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TOKEWELL | STACK PAPER, CATCH VAPORS

15 JAN/FEB 201 7

TRIBAL CLIQUE

WE SIT WITH THE MAN WHO CREATED THE BLUEPRINT FOR STREETWEAR FASHION TODAY.

ORGANICALLY SPEAKING

WE SESSION WITH HMC TALK ABOUT WHY ORGANICALLY CULTIVATED CANNABIS IS THE FUTURE.

THE TAKEOVER ISSUE 15 | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2017

MEET TWO OF THE VAPE GAMES MOST SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURS.

$4.20 U.S. $5.20 CAN.

TRU TO THE

GAME

R&B SUPERSTAR LLOYD TALKS TO US ABOUT HIS AFFINITY FOR THE COLOR GREEN AND HIS LATEST RELEASE.


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FEATURES

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THE TAKEOVER

James Kim and Jon Lee; the owners and founders of one of the vape games most successful companies talk to us about the importance of never giving up and always staying humble.

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TRU TO THE GAMe

We sit with "I Want You" R&B superstar Lloyd and talk about why he took a personal sabbatical at the height of his career and reinvented himself. But above all, how he still remains "Tru" to the game today.

ALL 54 INHONESTY

We session with creators of Honest Marijuana and talk about how opting to go organic isn't just for produce.

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TRIBAL CLIQUE

We sit with streetwear OG Bobby Ruiz and talk about the current fashion State of the Union and how his focus and refusal to sell-out contributed to Tribal's longevity and success.

ARTISANAL COLLECTIVE

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ART IN MOTION

Art is relative and subjective depending on one's perspective. Some might not view cars as art, but we beg to differ. We sit with acclaimed automotive artist Dave Shuten to talk about why being period correct is paramount and how his impeccable builds will change your entire vantage point.

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FLIPPING THE SCRIPT

PUBLISHED BY FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP, LLC PRESIDENT, FOUNDING PARTNER RICHARD COYLE RICH@TOKEWELL.COM CO-FOUNDER SENIOR V.P., OPERATIONS CINDY GALINDO CINDY@TOKEWELL.COM DESIGN HONEST KITTY STUDIO "NO-NONSENSE DESIGN"

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#TogetherWeRise

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF RICHARD COYLE DIRECTOR OF FINANCE YVONNE MORTON YVONNE@TOKEWELL.COM CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LEILANI ANDERSON, SHEERLIE RYNGLER, STEFAN DIDAK, RUBEN GALINDO, RENE GALINDO, ANTHONY FRANCIOSI AND MAXIMILLIAN STERLING. CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS LEAH MORIYAMA AND TAADOW69K freegreatpicture.com

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s we enter 2017 and leave 2016 behind, we cannot dwell on the past. 2016 was a tumultuous year for most and a very successful year for many. I for one am ecstatic about what 2017 has to offer just because it’s a blank slate and we all have the opportunity to do what has never been done. The vaping industry has definitely had it’s ups and downs, but like any thriving business with substance, it will go on. The cannabis industry is growing exponentially and it will be interesting to see what we will have in terms of regulations. Nonetheless, we should all look forward to the future and remain vigilant and positive in regards to what's over the horizon. We are living in exciting times in terms of enterprise, technological advancements and creativity. We are destined to achieve greatness collectively no matter the hands we are dealt. I for one, believe in all of us. So, let’s flip the script and hang on tight. It’s going to be an amazing ride.

Tokewell Magazine is published bi-monthly by Fr3shlab Creative Group, LLC. Tokewell Magazine does not condone the illegal use or obtainment of cannabis. All content within this magazine is copyright protected and may not be reproduced in part or in whole without explicit written consent from the publisher. Tokewell Magazine is strictly for entertainment purposes only, and is not to be held liable for any misleading orinaccurate material produced herein. ©2017 FR3SHLAB CREATIVE GROUP LLC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PO BOX 444, ALHAMBRA, CA 91802 AD SALES INFO@TOKEWELL.COM TOKEWELL.COM

FOLLOW US

“And now we welcome the new year, full of things that have never been” --Rainer Maria Rilke

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WELCOME TO RENEWED HOPE WORDS BY: STEFAN DIDAK | OWNER AND FOUNDER NOTBLOWINGSMOKE.COM

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elcome to 2017 and I wish you all the best in the months ahead of us. Months in which we will see increased battles at the State level abut also renewed hope and a fresh fighting spirit. It’ll be the year to stand up for what you believe in.

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As you may have heard, California Prop 56 passed. This measure increases the price of cigarettes by $2 a pack and requires an “equivalent” wholesale tax on vapor products. In order to avoid a tax of upwards to 70% several organizations, including Not Blowing Smoke are meeting with the Board of Equalization (BOE) with suggestions on how to apply this “equivalency”. The coming weeks will be critical to those efforts. I’m hopeful that, provided they agree and work with us, it will not decimate 90% of the industry and all its jobs in the State. There is also new hope at the federal level regarding the FDA deeming regulations. If you haven’t heard, we weren’t able to get the Cole/Bishop amendment passed in the Omnibus package. Right after

the elections our efforts were halted while a temporary budget was moved forward. Instead of having a victory or defeat to get a change to the predicate date, it has more or less fallen through the cracks. But all is not lost. In fact, I would argue that 2017 and the new administration brings new hope at a time when we need it the most. Efforts are currently underway to analyze and examine the next steps the industry should be taking to have another attempt at changing the predicate date that would allow the products as we now have and love to remain on the market without being forced through an impossible PMTA process. Regardless of the presidency, we now have a republican controlled Senate and Congress which opens up the door to possibilities and chances that we simply did not have in the past year and which led to the need for bipartisan support for anything we’d try to pass. From the outside looking in this process may look to move very slowly but I guarantee you that would be a false perception

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considering the efforts going into this. The thing to keep in mind here is that all these efforts are based on influencing individual relationships with people holding positions in the new administration. Yet, at the time of writing, many of these positions are still being filled and decided on. Once more of these positions get filled it becomes clearer which of the chess pieces are where exactly on the political chessboard. An essential aspect of understanding who and how to approach. And to end this on even more positive news; I am happy to see Senator Ron Johnson re-elected. Polling data showed him far behind his opponent. Senator Johnson recently thanked vapers for their efforts and said we will have a friend in him. Let’s ensure he can now continue his work that he started in 2016 when he demanded answers from the FDA to critical questions we all have had for quite some time.


PUBLIC HEALTH DILEMMAS: THE VAPE EDITION WORDS BY: SHEERLIE RYNGLER | CREATIVE DIRECTOR, VAPE ORGANICS

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he fate of public health policy seems forever and inextricably at the mercy of a major, perhaps central, dilemma: to acknowledge our imperfect reality and attempt to reduce harm, or invoke abstinence on moral grounds? A commitment to harm reduction can save lives in every application thereof, whether relating to tobacco, drugs, or sexuality; the opposite approach time and again preaches abstinence as the “best” policy… while real lives hang in the balance. Indeed, this dilemma is neither new nor unique, but it is once again playing into a heated public health debate—this time about the e-cigarette. To be fair, e-cigarettes have not been outright banned and there are methods of nicotine delivery that the American public health community promotes to smokers. However, the mere existence of the emerging and robust vape industry signifies that there is a demand for alternative methods. One size does not fit all, as evidenced by the testimonials of countless vapers who found the pre-existing, approved nicotine delivery systems to be illequipped opponents against their other option: the cigarette.

It’s true what they say: more evidence about the effects of e-cigarettes is needed. Yes, vapor technology is relatively new and the long-term health implications cannot yet be determined. When it comes to vaping, caution is advisable and sensible regulation to protect public health is undoubtedly necessary, but harm reduction must be a top public health priority; the e-cigarette, arguably the most popular alternative nicotine delivery system ever developed, must be seriously and thoroughly evaluated for its potential in this regard. If not, we face another age-old dilemma: allow fear of the new to stifle its progress, whilst the old thrives? The FDA’s mere grouping together of traditional tobacco products and e-cigarettes is problematic; this conflation is lazy at best and can actually have dangerous public health ramifications. For example, Dr. Michael Siegel, the prominent public health professor and advocate, recently featured a campaign by a Big Tobacco company asserting the danger of all forms of tobacco, specifically highlighting e-cigarettes. This tobacco company can make that

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very public assertion precisely because e-cigarettes have been classified as tobacco products… despite the fact that e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco. E-liquids used in vapor devices may (and often do) contain nicotine derived from tobacco, just as do approved methods of smoking cessation by way of nicotine replacement therapy, which are not classified as tobacco. How can e-cigarettes be critically evaluated for harm reduction potential in comparison to analog cigarettes if the two have already been equated? In the twenty-first century, Big Tobacco is seemingly free to seize a gap in the body of knowledge about the potential risks of e-cigarettes, equating them with the proven dangers of smoking—a resounding public health failure. The erroneous message from Big Tobacco that there is no possibility of reducing harm notso-subtly implies that smokers should continue smoking. After decades of bitterly fighting Big Tobacco, could this be the outcome the tobacco control and public health movements eagerly anticipated?


CRAFT VERSUS COMMERCIAL CANNABIS CULTIVATION

WORDS BY: ANTHONY FRANCIOSI | FOUNDER OF HONEST MARIJUANA COMPANY

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or the first time in the long relationship between cannabis plants and humans, cannabis is being grown by people who don’t think of it as sacred. For 10,000 years, small farmers and plant stewards carried marijuana throughout the globe. Starting in the ancient valleys of the Himalayas and continuing throughout the rest of the globe, humans carried this plant more than any other to the farthest reaches, using it along the way for its many holistic applications. The key evidence of this is in our own anatomy and the existence of an endocannabinoid system, which regulates the very molecules that this plant produces. As we move forward in this new era of legalization, it seems that we have forgotten that this plant existed long before us or any legislation that determined its legal status or who is eligible to grow or use it. So now as new marijuana legalization bills are sweeping the nation state by state, we see how the newfound industry is attracting every other industry, changing the way marijuana is grown, consumed, and marketed. Ultimately, it is being regarded as a commodity,

not as a sacred plant. Cannabis is not a commodity and as the framework for legal cannabis becomes more clear and concrete, it seems that the culture is losing out to the industry in a major sweeping way. Huge, commercial cookie cutter grows are using salt-based fertilizer and sterile mediums to create over-produced, underwhelming cannabis that translates directly to the extracts and other products being made. We have seen the effects of big agriculture in the U.S. before. As soil nutrition decreases, farmers have relied more and more on chemical means to replenish nutrients, eliminating the beneficial soil life and increasing the need for help from pesticides and the vicious cycle continues. The amount of natural gas used to create chemical fertilizer is incredible and accounts for more than 5% of the total C02 pollution globally every year. When you use sterile, lifeless mediums to grow, you create sterile lifeless medicine that winds up harming your health and the environment. Plants grown non-organically have no natural immune system and have an increased reliance on both pesticides and fungicides. These types of prac-

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tices are unnecessary in marijuana cultivation. Humans have been growing and using cannabis for a long time and to sacrifice the holistic nature of the plant by taking shortcuts and using non-organic means to reach a financial gain leaves me wondering what the point of all this legalization effort is. The marijuana industry as a whole has an opportunity to look at itself in its early stages and ask how it wants to move forward. As a regenerative, positive force in the world or as an industry that sold out the very plant which it is based upon? Cannabis grown in a living organic system is just much more vibrant than its commercial counterpart. The symbiotic relationship between the soil and plant seems to add a depth of character to the finished flower that shows in the aromas, tastes, and medicinal effect. These characteristics ultimately translate into the concentrates and other products as well, leaving you with a positive experience as well as the peace of mind that comes from knowing the products were made from cannabis grown with the environment and end user in mind.


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NEW PRODUCTS #15

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ANNABIS

The brainchild of entrepreneur; Jeanine Moss, AnnaBis has allowed women to maintain their productive lifestyle sans the condescending looks. AnnaBis is the first high-end cannabis fashion brand featuring Aroma-Bloc™ technology, ergonomic straps and hidden compartments giving women the freedom to carry their cannabis with confidence and style. The lineup features ergonomic straps, hidden Aroma-Bloc™ compartments and unparalleled protection for your fragile cargo while looking chic.

Shop: www.annabisstyle.com

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TRIBAL

GEAR #15

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You might have seen their logos on legends such as Linkin Park, P.O.D. or Korn just to name a few. Tribal Gear are OG’s in the game. With their impeccably stylized graphics and apparel, Tribal has cemented themselves as one of today's top streetwear brands. While their focus has always been on Southern California lifestyle, the brand is a global phenomenon and is sold at select retailers worldwide. Shop: www.tribalgear.com

NEW PRODUCTS TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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KILO

E-Liquids Since 2014, Kilo E-Liquids has developed artistry, craft, coupled with unmatched flavors and dedication to excellence. Their passion of meticulously perfecting the craft of each blend seamlessly with balance and harmony. Having said that, treat yourself and indulge in the excellence which is Kilo E-Liquids - Handcrafted to perfectio Shop: www.kiloeliquids.com

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THE

TAKEOVER WO R DS BY : R U B EN G A LI NDO S NA P S BY : LEA H MO R I YA MA

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JAMES KIM AND JON LEE; THE OWNERS AND FOUNDERS OF ONE OF THE VAPE GAMES MOST SUCCESSFUL COMPANIES TALK TO US ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF NEVER GIVING UP AND ALWAYS STAYING HUMBLE.

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teel tycoon; Andrew Carnegie, Walmart founder; Samuel Walton, and the queen of media herself, Oprah Winfrey are just a few examples of people who grew up from humble beginnings. They started out with nothing but an indomitable attitude and a strong desire to achieve greatness which made them who they are today. No matter how many times we see similar stories portrayed in movies or read in novels depicting endeavors in the pursuit of happiness, we are still profoundly drawn to the idea of the Great American dream. It’s that feeling of accomplishment and success that drives us to keep on pushing forward when all seems to fail. “We’re not here just to take part. We're here to take over” - Conor McGregor The vaping industry was a burgeoning business that was more underground than mainstream comprised of just a few vape shops here and there with no real public interest. Within just a few years, it had evolved into a multi-billion dollar, multinational enterprise. No longer lowbrow or labeled just a "fad" or "hobby". It was an emergence of a rapidly growing lifestyle that would even come to threaten the likes of the tobacco industry. With that in mind, old friends and entrepreneurs James Kim and Jon Lee decided they needed to take over and not just take part. These two entrepreneurs who seemed to be an unlikely duo on paper were brought together by that same vision and conviction.

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James, a former U.S. Army Soldier, and Iraq War Veteran, selflessly served our great country and willingly put his life on the line to defend our freedoms. The skills that were instilled in him would later prove to be instrumental in his rise to success as a businessman and entrepreneur. Jon, who hustled in corporate America, gained the skill set necessary to attain his goals and achievements as chemist and co-owner of Kilo E- liquids. When asked if they knew they were going to be where they are today, the answer was a resounding "no!" They didn’t think their “small dream” of owning an e-liquid company would turn into one of the most well-known, highly revered brands in the game today. “My foot into the industry was through opening a local vape shop back in 2013. After about a year of operating the shop, I felt that I had the experience within the industry and wanted to challenge myself to become innovative by taking vape branding and flavoring to the next level.” says James. Being former smokers themselves, they felt compelled to be a part of an industry that embraced this. James and Jon quickly went to work concocting hundreds of flavors until they had the product you're reading about today. Fast forward to 2014, the brand Kilo E-Liquids was born. James and Jon took the opportunity to help others on a personal level and gave smokers an alternative avenue to escape their addiction of cigarettes. With so many e-liquid companies to choose from, James and Jon didn’t rush to come out with the next big flavor of the month. They took their time and put out a quality product

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“WHY WE WORKED SO WELL TOGETHER IS THAT WE FOCUSED HEAVILY ON TWO DIFFERENT ASPECTS WHEN FORMING OUR COMPANY. I (JON) STRESSED THE IMPORTANCE OF AN EXCELLENT PRODUCT … AND JAMES FOCUSED ON THE EXPOSURE WE NEEDED TO GET OUR AMAZING PRODUCT OUT TO AS MANY CONSUMERS AS POSSIBLE.”

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Entrepreneurs James and Jon conversing at the Commissary in Los Angeles, CA.

and it reflected in the millions of bottles sold. “When we first launched, we attended every local events and conventions that were within our reach. Our personal motto was to be all about “the grind” and to have no hesitation when it came to outworking the competition to make a name for ourselves. Even if it meant sneaking in bottles of our e-liquid in our backpacks to pass out samples at the largest vaping convention at the time. We kept pushing with that mentality and the results started showing, rapidly.” says Kim. The flavor that put Kilo on the map was DewBerry Cream. Since then, Kilo E-liquids has come out with a wide variety of artisanal flavors to choose from like cereal milk, Kiberry

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yogurt, and Fruit Whip. They also have a new premium line labeled the Black and White series, which elevates the standard of quality and flavor to new heights.

for the fellas at Kilo to fall into pitfalls of early success. Being successful in an industry full of uncertainty and immaturity, one thing is certain. Kilo isn't going anywhere.

one has tasted. I told him if he accomplishes amazing flavors, I will market and sell it. That was the birth of Kilo Eliquids.

Although it seemed to be an overnight success for these two businessmen, they never let it get to their heads. They always stayed humble, and never forgot where they came from. "We never wanted to show off what we've accomplished. We are very business-focused and actually care about what we do.", says Jon. The goal has always been to give back to the community and their families and they've done just that. In an industry that has birthed many young, successful millionaires, don't look

How did you guys first get started?

What made you want to get into the vape industry?

James: My foot into the industry was through opening a local vape shop back in 2013. After about a year of operating the shop, I felt that I had the experience within the industry and wanted to challenge myself to become innovative by taking vape branding and flavoring to the next level. Jon, who was my roommate at the time, came up to me and said he wanted to revolutionize the industry by developing the best cream flavors that any

James: A friend of mine introduced me to one of the first devices that were available for vaping at the time while I was trying to quit cigarettes. I immediately knew this new product was going to change a lot of lives and I wanted to be a part of it. Remember when all the vape shops started popping up everywhere? I call that period the Vaping Boom of 2013, I jumped on it right away and opened up my first business venture.

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Jon: I started vaping because my friends started dropping the cigarettes and moving on to vaping. James opened up his vape shop at around the same time so it was easier for me to transition with everything readily available for me. Slowly, I started getting more intrigued about the flavor of the products I was vaping. I came up to James with a proposition to develop our own amazing flavors and we made it happen.

What sets Kilo E-liquids apart from the rest? Jon: Why we worked so well together is that we focused heavily on two different aspects when forming our company. I stressed the importance of an excellent product that provides the consumer the end result of complete satisfaction, and James focused on the exposure we needed to get our amazing product out to as many consumers as possible.

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James: Jon took nearly 6 months on creating 100-200 prototypes of Dewberry Cream in the beginning, and that gave me enough time to start focusing obsessively on creating a brand

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and learning about how to market our company. We definitely took our time on coming out with the perfect product as a whole. High quality flavor, top notch branding/marketing is something we take very great pride in.

With the vape industry going through a bit of scrutiny right now with the FDA and new regulations, what are your thoughts on the current situation? Jon: The industry has changed a lot, both good and bad. It does need regulation to a certain extent. Not as much regulation as the FDA would like, but it needs some. James: I think the industry does need to be regulated, but with the current deeming regulations, the FDA is intentionally trying to make our industry disappear. They are coming down hard right now, making it nearly impossible most of the companies out there to adhere to the rules. Regulate the industry but do not OVER-regulate us.

Geniuses' at work. "There are no shortcuts in evolution"

“I PREACH THIS A LOT, “NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE.” JUST FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS, BUT YOU GOTTA WORK HARD. ”

Gastronomy at Quarters Korean BBQ.

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“I’M A TRUE BELIEVER IN THE BENEFITS OF MEDICINAL MARIJUANA. I HAVE MY MEDICAL MARIJUANA CARD FROM THINGS DERIVING FROM MY EXPERIENCES IN THE MILITARY. I BELIEVE THERE ARE A LOT OF POSITIVES BENEFITS ATTRIBUTED FROM MARIJUANA. ”

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Do you think the combination of coming from a military background and corporate America gave you guys the fundamental structure to start a business? Jon: Definitely. I’ve been working since I was 16 years old. I know what it’s like to work hard and take care of myself.

U.S. Army Soldier, and Iraq War Veteran; James Kim.

James: Yes. The military gave me all the structure to know what hard work is. From working 20 hours a day to training beyond hard. It instilled in me discipline, motivation, and perseverance. Those traits helped me to

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take Kilo to the next level. Nothing was going to set us back. My biggest objective was to be one of the biggest brands in the market, and we accomplished that.

There are a couple of issues being brought up for voting on the November 8th ballot, one is a higher tax on tobacco, the other is the legalization of marijuana. What is your take on the issues? James: Our industry is constantly getting attacked, whether it be the FDA or the State. The FDA is trying to regulate us and the state wants to add more tax to our products, and

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these are products that do not have any tobacco in them but is still categorized as “Tobacco”. It’s nonsense. I’m a true believer in the benefits of medicinal marijuana. I have my medical marijuana card from things deriving from my experiences in the military. I believe there are a lot of positives benefits attributed from marijuana. Jon: I am against the taxes of course, especially because our products do not contain any tobacco in them. We are innovators that strayed away from tobacco, only to be classified in the same category as them. I’m all for the legalization of marijuana and if marijuana helps people, then why not? I'm all for it.

If you look at the cannabis world, their vape products are about 10 years behind the ingenuity and #15

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technology of vape products. Do you see the two meshing together in the future? James: I can see the two industries meshing together in the future because they are similar in many aspects. It really depends on the direction of the FDA because they are slowing down the innovation of vape products and they are not allowing us to develop better products.

What advice do you have for the readers or anyone who was looking to start a business?

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James: I preach this a lot, “nothing is impossible.” Just follow your dreams, but you gotta work hard. It seems society today doesn’t teach that (that’s old people stuff), but in reality, it starts with working hard. Have passion and be committed to your goals.

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Jon: It’s okay to fail. We failed a couple of times. Just get back up and keep trying.

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Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to rap with us and we wish you both much success in 2017. Kilo: No problem!

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TRU to the

game

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WE SIT WITH “I WANT YOU” R&B SUPERSTAR LLOYD AND TALK ABOUT WHY HE TOOK A PERSONAL SABBATICAL AT THE HEIGHT OF HIS CAREER AND REINVENTED HIMSELF. BUT ABOVE ALL, HOW HE STILL REMAINS “TRU”TO THE GAME TODAY. WOR D S BY: R IC H AR D C OYLE SN APS BY: LEAH M OR IYAM A

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“FAMILY LIFE, IF YOU CAN GET IT RIGHT, IS LIKE INSPIRATION OR A REVELATION. IF YOU HAVE A GOOD FAMILY LIFE, IT HELPS EVTERYTHING OUT IN LIFE. IT’S VERY IMPORTANT.”

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outhside" crooner and R&B superstar Lloyd is back with his new EP "Tru." Baring your heart on wax is daunting for any artist, yet Lloyd is able to do so in spades. The "BedRock" singer released his first single in 5 years and his latest installment titled "Out My Window" is slated to be Lloyd’s first studio album since 2011. Lloyd soared to new heights when his last album “King of Hearts” came out in 2011. A throwback to the golden age of R&B, Lloyd is one of the most prolific singers today especially in a time where the term R&B seems to have lost its luster and has taken a backseat to production. Through it all, the art of lyricism seems to have been lost. Not too long ago, the “Lay It Down” and “Cupid” singer was headlining the pop charts and his self-imposed fall from grace ensued shortly after. It seemed like Lloyd randomly disappeared off the face of the earth. What people didn't realize was that

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Lloyd was going through some internal changes and needed to take care of his home team first. Going through some personal changes and his record label situation, Lloyd is back. In all honesty, he never left. While it’s been some time since he released a project, Lloyd fills us in about what he’s been up to as of late and breaks down his new single. Sorting out his emotions and feelings, Lloyd talks about the process of how “Tru” came about. Speaking candidly about everything that’s been going on in his life, Lloyd begins things up by

He is transcendent — clearly, for his music, but in a broader sense, he has “transcended race, and pop culture.” With each strum of his guitar, his entire existence bridges the gap between mainstream America and the entire world. We sit with living legend Ziggy Marley to talk about his passion for humanity, what prompted him to publish a cookbook, and why imminent cannabis legalization is "waking up to the truth"

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nless you’ve been living under a rock for the past quarter century, you're familiar with Ziggy Marley - the son of music legend and icon Bob Marley. Ziggy is a seven-time Grammy and Emmy award winner, humanitarian, author, singer, songwriter and producer. Often times, picking up the proverbial baton and recommencing the legacies of megastar parents is more challenging than blazing your own trail, but unlike the offspring of influential icons like Michael Jordan and Bruce Lee, Ziggy Marley has extended and elevated the legacy of the Marley namesake with his own unequivocal success. Ziggy is certified reggae royalty as well as a committed humanitarian; some would even call him a living legend. He’s released six studio albums, been on Sesame Street and performed alongside Paul


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“I WOULD SAY THAT ONE THING THAT I’VE NOTICED THAT HAS CHANGED IS THE LEVEL OF APPRECIATION FOR THE GIFTS THAT WE’VE BEEN GIVEN AS ARTISTS.” verbally navigating through some his personal issues that have transpired for the past few years. “The creative process for Tru was how can I have a conversation in a song for one, and then what is that conversation about? Well, the only answer for me and still remains is what is honestly going on with myself. What am I feeling? What am I trying to overcome and to look at it from a completely introspective standpoint.”, says Lloyd. Intelligent and well-spoken, Lloyd talks to Tokewell about how he needed to surround himself with the right people and reinvent himself. We also touch on how Lloyd still often talks to Ashanti and Ja Rule who have both continued to support his career even after their time at Murder Inc. ended. “I questioned if things would ever be able to be the same. Those two have always been there for me.”, he responds. Lloyd also explains why "green" is one of his favorite colors from the "herbal" connotation to his vegan lifestyle. Lloyd takes time out of his jet set schedule to give us his first interview of 2017. He gives us an

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emotionally-charged and introspective interview and allows us in from Out his Window.

What made you spark an interest in music growing up? I think it was inherited first and foremost from my parents. My father was a saxophonist, he was a jazz musician, he was a choir director at his baptist church in New Orleans. My mom, ever since I can remember, up until about the age of 8 or 9 sang in the church choir. So I would say they were my first influences. Even though I lost my father when I was younger, I feel like my mom influences me a lot and still can see some of my father's reflections of him in me and through me.

Being in the industry for as long as you have, how has music changed or evolved from when u got into the industry and how it is now? I think that surprisingly from where I stand, someone who has been in the game for more than 10yrs and who’s had the beautiful opportunity to release numerous albums, I would

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say that one thing that I’ve noticed that has changed is the level of appreciation for the gifts that we’ve been given as artists. I don’t really see many people take these opportunities for granted. It’s like being able to learn from the stories of the ones that came before us good and bad. I think that today, an artist is much more aware and conscious about where they stand and what they represent, and who they doing it for, why they are doing it and I think that shows their entrepreneurship more than ever. I think that’s amazing.

Who are some artist that have influenced you or have inspired you? For me the word artist, first of all, would take on so many different forms, It’s not just a musical artist, it’s painters composers, most of my first influencers were producers who were people who gave me the

opportunity to just sit and watch them work from a very young age. Like Dallas Austin for instance, was one of the first major influencers that I had musically because I was able to watch him be a true creator from the sound, to the direction of the whole project as a producer. You know a lot of people might not know who he is, but people who make music definitely know who he is, but I think that’s really cool to mention him even though he’s not in the forefront all the time. I teamed up with him and we put up studios in some of the public schools and I performed. I just thought that he was definitely one of the dopest people growing up to me. Michael Jackson of course, and I inherited that definitely from my Mom who would write him letters as a little girl. As I got older I discovered more of the Motown sound, and now that I’m able to buy all the records I ever wanted, I realize that a lot of my biggest

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“... BUT WHAT I AM AN ADVOCATE OF PEOPLE'S RIGHT TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES, THE RIGHT TO FIND PEACE AND THEIR RIGHT TO LIVE INSIDE OF TRUTH. ”

influencers now are everybody. I mean everybody that’s just making music. I listen to almost everybody and everything I can get my hands on.

As a lot of us know, you broke through as a successful solo artist under the label Murder Inc with labelmates Ja Rule and Ashanti. How is your relationship with them now and do you still keep in contact? TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

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Yeah, absolutely! I remember the first concert that I did in New York City. I remember Ja and Ashanti came out and performed years ago and that was crazy because everybody thought that there was no love, and even myself I’ll admit there were times when I questioned if things would ever be able to be the same. Those two have always been there for me. Recently, I performed for them and with them. Ashanti flew down at the last min to perform with me in Atlanta. Me and Ja performed and that was amazing to me.


You recently dropped a new EP called "TRU", what was the creative process like going into that project? The creative process for TRU was how can I have a conversation in a song for one, and then what is that conversation about? Well, the only answer for me and still remains is what is honestly going on with myself. What am I feeling? What am I trying to overcome and to look at it from a completely introspective standpoint. To focus the idea was to maybe even use music just like it’s a reflection of so many things in my life and the fact that I record under my name. I don’t have a dope moniker to hide behind so, to embrace the fact that this is me, Although there are parts of my life that people don't know of I choose not to let them identify with that’s personal in some shape form or fashion. People will always feel that they know who I am because of my music, and I think my name representing me is a big part of that. Also, how can I connect with the people I’ve grown up to admire so much which are every day, honest, hardworking people you know. How can I connect with them and not

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be selfish in my endeavors and that truly is the best expression I could manifest.

What are your thought on cannabis legalization? Being a vegetarian and sometimes vegan, there aren't too many things I found green to be that bad [laughs] It seems to be a very good color of growth [laughs]. I'm not an advocate of anything in particular, but what I am an advocate of people's right to express themselves, the right to find peace and their right to live inside of truth. I’ll always think it’s silly to outlaw marijuana when there are other things out there much worse.

What's your personal relationship with marijuana?

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I can say that I've partaken in marijuana since I was younger and even though my tolerance isn't what it's used to be but I will revisit it Kush from time to time. I realize that unlike Wiz or Snoop, I cannot smoke before a show and perform. My mouth is just dry. It’s not a good idea but it showed me how amazing how liberating it can be. The south is probably going to be the last place that will legal.

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“...THERE ARE PARTS OF MY LIFE THAT PEOPLE DON'T KNOW OF I CHOOSE NOT TO LET THEM IDENTIFY WITH THAT’S PERSONAL IN SOME SHAPE FORM OR FASHION. PEOPLE WILL ALWAYS FEEL THAT THEY KNOW WHO I AM BECAUSE OF MY MUSIC...”

Talk to me about your relationship with King Louie. He’s an old friend of mine. He’s somebody I talk to a lot. He educates me on the game in terms of how cultivators are on the west coast and how the grind is. I admire him for being a hard worker and somebody of integrity. He’s helping people more so than anything else.

“PHILANTHROPY IS A FANCY WORD FOR CHARACTER AND BEING GOOD HUMAN BEINGS.”

What are your favorite strains and do -you McCartney not many prefer artists to can stake vapethator causes, including Africa Unite, Ziggy would rollMost claim. flower? importantly, Ziggy preaches comlater expand his goals to benefit others

being good to your fellow by creating his own foundation, U.R.G.E., Ipassion, love mylove Jettyand Extracts (www.jettyextracts.com) man through musicanytime and entrepreneurial vape pen. As ahis vocalist you can reduce the in 2007, designed to help underprivileged endeavors. thing that is clear: nothing carcinogens One its achieving your goal. Also, I appreciatechildren and give them the opportunity to Ziggyscience does isand solely for monetary benefit, the wayattend school. Marley would also continue his how technology have changed as evidenced whenthe heintake talks to about his manyAs far as altruistic efforts for other organizations such we medicate from the lifestyle. business as the Nancy Davis Foundation, Little Kids my strain projects. goes, it’s King Louie (@OgLouieThe13th) for Rock, and many others, which makes perfect sure. I’m a joint guy. That's my thing. Papers. Being philanthropic is embedded in his DNA. sense - after all, when Bob Marley, Ziggy's In early 2001, else Anything Ziggy shifted you’dhislike focus to and add? father, passed, he parted these final words became engaged, as to his son, something we’d all do well to Today is amore goodpolitically a day as any to countserving one's blessings aand Goodwill Ambassador forthat thefear U.N., remember: "Money can't buy life." always Youth keep perspective and and hatred and creating a label in Jamaica called Ghetto breeds misunderstandings. I’m thankful that I'm able Youths to assist the there. Havingthrough We all know Ziggy Marley as one of the to eradicate some of children those misconceptions been active in the Bob Marley Foundation’s most influential musicians of our time, one my music.

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In All

Honesty WOR D S BY: LEILANI AN D ER SON

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“I DO THIS OUT OF PASSION. I HAVE A NUMBER OF BUSINESSES WHERE MY INVOLVEMENT IS STRICTLY FINANCIAL, BUT CANNABIS, JUST BY NATURE OF THE BUSINESS ITSELF, IS A PASSIONATE INDUSTRY.�

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O

rganic. It's the word you see everywhere. Organic this, craft that, small batch everything. Like the recent craft beer revival movement, there's been a calling for more natural products and a reduction in the harmful chemicals we put into our bodies. We call for fewer pesticides and mass production, to buy local and to know what goes into whatever we put into our bodies.

static about a slowing growing industry, With opinions about the plant changing on a national level, Serge jumped at the opportunity, taking the time to travel and do his research. From California to Colorado, Serge bided his time until he came upon a stroke of luck.

The state of Colorado has a unique environment these days. While the medical cannabis law was passed in 2003, the shops that are so much more common today really had no set structure until 2007. A few years later, an established and developed market would thrive, one that attracted many entrepreneurs to the state.

When the idea of starting a grow came up, both men sat down and talked out what they wanted to do. Both wanted to get into the cannabis industry and provide people with the highest quality of plant as possible. The majority of the market was concerned with maximizing square footage and producing the largest quantity possible rather than the quality of the product being produced. And with regulations still up in the air, both men understood that only those who take pride in what they produce would thrive.

Serge Chistov is one of them. A Wall Street financial advisor and importer, he found his calling with cannabis after hearing some general

And thus Honest Marijuana Company was born. A company built on the idea to build the cleanest, most organic farming operation. Once they

So why not with cannabis?

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gained local clearance, these two men, and their team hit the ground running. Ant's landscaping background gave them an idea of what needed to be done and what a project of this magnitude would entail. The soil environment in the state of Colorado can make growing very difficult, let alone growing an organic operation, but while it was no easy feat, HMC definitely was built to adapt. With an airflow system that utilizes the cold Colorado air and highly efficient lighting, HMC was built from the ground up and is a state of the art operation. They use living soil and plant based nutrients and absolutely no pesticides. While anyone can call themselves organic, HMC is one of the few operations in the state of Colorado who's techniques and products are fully compliant with organic regulations and classifications. Their aim is to be the cleanest and most efficient operation while still offering the highest quality product. "We don't believe in stripping down the plant

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“Organic' means using the highest quality ingredients to start with, and working with companies who are eco-conscious in their packaging and the way they do business. That's a very big thing for us”

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and adding other terpenes from non-cannabis plants and that type of thing," Ant tells us. The love and care this company puts into its products as well as in the well-being of their consumer are seen in everything they do, right down to their canning and nitrogenpreservation processes. We sit down with these two men who've set the bar high for grow operations everywhere.

What motivates you to do what you do? SERGE: I do this out of passion. I have a number of businesses where my involvement is strictly financial, but cannabis, just by nature of the business itself, is a passionate industry. I don’t know of any other business where there are that many passionate people involved. You can’t buy passion - that makes it extra valuable

The cultivation farm in Wray, Colorado. The farmers from CW Hemp harvesting the hemp plants and preparing them to be dried

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in my book. I was lucky enough to find enough passionate people around me to work their butts off for one purpose and one purpose only - to give this plant the ability to become the best plant it can possibly be. We are growers, not breeders, but we want to make sure that when we go to bed at night, we can sleep well knowing we did everything in our power to allow this plant to develop into the best possible plant it can be. ANT: The basis of legalization was advocacy for patients, so innocent people utilizing a harmless, natural plant wouldn't be criminalized, and to free this medicine up to those who needed it. I want to encourage people to grow their own the right way so that they can have the cleanest medicine possible. It's really about promoting organic practices in general regarding cannabis.


Why is eco-mindedness and quality control so important? A: 'Organic' means using the highest quality ingredients to start with, and working with companies who are eco-conscious in their packaging and the way they do business. That's a very big thing for us - we want people to buy our products, understanding that we not only care about the environment but them, the consumer, as well. We want to remind people that organic is an option.

Scientists at work processing and extracting at the CW Hemp lab in Boulder, Colorado

S: Predictability of experience is a big thing for us because we do not have quality control at the final product presentation on the market. There's a lot of venues opening up for us to take it to the next level and

expand the company. We invested in the nitrogen preservation packaging because on average, within three weeks of my bud leaving the premises, the physical and chemical characteristics will have changed. It won't even be the same product anymore, and nobody gives a shit. If I spend the extra money to create a product, why won't I ensure that it stays in the condition it was meant to be experienced in? This is the only industry where we can fool the consumer and give them an inconsistent product, and they're okay with it. We aim to change this by grabbing the market's attention, and it's starting to notice.

Is it really worth going that extra mile?

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“THAT'S WHAT'S COOL ABOUT CANNABIS THE CULTURE AND THE NETWORK OF LIKE-MINDED PEOPLE. I WOULD LIKE TO SEE MORE INGENUITY AND COMPETITION AND AM EXCITED TO SEE WHAT'S AROUND THE NEXT CORNER.”

OFFERING OVER

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Scientists at work processing and extracting at the CW Hemp lab in Boulder, Colorado

A: Of course. In the wake of a full blown legalized environment, I think some people lose sight of the fact that cannabis has never been grown in large scale facilities with the major production systems that Big Agriculture uses for tomatoes and things. Those type of systems are bad for the environment. We need to remember that this plant is one of the oldest cultivated plants on earth, and it deserves to be treated a certain way so that it can continue to get to people a certain way. To mass produce it and to fall behind on quality control is like breaking a taboo. S: We wanted to start with the cleanest, most natural, organic plant to generate a beautiful flower, beautiful cannabinoids, and beautiful terpenes. Within the state of Colorado, the low humidity damages our product, so we need to go above and beyond to ensure our product is as high a quality

as possible. The consumer is ultimately the decision maker, and we will aim to work on whatever products they choose.

How do you come up with your unique products? And what should we expect in the future? S: I ask myself, as a consumer of the product, what would I want from HM's line of products? What would the consumer like, what wouldn't they like? Will it be accessible to them, will they be able to distinguish our products from any others? We’re the first ones in the Colorado market who use nitrogen packaging on all their products - consistency and quality are what will keep people coming back, and there will always be the opportunity for the people who don’t cut corners. Basically, our goal here is just to work on creating a beautiful customer experience.

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A: Absolutely. For example, a lot of blunt smokers, as they get a little older, get to a certain point where they can't smoke them anymore, so we developed the Honest Blunt. We were looking to help bridge that gap, give people that slow burning, full 'pull' effect, if you will, that you get from that type of smoking experience. It's an awesome alternative to traditional blunts. We've even met a ton of people who don't typically like to smoke blunts, and they give these a shot and enjoy them because they're very smooth and very clean. We're also fans of the vaping movement - you might see a cartridge from us in the future, and we definitely have lots of concentrates that can be used in pens, like our Honest Wax.

Where do you see the cannabis industry in the next few years? A: I don't think we'll see full decriminalization, but I do think we'll see more states come online, and that's a good thing. The more

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people are on board, the more ways they try to handle it, and eventually, we might be able to adopt a federal program. S: The industry has seen an influx of celebrity endorsements, real estate moguls looking for lucrative property, and my favorite people - the crafty, boutiquey, niche guys. These smaller entrepreneur types are the most creative and innovative, keeping the industry exciting and challenging and evolving constantly. That's what's cool about cannabis - the culture and the network of like-minded people. I would like to see more ingenuity and competition and am excited to see what's around the next corner. There's a lot of new things happening around cannabis, and it's making a mark on how we all consume cannabis.

Any last words? A: Do your research and know who grows your cannabis!

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TRIBAL CLIQUE

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WE SIT WITH STREETWEAR OG BOBBY RUIZ AND TALK ABOUT THE CURRENT FASHION STATE OF THE UNION AND HOW HIS FOCUS AND REFUSAL TO SELL-OUT CONTRIBUTED TO TRIBAL'S LONGEVITY AND SUCCESS. WO R DS BY : R U B EN G A LI NDO S NA P S BY : TA A DOW 69K

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S

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treetwear was never intended to be sold in department stores or to be for the masses. It was a counterculture movement where an entire generation of skateboarders, graffiti artists and those with some street smarts could rep their lifestyles and wear their hearts on their sleeves - literally. In fact, the term “streetwear” was uncommon at the time. It was just dope, fresh clothing that allowed people to express themselves through their gear. As with many grassroots cultural movements, streetwear has been notoriously difficult to define. While under a constant state of evolution and creative direction (as with many street trends), the one constant has been the types of clothing produced.

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1989 in San Diego, California, Bobby Ruiz and his brother Joey founded “Tribal Streetwear.” Tribal was a new kind of statement and movement that fused Chicano culture, skate, the streets and fashion together. What started off as a passion project by printing tattoo flash on t-shirts, evolved into a fullfledged business. They found success with the support of the local community. They started to incorporate elements of what that

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they were into; both ancient and new motifs as well as influences ranging from skate, hip hop to the gang culture that surrounded them. After all this is southern California, “We basically did what we wanted to do, we refused to be kept in a box.” says Ruiz. They didn’t follow fads or fashion trends that were in at the time, which is what separated Tribal from the pack. Later on, Bobby incorporated b-boy styles in the mix and linked up with several distinguished artists like, “Mike Giant” “OG Abel” “Dyse One” and “Mr. Cartoon” to name a few who are revered in the street scenes. Tribal Gear later expanded to include a myriad of designs representing west coast lifestyle and car culture. In today’s millennial culture of self-promotion, advertising can be achieved by simply uploading a video on YouTube or posting a link to Facebook. Bobby didn’t have those luxuries back then. He had to rely on his “street hustle”, his knowledge of the market and circle of homies to get the word out about his brand. Much like the Beatles and the Rolling Stones who laid the foundation for the rock n’ roll era; the same holds true for Bobby Ruiz, who set the blueprint for others to emulate

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Bobby Ruiz posted up in his garage of classics.

and made streetwear what it is today. Tribal has gone from a small business to a global fashion phenomenon and movement with staunch support from the action sports community, all four elements of hip hop to bands like Linkin Park, Cypress Hill, Korn, P.O.D etc and has now also crossed into MMA. Bobby Ruiz talks about his love for Southern California culture, his influence on today's streetwear brands and how we are all Tribal in some form or fashion.

members of tribes, so at what point did we stop being from tribes? People still live in their communities, in pockets with groups of people. Tribes express themselves and communicate through music, art, clothing, dance, and calligraphy. Basically, it’s how the tribe represents, its considered Tribal.

How did you come up with the name Tribal?

Well, i’m right here [laughs]. We are here in downtown San Diego, so we get a good pulse of the city and what the people are into. There’s always people coming through and we’re always being introduced to new influential people, so the network just continues to grow. I always took the approach that we are living in a reality that

In the beginning, my brother and I were doing motifs based on Aztec and Mayan images for his tattoos, and they were considered to be Tribal. As the brand evolved, so did the definition that we had for it. People throughout history have always been

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With social media playing a big role now in all aspects of the industry, how do you stay on top of the game?

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TRIBAL WAS A NEW KIND OF STATEMENT AND MOVEMENT THAT FUSED CHICANO CULTURE, SKATE, THE STREETS AND FASHION TOGETHER.

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is based on what you did, how you’ve lived, how you represent and where you showed face. Nowadays, there are people generating fictitious images as being somebody that they're not. They are living through social

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media, trying to project an identity or lifestyle that they're not really involved in. The whole industry and even the streetwear name has been misused. There is a Huge gap between reality and social media.


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Always with his ears to the street and eye on you.

What do you think is the biggest difference between street art and graffiti art? For me, graf has evolved in a great way. There are a lot of things in that realm that have become acceptable that were not the 80-90’s. There were certain rules to the art that applied. Now it has become more acceptable for people to use different mediums and techniques in their art pieces. There are gallery collaborations happening between street art and graf writing. Not to take anything away from street art, but “street art” is relatively new. Street art is the new term that has become more acceptable than someone saying graffiti or vandalism.

You have employed many people, some of whom were incarcerated, What does it feel like to give back to the community and to give TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

someone a second chance? It’s not really a conscious thing to me. I am just glad to be in a position to be able to help someone out. It’s all within the network. Someone has to provide opportunity. It helps them out, it helps us out. We do what we can.

Why do you think the Tribal brand has been able to stay relevant in this constantly changing and evolving industry? I think it’s the word wide loyal supporters and fans both older and new that have helped us to still be around today and represent this movement globally. We have a great team and the best support. Our real artistic and street credibility keeps us solid. We’ve always stayed visible and accessible. Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to rap with us.

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“I think it’s the word wide loyal supporters and fans both older and new that have helped us to still be around today and represent this movement globally. We have a great team and the best support. Our real artistic and street credibility keeps us solid.”

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ART

IN MOTION #15

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“SIMPLICITY IS THE ULTIMATE SOPHISTICATION” - LEONARDO DI VINCI

WO R DS BY : R ENE G A LI NDO S NA P S BY : LEA H MO R I YA MA

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" IT WASN'T UNTIL I WAS IN MY EARLY 20’S WHEN IT ALL STARTED TO CLICK AND MAKE SENSE. THAT'S WHEN I FIGURED OUT THAT THERE ARE REALLY NO LIMITATIONS FOR ANYTHING."

#15 P 85 From the outside looking in Orbitron's iconic bubbletop. Art is relative and subjective depending on one's perspective. Some might not view cars as art, but we beg to differ. We sit with acclaimed automotive artist Dave Shuten to talk about why being period correct is paramount and how his impeccable builds will change your entire vantage point.

W

hen you think of art in the classic sense, the renaissance era often comes to mind. Virtuosos from that time period featured renowned artists such as Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Sandro Botticelli, and a myriad of others, it's hard to argue against that case. It is because of the creativity, innovation, and ingenuity of these pioneers we have masterpieces like the Sistine Chapel, the Statue of David, and The Mona Lisa just to name a few. The meticulous planning and attention to detail in each piece can still be seen centuries after they've been crafted. Widely considered an archetype of the “Renaissance man”, Leonardo da Vinci's works

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are still displayed today from his studies on human anatomy to the inventions of common day items like the parachute and scissors. True masters of their craft, they are universally credited to be the forefathers of contemporary art and have influenced artists from all over the globe. eople from all over the world congregate to witness their works and revel in their beauty at institutions such as the Louvre, the Guggenheim, and the Vatican to name some. Like the artists before him, automotive artisan Dave Shuten has practiced his craft and honed his skills to the level of becoming a master of

his craft and one of today's most sought after builders. While Dave's tools of the trade might be different than his renaissance brethren, the end result is the same. Impeccably detailed craftsmanship and innovative works of art. The only variation of that parallel is that Mr. Shuten's art starts and drives. Much like the Mona Lisa or the Last Supper, Dave's art in motion is immediately identified by his wild builds like the quirky Bubbletop AstroSled to Ed Roths Mysterion, and his world famous Iron Orchid to name a few. As in every great artist, Dave's creativity started off at an early age. In his youth, playing with Hot Wheels and model cars evolved into customizing model cars and building bikes. “I was 14 or 15 when I started working on my first car then it sort

of snowballed into all this. It wasn't until I was in my early 20’s when it all started to click and make sense.”, says Shuten. More of a hobby at first and not wanting to be confined to an office, Dave fully intended on making a career as an artist, even going as far as enrolling in Art School. “I actually went to school for art, painting and to do all these things. It was right about the time computers were taking over. I had no interest in drawing on a computer or doing any kind of art on a computer. I didn't even consider it art at the time. The thought of it was abhorrent.”, he mentions. That mindset lead him to quit school and take a job with General Motors. It wouldn't be until a few years later that everything started to mesh and make sense for him. Fast forward to 2017, Dave Shuten is one of the most famous and commercially

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The artist sees what others only catch a glimpse of.

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The master himself, Mr. Dave Shuten at the G.A.S. Museum.

successful automotive builders on the planet. In fact, as you read this, Dave is putting the finishing touches on former feature Daniel K. Nelson's Henry J drag car aptly coined the "Henry Jade". We sit in Dave's secret lab nestled in the G.A.S. campus and talk about the importance of being period correct and why he has an affinity for 60's era cars.

For those who aren't familiar, how did you get started with building cars? I guess it's all I ever really wanted to do. I started as a kid playing with hot wheels, model cars and then customizing model cars, building crazy bicycles, and all that kind of shit.

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When did you start working on your first actual car? I was 14 or 15 when I started working on my first car, then it sort of snowballed into all this. It wasn't until I was in my early 20’s when it all started to click and make sense. That's when I figured out that there are really no limitations for anything. So if I can see it, I can make it or build it. If I can draw it out then I can reproduce it.

What was the inspiration for some of your unique builds? My favorite time period is early to mid 60’s. That's when everything got a little crazy, a little more atomic, and a little more futuristic

inspired. It was during that time that they started melding art and cars together, so I really feel that they are more art than they are the car. With every piece being touched by hand, and made by hand. You know, with there only being one of this, and one of that. It makes it more personal. Anybody can have a car that's produced but to just make your own that's only yours, that's pretty rad.

Did you ever want to be a artist in the traditional sense? I should say I intended to be an artist. I actually went to school for art, painting and to do all these things. It was right about the time computers were taking over. I had no

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“MY FAVORITE TIME PERIOD IS EARLY TO MID 60’S. THAT'S WHEN EVERYTHING GOT A LITTLE CRAZY, A LITTLE MORE ATOMIC, AND A LITTLE MORE FUTURISTIC INSPIRED. IT WAS DURING THAT TIME THAT THEY STARTED MELDING ART AND CARS TOGETHER….”

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The legendary Pink Panther mobile built by the legend himself.

interest in drawing on a computer or doing any kind of art on a computer. I didn't even consider it art at the time. The thought of it was abhorrent. At that time in my life, I left school and went to work for General Motors.

How did you end up at G.A.S.? I've been friends with Beau for years before I came here, and when the Orbitron was discovered in Mexico, he brought me down here to lead the restoration. Soon after that, General Motors was sort of folding up and closing a lot of plants, I wasn't sure where life was going to take me and that's when he asked me become part of the G.A.S. family.

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What are your top five builds that are your personal favorites? Orchid is my favorite just because it's the only thing I've ever been able to do that's completely out of my head but also exactly the way I want it. What I mean by that is that with me doing it and Beau backing it, it worked out as an amazing project and got us a tremendous amount of love and press. The Grasshopper is another one of my favorites because if it's prominence and it's a huge part of history. Orbitron is another good one. I also did a one off top of my head bubble car that's living in some rich guys living room

right now. I do miss that one. Last but not least probably my ‘32 Ford that I have at home now if I ever do finish it. Your dream garage, give me your top five cars that are in it with money being no object. If I could have five cars, actually the ‘32 I have right now would be one of those. Orchid would be one of those. Beyond those two, ah there's just hundreds of cars that I've been in love with over the years. Nothing that no one would even recognize. I really like purpose built cars. I've always wanted a winged car which is either a Superbird or Daytona.

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You were recently inducted The National Rod and Custom Car Hall of Fame, how was that? I have to admit that was pretty awesome. I'm not sure but I might have been one of the youngest ever inducted into that. It's pretty cool to be put on a level with the same people you put on a pedestal your whole life. I've been very fortunate to not only meet but to get to know and become friends with pretty much every one of my heroes as a kid.

Who are some of the people who inspired you? Robert Williams was a huge inspiration of mine. One of my favorite artists that I didn't get a chance to meet was H.R. Giger. His work was absolutely astounding and way ahead of his time. Automotive-wise, anyone who was doing something different. I have no interest in cars that are normal. Anybody like Barris Roth, Carl Casper is another great one. All these people that just really dig in

TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

ORCHID IS MY FAVORITE JUST BECAUSE IT'S THE ONLY THING I'VE EVER BEEN ABLE TO DO THAT'S COMPLETELY OUT OF MY HEAD BUT ALSO EXACTLY THE WAY I WANT IT.

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and do something different. Chip Foose is another great example. He's changed the game a lot and that's really bitchin’.

What's in the future for Dave? You know, just the next car. It's sort of weird. I'm just super focused and I don't think about anything until that ones done or whatever. The two that I have going on now will get me through until January and then after that, I have no clue.

TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

What are your thoughts on the legalization of cannabis? It's certainly good for the economy. In the scheme of things, it's just not a big deal. I feel like that there's more important shit to be worried about than that. So let people do it if they want to do it and let me do this and everything's fine. They're really trying to make it hard so we can't build these cars and drive them in the US. That's a big deal. I don't know at which point we stopped being

OCTOBER 2016


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free, but it's starting to feel that way with everything being regulated. I just want everyone to do what makes them happy because if there's one thing I've learned is life's way too short. Just go do what you want to do and be who you want to be. If people don't like it then tough, because if you do it well enough eventually they'll want to do it. Thanks for your time Dave it was a pleasure getting to know you and we're looking forward to your next build.

TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

OCTOBER 2016


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JAN / FEB 2017


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OCTOBER 2016


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TOKEWELL MAGAZINE

Tokewell issue 15  
Tokewell issue 15  
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