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Together

Magazine

The Diocese of Derby magazine

Issue 6

Pride in Belper Harvest Homes

Going hungry How churches are joining the fight against food poverty


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Contents ISSUE SIX

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20 12 16

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Bishop Libby writes

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19 Cornergate Lunch Club

Bishop Libby’s tour of the deaneries photos Food poverty on your doorstep: Letting 8 News from around the God’s light shine diocese 20 Open for breakfast... 12 Pride in Belper and fun! 14 Harvest Homes 22 Christmas Lunch on Jesus 16 Meet Jean

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10 facts about food banks

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What’s On

27 What is your vocation? 28

Derby Cathedral Page

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From the pews

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Book Club

17 Food poverty in Derbyshire 18 Feeding Derbyshire: A Diocesan Adviser’s perspective

23 Social dining: taking 32 loneliness off the 34 menu in Ashbourne 24 Q&A: Revd Sam Tredwell, Long Eaton Foodbank

Together magazine is distributed to over 10,000 people across Derbyshire.

Together magazine is printed on 100% recycled paper and is 100% recyclable.

The magazine is made possible thanks to the support of our generous advertisers. Please mention Together if you utilise their services.

We encourage you to share this copy with your family, friends, neighbours and local community to share the great work taking place in our churches Distribution date for issue 7: 15 November 2019

The Diocese of Derby does not endorse any of the products or services offered by these advertisers.

Leisure Time The Final Word: Bishop Jan

Advertising and all enquiries: Together Magazine Derby Church House Full Street Derby, DE1 3DR 01332 388680 together@derby.anglican.org .

Copy deadline for issue 7: 11 October 2019

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Welcome! One of the things that struck me during my rich and diverse deanery visits, in the weeks following my Installation, was how across Derby and Derbyshire the whole life of our nation is reflected. This was illustrated, for example, by visits that took me from ‘field to fork’. I visited livestock and arable farms, the Agricultural Business Centre and Auction, food manufacturers, allotments and community gardens, shops and restaurants, colleges and courses, including in prisons, training in agriculture, horticulture, animal husbandry and catering. I shared food and hospitality at breakfast clubs, coffee mornings, lunch clubs, afternoon teas, and suppers in church halls, community centres, homes and cafes. We are blessed in our diocese, across the city and county, to encompass the complete chain that keeps us fed. Writing in July’s edition of ‘Our Diocese’ +Jan reminded us that Jesus is known as the living bread in whom all our hungers are satisfied.

“Jesus is known as the living bread in whom all our hungers are satisfied.”

She reflected on the ‘Feeding Derbyshire’ Conference which brought together volunteers from churches and community groups, leaders of charities and representatives of Derbyshire County Council to work together towards a three year plan that aims to ensure no-one in Derbyshire has to go without food. She reminded those present that churches were at the forefront of recent response to hunger, setting up foodbanks, for example. And she reminded us, who follow Jesus, to take a special interest, saying: “Jesus had a special concern for the poor … and a special concern for those who were hungry” . +Jan turned our attention to a story in the gospels when thousands of hungry people were fed despite the anxiety of the disciples, and the apparent paucity of resources available – two fish and five small loaves from a young child’s picnic. I want to echo +Jan’s challenging comment that, humbled by the generosity of a child and encouraged by the miraculous work of God, those present, who had been selfishly hoarding their own food, were prompted to share their own bread too, so no one went away hungry. We pray “give us this day our daily bread”. It is a potent and dangerous prayer. It recognises our need and dependence, and demands of us to be generous – open to both receive and give. This edition of ‘Together’ offers food for thought: invitations to be fed and prompts to be generous. Bon appetite!

The Rt Revd Libby Lane Bishop of Derby

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Bishop Libby’s tour of the deaneries After her installation as Bishop of Derby, Bishop Libby embarked on a tour of the diocese visiting each deanery. Here are a few of the photos taken during her trip.

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News from around the Diocese What’s happening in your church? Share your special services, events and news with diocese. Email your stories and photos to together@derby.anglican.org

Derby Cathedral welcomes The Knife Angel this autumn Derby Cathedral will host The Knife Angel when it comes to the city later this year. Derby has been chosen to be one of the cities across the country to host the National Monument Against Violence and Aggression. The spectacular 27ft sculpture, made from around 100,000 bladed weapons collected in knife banks during police amnesties across the country, will be based next to the Cathedral on Irongate, for 28 days in October. The Knife Angel is being brought to Derby by a group of agencies and organisations across the city, including: Derby Cathedral, Derbyshire Police, Derby City Council, the Police and Crime Commissioner and University Hospitals of Derby and Burton NHS Foundation Trust.

Fond farewell to Area Dean - Revd Canon Dr Simon Taylor In May 2019 it was announced that the Revd Canon Dr Simon Taylor, Director of Curate Training, Area Dean of Derby City Deanery and Canon Chancellor of Derby Cathedral had been appointed Director of Ministry Development, Diocese of Bristol. On his role as Area Dean, Simon said “There is much to celebrate and to be thankful for, in the past three years and in the years to come. Be assured of my continuing prayers. Please pray for me during this time of change.”

Revd Canon Geraldine Pond to retire Cleaning Glossop Glossop Parish Churchgoers are helping keep Glossop tidy. A number of them have joined Glossop Big Pick – a monthly ramble around the town to litter-pick and tidy up.

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These fantastic folk volunteer every month to help keep the beautiful town, well, beautiful! It’s also a chance for the litter-pickers to spend time with others and make new friends. For more information, see facebook.com/GlossopBigPick/

The Revd Canon Geraldine Pond, Diocesan Director of Vocations with additional responsibility for clergy wellbeing and Warden of Readers, will retire in October 2019. Canon Pond’s last day in post will be Sunday 6 October 2019. Canon Pond will be appointed Canon Emeritus of Derby Cathedral in retirement and will move away from the diocese.


The laying on of hands at the ordination of priests service at Derby Cathedral.

Youngsters honoured with Bishop’s Badge Children from all over the Diocese received their Bishop’s Badge Schools Awards for service to their schools and communities. Nine individuals and three projects were presented with their badges and certificates at services at Christ Church Litton and Derby Cathedral. The group awards included Breadsall C of E Primary School’s Hope After Conflict project, looking at the impact of the First World War on the local community. Then pupils researched local connections with soldiers and were so moved by the stories they unearthed that they based their carol concert around WW1 and read messages of peace and hope. The Kites and Harriers Hope in the Community project at St Luke’s C of E Primary School supported two local charities: Mummy’s Star, supporting women and their families affected by cancer in pregnancy and Rubens Retreat, who support children and families dealing with the death of a child or who have children with life-limiting or life-threatening conditions. And KidsCan Charity Ambassadors at the Duke of Norfolk C of E Primary School supported their schoolfriend Emma, who at the age of 18 months had been diagnosed with an inoperable brain tumour. Emma herself became an ambassador for KidsCan and became the face of the charity. The ambassadors said: “Emma inspires us all every day to remain hopeful, to never give up even when hop seems lost. She has taught us that hope is like love: the more we give to others, the more we have for ourselves.” Emma, too, received her Bishop’s Badge at the service in Litton.

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Clowne’s new mining mosaic

Shadows of the Past: A history of Tideswell Church in 100 people During Tideswell Wakes Week, in June 2019, Tideswell Church welcomed 100 people connected with the church or community at some point in the 600+ years the church has been in existence. Emphasising the human story of this church and its parish, figures included ordinary people alongside more well-known characters! A nameless child apprentice who died at the notorious Litton Mill (buried in the church yard) sat alongside King Edward I who visited Tideswell in 1275; a refugee family given shelter during the First World War could be seen alongside Canon Andrew, the Vicar, who built daughter churches for the growing mill villages nearby; a representative craftsman, involved in building the church, rested beside local characters who were part of the congregation in living memory. Highlighting just 100 of the many ‘living stones’ who have been part of a Church that still speaks to people today, the exhibition provoked a lot of discussion and a greater appreciation of a place that is far more than just an ancient building.

After months of collaborative design work, learning new skills and sheer hard work, a Mining Mosaic now adorns the front of the altar of St John the Baptist’s Miners Chapel in Clowne. Made by local volunteers, the mosaic is a tribute to the town’s mining community. It depicts a shaft of light coming down from the cross in the window above – the light of Christ. On the right is the image of a nurse and on the left a miner, recognising that men and women were part of the mining industry in lots of different roles. Around the edge are smaller images depicting people’s hobbies and home life, including a fish, a pint of beer, a pigeon, a spade, a whippet and a cup of tea. The four corners show pit tallies (tokens used by miners to clock in and out) – one each for Bolsover, Whitwell, Creswell and Markham pits. The text is from Job 28:11.

Preparation for the exhibition, with help from the local community, involved the creation of 100 cardboard figures. Each was labelled with a name and short biography before being seated around the church building. A booklet listing the 100 biographies was available for visitors.

New appointment for Area Dean, Revd Dr Graham Rutter The Revd Dr Graham Rutter, Vicar of Emmanuel Church in Swadlincote and Area Dean for the Mercia Deanery, is leaving in the autumn following his appointment as tutor of Old Testament at St Mellitus College, North West based in Liverpool. Graham will continue in post until the autumn, details of his departure will be announced in due course. “I’d like to take this opportunity to say thank you to everyone in Mercia Deanery. It has been a privilege working with you.”

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The Museum of the Moon A giant moon is set to rise in Derby Cathedral! Museum of the Moon is a touring artwork by UK artist Luke Jerram. Measuring seven metres across, the moon features detailed NASA imagery of the lunar surface. The installation is a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by BAFTA and Ivor Novello award-winning composer Dan Jones and it will be with us from Monday 16th September to Sunday 6th October. There will be a number of activities taking place under the moon during its time at the Cathedral.


Goodbye from The Dean

The Very Revd Dr Stephen Hance, Dean of Derby will take up a new role as National Lead for Evangelism and Witness for the Church of England in September. Here he reflects on his time at Derby Cathedral.

‘It has been a privilege to be Dean here for the last two years, and while I am moving on sooner than I had expected, I am grateful for all that we have accomplished together. ‘Among other things, I am glad to have been able to play a part in welcoming Bishop Libby to Derby, ‘In the Cathedral, we have opened Derby Cathedral School, launched The Sanctuary at Derby Cathedral, received a substantial grant from the Church Commissioners to ensure the future sustainability of the Cathedral, and made some significant new staff appointments, for all of which thanks be to God. ‘In my new role I will be working in the areas of evangelism, discipleship, and church growth, which have been particular hallmarks of Archbishop Justin’s time in office. This is an exciting time to be involved in this work, with a renewed commitment from the Church at all levels to enable evangelism that is motivated not by institutional anxiety about diminishing numbers gathering on a Sunday, but about a longing for every person in our society to know the love of God for themselves. I am glad that this work will bring me back to the Diocese of Derby from time to time. Please pray for me as I will continue to pray for you.’

The nomination of a Dean to either a Crown or Parish Church Cathedral is made by a panel convened for this purpose. The panel is led by a Chair, nominated by the Archbishop of the Province. An overview of the process is available on the Church of England website. More information about the appointment of a new Dean of Derby will be available in due course.

St Matthew’s Darley Abbey celebrates 200 years In June, St Matthew’s Church, Darley Abbey, celebrated its bicentenary with a weekend full of worship, live music, drama, dance and lots of cake! The weekend started with guided tours of the church and a BBQ followed by performances from Hilary L’Raine’s dance school, the Derby Shakespeare Company and the Marlowe Theatre Company. Later the church was packed for a concert by the Darley Abbey Choir (children from Walter Evans and Old Vicarage schools, conducted by Anne de Waal) and the choir of St Matthew’s. Bishop Jan attended the Sunday morning Choral Communion service along with the Mayor of Derby, previous vicars, Martin

Wilson and Chris Dyer and friends from St Edmund’s. Bishop Jan commented: “St Matthew’s struck me as a warm and welcoming church family with a very high standard of worship.” She encouraged the church “to keep flinging wide those doors and to be bold in inviting others to come and see ...” After the service, cake and bubbly were served and many in the congregation enjoyed a picnic in the church grounds. Later, a string quartet entertained the crowd whilst berries and bubbly were served. On Monday 24 June - the actual anniversary of the opening - youngsters from Walter Evans School came to celebrate. They enjoyed a talk about the

history of the church then had a picnic. The nursery class sang ‘Happy birthday St Matthew’s”. The following weekend saw St Matthew’s open for more tours and cake. In the Butterfly Garden of Darley Park a storyteller, Debjani Chatterjee, and a dancer, Charu Asthana, told a wonderful tale of love and friendship among the children of the original community. We finished the weekend with a Hot House Jazz Concert in St Matthew’s, in aid of Cancer Research. The church was packed, the music vibrant, and the young people absolutely stunning. What a marvellous way to end the celebrations!

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PRIDE in Belper As soon as I heard that Belper was hosting its own Pride event, I knew that Christ Church had to be involved. Snowballing from a small picnic planned in the memorial gardens to the town-wide event it became as interest grew, Pride in Belper presented a fantastic opportunity for us to spread Christ’s redeeming message of love and acceptance to a community who had, directly or indirectly, often had painful experiences with the church. This was in line with our mission as an Inclusive Church, which we signed up for in November 2017. Inclusive Church is a network of churches, groups and individuals uniting together around a shared vision: “We believe in inclusive Church - a church which celebrates and affirms every person and does not discriminate. We will continue to challenge the church where it continues to discriminate against people on grounds of disability, economic power, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, learning disability, mental health, neurodiversity, or sexuality. We believe in a Church which welcomes and serves all people in the name of Jesus Christ; which is scripturally faithful; which seeks to proclaim the Gospel afresh for each generation; and which, in the power of the Holy Spirit, allows all people to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Jesus Christ.” The celebrations kicked off, like most Prides, with a parade - but this being Belper, it was far more fitting for this to be a ‘Strutt’ down from the marketplace, along King Street, then back up to the memorial gardens. Crowds lined the streets, with people leaving shops to watch the Strutt - even mid-haircut! We were grateful to have been allocated a stand in a prominent position—as were the Unitarian Church and the Quakers - to ensure that the healing message that God’s love does not discriminate was front and centre. This was a deliberate move by the organisers which not only allowed us to have many conversations with all kinds of people, it also meant that our sign quoting 1 John 4:16 - “God is love. Those who live in love live in God, and God lives in them” - was unmissable by all walking by, with some stopping just to photograph it. We encouraged any who visited the stand to write names or prayers on a second sign with the word ‘LOVE’ written out, which a truly touching number of people chose to do, and our intercessions the following day were centred on holding each of these people and situations in prayer. Our shirts, provided by One Body One Faith who run the Christians at Pride movement, also proved a valuable witness and meant that even away from the stand people would stop us to ask questions or to simply thank us for being there. With around 2,000 people estimated to have attended, the reaction we received was overwhelmingly positive, though even the most heartwarming reactions to people receiving the message that they are loved and accepted for who they are carried an undertone of sadness for the lifetime of alienation, rejection and secrecy that this revelation betrayed. We will continue to carry the stories and situations we heard in our hearts and prayers, and hope that the spectacular success of Saturday’s festival is the spark for wider change and growth in the church. By Hannah Grivell, Deanery Synod member at Christ Church, Belper

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Harvest Homes The Diocese of Derby rebuilding lives with the Diocese of Manicaland, Zimbabwe

In mid-March this year, parts of Manicaland, rich agricultural lands in eastern Zimbabwe, were devastated by Cyclone Idai. The cyclone brought rain, flooding and landslides, but worse was the devastation as a dam burst its banks sending huge rocks, some over 10 tons, down the valley, destroying homes, crops and livelihoods. The Diocese of Manicaland provided shelter in its schools and churches in the aftermath, bringing comfort to the bereaved, care for the injured, and food for those who had lost everything before the larger agencies came with support. The church has worked closely with other agencies to ensure the most vulnerable were not left out. The cyclone has felt like the final straw breaking people who have already suffered so much. They have endured a long political crisis that led to an economic crisis with hyperinflation. In 2016 they were badly affected by drought. These resourceful people are feeling overwhelmed by this latest crisis. To support them the Mothers’ Union is planning trauma healing support.

Isaiah 25:4 For you have been a refuge to the poor, a refuge to the needy in their distress, a shelter from the rainstorm and a shade from the heat. But the church wants to do more. They are really concerned about the elderly and widows who are living in communal tents, often looking after orphans. The church would like to build them simple homes, away from the danger area. The government has offered land. As a diocese, we will partner with The Diocese of Manicaland, who will provide cement, bricks and roofing sheets, which we will finance. The community will then contribute local materials and their labour to construct homes for their needy neighbours. Each home will cost around £900 to build. We are aiming to generate funding for 20 family homes which gives us a target of £18,000. Can you help Mary and other vulnerable people to have a dry home, safe from future storms? Donations should be made payable to ‘The Bishop of Derby’s Harvest Appeal’ and sent to Mr Edward Latham, 64 Birkinstyle Lane, Shirland, Alfreton, Derbyshire, DE55 6BS. Resources and more information will be available on the Diocesan website from 1st September, including prayers, links to Biblical material and study guides and 30 days of practical family-friendly ideas and activities. The appeal is focussed on September and October and will close on 31st December 2019.

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Mary* and her husband had a dream for a strong and solid house where their children could grow up in safety. Mary’s husband used to travel to South Africa to earn money and bit by bit they were gathering the materials to build their home. When the cyclone struck, Mary and her family were still living in a mud and thatch hut. Mary doesn’t know what happened during the chaos of the winds, rains and floods. Tragically her husband and two children are still missing. She fears they are dead. The floods also swept away all the building materials the family had bought. Since the disaster, Mary has been living in a tent with her surviving child. The local church has given help, bringing food and comfort and ensuring her child stays in school. But Mary is traumatised and longs for safe shelter. *Not her real name

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Meet Jean She’s sold poppies for 75 years and raised thousands of pounds for charity October and November are the months of poppies. Not those in our gardens, but those that adorn shop counters, collection boxes and our lapels. And each year, an army of volunteers heads out into the Diocese to help sell those poppies and raise vital funds to support today’s Armed Forces community – and to help ensure we never forget. In the village of Hulland Ward, not far from Ashbourne, one such volunteer has been committed to selling poppies for a staggering 75 years!

Last year Jean and colleagues in the village raised more than £2,000 for the Poppy Appeal.

“I started when I was ten,” says Jean Redfern. “At that age, I didn’t really know what I was doing or why. But I was out on my bike one day when I was stopped and asked if I’d like to sell some poppies.” This is Jean’s calling as she hasn’t missed a single year since. Each year, a consignment of poppies has been delivered to her home. Jean divides them up and gets them ready to be distributed throughout Hulland Ward, including at the church she has visited for 80 years, Christ Church, Hulland.

awful.”

of tea everywhere I go or I’d never get round everyone! “People in the village are always generous – at least I think they are because I never look at what they are putting in the tin,” she laughs. “That wouldn’t be the right thing to do.” But Jean certainly has got the tins filled. Last year her efforts together with village resident Jane Twigg, who sells hand-knitted poppies, helped raise more than £2,000 in the village. Jean says: “I do it because I’ve always done it and because it’s important to remember those poor soldiers who come back from wars these days without limbs and in a terrible state. It’s

Jean’s brother, Ken, was also in the army and came home from the Second World War. He has since died but his memory also inspires Jean to sell poppies: “He was away for a long, long time when I was only a girl. We didn’t hear anything of him in that time… but he did come home.” Christ Church, Hulland, has been Jean’s place of worship for 80 years. Jean is humble when she talks about the personal accolades she has received because of her commitment to the Poppy Appeal: last year she was awarded the Bishop’s Badge, presented by Bishop Jan in Derby Cathedral, and earlier this year she received Maundy Money from the Queen at Windsor Castle.

She has walked the length and breadth of the village, leaving poppies to be sold at the pubs, the village shop and the school and has knocked on villagers’ doors offering them a smile and a chance to buy their poppy. Many will have been expecting Jean recalls, “When I first got the letter inviting me, I thought ‘Oh her and will have their money ready to hand over. She is often Heck! Who’s told her about me?’ accompanied by her granddaughters to help her carry the collection boxes and the boxes of poppies. “It was a grand occasion though. The Queen didn’t stop to chat as she had so many people to see, but she smiled as she “People are used to me going round with poppies – and presented me with the purse, and that was lovely.” some say they will only buy them from me now,“ she says. “Sometimes we have a bit of a chat, but I can’t stop for a cup

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It may be hard to swallow, but Derbyshire produces more food than it can eat, and yet people in Derbyshire are going hungry!

In this issue of Together Magazine, we’re looking at some of the problems around food poverty in the Diocese of Derby – and some of the projects run by our churches and other community groups to help feed Derbyshire and to help ensure children and adults in our communities don’t go to bed hungry.

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Feeding Derbyshire: A Diocesan Adviser’s perspective by Stella Collishaw, Community Action Officer, Diocese of Derby

I have learnt two things from this work.

The Christian gospels show the importance of shared meals: meals with friends, at festivals, weddings, large scale picnics, meals where Jesus was criticised as being with the wrong sort of people and, my favourite, a cooked breakfast on a beach.

First, no-one wanted food banks to become part of life ever after in Derbyshire. It feels shameful. Feeding Britain has lobbied for structural changes including that food poverty in this country be considered alarming enough to be measured.

People who interacted with Jesus ate together. After his death and resurrection Christians remember Jesus’ life and death through a sharing of bread and wine.

Second, still not everyone accepts food poverty exists - it remains hidden in many of our communities. Let’s not forget we didn’t all begin with the same opportunities. The lack of equality from housing to education to health and lack of family support impact people’s life chances and exacerbate vulnerabilities.

In the Old Testament we are reminded to look after the stranger and the widow and there is strong criticism from the prophets to those participating in acts of worship without related acts of justice and compassion.

‘If your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink.’ Romans 12: 20-21 The Director of Public Health Derbyshire, Dean Wallace, reminded us at the recent Feeding Derbyshire Symposium (June 2019) that 2.2 million people living in the UK are severely food insecure - the highest level in Europe. People in food poverty emerge through financial crisis brought on by a change in circumstances or a change of income. Shelter highlighted the precariousness of personal finances with working families showing 1 in 3 were one month away from homelessness if one working person lost their job. In Derbyshire, local Christian people have seen the rise in food poverty and responded to the challenge by developing and supporting foodbanks and community café schemes. The group of agencies working across the county is called Feeding Derbyshire. They have developed schemes to support children, and combat isolation and stress. This includes the supply of surplus food from supermarkets via the Food Hub, along with charitable giving by individuals in local communities and managers in local stores. The partnership is currently renewing its strategy looking at the problem.

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I hope we are not becoming a society that lies to itself about meritocracy - presuming we are all individually responsible for the good times we experience, and the painful times are personal self-inflicted problems. The tendency to blame the victims because of our comparative good circumstances is a perilous path. The decision whether to run a Trussell Trust foodbank or an independent one has been about 50:50 in the county - often on the assumption that recipients would need around three parcels a year and no more. Although many people do not need support for longer than three weeks, there are some complex cases. The development of ‘no questions asked’ community cafés or paywhat-you-can social eating events may be in response to this. So, I hope that we in our county and in our churches can continue to reinvent our community spaces where we eat together, and our hospitality - even if its Messy Church we spend our resources on rather than ticket-only Harvest Supper. We can donate throughout the year to support foodbanks, not just at Harvest, maybe offering female hygiene products or nappies or toothbrushes as well as canned goods or a fancy loaf. And we can support agencies like Citizens Advice and Church Action on Poverty etc to lobby for change. And finally, the reported 4 out of 5 churches supporting foodbanks in one way or another could become 5 out of 5, until we no longer need them, because our government has been lobbied to make the changes needed.


Cornergate Lunch Club celebrates 20 years

It is 20 years since Cornergate Lunch Club was founded at Sawley Church Hall and a special lunch and service was held on Sunday, 2 June 2019 to celebrate. In 1999, Averil Carver had a vision to start a luncheon club in Sawley. She discussed the idea with Linda Thompson, prayed about it and the seeds were sown! Various friends were contacted and asked to help with either cooking, kitchen duties, pick-ups or serving at tables. The name of the club came about when Averil opened her bible at the place Cornergate was the page heading (Zechariah 14.10). It was very appropriate as we were situated on a corner and had large gates. Originally there were only 12 guests. Over the years there were lots of outings - well dressings, boat trips, garden parties and numerous meals for special occasions! From small beginnings we have grown to 28 guests and up to 15 helpers. New helpers and drivers were recruited over the years, but Janette Riley has been there from the beginning in charge of the vegetables. It was calculated that over the 20 years she peeled and chopped over 2000 kilos of carrots and she was duly presented with an engraved wooden spoon — and a bunch of carrots! Barbara

Warner is our oldest helper at 91 and always puts on her pinnie for the occasion! Pictured are some of the original team, many of whom have been involved for 20 years. Lots of fantastic meals, fellowship and outings later and with God’s grace we are still running after 20 years! However, many of our guests are now well into their 90s and many of the helpers could qualify for a place too! We pray that the Lord will bless us for years to come although we are in need of some younger legs to help in the future! We are all putting our names on the waiting list now to be sure of a place! June Oliver

Food poverty on your doorstep: Letting God’s light shine

Sometimes, food poverty in the Diocese of Derby can take you by surprise.

It can be difficult to get your head around the fact that people might be going hungry in our own communities – maybe even on our own streets. Revd Chris Andrew,in the United Benefice of Morton and Stonebroom with Shirland, recalls a recent pastoral situation really brought hunger to the fore and needed the Church to help out. “A parishioner met a young woman, Jennifer (not her real name) who, together with her children aged 6 and 8, had been abandoned by her (highly controlling) partner. “As you know, we are a trial area for Universal Credit. The benefit money was paid directly to him, but he stopped passing it on to Jennifer and the kids. So, my parishioner took Jennifer to buy milk and bread. “However, it emerged that for the previous three weeks they had had no gas or electricity. To make matters worse, there was a sixweek wait between Jennifer making an application for Universal Credit in her own name and the first payment. “Accordingly, we as a Church decided to support them in terms of shopping trips to a supermarket and topping-up the gas and electricity. Fortunately, we have been able to do this by tapping into our ‘Gisbourne Trust’ resource. “In a nutshell, had we not been there, they would have had neither food nor fuel during the intervening period. “I might also add that as part of our Thy Kingdom Come events, we have instigated the Thy Kingdom Come Emergency Fund, to ‘let God’s light shine into the darkest places’ and to enable us to have a rapid response contingency.”

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Open for breakfast...

and fun!

A look inside Creswell’s school holiday breakfast club. 20

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One of the great things about going to school is that you get fed! And whilst not every child relishes the thought of having a school dinner, at least those that do don’t go hungry. But what happens during the school holidays? If parents are struggling to make ends meet there is a real possibility that some children can start the new term malnourished. Breakfast and lunch clubs during school holidays have proved to be part of the solution for some areas. Bob Glassy runs Creswell Breakfast Club in North East Derbyshire Deanery. Based at St Mary Magdalene Church in the village, the club is now in its fourth year. “When the schools break up, we start work,” says Bob. “The children who come here get a breakfast – cereal or porridge – and unlimited toast. They also get a lunch bag to take away - a sandwich, drink, piece of fruit and a cereal bar.” The club also provides toys and activities, such as crafts they can enjoy while the club is open and charges 50p per child per day. Occasionally they show films. Bob is keen to point out that all children are welcome to use the club – it’s not just for those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Most of the children – and there can be as many as 40 there in a day – come from within the benefice of Elmton with Creswell and Whitwell with Steetley. The club has a team of volunteers who run the club and prepare the food; parents are expected to supervise their children while they are at the club. Bob says: “Some children enjoy making their own sandwiches for their lunch bag while they are here, so the volunteers help them do that too. Without the volunteers, there wouldn’t be a club!” Like many breakfast and lunch clubs, much of the food is provided by FareShare, for which Derbyshire County Council pays the subscription fee. And anything left over is distributed to parents to ensure children can be fed and that nothing goes to waste. Local businesses also help out with donations, including Creswell Co-op who provide the club’s milk each day. Bob says: “Children who come here go home with a full belly. We’re also building memories for them and some of them in years to come will walk past the church and say: ‘We used to go there – and we were fed.’” To find out more, see Creswell Breakfast Club on Facebook.

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Christmas Lunch on Jesus

Revd. Canon Paul Morris, St. Peter’s in the City, Derby As a Jewish believer in Jesus, I would like to begin with a Jewish saying, “Many people worry about their own stomachs and the state of other people’s souls. The real task is to do the opposite: to worry about other people’s stomachs and the state of your own soul.” Or as Rabbi Israel Salanter (1810-83) put it: “Someone else’s material needs are my spiritual responsibility.” I think of these wise sayings as we prepare for our 10th Christmas Lunch on Jesus, a project that is so important to many families in Derby. Over the years we have certainly fed the 5000 and more! As the Derby Telegraph headline stated so clearly one year, “Food hampers will give festive cheer to needy families this Christmas.” The facts about the acute need for food in many countries are devastating. One billion people, one eighth of the world’s population, still live in hunger. Each year, 2 million children die through malnutrition. This is happening at a time when doctors are warning of the spread of obesity. We are eating too much while others starve. This is not just an economic and political challenge but a spiritual one as well. The Bible contains multiple provisions to ensure that no one would go hungry. The corners of the field, forgotten sheaves of grain, gleanings that drop from the hands of the gleaner, and small clusters of grapes left on the vine were to be given to the poor. Everything that grew in the seventh year belonged to everyone. And in the third and sixth year of the seven-year cycle, a tithe of all produce went to those in need. One contemporary translation of these biblical imperatives is Leket (gleanings), Israel’s national food bank, which rescues surplus food that would otherwise be destroyed from farms, restaurants, cafeterias and bakeries and gives it to the disadvantaged. We are now seeing this here, with supermarkets giving away surplus food to many organisations for distribution to those in need. Where there is a will, there is a way. Today the problem is that the world produces enough food for everyone but not everyone has enough food, and if ever there is a time where the differences are at their most stark between the haves and have-nots, it is at Christmas, where some feast in abundance and others struggle to put enough food on the table. Christmas Lunch on Jesus is a project that provides everything an individual or family needs for a Christmas Day lunch. Our hampers include turkey, vegetables, potatoes, gravy, Christmas pudding, crackers, chocolates, cranberry sauce, mince pies, (and alternatives for those with dietary requirements), a celebration candle, everything needed for an enjoyable Christmas lunch. Last year we distributed 400 boxes for 1500 people on low income who otherwise would struggle to afford a Christmas meal.

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Nominations for boxes were received from Social Services, GPs, Women’s Refuge, Housing Associations, Churches, Schools, British Red Cross (for migrants) and Derby City Mission. To celebrate our link between the Diocese of Derby and Kolkata Cathedral, we donate funds enabling them to provide hampers for some of the poorest people in Kolkata’s slums, containing rice, lentils, dahl, biscuits, sweets…a Christmas feast for those who live in poverty on a daily basis. They distributed 380 hampers and served lunch for 1400 people in the cathedral! Can you partner with us this year? We need volunteers to help pack the hampers on Monday, December 23rd? We also need donations, and this can be done in person at St. Peter’s or online, where you can also see a video telling the story of how each hamper is filled! Let me close with one of my favourite Jewish stories. Rabbi Shneor Zalman of Ladi awoke one night to hear his baby grandson crying. He went downstairs and found his son so intent on his Old Testament studies that he had failed to hear the cry. So the grandfather went into the child’s bedroom and gently rocked the baby until it went to sleep again. Then he went to his son and said, “My child, I do not know what you are studying, but it cannot be the word of God if it makes you deaf to the cry of the child.” Today, even in a world of plenty, too many of the world’s children are crying. Let us not be deaf to their cry. For more information, visit the St. Peter’s in the City website at: https://www.stpetersderby.org.uk/project/christmas-lunch-on-je-


Social dining: taking loneliness off the menu in Ashbourne Whilst there are many food projects in the Diocese that are there specifically to help combat food poverty, there are others that help both cut down on food waste and deal with other social problems at the same time.

Take a step inside Ossie’s Kitchen in Ashbourne for a shining example of how to make this work. In a nutshell, every month Ossie’s Kitchen takes food that is about to go to waste and converts it into a three-course, social dining event at St Oswald’s Church Centre. It’s designed with those who are experiencing loneliness and isolation in mind, but anyone is welcome to go along.

This is freshly-cooked, healthy food – a fresh home-cooked meal. One of the project organisers, Revd Nigel Rode, explains: “We work closely with FareShare. On the fourth Monday of the month, they send us enough food to feed 50 people three courses each, and our cooking team takes a look at what we’ve been sent and devises a menu.” The team has no idea what food is being sent to them before it arrives – so coming up with a tasty, balanced and nutritious menu is something akin to a Masterchef challenge! However, according to Nigel, FareShare do consider carefully what they send to Ossie’s Kitchen, and the five kitchen staff are inspired by the ingredients they receive. “And just 24 hours later, the team is cooking it up into tasty meals!” Says Nigel. “Guests can come and enjoy their dinner in the company of others. Some are pre-identified as being isolated and lonely, some are referred by the local foodbank – and others just turn up because they fancy coming along – including families.” In reality, the food supplied by FareShare can feed more than 50 people. In fact, at the launch, it fed 68, including special guests – and no-one went hungry. There is a suggested donation of £3 per meal (£1 per child’s meal), but no one is required to pay. Ossie’s Kitchen is keen to point out that the food it is sent is not out of date or rotten – far from it, it is surplus food that is re-distributed to projects in need. This means it doesn’t instead go for composting, get put into animal feed or go to landfill. So what happens if any is left over? Even that doesn’t go to waste – it is offered to guests for a suggested donation of £2 per carrier bag-full. The project was conceived when Nigel and his wife, Maggie, both retired priests, identified loneliness and isolation as a problem in the Ashbourne area. After talking to Derbyshire County Council and other similar projects, five months later they had an army of 28 volunteers in place and were ready to do a practice run at the end of April 2019. The kitchen now opens on the fourth Tuesday of each month, between 4 and 6 pm.

Nigel says the response from diners has been nothing but positive. One note to the organisers read, “Thank you for Ossie’s Kitchen – we love it!” Like many projects of its kind, Ossie’s Kitchen relies on volunteers. “They are terrific,” says Nigel. “Some of them are isolated and lonely themselves and they find it hugely rewarding.” To make sure all guests are properly catered for, the project has a cooking team, hospitality team, drinks team and a serving team. Combatting loneliness, cutting down on food waste and reducing food poverty – Ossie’s Kitchen is certainly making a difference! For more information, or if you would like to visit Ossie’s Kitchen, contact Nigel or Maggie on 01335 664159

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Q&A

With Revd Sam Tredwell, Long Eaton Foodbank Food banks are now, sadly, a common feature of many towns and cities as more and more people struggle to find the money to pay for life’s basics.

How do you decide who needs what? The Trussell Trust gives us a picking list – they’ve put together a list of things you would need to keep you going for about three to four days. The list includes cereal, milk, coffee, vegetables etc – so because we’re part of that network they’ve done the hard work for us. Obviously, a single person gets less than a family… but we give out more single parcels than anything else.

Of course, food banks don’t tackle the core problem, but they do at least help some of those who struggle to pay for one of our basic requirements – the need to eat. And most of the Derbyshire foodbanks have strong connections with our churches. One such food bank is in Long Eaton, which is a collaboration between a number of churches of different denominations and is based at the Methodist church. It relies on donations and a team of 40 or 50 volunteers who are drawn from churches and the local communities. It also has a food bank in Sawley and a satellite in Castle Donington. The volunteers do a range of jobs, including packing, welcoming guests and offering conversation, logistics, signposting people to other services, warehouse organisation, and collections. Revd Samantha Tredwell is the vicar of St John in Long Eaton and is involved in the food bank. She’s been telling Together Magazine more. How bad is the problem of food poverty in Long Eaton? There’s been an increase of 52% in the use of the food bank in the last 18 months and that’s been at the same time as the roll-out of Universal Credit across the region. We knew it would go up – but it’s gone up and stayed up. So we’re now getting as many as 18 to 25 users each session. And who uses the food bank? I would say everybody. People with young families – particularly in the holidays, people who have been made redundant and homeless people. We also see the working poor - people who aren’t earning enough to pay their rent and to feed themselves, or people on zero-hours contracts who don’t know from one month to another how much money is coming in and there isn’t enough to go around. So anyone could find themselves in this situation then? If for example they were to lose their job? Yes, because people think there is a

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network of benefits. There are benefits but there is quite a serious time lag between applying for and getting that money. The government says it’s five weeks, but we’ve seen it be eight or nine weeks without any money. The longest I’ve come across is a lady who went for seven months without any benefits – because of complications, because you need identification or a bank account – those things that perhaps people don’t have. As a vicar, how does it make you feel seeing these people at the foodbank today who haven’t got enough to eat? It makes me angry – angry that people should go hungry. It feels wrong on all levels. We are a wealthy nation … and we also throw away a large amount of food each year. And we frequently come across people who have chosen to feed their children rather than themselves and have gone for days without eating. That makes us angry! So how does this work? Where do you get the food from to give to others? The food we give out all comes from donations, which come from the community – from Long Eaton and Sawley. The community keeps us going and is very, very generous. We have food bins in Tesco and Asda that are filled up twice a week – we get tremendous help from them. The churches are collection points, people do collections for us and we have a Facebook page where we publicise what we need.

This has led to other activities, hasn’t it? Yes, it’s a real ecumenical process. One of the things about the food bank is that you don’t really get to know people well. So, at St John’s in Long Eaton we are fortunate to have a big hall and a kitchen, so we decided to do a lunch once a week to build on friendships and to serve a hot meal. We thought we’d do that for six weeks – and two years on we’re still going. This week we fed around 100 people! They include young families, people who are older and lonely and some older people who are not managing on their pension. And another church, Oasis, has started a breakfast club on a Monday morning and a job club. St John’s has also applied for a grant to put on some basic cookery classes. It’s all very well people coming to collect food, but not everyone has the skills to cook. What’s the best thing people can do to help? Checking what we need is really helpful – we don’t really need baked beans all the time – we often need milk, vegetables and other things. So please check first. I had a significant birthday this year and instead of presents I asked for food – and I collected about three-quarters of a ton for the foodbank – so people could try things like that too! Find out more and get in touch by checking out their Facebook page: @longeatonandsawleyfoodbank


FOOD BANK SHOPPING LIST

Below is just a guide of the types of food most in demand by food banks. Please contact your local food bank to check what they need. Requests are often published on social media. TINNED MEAT AND FISH TINNED SAVOURY PIES

10 facts about food banks 1. In the last five years, food bank use across the Trussell Trust network has increased 73%

2. Food banks are run by charities and non-profit organisations and are mainly run by volunteers 3. They provide a minimum of 3 days’

emergency food and support to people experiencing crisis

4. The top three reasons for referral to a

food bank in the Trussell Trust network in 2018 were ‘income not covering essential costs’, ‘benefit delays ’ and ‘benefit changes

5. Most of the food donated is by local people or provided by UK charity FareShare which distributes surplus ‘fit for purpose’ products from the food and drink industry, including major supermarkets, to community organisations 6. To receive a food parcel, residents

need to be referred to a food bank from children’s centres, GPs, schools, the probation service, Derbyshire Police or a range of other advice agencies

7. Food banks provide more than just

LONG-LIFE MILK AND FRUIT JUICE TINNED PUDDING AND CUSTARD

food. Many also provide essentials such as sanitary products, nappies and toiletries.

PASTA, RICE AND INSTANT MASH

8. Food banks can often offer advice

TINNED VEGETABLES

on where to go to find more help with finances, debt or benefits and also other charities or groups that may offer extra support.

9. There are food banks in Ashbourne,

TINNED TOMATOES

SOUP PASTA SAUCES TINNED FRUIT

Belper, Bolsover, Buxton, Chesterfield, Clay Cross, Glossop, Heanor, Holmewood, Ilkeston, Killamarsh, Langley Mill, Littlemoor, Long Eaton, Matlock, New Mills, Ripley, South Normanton and Swadlincote alongside those in Derby City.

TEA BAGS AND INSTANT COFFEE

10. It’s really easy to support your local

SUGAR (500G)

food bank! There are drop off points for donations inside local supermarkets, libraries and council offices. Here you can simply drop off food or toiletries and the food bank will collect. Food banks also need cash donations and volunteers. To find out what your local food bank needs follow them on social media or contact them directly. Sources: derbyshire.gov.uk and trusselltrust.org

CEREALS JAM BISCUITS OR SNACK BARS

TOILET ROLLS SHOWER GEL, SHAMPOO AND SOAP NAPPIES SANITARY PRODUCTS

End Hunger UK WEEK OF ACTION 11-18 October 2019 End Hunger UK will be raising awareness of hunger in the UK and telling the government that they must take action to ensure that everyone has enough money to afford good food and that no one goes to bed hungry. There are two ways to get involved in this year’s campaign: 1. Do something locally during the week 14 - 18 October 2019 2. Take part in the Day of Action in London, Wedneday 16 October 2019. More information about hosting an event or attending the Day of Action is available on endhungeruk.org

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What’s On

Find more events taking place around our diocese at www.derby.anglican.org/events. For the next issue we are looking for events taking place in December, January and February. Email information to: communications@derby.anglican.org and information will be published on our website and this page.

September

October

November

Chesterfield Well Dressing Crooked Spire, Chesterfield 7 - 14 September, all day.

Knife Angel Derby Cathedral Early October

St John’s Tideswell Open Day St John’s Church, Tideswell 14 & 21 September, all day. Special tours and tower trips. Book - www.tideswellchurch.org.

Autumn Lunchtime Organ Recitals Crooked Spire, Chesterfield Every Thursday, 3 October - 14 November 12.15pm. For more details visit: www.crookedspire.org.

Christmas Tree Festival Crooked Spire, Chesterfield 16 November - 1 December, open all day. Return of the stunning and popular Christmas Tree Festival.

Sheffield & Hallamshire Military Band St Mary’s Church, Dronfield 14 September, 2 pm - 4 pm Suggested donation £6.00 including refreshments.

Derby Folk Weekender Derby Cathedral 4 - 5 October, Times vary. Visit www.derbylive.co.uk for more details.

Museum of the Moon Derby Cathedral 16 September - 6 October See UK artist Luke Jerram’s 7-metre diameter fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by award winning composer Dan Jones. Two Choirs @ The Spire Crooked Spire, Chesterfield 21 September, 7.30 pm. The Choir@theRoyal and Swansea Bay Singleton Singers in a special concert. Tickets £7, from the Crooked Spire. www.crookedspire.org Film Night St John the Evangelist, Derby 24 September, 7 pm Free admission. D Day Darlings Derby Cathedral 25 September, 7.30 pm The BGT finalists will perform songs from their debut album “I’ll Remember You”. Tickets £10 from www.derbylive.co.uk Lantern Making Workshop St Peter’s Church, Belper 28 September. 10-12pm, 1-3pm or 3.30-5.30pm Contact Anne Clark (anneclark.co@gmail.com) Coffee Morning Sinfin Moor Church, Derby 28 September, 9.30 am - 12 noon. Books, Bric-a-Brac, Sausage & Bacon Cobs, Free admission. An afternoon Going Green All Saints Church Hall, Sawley 28 September, 2 - 4pm. Learn how to make bird & bat boxes, hedgehog habitats and insect hotels. Plant spring bulbs, displays & environment quiz. All ages welcome.

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Choros Amici - The Choir of Friends Melbourne Parish Church, DE73 8EN 5 October, 7 pm for 7.30 pm. Choros Amici has a mission to sing to the highest possible standard, to entertain and inspire audiences, and to have fun! Tickets £10 - info@melbournefestival.co.uk. Classical Violin and Piano Concert Christ Church, Litton 5 October, 7.30pm. Tickets - 01298 871796.

Coffee Morning Sinfin Moor Church, Derby 20 November, 9.30 am - 12 noon. Books, Bric-a-Brac, Sausage & Bacon Cobs, Free admission. Sam Callahan Live Derby Cathedral 22 November, 7 pm Former X Factor finalist visits Derby as part of his tour. Tickets £10 from www.derbylive.co.uk Christ Church Belper’s Patronal Festival Christ Church, Belper 24 November, 6.30pm Feast day celebrations with Choral Evensong followed by wine and refreshments. All welcome.

Churches Together for Derbyshire Gathering Matlock Methodist / URC Church 5 October, 10 am - 3 pm. Speaker: Revd Ruth Gee, Methodist National Ecumenical Officer. Info - Revd Peter Barham, 01332 551404. Sozein Quiet Day The Old Vicarage, Horsley Woodhouse 15 October, 10 am - 4 pm. ‘Life After Deaths’. Book: neil.broadbent@ sozein.org.uk. £12 donation suggested. Coffee Morning Sinfin Moor Church, Derby 26 October, 9.30 am - 12 noon. Books, Bric-a-Brac, Sausage & Bacon Cobs, Free admission. “Under The Spire” Crooked Spire, Chesterfield 26 October, 7.30 pm. Concert with the Rockington Brass Band. Tickets £6 - 01909 517368. Farmers’ Harvest Festival Agricultural Business Centre, Bakewell 27 October, 2.30 pm.

Your Christmas 2019 events here! Send in information about your church events and we will advertise them here for FREE!


What is your vocation? Its not just kids that get that ‘back to school’ feeling each September. Many people see the start of the new school term as a chance to reassess their lives, take up a new hobby or join an evening class. Here in Derby we are lucky to have our very own learning and training team who put on free-to-attend courses throughout the county. These cover subjects as varied as vocation, social media and first aid alongside more role-specific courses for churchwardens, treasurers and clergy. To give you a taster of what you could expect on a vocations session we have set twelve questions. Take a few minutes to think about each one - you might find you’re surprised by your answers!

Vocation is much more than that - vocation is for all of us. Vocation is about all of us being called to be the people of God, to live out our lives as Christian disciples. God calls each and every one of us to serve, and exploring how God calls us is really exciting. If you’ve found answering these questions has prompted you to want to explore further, please considering joining one of the Learning in Faith vocations sessions - they will give you the time, space and structure to look at how God is calling you. You can find more information about all the training on offer on the diocesan website: www.derby.anglican.org/learninginfaith

When we talk about ‘vocations’ in the Church very often the focus is a narrow one - on those people being called to ordained ministry. Obviously vocation to ordination is really important for the Church, but it is just one small part of the whole picture.

1. What am I most passionate about? 2. What talents do I have naturally? 3. What gifts have I most developed? 4. What do I deeply enjoy about who I am and what I do? 5. What does the world around me need right now? 6. What career path have I chosen and how will that fit into the needs of the world? Background image courtesy of Freepik.com

7. What options are open to me? 8. Which option will be best in providing ser vice to the world? 9. How do I hear from God? 10. What could I do to listen more carefully to how God is calling me? 11. What do I do to encourage others to explore how God is calling them? 12. Which person could I commit to encouraging this week? Together Magazine

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Derby Cathedral’s diary is packed full of diverse events. Here are just a few highlights. Visit www.derbycathedral.org and follow Derby Cathedral on social media for more details.

The Dean of Derby Cathedral The Dean of Derby, The Very Revd Dr Stephen Hance, has been appointed National Lead for Evangelism and Witness for the Church of England. The Dean is passionate about growing the Church and helping people come to faith in Christ. This new role is all about enabling the Church of England to focus on these priorities and as such, this is an exciting role for the Dean. An Acting Dean will be announced soon and then the process to recruit a new Dean of Derby will begin.

Cathedral Events Autumn brings another packed programme of events at the Cathedral with something for everyone. The Museum of the Moon will arrive at the Cathedral on Tuesday, 17 September 2019 for three weeks. This installation has been designed by UK artist Luke Jerram and measuring 7 metres in diameter is a fusion of lunar imagery, moonlight and surround sound composition created by award winning composer Dan Jones. A whole host of events will take place during this three week period, including welcoming the Britain’s Got Talent Finalists, the D-Day Darlings, on Wednesday, 25 September 2019 at 7.30 pm. A musical evening for all to enjoy under the spectacular moon – an event not to be missed. Tickets are available from www.derbylive.co.uk.

The ever popular London Concertante Concert returns to the Cathedral on Friday, 13 September 2019 at 7.30 pm. Enjoy an evening with the world-renowned group as they bring us a stunning red carpet ride of iconic movie soundtracks. This evening promises to be an exciting exploration of the power of film music, packed with all your family favourites made famous by Hollywood!

On Sunday, 22 & 29 September at 3.00 pm, we will celebrate ministry and service in the church and the community.

In October, we are proud to be one of the venues for Derby’s Folk Weekender. Friday, 4 and Saturday, 5 October 2019 will see numerous folk acts perform in the Cathedral during the day and evening. See our website for further information.

The Cathedral Eucharist on Sunday, 29 September 2019 at 10.45 am will be our traditional Harvest Festival, giving grateful thanks to God for all his gifts. All are very welcome to attend this service.

We welcome back Sinfonia Viva on Wednesday, 23 October 2019 – a firm favourite at the Cathedral. Derby City is one of the cities chosen to host the National Monument against Violence and Aggression in October and will be positioned outside the Cathedral. Unfortunately, Derby is not immune to the devastating effects of knife crime and the ‘Knife Angel’ is sure to be a very powerful and emotive statue. Lots going on during this busy time of year, please visit our website for more information - www.derbycathedral.org.

Cathedral Services As we fast approach another busy time in the Cathedral diary, we look forward to two very special services – The Bishop’s Badge Services.

The Bishop of Derby’s Badges and Awards, nominated by churches from across the diocese, will be presented, recognising the commitment and dedication of many individuals and groups.

On Saturday, 26 October 2019, the Diocesan Confirmation Service will take place starting at 4.00 pm. Please keep checking our website for further information on Advent and Christmas services.

The Sanctuary The Sanctuary at Derby Cathedral continues to thrive, supporting local businesses by selling local gifts and cards. Don’t forget, we also stock church supplies and offer a 10% discount on purchases over £30.00 for all churches in the Diocese. Pop in and take a look, we have a good range of Christian books and cards available.

@DerbyCathedral


From the Pews

From the Pews is dedicated to the stories, letters, experiences and even funny anecdotes from members of our congregations. If you have something to share, we would really love to hear from you. Email together@derby.anglican.org or by post using the address on Page 3.

Let’s Pray

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What did you say? “Let’s Pray?”, but it’s only May Surely praying is for special times of the year Would it be ok to pray? I mean what would people say? Is the church door open? Will it be closed? Can we get in? And what would we say? That “we want to pray”? What would Jesus say and do? He would fling open the doors with open arms and say: “Come on in, let’s pray”. It sounds so simple? Surely not! What would the people say? What would Jesus do? He would walk right in with a slight grin, Open wide his arms and say “Let’s begin”! It’s that easy and you don’t have to wait For that special date, season or reason to pray. To pray is to say, and we may say, Our hearts full or words that can be buried deep, So deep that a burden and sorrow will just have to keep. Let’s open our hearts and the rest will follow, So follow your Lord and Pray It’s easy to say but trust me you will find a way Let’s Pray. Amen.

This poem has been sent in by Louise Woods-Williamson, who worships at St Osmund’s Church on London Road in Derby and suffers from dementia. She was inspired to write this poem one Sunday morning before church and explained: “It’s about praying, it’s not where you are when you pray, it’s trusting the Lord that there is no right or wrong way - it’s a personal choice of where and when”. Louise would like to dedicate the poem to her friends at “The Journey Group”.

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Book Club

Looking for a good book recommendation? You’ve come to the right place! All our reviews are written by volunteers from around the diocese, if you are interested in reviewing a book, please get in touch, together@derby.anglican.org Walking to Jerusalem Justin Butcher Hodder & Stoughton Review by Chris Dyer

The fly leaf states ‘2017 marked three anniversaries for the Palestinian people: the centenary of the Balfour Declaration, the fiftieth year of Israel’s military occupation of the Palestinian Territories and the tenth year of the blockade of Gaza. To change the record after a century of injustice, a pilgrimage set out to walk from London to Jerusalem in penance solidarity and hope’. Early in the book I was a little concerned that this was simply going to be a political description of the Palestinian cause: this definitely a book from a specific point of view. However, I needn’t have worried - it is much more. Butcher has an engaging style of weaving the story of the pilgrims and the places they visit, with the people they meet and the history of the surroundings, all contextualised with the events of the world around. One minute ‘Arthur’s socks are stewing in our basin’, the next they receive a text about the attack on the Finsbury Park mosque. Next, he is reflecting on big questions: almost as an aside, on the needs of human beings to recover the bodies of loved ones who die violently, or on the theology of the incarnation, the next next we are invited to consider small human dramas like Aboud, the 13 year old with a toothy smile and sticking-out ears, shot by an Israeli sniper. Butcher’s descriptions of people and places are vivid, compelling and often moving and he leads you through history and politics by diary and story In reading this book I learnt much about the plight of the Palestinians (about which he is passionate) and the history of their struggle. You might conclude there are other ways to describe the situation but this compelling reading and I learnt much, as any pilgrim does, from the encounters with people and their stories, for it is always the journey that changes us as much as the conclusion.

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Living A Life You Love Joyce Meyer Hodder & Stoughton Review by Victoria Walker

The name Joyce Meyer, first came to my attention when a colleague told me how much she enjoyed her books, radio and TV broadcasts. In fact, more than 100 of the best-selling, charismatic Christian author’s books have been published, including, ‘Living A Life You Love’ - first published in 2018. In the book, Joyce writes in such an easy-to-read, interesting style, that it becomes difficult to put the book down. She intersperses the points she makes with relevant Bible verses and there are neat summaries of points made at the end of each chapter. In the content, Joyce sets out her belief that, though often weighed down with responsibilities, problems, fears and burdens in our life, we can learn to have hope; to rise above life’s challenges and to begin to enjoy living a full life of happiness and joy as a child of God. Joyce includes many anecdotes from her own life - from when, as a child, she was stuck in a situation of frustration, anger, insecurity and paternal abuse, through to learning, through Christ’s teaching, how to love the life God has given her - though her path has not always been smooth. Joyce is refreshingly honest about how trust in Christ has enabled her to change her life and how it is possible to move from leading a life of negativity to a positive one, no matter what life throws at us. Subjects covered in the book include - Living in the moment; not dwelling on past mistakes; the power of love; rediscovering the joy of relationships and counting our blessings. If you are looking for a motivational self-help book based firmly on Christian teaching, this may well be the ideal one for you.


Shadow Doctor: The Past Awaits Adrian Plass Hodder & Stoughton

Review by April McIntyre

It took a while to get my head around these new Shadow Doctor books by Adrian Plass. The Past Awaits is the second novel in a series that feels quite different from the wellknown Sacred Diaries. The mood is darker, perplexing, raising many challenges, as the rather confused young Christian, Jack, comes alongside Doc and attempts to unravel the mysteries surrounding the older man’s work, his past life and his relationship with God. The book moves forwards through a series of encounters with troubled people who are helped by the Doc and Jack inexplicably, intuitively and aided by great coffee, single malt whisky and ‘going with the flow’. Gradually, Jack discovers clues to make some sense of the past, becoming more at ease with himself and others and less reliant on Christian formulas and clichés. And, somewhere in the background, the enigmatic power and presence of God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, draws us through darkness, pain and puzzles, onwards towards the light – and, hopefully, a third novel.

L is for Lifestyle Ruth Valerio Inter-Varsity Press

Review by Rachel Huskisson I’ve always been interested in treading lightly on the earth, so any books on the subject of ethical living tend to catch my eye. This isn’t a book to be rushed as there is a lot of information, it is best to let each chapter sink in and perhaps try one of the challenges at the end of each chapter. It’s a really motivational read as the challenges are all manageable and yet significant. There are links to lots of organisations to get involved in or delve deeper into particular topics so I will no doubt be returning to the book many times in the future. I would suggest just taking one chapter a week even and really sitting with the information and considering how to weave the actions into their own lives. The book is pitched well and would suit both someone looking to start their journey into ethical living as well as those further along the journey seeking to make more changes to the way they live their lives.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Faith Peter Stanford Hodder & Stoughton Review by Rosemary J Brownlee

When I saw the title to this book I was intrigued by it and wished to learn more. I settled down for a good read and I was not disappointed. The book is divided into manageable bite sized chapters with intriguing headings such as “The Vow-Takers”, “The Doers”, and “The Creatives” to name just a few. The author, Peter Stanford has, over his 35 years as a journalist, interviewed many fascinating people and those chosen for this book give an insight into how important their faith is to them. Not surprisingly it also shows how their faith has guided them through their public office. There are interesting, thought provoking comments throughout. The reminder for all of us how important prayer is in our daily lives as Sister Wendy Beckett says in her interview, “You just need to have the courage and faith to sit quietly and let God love you”. The gentle reminder from Delia Smith that being Christian is not meant to be easy but “Is being misunderstood so bad when Christ coped with ridicule and misunderstanding everyday?” Sir Peter Fahy, who describes his service as a police officer as akin to a vocation. He goes on to speak frankly of how difficult it is to be Chief Constable and balance the politics of all the role entails with his faith being accused once of being “a social worker not a copper.” The book is well balanced in that some of those interviewed are very well known; others less so. It deals with what Stanford calls “Rebels and Reformers” and also “Outsiders” to maintain that balance. I found this book an interesting read with many little gems and insights that collectively remind us what Faith in God really means and why once we have learned to love God we must try to bring others to know Him. If there is a criticism of this book for me it could be a desire to hear more of the interviews with some of those included in the pages. I fully understand why there are only snippets of the interviews though, and as before each one there is a clear introduction explaining where and when the interview took place, it would not be hard to research and find them in total if you wished. It is not a light read but I would definitely recommend this book as a very worthwhile read. It has helped me to collect together my thoughts on my own faith. In issue five we included a review of ‘How to Pray’ by Pete Greig. During the design process the name of the reviewer was missed off. This review should have been credited to Samantha Tredwell.

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Leisure Time You can enter our competitions by email: together@derby.anglican.org or by post: Together Magazine, Derby Church House, Full Street, Derby, DE1 3DR. Make sure to include your name and address. Deadline for entries is 16 October 2019. Good luck! G

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Word search

Simply find the words listed below in the grid, once you’ve found them all, read from left to right the remaining letters will reveal a message. Send in your answer for a chance to win some Fairtrade chocolate. Acorns Back to school Chestnut Crisp Leaves Apples Boots Clocks go back Harvest Orange Autumn Brown Conkers Jumpers Yellow

--- --- ---------- ---- -- --- ---- --- ------ -Kids Competition! --- ---- ---After his birth, wise men from the East followed a star to find Jesus and brought him gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.

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Five in a row Quiz Enter our quiz and win some Fairtrade chocolate. All the answers can be found in this issue of Together. 1. In which Derbyshire town is Ossie’s Kitchen? 2. How many individuals received Bishop’s Badge School Awards? 3. Which inclusive church supported Belper Pride? 4. How many years has Jean Redfern sold poppies? 5. Which Diocese is being supported by the Bishop of Derby’s 2019 Harvest Appeal?

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Let me tell you about Mrs Stanley. Mrs Stanley was my teacher when I was six years old and she often led our school assemblies. Mine wasn’t a church school, but Mrs Stanley didn’t let that put her off! Her morning assemblies were rich with stories mined from her strong Christian faith; stories which captivated her young audience; some of which I remember to this day. Mrs Stanley talked once about a man visiting a strange place where everyone was starving. The reason was clear. They could only reach the available food with spoons. And the spoons had handles the length of a broom. Getting the food onto the spoon was hard enough. Getting the food to your mouth was impossible. There was much groaning and wailing and gnashing of teeth. The man then moved to another place, where everyone looked well fed and content. And yet, the spoons were exactly like those in the first place he had visited - handles the length of broom handles. He waited and in time everyone came to eat. They piled the food onto the spoons… and then they turned to feed each other. Same desperate situation, but a new solution. A solution based not on selfish greed but on a just and peaceable sharing of the abundance of food on offer. It is a travesty that, in this day and age, people in Derbyshire – or anywhere else - go hungry. The reasons for this, and the potential long-term solutions, are complex and mostly political. But I am humbled by the sheer numbers of people in our diocese who volunteer their time, their money and expertise in providing help to those in need of food and find a whole manner of innovative ways to ensure that people in Derbyshire have access to that food. To those volunteers, a heart-felt ‘thank you’ for all you are doing. Many of the county’s food banks are linked to, or organised by, our churches - or by a group of churches of a variety of denominations working together. Perhaps this is because the Bible is packed with stories about food, fasting and feasting, justice for the

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L-R: Simon Taylor, Chair of Rural Action Derbyshire; Bishop Jan; Jacqui Bell, Policy and Partnership Managaer and Lead on Feeding Derbyshire for Rural Action Derbyshire

The final word Bishop Jan

Bishop Jan gave the opening address at June’s Feeding Derbyshire symposium – a meeting of a partnership of agencies who came together to help create a new three-year plan to feed Derbyshire. Bishop Jan writes: poor and a vision of heaven which is described in terms of a banquet where no-one will go hungry anymore. Stories such as a starving crowd gathered all day around Jesus, drawn by the wisdom of his teachings; but getting restless as the day draws on with no food in sight. “Send them away,” the disciples advise him. “We’ve got nothing to give them.” But instead Jesus calls a small boy who has five loaves and two small fish. The small boy willingly gives what he has to Jesus and somehow - we’re not sure how, so we call it a miracle over 5,000 were fed that day. If you’re not into miracles, maybe just maybe - others in the crowd were humbled by the small boy’s

willingness to share the little he had; and they too shared the little they had -until one by one, everyone was fed. It is not for nothing that Jesus described himself as the bread of life; in whom all our hungers are satisfied. He meant spiritual hunger - but being Jesus, he recognised that you can’t think of things spiritual when your tummy is rumbling; so he made sure he left instructions that his followers should feed those who are physically hungry too. And 2,000 years later, that is exactly what his modern-day disciples continue to do.


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