 Secor Road. (419) 473-0062 or www.toledoclubsoda.com. O MAS FiNA: Feb. 4-5. O Venyx: Feb. 11-12.

Dégagé Jazz Café Signature drinks, such as pumpkin martinis, plus live local jazz performers. 301 River Road, Maumee. $5 weekends for cafe seating. (419) 794-8205 or www.degagejazzcafe.com. O Janet Tenaj: Feb. 4-5.

The Distillery Karaoke is offered Tuesdays, but paid entertainers rock out Wednesdays-Saturdays. 4311 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 382-1444 or www.thedistilleryonline.com. O Kyle White: Feb. 2 and 9. O Ben Barefoot and Company: Feb. 3. O Velvet Jones: Feb. 4-5. O 56 Daze: Feb. 10-12.

Basin St. Grille

Bronze Boar

This Toledo standby has been revived with more than 20 different flavors of martinis and live, local music. 5201 Monroe St. (419) 843-5660. O Stephen Woolley, Suburban Soul: Feb. 2 and 10. O Tom Turner, SlowBurn: Feb. 3. O Acoustic Buddha, Kevin Russell: Feb. 4. O Swamp Kings, Deacon Robertson: Feb. 5. O Jeff Stewart: Feb. 9. O Distant Cousinz, Scott Fish: Feb. 11.

Be sure to check out this Warehouse District tavern’s namesake, overhead near the entrance. 20 S. Huron St. (419) 244-2627 or www.bronzeboar.com. O Jerod: Wednesdays and Thursdays. O Open mic night with Chris Knopp: Mondays. O Karaoke: Tuesdays. O Ravens: Feb. 4. O Bush League: Feb. 5. O Stonehouse: Feb. 11.

The Blarney Irish Pub

Caesars Windsor

Frankie’s

Catch local acts while taking in the pub’s modern Irish and American fare. 601 Monroe St. (419) 418-2339 or www. theblarneyirishpub.com. O Rick Whited: Feb. 3. O Calen Savidge: Feb. 4. O Pilot Radio: Feb. 5. O Jeff Stewart: Feb. 10. O Toast & Jam: Feb. 11.

Consider hopping the Detroit River for this casino’s entertainment offerings. Ticket prices, in Canadian dollars, are for the cheapest seats; attendees must be 19 or older. Caesars Windsor Colosseum, 377 Riverside Dr. East, Windsor, Ontario. (800) 991-7777 or www.caesarswindsor.com. O The Spinners, the Stylistics: 9 p.m. Feb. 4, $25. O The Canadian Tenors: 9 p.m. Feb. 11, $15.

Blind Pig

A different band performs each week. 702 E. Broadway St. (419) 754-1903. O DJ Lamont: Tuesdays.

Toledo’s venue for rock. 308 Main St. Tickets vary between $5 and $15, unless noted. (419) 693-5300 or www. FrankiesInnerCity.com. O Auto Tune karaoke: 9 p.m. Mondays. O Red Wanting Blue, I of Radio: 9 p.m. Feb. 4. O Mark Ballas, Jason LaPorte, Ryan Dunlap, Steel Vines (rescheduled): 9 p.m. Feb. 5. O Goodbye Blue Skies, Arson Our Savior, Lost in the Light, Not Without a Fight, a Violent Perfection, Armastus: 6 p.m. Feb. 6. O Mobile Deathcamp, Buried but Breathing, Organism, Haud Imperium: 9 p.m. Feb. 11.

A variety of rock, soul, pop and alternative acts perform at this bar. 208 S. First St., Ann Arbor. $3-$20 unless noted.

Cheetah’s Den

Fat Fish Blue Serving blues and similar sounds, as well as bayoustyle grub. Levis Commons, 6140 Levis Commons Blvd., Perrysburg. (419) 931-3474 or fatfishfunnybonetoledo.com. O Tantric Soul: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 4 and 9 p.m. Feb. 5. O Arctic Clam: 9:30 p.m. Feb. 11 and 9 p.m. 12.

French Quarter J. Pat’s Pub Live entertainment after 9:30 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays. Holiday Inn French Quarter, 10630 Fremont Pike, Perrysburg. (419) 874-3111 or www.hifq.com. O Green Eyed Soul: Feb. 4-5. O The Late Show: Feb. 11-12.

Ice Restaurant & Bar This local, family-owned enterprise offers food, drinks and music in a sleek atmosphere. 405 Madison Ave. (419) 2463339 or icerestaurantandbar.com. O Jesse Coleman: 5 p.m. Feb. 3 and 7 p.m. Feb. 4. O Relativity: 7 p.m. Feb. 5. O Alexander Zonjic, Marc Antoine, James Lloyd: 6 and 9 p.m. Feb. 10, $20-$25. O The Berlin Brothers: 8 p.m. Feb. 11.

Kerrytown Concert House This venue focuses on classical, jazz and opera artists and music. 415 N. Fourth Ave., Ann Arbor. $5-$30, unless noted. (734) 769-2999 or www.kerrytownconcerthouse.com. O Ilya Blinov: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 6. O Bartok and Beyond: 8 p.m. Feb. 10. O Oblivion Project: 8 p.m. Feb. 11.

Manhattan’s This “slice of the Big Apple” in the Glass City provides entertainment most weekends. 1516 Adams St. (419) 243-6675 or www.manhattanstoledo.com. O Vytas and Steve: 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. O Open mic with Bread and Butter: 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Mondays. O Quick Trio: 6 p.m. Feb. 3. O John Barile: Feb. 4. O Quartet Bernadette: Feb. 5. O Tom Turner: 8 p.m. Feb. 8. O Daniel Burris Trio: 6 p.m. Feb. 10.

Mickey Finn’s A variety of genres to wash your drinks down with. Open mic nights, 9 p.m. Wednesdays, no cover; $5-$7 cover other nights. 602 Lagrange St. (419) 246-3466 or www.mickeyfinnspub.com. O Local music and film nights: 8 p.m. Thursdays in February, no cover.

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“AM I EVER GONNA MAKE THE GRADE?” — OZZY, “TONIGHT”

Mickey Finn’s (cont.)

Woodchucks

O Slow Death, the Live Nudes, Tons of Fun: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 4. O Bobby May and the Dry Bone Revival: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 5. O Gold, Earth Hits Hard: 8:30 p.m. Feb. 11.

The place to go for an eclectic mix of people and music. 224 S. Erie St. (419) 241-3045. O Karaoke with Georgia Peach: Wednesdays. O Yeti Machete, Ego & the Maniacs, St. Thomas Boys Academy, Texas Pete & the Revolutions: Feb. 4. O Grommet, Megaton Hammer, Bathhouse Betty: Feb. 5. O The Grubs, Static Ego, the Shame Game: Feb. 11.

M.T. Loonies Last Born Sons Band performs at 9 p.m. Thursdays; DJs take over on Fridays and Saturdays. 6648 Lewis Ave., Temperance. (734) 847-7222 or mtloonies.net.

Murphy’s Place Jazz — straight, smooth, bebop or traditional — all kinds are played here. 151 Water St. (419) 241-7732 or www.murphysplacejazz.com.

Omni This club is a venue for music (and music lovers) of all types. 2567 W. Bancroft St. (419) 535-6664 or omnimidwest.com. O Nevermind: 8 p.m. Feb. 11. Casual meals with weekend entertainment. 1815 Adams St. (419) 725-5483 or www.otavern. com. O Nowhere at All, John Salvage, the Solar Eight, GoLab, the Zimmerman Twins: 8 p.m. Feb. 3. O Nowhere at All, Thirty Three and 1/3, the Dead Sun, Kelly Johns, Hound WEe: 8 p.m. Feb. 4. O Nowhere at All, Joey & the Traitors, Matt Truman Ego Trip, Boogaloosa Prayer: 8 p.m. Feb. 5. O Chris Bathgate: 8 p.m. Feb. 11.

Toledo’s Mainstreet Bar and Grill

8 p.m. Thursdays, South Briar Restaurant, 5147 S. Main St., Sylvania. (419) 517-1111 or (419) 708-0265.

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band All Stars Dancing is encouraged. 8-10:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Trotter’s Tavern, 5131 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-2079 or (419) 708-0265.

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra
with Wynton Marsalis

((((((

Ottawa Tavern

Jeff McDonald’s Big Band Revival Party

FREE FOR ALL

Feb. 8, 6:30-8 p.m.

Save the Squirrels

Participants will build natural feeders to take home to feed the furry nut fiends. Wood County Park District headquarters, 18729 Mercer Road, Bowling Green. Registration: (419) 353-1897 or www.wcparks.org.

Ronn Daniels performs weekly at this pub. 8-11 p.m. Thursdays, 141 Main St. (419) 697-6297 or www. toledomainstreet.com. O MoonDogs: 10 p.m. Feb. 5.

The Village Idiot Tunes combined with pizza and booze, some would say it’s a perfect combination. 309 Conant St., Maumee. (419) 8937281, (419) 740-2395 or www.villageidiotmaumee.com. O Old West End Records: Wednesdays. O Mark Mikel: Friday afternoons and Tuesday nights. O Bob Rex: Sunday afternoons. O Frankie May, Ben Barefoot: Mondays. O 500 Miles to Memphis: Feb. 4. O Polka Floyd: Feb. 11.

The legendary trumpeter will lead 15-member ensemble in a performance from “Vitoria Suite,” composed by Marsalis to meld the jazz and blues of North America and the indigenous and flamenco music of Spain. 8 p.m. Feb. 2, Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor. $10-$54. (734) 764-2538 or ums.org.

Club Friday The Murphys: Some of the city’s most talented performers entertain museum-goers during TMA’s It’s Friday events. 6:309:30 p.m. Feb. 4, Cloister, 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org.

Findlay First Edition and Pantasia This show choir and steel drum band, respectively, offer an escape from winter doldrums with this fundraising concert. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 4, Central Auditorium, 200 W. Main Cross St., Findlay. $13-$18. (419) 422-4624, www. artspartnership.com, www.findlayfirstedition.org or www.pantasia.org.

Friday Night Live Regional entertainers will perform in an intimate setting. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 4, Ritz Theatre, 20 S. Washington St., Tiffin. $10. (419) 448-8544 or www.ritztheatre.org.

Free Room Rental for groups of 75 or more! Fund-raisers, Client Appreciation, Celebrations Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner Buffets Call today for your personal tour and menu package!

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / FEB. 2, 2011 n 15

New CD releases at Ramalama Records

O Tao of the Dead ...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead O S/T II: The Cosmic Birth and Journey of Shinju TNT Akron/Family O Mondo Amore Atkins, Nicole

O Zonoscope Cut Copy Belphegor O World Is Yours [Bonus DVD] Motorhead O Love Is the Law O The Long Surrender Bond, Graham O Sever the Wicked Hand Over the Rhine [Explicit Content] O Jailbreak (deluxe) Crowbar Thin Lizzy O Blood Magick Necromance

Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg and New Century Chamber Orchestra

mingham Branch Library, 203 Paine Ave. (419) 259-5210, www.toledolibrary.org or www.thekellerbrothers.com.

The violinist and San Francisco ensemble perform Astor Piazzolla’s “Four Seasons of Buenos Aires” and works by Philip Glass and more. 8 p.m. Feb. 4, University of Michigan, Rackham Auditorium, 915 E. Washington St., Ann Arbor. $24-$50. (734) 764-2538 or ums.org.

Beethoven’s Ninth The Toledo Symphony, led by Stefan Sanderling, will perform one of the best-known classical symphonies. 8 p.m. Feb. 4-5, Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle, 2445 Monroe St. $20-$50. (419) 246-8000, (800) 348-1253 or www.toledosymphony.com.

TMA concert Visual and audible arts combine for a new experience. Great Gallery (unless noted), 2445 Monroe St. (419) 255-8000 or toledomuseum.org. O Music, Poetry and Dance to Celebrate the African-American Experience: 3 p.m. Feb. 5.

UT concerts The university’s music students and friends will perform the pieces they’ve been perfecting. (419) 530-2452, (419) 5302448 or www.utoledo.edu/as/music. O Pianist Louis Nagel: Master class, 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 5; concert, 3 p.m. Feb. 6, Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall, Tower View Boulevard and West Campus Drive.

Scholars of a Different Note This concert series features BGSU vocal and instrumental music students. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8, Wildwood Preserve Metropark Manor House, 5100 W. Central Ave. (419) 407-9700 or metroparkstoledo.com.

The Keller Brothers This talented sibling trio blends voices in performance of operatic songs, hymns and pop tunes. 4-5 p.m. Feb. 8, Bir-

Drumline Live Pounding beats meld with the traditional (and nontraditional) dance steps of the nation’s top historically black college marching bands. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9, Stranahan Theater, 4645 Heatherdowns Blvd. (419) 381-8851 or www.stranahantheater.com.

Blues at the Crossroads Big Head Todd & The Monsters, David “Honeyboy” Edwards, Hubert Sumlin, Cedric Burnside and Lightnin’ Malcolm will perform for the Robert Johnson centennial concert. 8 p.m. Feb. 10, University of Michigan, Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor. $10-$46. (734) 764-2538 or ums.org.

Rafal Blechacz This pianist, winner of the 2005 International Chopin Competition, will play works by Mozart, Debussy and others. 8 p.m. Feb. 11, University of Michigan, Hill Auditorium, 825 N. University Ave., Ann Arbor. $10-$50. (734) 764-2538 or ums.org.

BG & MORE

BOWLING GREEN

BGSU performances The university’s ensembles, choirs, quartets and more — and their friends — will present the music they’ve been perfecting. Halls are located in Moore Musical Arts Center, Willard Drive and Ridge Street, Bowling Green. (419) 372-8171, (800) 589-2224, (419) 372-8888 or www.bgsu.edu/colleges/music. O Laura Melton, piano: 8 p.m. Feb. 2, Bryan Recital Hall. O Robert Levin, piano: lecture/presentation, 4:30 p.m. Feb. 4, Kobacker Hall; preconcert lecture, 7:15 p.m. Feb. 5, Bryan Recital Hall. Concert, 8 p.m., Kobacker Hall, $17-$36.

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16 n FEB. 2, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

“You got some real bad habIts, you better stop right quick.” — SLASH, “Doctor Alibi”

Tell A Friend about 107.7 The Wolf and win! You and a friend could each win a weekend getaway to Great Wolf Lodge Waterpark and a $250 Visa Debit Card from Genoa Bank! Enter at www.1077Wolf.com or simply fax your name and your friend’s name to the Wolf @ (419) 241-1077, then tell your friend to listen for their name to be called Monday through Friday at 7:07 a.m., 10:07 a.m., 1:07 p.m. and 4:07 p.m.! Your Name: ________________________________________ Friend’s Name:______________________________________ BGSU performances (cont.) O Bowling Green Philharmonia: 3 p.m. Feb. 6, Kobacker Hall. O Anubis Saxophone Quartet: 8 p.m. Feb. 7, Bryan Recital Hall. O Woodwind faculty concert: 8 p.m. Feb. 9, Bryan Recital Hall.

BGSU Planetarium shows This semester, the star gazers are focusing on shows that “connect astronomy and everyday life” that were created at the university. 8 p.m. Fridays and Tuesdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays; and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, Room 112, Physical Sciences Lab Building, near North College Drive and East Merry Avenue, Bowling Green. $1. (419) 372-8666 or physics.bgsu.edu/planetarium. O “It’s About Time”: Secrets of clocks and calendars. Through Feb. 4. O “Dinosaur Light”: Universal tour in space and time. Feb. 6-25.

Clazel Theater This venue has been rocking BGSU students (and others) for years. 127 N. Main St., Bowling Green. (419) 353-5000 or www.clazel.net. O Luke James, Katie Monroe: 7 p.m. Feb. 5, $5.

Gish Film Theater Named in memory of Dorothy and Lillian Gish, this theater hosts screenings of international and arthouse movies and matinees of popular films of the past. BGSU’s Hanna Hall, East Wooster Street, Bowling Green. Free. (419) 372-4474 or www.bgsu.edu/gish. O International Film Series: “A Call Girl,” 7:30 p.m. Feb. 3; “Strokes of Fire,” 7:30 p.m. Feb. 10. O Tuesdays at the Gish: “Prehistoric Women,” 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8.

ment. 4:30-6 p.m. Feb. 3, Room 308, Bowen-Thompson Student Union, BGSU, Ridge Street and North College Drive, Bowling Green. (419) 372-2796 or www.bgsu.edu.

Brown Bag Music Series Eat that ham and swiss with a side of music. This week’s performers are College of Musical Arts vocal students. 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 4, Simpson Building, 1291 Conneaut Ave., Bowling Green. (419) 354-6223 or www.bgohio.org/departments/parks-and-recreation.

The Great Kaplan Inspired by the greats of days gone by, David Kaplan puts on a one-man Vaudeville show, juggling bean bag chairs, playing the balloon and various acts of skill and gimmick. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 5, Pemberville Opera House, 115 Main St., Pemberville. $12. (419) 287-3274, (877) 287-4848 or www.pembervilleoperahouse.org.

Undergraduate Art & Design exhibition Students in BGSU’s School of Art will have their work, in all media, juried. Reception, 2-4 p.m. Feb. 6; exhibition, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays (plus 6-9 p.m. Thursdays) and 1-4 p.m. Sundays, Feb. 6-27, Dorothy Uber Bryan and Willard Wankelman galleries, Fine Arts Center, between Ridge and Wooster streets, Bowling Green. (419) 372-8525 or art.bgsu.edu/galleries.

Save the Squirrels Participants will build natural feeders to take home to feed the furry nut fiends. 6:30-8 p.m. Feb. 8, Wood County Park District headquarters, 18729 Mercer Road, Bowling Green. Registration: (419) 353-1897 or www.wcparks.org.

Grumpy Dave’s Comedy Nights

“Screams From Shadowed Places”

This venue offers weekly humor-fests (maybe to make up for the crankiness). Above the Easy Street Cafe, 104 S. Main St., Bowling Green. $3-$5. www.grumpydavespub.com. O Mike Stanley, Joe Shelby: Feb. 1. O Dave Landau, Jeremy Greenberg: Feb. 8. O Music night: Kitty Glitter, the Dumb-Easies, the Fairly Handsome Band: Feb. 11.

Professor Maisha Wester will discuss “Contemporary African American Re-Visions of Gothic Racial Ideologies.” 2:30 p.m. Feb. 8, Room 201A, BGSU’s Bowen Thompson Student Union, Ridge Street and North College Drive, Bowling Green. (419) 372-0585 or bgsu.edu.

Howard’s Club H Bowling Green comes alive at this venue for rock and more. 210 N. Main St., Bowling Green. (419) 352-3195 or www.howardsclubh.com. O The Ground Is Lava, the Fight Within, the Miracle Vitamins, Zenadare: 9 p.m. Feb. 5. O Ekoostik Hookah: 8 p.m. Feb. 10. O Tokyo Police Club: 9 p.m. Feb. 11.

Kate Jordan and Soul Venture in Concert The concert is a unique blend of scripture, stories and music that is Christian traditional gospel and progressive southern gospel. 10:45 a.m. Feb. 13, Swanton Church of the Nazarene, 315 West Airport Highway, Swanton. (419) 825-1230 or www.katiejordanmusic.com.

Fish Fry 4:30-7:00 p.m. Feb.4, New Hope Christian Church, Holloway & Garden Road, Holland. $8. (419) 867-1535.

“At the Dark End of the Street”

National Wear Red Day/Go Red for Women

Danielle McGuire will discuss her book, which covers the links between sexual violence and the Civil Rights move-

Midnight-11 p.m. Feb. 4. (419) 740-6180 or www. heart.org/Toledo.

Director Karin Giffin guiding the students in a singing exercise. TOLEDO FREE PRESS STAR PHOTO BY LISA STANG

Green pajamas

Bowsher production minds its carbon footprint.

Bowsher High School plans to go “green” with its production of “The Pajama Game.” The theater department has worked with Broadway Green Alliance (BGA), an industrywide initiative to reduce the carbon footprint of Broadway productions, to pursue environmentally friendly practices in its show. While a number of high schools have contacted the BGA for tips to make their shows more environmentally friendly, Bowsher is the first high school nationwide to say that it wants to do an all-green production, said Susan Sampliner, co-chairwoman of the group. “They’re the future. If we can get kids conscious of this when they are younger, when they move on to more extensive productions they can bring those practices with them,” she said. The students involved in the production were told at the first rehearsal of the department’s attempt to make a green production and are excited, said Karin Giffin, producer of “The Pajama Game.” Giffin said pursuing a green production shows responsibility toward the planet and she’s thrilled at being the first high school in the country to pursue a green show. “It’s important for the students to learn these practices, especially if they’re going to pursue theater at the college level and further,” she said. The idea to pursue a green production came after “Wicked” was in town, said Scott McGorty, marketing and public relations coordinator for Bowsher High School productions. “Wicked” promoted the fact it was

a green production, with different lights, watching what it used, and recycling backstage and McGorty thought, “Why can’t we do that at a high school level?” he said. McGorty contacted the BGA and the school received a list of green practices that could be used during a show. “The Pajama Game” will have biodegradable cups and recycle bins at its performance, will use recycled paper for all its printing and will decrease the size of its program. The department will also reuse its wood and costumes, McGorty said. In addition to reusing its own materials, Bowsher will borrow props and supplies from other schools. The department has contacted Findlay College to see if Bowsher can utilize any of its props from “The Pajama Game” it performed last summer, Giffin said. The school is borrowing a knife-throwing mechanism and sewing machines from the college. If and when anything has to be made, the students will follow BGA’s suggestion of more environmentally sustainable materials, McGorty said. The students will use certain paints and avoid harmful materials, he said. “What we’re trying to do is make a difference though the entire industry,” Sampliner said. “As an industry, we are interested in conservation in general because we don’t have a lot of money, but we also tend to generate a lot of waste and we’re trying to reduce that.” Bowsher will perform “The Pajama Game” on April 1 and 2. Tickets for the show are $12 for adults and $10 for students. O — Kristen Rapin


“THE MIRROR TELLS ME LIES.� — OZZY, “DIARY OF A MADMAN�

SUNDAY CINEMA AT THE CROSWELL

Croswell Opera House, 129 E. Maumee St., Adrian

Feb. 6, 4 p.m.: “Casablanca� (1942)

One of the best movies ever made! (www.croswell.org) This romantic drama stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman and Paul Henreid. Set in Africa during the early days of World War II, “Casablanca� focuses on a man torn between love and virtue. He must choose between being with the woman he loves and helping her and her husband escape from the city of Casablanca. The Croswell offers this movie at a special time on Super Bowl Sunday. Tickets are $5 for adults, $2 for all 18 and younger. Kids 5 and younger are free. Sponsored by the Adrian Kiwanis Club and Toledo Free Press Star. O

School for the Arts performs Simon play Toledo School for the Arts (TSA) will perform Neil Simon’s comedy “Rumors� at the Toledo Repertoire. This is the fifth year TSA and the theater have been in partnership. The play will be directed by theater teacher Rosie Best, who wanted to perform a farce comedy, which is a “particular challenge� with high school students, said TSA Artistic Director David Saygers. The comedy, first performed in 1988, follows upper-class guests attending a dinner party. They quickly realize the party’s host has

died while his wife and servants are missing. “Rumors� shows the guests’ attempts to keep the details from the media and police. The performances are Feb. 10-12 at 7 p.m. and Feb. 13 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are available by calling the TSA box office at (419) 246-8732 or at the door. Tickets cost $11 for adults and $6 for students and seniors. College and high school students can present their school IDs for the discount price. O — Matt Liasse

Mr. Stewart goes to Perrysburg Throughout February, the Way Public Library will host a James Stewart and Katherine Hepburn film festival. The series will kick off with “The Philadelphia Story� featuring Hepburn and Stewart on Feb. 6. In the 1940 film, Hepburn plays a society girl and Stewart plays a reporter who falls in love with her. The movie also features Cary Grant playing Hepburn’s ex-husband. The motion picture was nominated for six Academy awards, with Stewart winning for Best Actor. The library will also feature, “Woman of the Year� on Feb. 13, “The African Queen� on Feb. 20 and “Rear Window� on Feb. 27. Each movie features a guest speaker and brief discussion following the viewing. All films

STEWART and HEPBURN start at 2 p.m. in the lower level auditorium. The festival is free and open to the public. Way Public Library is located at 101 E. Indiana Ave. O — Kristen Criswell

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / FEB. 2, 2011 n 17

Monroe County blues series features new, familiar faces All four Tuesdays in February plus a bonus Saturday blowout will find Monroe County hopping with rhythm, blues and boogie-woogie beats. The 24th annual Black History Month Blues Series, presented by the Monroe County Library System and other area organizations, will feature new faces as well as familiar ones, said library Circulation Coordinator Bill Reiser, event coordinator for the Blues Series. “We’ve always liked to think of this project as storytelling,� Reiser said. “We are telling this unlikely and unique story of Monroe, Michigan, becoming this sort of small-scale capital of the blues each year, at least for a month. Using that approach, we have recurring characters helping us tell the story with their music. We get new acts each year, but we like to salt familiar faces into the mix.� The series will kick off Feb. 1 with a 7 p.m. performance by New York City-based blues and boogie-woogie piano master Arthur Migliazza at the Carleton Branch Library, 1444 Kent St., in Carleton, Mich. “It feels like he’s been here before because a number of the great blues and boogie-woogie piano players have been talking about him for years and telling me ‘You have to get this kid,’� Reiser said. “He was a prodigy, I think it’s safe to say, and all these older artists kind of took him under their wing and he’s incorporated all the lessons they taught him yet still does his own thing. We’re real excited to move him from the wish list to the guest list.� Blues Series regular Rev. Robert B. Jones will share the stage with his friend Ben Wiley Payton of Jackson, Miss., at 7 p.m. Feb. 8, at Dorsch Memorial Library, 18 E. First St., Monroe. “He’s bringing a little bit of the Delta up for us and that’s going to be a night of two outstanding acoustic musicians trading songs and stories for a real down-home, intimate feel,� Reiser said. School kids will rock out to Mr. Seley and the Troublemakers at Bluesapalooza, Monroe County’s largest annual children’s music extravaganza, during two shows Feb. 15 at the Monroe County Community College’s Meyer Theater, 1555 S. Raisinville, Monroe. Tom Seley is an elementary

school teacher in Birmingham, Mich. For show times and availability, call (734) 241-5277. Later that night, The Starlight Six, a supergroup of Michigan young acoustic folk/blues/roots musicians, will perform at 7 p.m. at Meyer Theater. Members are friends Seth Bernard, Dominic, Josh and Rachael Davis, May Erlewine and Mike PAYTON Shimmin. “You just get this great mix of voices and song styles and the camaraderie between the musicians is pretty infectious,� Reiser said. “They’re having a good time playing together and it just rubs off on the audience.� The Macpodz, an Ann Arbor quintet comprised of a bass, trumpet, percussion, keyboard and drums, will perform at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 at the Bedford Library, 8575 Jackman Rd., Temperance. The month-long series builds to a crescendo with “The Big Gig,� opened by the Rev. Robert B. Jones, followed by New York City-based string band The Ebony Hillbillies and headlined by The Holmes Brothers. The show starts at 7 p.m. Feb. 26, at Monroe County Community College’s Meyer Theater. The Holmes Brothers, who last played the Blues Series in 1992, “easily blends Saturday night’s roadhouse rock with the gospel fervor and harmonies of Sunday morning’s church service,� according to its website. The trio has shared the stage and recording studio with the likes of Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Merle Haggard and others. “The people on stage will be having as much fun as the people out front,� Reiser said. “That’s what we strive for through the whole project. Just a big old Saturday night blowout. There’s no catch. You just show up, have a great time, enjoy the music, enjoy the company and then come back the next week. And it’s free — you can’t beat the price.� For more information, visit www.monroe.lib. mi.us/blues.htm or contact the library at (734) 241-5770, Ext. 225. O — Sarah Ottney

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“I TOOK THE VERDICT I WAS HANDED AND NOW I’VE SERVED MY TIME.” — SLASH, “STREET CHILD”


“EVEN WHEN WE TOUCH IT SEEMS MILES AWAY,” — OZZY, “YOU LOOKIN’ AT ME LOOKIN’ AT YOU”

Renaissance man D

J Ron G isn’t old enough to buy liquor in the clubs he packs. But when your goals include winning a Grammy, embarking on your career path must start early. Ron G isn’t your typical club DJ. He isn’t associated with any cliques in the city, and he never sends out those annoying texts or Facebook messages as a constant reLIL minder of when he’s working. In fact, the University of Toledo college student never wanted to be a DJ. You would never guess that this humble, soft-spoken guy has dreams of being a rapper. His style is reminiscent of Kanye West circa 2004, with the style and hustle to match. Home studio equipment is a little pricey, so as an alternative, Ron G acquired turntables. It was only supposed to make him enough money to buy the tools needed to record. He has a home

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studio now, and is still the man behind the tables. Since his senior year of high school, DJ Ron G has been perfecting his craft on the 1s and 2s, and he’s even managed to blur the line that separates Toledo club goers. There is a great divide in Toledo between college students (mainly University of Toledo) and noncollege students. Hardly ever does one see the two crowds mingle at the same club event; the music, atmosphere and attitudes are totally different. DJ Ron G has a musical inventory that will satisfy any crowd, from techno to Hip-Hop, and because of this, he is one of the few DJs accepted into any venue. The attitudes of some Toledo college students towards noncollege students are that they are aggressive, angry and can’t party without fighting. Shockingly enough, DJ Ron G prefers rocking an urban crowd be-

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cause, while they may be harder to please, once you win them over, they will be wherever you’re spinning. And in the music industry, loyalty goes a long way. There are even local Hip-Hop artists who have enough trust in Ron G to record at his studio and allow him to engineer their music. As an even exchange, he trusts their reputations enough to use them to build up his musical resume so that when he releases his own music, his “street cred” will be in place. Social networking is a huge part of DJ Ron G’s connection to artists and potential club patrons. I’m sure he doesn’t personally know all 3,800 of his Facebook friends, but as he put it, “you’ll forget a lot of people, but they won’t forget you.” It may seem like the young DJ came out of nowhere; the opposite couldn’t be more true. From carrying crates of records for other DJs to DJing parties for free, DJ Ron G understood the golden rule of the entertainment industry: You must be able to “accept last place to get to first.” DJ Ron G’s “first place” is on the small screen. Perhaps performing on “Saturday Night Live,” rapping, then getting behind the tables. Or “in a fantasy world, at the Grammys.” At the pace he’s going, it’s about time he faced the fact that his art is imitating his life, and the Grammys don’t seem so far-fetched. O

DJ Ron G

PHOTO COURTESY DJ RON G

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2010 PONTIAC G6 4dr – JUST LIKE NEW! – STK# P4460 .........................$12,995* 2009 FORD F150 XL REG/CAB – 4x2 – V8 – 8’ BED – STK# 108918A ........... 16,995* 2009 FORD FUSION SEL 2.3 4CYL – GREAT PRICE! – STK# 115082A ................$12,995* 2008 FORD ESCAPE XLT FWD – V6 – SUN ROOF – 21K – STK# P4455 .............$18,995* 2008 FORD TAURUS SEL FWD – SYNC – NICE CAR – STK# 113027A .................$15,995* 2008 FORD FOCUS SE 4dr. – HURRY ON THIS ONE! – STK# P4495 ................ $11,995* 2007 MERCURY MARINER 4x4 – 3.0 V6 –TEST DRIVE TODAY! – STK# 118344B ...$15,995* 2006 PONTIAC MONTANA SV6 – EXT/VAN – ONLY 37,000 MILES! – STK# P4500 $13,995* 2005 FORD FREESTYLE LIMITED AWD – LEATHER - LOW MILES – STK# 112079A .........$12,495* 2004 FORD RANGER XLT FX4 4x4 – EXT/CAB – 58K – STK# P4523 .........................$12,995* 2004 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4x4 – LOADED – 40,000 MILES – STK# 118262A .......$13,995* 2004 FORD F350 XLT EXT/CAB – 4x4 – DIESEL – ONLY 57,000 MILES – STK# 118295A...... $23,995* *Plus Tax, Title and License

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2008 FORD RANGER XLT

EXT/CAB – 2WD – 4.0 V6 – STK# P4497 ............................$14,995*

2005 MALIBU LS

2008 MERCURY SABLE PREMIER

$7,995 K40606A One Owner .................................................... $9,195 2008 SPECTRA EX K40761A Auto, Air, One Owner ...................................... $9,495 2007 MALIBU LTZ K3354A One Owner ...................................................... $9,795 2008 RONDO LX K40765A One Owner, Very Clean.............................. $10,495

FWD – NICE CLEAN CAR! – STK# P4509..............................$15,995*

K40835A Auto, Air, Clean...............................................

2003 TRAILBLAZER 4X4

2007 FORD EXPLORER EDDIE BAUER

4x4 – MOON ROOF – 3rd ROW SEAT – STK# P4474 ...........$20,995*

2007 FORD FOCUS SES

Come see the Friendly Difference! We are Large Enough to Deal and Small Enough to Care. Family Owned and Operated for Over 27 Years!

ZX5 – 33K – YELLOW! – STK# P4483 ..................................$10,995*

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4x4 – ONLY 36,000 MILES – STK# P4498............................$20,995*

2007 FORD TAURUS SE

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2006 FORD F350 XLT

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2000 FORD F150 LARIAT

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V6, All Power, 96K ......................................$4,200 CASH

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By Michael Siebenaler Toledo Free Press Star Staff Writer star@toledofreepress.com

The Sims 3 (Electronic Arts) Electronic Arts modifies its popular PC game series “The Sims 3” for console and the Nintendo DS. This immense simulation experience allows wide exploration among a complete community. The visuals, music, sound effects and famous nonsense Sim character dialogue (aka “Simlish”) enhance the experience while keeping the mood light and restful. The console-exclusive karma powers shape goals and action scenarios. These powers give a quick boost or reduce progress. This unpredictability adds even more dynamic gameplay, which also includes character wishes and challenges. As always, players can explore the neighborhood as they develop traits including mental, physical and social as well as skills including athletics, charisma, logic, handiness and painting. The Nintendo DS version is set in Beacon Bay and is adapted for right and left handed players. The stylus works much better than the control pad for camera navigation. Players can begin with a tutorial, create-a-Sim mode, or start in a

pre-made household situation. The menus can be hard to navigate and home improvement changes could have been easier, but this handheld version packs enough gameplay and fun scenarios to negate most vices. The karma powers add clues and puzzle elements that players can explore and discover as their character and gain special advantages that save time. Players can eventually earn a reward of lifetime happiness and enjoy the best advantage in this version — not dying. Characters go to the hospital and players funds are reduced a bit when basic needs are not met (***, rated E for comic mischief and mild suggestive themes). The PlayStation 3 version offers enhanced gameplay with online options and great graphics. Set in Moonlight Bay, players can begin by creating a Sim, choosing household or moving into an existing household. Players can find more skills than the Nintendo DS version, plus players can make customized items in My Studio and download other players’ creations in The Exchange, which saves setup time. Players can also buy items in The Store (***1/2 rated T for crude humor, sexual themes and violence). A Nintendo 3DS version is coming March 27. The Sims 3 is also available on the Mac, Nintendo Wii, PC, Xbox 360 and Windows Phone. O


22 n FEB. 2, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

HEAR ‘JEDI OF POP CULTURE’ JEFF McGINNIS EVERY TUESDAY ON THE 92.5 KISS-FM MORNING SHOW.

‘Space’ scares E A publication of Toledo Free Press, LLC, Vol. 2, No. 5. Established 2010. Thomas F. Pounds, President/Publisher tpounds@toledofreepress.com Michael S. Miller, Editor in Chief mmiller@toledofreepress.com EDITORIAL

Mary Ann Stearns, Design Editor mastearns@toledofreepress.com James A. Molnar, Lead Designer jmolnar@toledofreepress.com Brandi Barhite, Associate Editor bbarhite@toledofreepress.com Kristen Criswell, Special Sections Editor krapin@toledofreepress.com Chris Schmidbauer, Sports Editor cschmidbauer@toledofreepress.com Andrew Farr, Bowling Green Editor afarr@toledofreepress.com Lisa Renee Ward, Social Networking Manager star@toledofreepress.com ADMINISTRATION

Pam Burson, Business Manager pburson@toledofreepress.com CONTRIBUTORS star@toledofreepress.com

Jim Beard • John Dorsey • Matt Feher • Jerry Gray Dustin Hostetler • Stacy Jurich • Vicki L. Kroll lilD • Martini • Jeff McGinnis • Whitney Meschke Rachel Richardson • Michael Siebenaler Julie Webster • Don Zellers Chris Kozak, Staff Writer Emeritus Lisa Renee Ward, Darcy Irons Sarah Ottney, Proofreaders ADVERTISING SALES

Renee Bergmooser, Sales Manager rbergmooser@toledofreepress.com Casey Fischer cfischer@toledofreepress.com Matt Mackowiak mmackowiak@toledofreepress.com Chick Reid creid@toledofreepress.com DISTRIBUTION

Charles Campos (419) 241-1700, Ext. 227 ccampos@toledofreepress.com

Toledo Free Press Star is published every Wednesday by Toledo Free Press, LLC, 605 Monroe St., Toledo, OH 43604 • (419) 241-1700 Fax: (419) 241-8828 www.toledofreepress.com. Subscription rate: $100 /year. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner without permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright 2011 with all rights reserved. Publication of ads does not imply endorsement of goods or services.

ven the most staunch gamers must admit that there are some emotions that video games cannot yet generate as effectively as other forms of art — at least, not yet. It’s hard to stir someone into passionate outrage by the social issues a game raises, or move them to tears by a game’s subtle depiction of a romance, though there are examples of JEFF both. My point is there are other forms of art that mine these emotional depths better, in general, than games can. There is one thing, however, that games do better than any art form in pop culture: scare you. Ever since 1996 and the release of the first “Resident Evil” game, the genre of “survival horror” has reigned supreme as the best way to be creeped out. It’s not hard to figure out why. When you’re watching a scary movie or show, no matter how horrifying the events onscreen, they’re still happening to someone else. A game is happening to you. One of the best examples of the genre in recent years was called “Dead Space,” released in 2008. A horror title set on a distant spaceship, the game called to mind comparisons to the “Alien” movie series, as gamers fought for their lives against a mutated race of monsters called the Necromorphs. The game was a critical success but only modestly popular commercially, leaving the development of a sequel somewhat in doubt. Thankfully, Visceral Games still pursued a follow-up, and the result, “Dead Space 2,” was released Jan. 25 for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and PC. And, like its predecessor, it raises the bar for what is possible with a horror video game, setting new standards in visuals, story and, yes, scares. Isaac Clarke, the hero of the first title, awakens on a space station called “The Sprawl,” located on one of Saturn’s moons. Like Ripley of the “Alien” series, he has no idea that time has passed — three years — and wakes to a new nightmarish invasion of the aliens who wreaked havoc in the first game. The basic idea remains the same — run around, fight monsters who jump out from around every corner, level up weapons and try to survive. It’s the details that make “Dead Space 2” so special, starting with the lead character. In the first game, Clarke was practically a nonentity. We knew almost nothing about him, other than the fact that he had a girlfriend on the ship he was searching for. We barely saw his face, and he didn’t even have a voice. This time, Isaac emerges as a fully realized individual. The character is grief-stricken over the loss

of his beloved Nicole, and his exposure to the events of the previous game seems to have driven him mad. As he fights for his life, we see numerous visions of his past flash before him, as he tries to reconcile the horrors of his past with the horrors of his present. As voiced by actor Gunner Wright, the player can now more fully identify with and sympathize with Clarke. Our attachment makes the game’s scares all the more immediate. And oh, are there scares. The developers claimed in interviews leading up to the release that there would be more of a focus on action and less on horror. While action is indeed front and center, horror is far from an afterthought. The world of the Sprawl has been fully realized as a living, breathing place, which feels totally real with plenty of nooks and cran-

mCGINNIS

POP GOES THE

CULTURE

New video game raises the bar for horror. nies for monsters to jump out at you. Unlike the first game, which had a very strict structure of levels, this one feels much more organic and continuous, intensifying the feeling that there’s no place to hide. The success of the primary campaign is the meat and potatoes of the package, but Visceral Games has provided plenty of tasty side dishes, too. Unlike the first title, “Dead Space 2” has an extensive online multiplayer mode, and for PS3 buyers, the game comes in a Limited Edition which features the excellent “Dead Space: Extraction” shooter as a bonus. That game was originally released only on the Wii, but the version available here is excellent, and plays well with either the Playstation Move or traditional controller. Though the first “Dead Space” was a great example of what could be done with horror in games, its sequel successfully surpasses it in every way. It looks amazing, plays like a dream and feels like your worst nightmare — in the best possible way. If you don’t like being terrified, stay away. But for everyone who loves a good scare now and then, you cannot do better than this. O E-mail Jeff at PopGoesJeff@gmail.com.

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“WELL, THERE IS A REWARD, TO LIVE AND DIE BY THE SWORD.” — “BY THE SWORD,” SLASH

TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM / FEB. 2, 2011 n 23

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2003 HONDA ODYSSEY Loaded, Leather ..................................... $8,499 2007 CHEVROLET HHR Great MPG,Extra Clean, Auto .................. $9,980 2006 FORD FUSION SE 65K Miles,Full Maintenance, Must See ... $9,850 2006 CHEVY IMPALA 75K, Well Equipped, Like New ................ $9,999

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2006 PONTIAC G6 Great MPG, V6, Hurry ...........................$10,350 2008 CHRYSLER SEBRING 46K Miles, Loaded, Extra clean ............$10,550 2008 MAZDA 6i Extra Clean, Reduced Price ..................$10,980 2008 VW PASSAT Loaded, Nice!.......................................$11,599

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2004 ACURA RL Nav,Loaded,Roof,Rare Find ..................$12,850 2006 TOYOTA RAV4 SPORT 4X4 Loaded and Ready to Go! .....................$15,995 2008 TOYOTA PRIUS 50 MPG, Certified, Loaded....................$15,995 2008 TOYOTA RAV4 4X4, Only 36K Miles, Certified ..............$17,995

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24 n FEB. 2, 2011 / TOLEDOFREEPRESS.COM

”Crazy, but that’s how it goes/Millions of people, living as foes” — OZZY, “CRAZY TRAIN”

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36 mo. Lease 8 passenger seating, OnStar XM radio, power package. Stk#114143

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Toledo Free Press STAR – Feb. 2, 2011