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MENG

ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURAL YEAR 3 PORTFOLIO YAN CHING ELLIE TO

DESIGN


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Climate change has been a constant concern among us. It is observed that temperature rise is more prominent in the past century and can surge further in the next 100 years. What we would hope for is climate stability for the existence of mankind. Recently, microbiologists raised questions as to why this silent and unseen majority have been constantly ignored and factored out from climate change calculations. It is in fact the lack of adequate understanding because of which microbial activity has not been considered properly in most climate change models. The truth is, the microbial world has been around for 3.8 billion years and makes up a huge part of living matter. They support the existence of all higher lifeforms and are critically important in regulating climate change. They were the first living things on the planet, and will almost certainly be the last survivors. Understanding towards this other realm of living is needed.


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THE ARCHITECTURE OF CALIBRATING ACCELERATED PASTS

+ THE BRIEF + INTERROGATING THE THORNEY ISLE +THE VESSELS + ENVIRONMENTAL ELEMENT STUDIES + INTO PERSPECTIVE


RIVER T YBURN

PARLIAMENT SQUARE U

HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

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The Thorney Isle deemed a point of interest due to its dense concentration and layers of history. This stired up ideas of revelation within the lost island of its past, and further projecting its possible future. The ‘island’ is registered through movement, interaction, sound, light, moisture, wind and soil conditions, unpacking its mostion of change through material and whats already there. Rigs/ vessels were to be designed to specific sites to act as a tool of measurement or a tool to educate about or assist that environement. Focus is more on how to inform public about this unseen/not frequently considered population, and understand their ideal envionments through climate manipulation in future building.

SITE 3

JEWEL TOWER SITE 2

SITE 1

VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN

BURN R IV E R T Y

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Site assesment was done around the Thorney interest. Theses sites were chosen based on

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few points of of destruction.

The first visit aimed to be a more general interrogation of Thorne Island. Something that caught attention was the extent of “crumbling” and “falling off” seen. Material changes due to unfavorable environmental conditions as well as how humans interact with it. Questions were raise how understanding the material can allow material surface manipulation ie. planned interactions with the weather. Revisiting the site gave potential for looking at specific sites at a different scale. Looking closer into detail and extracting more information for possible ideas that can be used in building.


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WINTER SOLCTICE 09:00 WINTER SOLCTICE 15:00 RIVER T YBURN

NO OVERLAPPING PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN SOUTH FACING FACADES

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

PROPOSED SITE AREA STREET TREES HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT R IV E R T YBURN

PROPOSED SITE AREA

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RIVER THAMES HIGHER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS LOWER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN JEWEL TOWER

NORTH FACING WALLS Ws >= 10 9 <= Ws < 10 8 <= Ws < 9 VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN

BURN R IV E R T Y

7 <= Ws < 8 6 <= Ws < 7 5 <= Ws < 6 4 <= Ws < 5 3 <= Ws < 4 2 <= Ws < 3

NO2 LEVEL (55-58ug/m2) NO2 LEVEL (52-55ug/m2) PARKS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN ELM TREE CHERRY TREE WHITEBEAM TREE ALDER TREE APPLE TREE OTHER TREE PEAR TREE ASH TREE PLANE TREE


TREE SHADOWS N

WINTER SOLCTICE 09:00 WINTER SOLCTICE 15:00 RIVER T YBURN

NO OVERLAPPING PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN SOUTH FACING FACADES

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

PROPOSED SITE AREA STREET TREES HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT R IV E R T YBURN

PROPOSED SITE AREA RIVER THAMES HIGHER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS LOWER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN

JEWEL TOWER

NORTH FACING WALLS Ws >= 10 9 <= Ws < 10 8 <= Ws < 9 VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN

BURN R IV E R T Y

7 <= Ws < 8 6 <= Ws < 7 5 <= Ws < 6 4 <= Ws < 5 3 <= Ws < 4 2 <= Ws < 3

NO2 LEVEL (55-58ug/m2) NO2 LEVEL (52-55ug/m2) PARKS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN ELM TREE CHERRY TREE WHITEBEAM TREE ALDER TREE APPLE TREE OTHER TREE PEAR TREE ASH TREE PLANE TREE


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WINTER SOLCTICE 09:00 WINTER SOLCTICE 15:00

RIVER T YBURN

NO OVERLAPPING PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN SOUTH FACING FACADES

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

PROPOSED SITE AREA STREET TREES HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

R IV E R T YBURN

PROPOSED SITE AREA RIVER THAMES HIGHER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS LOWER POTENTIAL FLOOD FROM RIVERS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN

JEWEL TOWER

NORTH FACING WALLS Ws >= 10 9 <= Ws < 10 8 <= Ws < 9 VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN

BURN R IV E R T Y

7 <= Ws < 8 6 <= Ws < 7 5 <= Ws < 6 4 <= Ws < 5 3 <= Ws < 4 2 <= Ws < 3

NO2 LEVEL (55-58ug/m2) NO2 LEVEL (52-55ug/m2) PARKS PREDICTED RIVER TYBURN ELM TREE CHERRY TREE WHITEBEAM TREE ALDER TREE APPLE TREE OTHER TREE PEAR TREE ASH TREE PLANE TREE


SITE 1 GREAT COLLEGE STREET Great College Street was considered due to the great interest given towards the â&#x20AC;&#x153;crumbling wallâ&#x20AC;?. Several visits were made to inspect the wall at different scales, unravelling the micro scale impacts towards climate change.

Shaded wall with higher levels of moisture causing vulnerability in wall materiality. Becomes more sensitive to cracking. More lighting directed to opposite buildings, for possible light capturing rig.

Irregular fragments of wall layers come together, holding each other in place throught friction.

Looking closer into the gaps and connections between all the fragmented parts.

Posibility of microscopic elements that affect the structural integrity of the wall. These elements may be in their own microclimates and the environmental conditions seen at the wall (high moisture, low sunlighting) may be something the living organisms are reliant on.


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BASE LAYER:

ENVIRONMENTAL LAYER:

VESSEL LAYER:

INFORMING THE BUILDING:

First attempt was done according to points that caught my eye, most importantly the possible points of deterioration on the right side wall. Motion of fragmented parts were interrogated and mapped in accelerated time.

Looking at the causes of such deterioration, possible sunlighting patterns, soil properties, moisture levels and human interaction.

The idea was to provide support to this crumbling wall, creating a scaffold that allows the wall fall naturally at its own pace.

In building this rigs informs the idea of inhabitable wall. They would perform at different scales creating trinkets of spaces for both plants and visitors.

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DETERIORATION 1 15:05

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DETERIORATION 2

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made ground

RIVER T YBURN

brown silt

soft brown clay

10:05 Direct Light

Movement Concentration

sandy gravel

11:05 Direct Light

Highly Textured Surface

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

RIVER T YBUR N

15:05 Direct Light

Points of conversation

firm clay

JEWEL TOWER

VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN UR N RI VE R T YB


The wall layers were pulled out and examined as an independent element. The most susceptible to weathering and deterioration is the flint stones (marked as the most outer layer). Following is the motar that ties the stones together. At the current site, the wall is shaded most of the time not due to its orientation but due to the adjacent buildings around it. Vessel protects the wallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elemental fragmentation from falling consequence. It also gives allowance for possible displacements. It acts as a second skin for the wall and protects and provides the wall prime conditions for it to stand.

BREATHABLE SKIN

STRETCHABLE GUYS


SITE 2 JEWEL TOWER (1) The front facade of the Jewel Tower shows layers of historic phases. These specific layers revealed cyclic mechanical actions (manmade and natural) that have affected the facadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permeability and the effects of broken cycles to changes in the building fabric.

Lost channel that possibly ran into the River Tyburn in the past, used to run around the Palace boundaries, forming part of the Thorney Island.

High levels of daylighting observed during the day. The front area of the Jewel Tower is always welcomed by tourists and people that sit around the provided benches cor a rest.

Part of this wall was knocked down mechanically and layers of broken cycles can be seen in its adjacent facade. This knocked down wall was once protection from mechanical weathering.

Internal weathering due to probably moisture as it does not benefit from external natural lighting, and can be due to the multiple uses of the Jewel Tower in the past.


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The Jewel Tower shows layers of history through its cause and effect seen in its materiality. The way visitors percieve and use the space was quite interesting as well.

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ENVIRONMENTAL LAYER: MEC

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Due to Jewel Towerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic feature it has gone through many cycles, ones that are broken and ones that are still occuring. These cycles affects the vulnerability of the building envelop material. This is investigated through lighting, wind and sound data to see if there are cases of cycles observed.

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DESTRUCTION THROUGH MECHANICAL MOTION

RIG LAYER: The rig proposed for this site is a hand device that examines the magnified view of parts of the building, and understanding how the facades have developed and how it will continue to develop in the future.

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one arm span 53.20 dB

The rig proposed for this site was modelling to be scaffolding to support the wall and at the same time allowing the wall to degrade at its own pace.

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hand held height 59.03 dB

33442 lux

56.9% humid

ground 57.02 dB

RIVER T YBURN

Visual 1

Shade

Visual 2

Deterioration

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

Visual 3

HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

RIVER T YBUR N

JEWEL TOWER

VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN UR N RI VE R T YB


The walls around Jewel Tower were inspected. Its texturing and fragmentation was mapped out and this gave an understanding that looking closer shows so much more depth. The idea of a tool measuring the weathering up close was interesting becauses the magnified views of reality would give more impact.

SMALL FRAGMENTS SMOOTH ROUGH GAPS LARGE FRAGMENTS

The proposed tool is a hand tool that allows the magnification of the surface it touches. Seeing into this idea of microbial elements that engages in this process of deterioration, how a drop of rain can shape a stone or reasons behind its cracking.


SITE 3 JEWEL TOWER (2) The back facade of the Jewel Tower shows an opposite vibe to the front as is sits in the shade and is surrounded by tall adjacent facades.This used to be defined as the edge of once the Palace. The extreme isolation compared to the front of the Tower.

The backside of the Jewel Tower shows hints of isolation and seclution.

This shows traces of a past channel that passes through. Material texture difference observed may be due to parts degraded through cyclic mechanical action and parts preserved by water that was previously present.

Window placement shows that there might not have been any structures build around the Jewel Tower in the past.

Adjacent buildings can bring impacts to the level of degradation the Jewel Tower expernices this instance. Acts as a protective layer for directional winds.


BASE LAYER: The backside of the Jewel Tower shows opposing qualities to its front resulting in interesting contrasts visually.

ENVIRONMENTAL LAYER: Light and sound levels , people movement and temperature all seem to be much lower in this site due to its surounding facades.

VESSEL LAYER: Due to the sites feeling of isolation and its oposition to the front of the Jewel Tower, a vessel for personal space was considered. It is like a pod that allows users to work or rest in their own personal bubble with their prefered controls in lighting and temperature or to understand how they are affecting their own space. INFORMING THE BUILDING: Idea for controlled climate pods that are separate from the main building, allowing users to feel like they are within the chosen controlled climate and also how they affect theirown environment.

Measure point

12662 lux

Shade Points of isolation Deterioration Bright

RIVER T YBURN

BALLON

PARLIAMENT SQUARE

HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

RIVER T YBUR N

JEWEL TOWER

VIC TORIA TOWER GARDEN UR N RI VE R T YB

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In the wave of inflatable architecture of 1960s, the avant-garde Viennese group Haus-Rucker-Co set out to explore the capacity of architecture to enhance sensory ex-perience and highlight the potential of human senses. In opposition to practical and cubical modernist architecture, as well as the critic of the confined spaces of bourgeois life, this group in 1967 proposed an experimental architectural intervention â&#x20AC;&#x153;Balloon for twoâ&#x20AC;?. is room-size plastic bubble expands the boundaries of living space, showing at the same time how people could affect their own environment. The vessel idea was to achieve something that allows users to be attentive of their own personal space and understanding how they affect through thir actions around a space.


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The Victoria Tower Gardens was considered to be the building site for the next stage. It is situated adjacent the Thames River and the south facade of the Houses of parliament. Investigating exagerated shadowing, points of direct lighting can be observed and give positive influences to certain plantery.


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THE WALLED GARDEN OF THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

+ THE BUILDING + THE SITE + CASE STUDIES + INITIAL PLAN + 1:1 COMPONENTS


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+ THE BUILDING + THE SITE + CASE STUDIES + INITIAL PLAN + 1:1 COMPONENTS

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THE MANSION - THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

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THE LANDING PLACE

COURT

EARL MARSH

DRESS ROOM

SEALERS ROOM

LOBBY

RECORD OFFICE STAIRS

LORD CHANCELLOR’S OFFICERS ROOM

LORD CHANCELLOR’S ROOM

LOBBY

DRESS ROOM

CLERK OF PARLIAMENT

COUNSEL OF CHAIRMANS

LOBBY

DRESS ROOM

CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEE

LOBBY

CHANCELLOR’S CORRIDOR

LOBBY ANTI ROOM PEERS STAIRCASE

GUARD ROOM

DRESS ROOM

PRINTERS COURT

PEERS ROBING ROOM VOTE OFFICE

WAITING ROOM

WAITING ROOM OFFICE

HOUSE COURT

ANTI ROOM

OFFICE

WITNESS ROOM

VICTORIA GARDENS

MASTER OF THE ROLLS

LOBBY CORRIDOR WEST

GALLERY

PEERS PRIVATE CORRIDOR

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MASTER IN CHANCERY

CORRIDOR QUEEN’S ROBING ROOM

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G A R D E N S WAITING ROOM

“ F E E D I N G” I N F O R M AT I O N I N TO T H E PA R L I A M E N T P E O P L E A N D E C O S Y S T E M S A R E AT S TA K E

CLERK’S ROOM ARCH BISHOP ROOM

ROYAL COURT

LORD GREAT CHAMBERLAIN’S DINING ROOM

P L A N T S A R E PA R T O F T H E C L I M AT E E Q UAT I O N L E A D I N G T H E C O N V E R S AT I O N BY O B S E R VAT I O N

“climate change” has been mentioned more than 19,000 times in British parliamentary debates

LORD GREAT CHAMBERLAIN’S DRAWING ROOM

BISHOPS DINING ROOM

reaching net-zero emissions by 2050

BLACK RODS CORRIDOR BLACK ROD’S DINING ROOM

Agriculture is one of the most vulnerable sectors to the impacts of climate change, as well as the fourth highest greenhouse gas emitting sector globally “nearly 20% of UK’s fruit and vegetable comes from countries at risk of climate breakdown,” said Environmental Audit Committee Chair Mary Creagh

READING ROOM

PEERS COURT

DINING ROOM

DOORKEEP DRESSING ROOM

OFFICE

OFFICE

SERGEANT AT ARMS

TEA ROOM

THE GRILL KITCHEN

most of the early discussions about the greenhouse effect took place in the House of Lords a climate “crisis”, “emergency” or “catastrophe”

OFFICE

OFFICE

BISHOPS CORRIDOR

“ S E R V I N G” T H E H O U S E S O F PA R L I A M E N T

CORRIDOR PEERS CORRIDOR

V I C T O R I A

HOUSE LOBBY

HOUSE OF LORDS

VICTORIA HALL

VICTORIA GALLERY

LIBRARIAN’S DINING ROOM

LIBRARIAN’S TEA ROOM

PEERS PRIVATE CORRIDOR

SUITE OF PEERS LIBRARY

PEERS COMMITTEE ROOMS

COURT BLACK ROD’S DRAWING ROOM

BLACK ROD’S TEA ROOM

LIBRARIAN’S DRAWING ROOM

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The site shows the striking view of the south facade of the Houses of Parliament that allows the proposed garden to serve its â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;mansionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. It would also face the River Thames, allowing the use of fundamental weather elements to manipulate the workings of the building.


ASSESSIBLE TO DIRECT SUNLIGHT

INTERIOR EXHIBIT SPACE

LAB SPACE

GROWING SPACE

ASSESSIBLE TO DIRECT SUNLIGHT

DIRECT SUNLIGHT FOR BUILDING

WINTER SOLSTICE 15:00 SHADOWS

DIRECT SUNLIGHT FOR BUILDING

POSITIVE SPACE

BURN RIVER T Y


Advanced Horticultural Techniques in Korea: The Earliest Documented Greenhouses

Around circa 1450, significant glasshouse development occurred across the globe in countries like Korea, where fully â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;activeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (temperature controlled) houses were being built, as written by Jeon Son in his 1459 cook book, Sanga Yorok.

Greenhouse construction - sloping roof pitched at its three quarter point with a height of 50cm to the lowest south side with a 3m rise - provide maximum sunlight penetration into the greenhouse - cob walls with 40cm long bricks according to ancient techniques with a mixtue of loess and rice straw - loess walls have excellent insulating propterties

Internal walls and windows covered with oil-coated paper - Walls on east, west, north to maximise the reflection of sunlight, thus promoting plant growth - Known as a 'living paper' since it still maintained its properties of natural ventilation despite its waterproof oil coating - Enable maximum amount of sunshine available - Prevent water vapour in the air from condensing to cause damage through cold waterdrops falling onto tropical plants - Preserving heat inside greenhouse - Compared with polyvinyl or glass, experiments have suggested that oilcoated paper has better thermal insulation properties, while enabling natural ventilation and thereby better humidity control - Provided a barrier with the outside

exhaust section

heating section

combustion section

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Ondol floor heating system - fireplace set up in the kitchen or on the outside wall to generate heat - heat spreads under the household in a conducted tunnel built up underneath the floor - water vapour is also collected and used as a means to adjust humidiy of the greenhouse

Conventional Ondol Section

1. Firewood and combustion air supply 2. Convection chamber 3. Front block of fire 4. Cauldron

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Recommendations for greenhouse design in Sanga Yorok - should be positioned on a sunny, high and dry location - south facing windows should be big enough to enable the earth energy to flow, a reference to contemporary fengshui. - mild weather : windows were to be opened - cold weather : the whole house was to be covered with a thick straw mat to prevent frost damage to plants - In spring, windows were to be opened as frequently as possible during mild spells and the use of straw mats was to be reduced, till the plants were finally moved out at Hansik, the 105th day after the winter solstice when sacrificial food was offered at ancestral tombs. - a tall building to the north of it blocking the cold north winds.

5. Rear block of fire

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6. Fire throat 7. Sunken pale for sinking ashes 8. Summer stone 9. Duct (smoke passage)

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10. Flat stone layer 11. Dry loess dust layer 12. Loess mud layer 13. Sunken plae for sinking ashes 14. Flue 15. Sunken plae for siking ashes 16. Hole for sweep 17. Chimney 18. Wall 19. Place for cooking pot 20. A cooking fireplace

Convntional Ondol Plan


Capilano Suspension Bridge Park: Treetop Adventure Treetops Adventure consists of seven suspension bridges connected to eight magnificent 250-year-old Douglas fir trees. Visitors can get a squirrel’s eye view of a thriving coastal forest from the elevated suspension bridges, some reaching as high as 100 feet (30m) above the forest floor. The observation platforms provide a unique bird’s eye view of the forest surrounding. The suspended trail system takes visitors on a fascinating journey through the area’s verdant temperate rainforest. The walkway consists of seven footbridges suspended up to 110 feet above ground which wind between the impressive 250-year-old Douglas Fir trees. Built in 2004, it was one the first venues of its kind in North America, as well as boasting an innovative adjustable design that accommodates the continuous growth of the surrounding trees. The suspended bridges and observation decks provide incredible views and a unique perspective on the forest flora and fauna.

Guys used to anchor viewing platforms are composed of double-braided polyester, which is able to absorb energy by stretching then slowly return to its original length, dampening swaying without harming trees In windy weathers, trees of different heights may sway with different frequencies and amplitudes Adjustable friction collars and bridge suspension cables

If steel cables had been used to connect trees of different sizes, they would experience shock restraint when swaying away from each other

7 suspension bridges are supported by steel cables, sag is integral in their design, when trees sway away, there is sufficient slack to avoid increasing forces on the friction collars

To protect the fragile forest during construction, the elements were crafted off-site by hand, then brought into place with pulleys and ropes. The bridges themselves are constructed of hemp netting, wooden planks protected with environmentally friendly preservatives and other natural products, reflecting and enhancing the surrounding rainforest environment, while antique wooden beams and pegs lend a unique historical flavor to the attraction’s handcrafted, two-story Treehouse. Treetops Adventure is an engineering marvel: an innovative compression system safely secures each tree’s observation platform using only 20 pounds of force per square inch, or the amount of pressure exerted by pressing your thumb on a tabletop.

Built with no nails, bolts or saw-cut penetrating the fragile tree bark

Fine adjustments made to cable turnbuckles and friction collar tension bolds to accomodate tree growth according to tree monitors and periodic safety inspections

Provides protection for sensitive forest floor Blends visually with surrounding forest


Heated lamps

Drainage system

Surrounding the building

Open storage

The Conservatory, Barbican Centre The conservatory was built as an "add on" to the main Barbican building in 1980. It covers 23,000 sq ft and is situated on top of the theatre's fly tower (where sets are stored) and was originally designed to disguise this rather overbearing structure and to improve the view for the local residents. Its design envelops the central tower, cleverly incorporating the towers' balconies to create a "hanging gardens of Babylon" effect.

Material layering

Leveling

Every planting opportunity has been exploited to include palms, trees, climbers, trailers, clingers, ferns, ground-coverers and even air plants floating about. There are around 2,000 different plant species here, making it almost impossible to create the optimum environment for all of them. Most of the plants look pretty healthy and have adapted well to their artificial environment, but low light levels due to the shade of the tower mean that some of the plants are getting leggy as they search for light. I actually like the feel this gives to the conservatory, because this is exactly how the plants would react in their natural habitat. By contrast, fluctuations in temperature in the conservatory are far more extreme than most of the plants would naturally be used to - summer temperatures at night in the Barbican can drop to 11C, and shoot up to 38C during the daytime. The watering system is crucial to the health of the plants as it helps keep up the humidity. It incorporates a nitric acid dosing system, which reduces the pH, keeps the soil acidic (which these plants like) and stops the calcium deposits, found in hard London water, from blocking up the irrigation nozzles.


When the temperature exceeds 12°C inside the building, vents in the glass roof open, all controlled by a localised sensored mechanism Lights for temperate control

Internal glazed separator

Kew Gardens Kew Gardens is a botanic garden in southwest London that houses the "largest and most diverse botanical and mycological collections in the world". Founded in 1840, from the exotic garden at Kew Park in Middlesex, England, its living collections includes some of the 27,000 taxa curated by Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, while the herbarium, which is one of the largest in the world, has over 8.5 million preserved plant and fungal specimens. The library contains more than 750,000 volumes, and the illustrations collection contains more than 175,000 prints and drawings of plants. It is one of London's top tourist attractions and is a World Heritage Site.

In 1985 Sir David Attenborough buried a time capsule containing seeds of basic food crops and endangered species in the foundation of the Princess of Wales Conservatory.

Ventilation pipes Blowing cool air over plants from an underground labyrinth

Heating On winter days, the glasshouse is heated by boilers and radiators, while the windows are kept shut


HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

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PRIMARY STAIRCASE

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IW2 UR EC

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SUNKEN GARDEN

MO IST

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MICRO-CLIMATIC VESSELS

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RIVER THAMES

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INHABITABLE WALL (HUMAN SCALE)

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INITIAL PLAN GROUND FLOOR 1:200

CAFE ENTRANCE 1 WALLED GARDEN

INCUBATOR COLUMNS


The Sunken Garden : Provides visitors with accurate temperature and sunlighting within this chamber with is fully glazed roof. There is also introduction of a smaller scale inhabitable wall for storing light sensitive plantation.

The Microclimatic Vessel : Providing small volumes for easier climate control within vessel. This allows users experience possible extreme habitats some plants experience in real life.

THREE INSTANCES WITHIN THE BUILDING Introducing initial instance ideas within the building that would involve observation at different levels, rooms of varying volumes for easier climate control and material interaction.

The Inhabitable Wall : A play with materiality with smaller scale plantation grasped onto their surface. Allows different level observation of living organisms on the walls and interaction with the wall. Gaps can allow outlets to provide certain amount of fresh air into gap-like space.


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garden beds heated by under-ground heating, energy provided by building energy wastage and termal mass released by trombe wall

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best for soil sensitive vegetation which includes root vegetables that can be supplied to the cafe, providing year round resources for the kitchen

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ENTRANCE 1

INHABITABLE WALL

WATER COLLECTION POND

human scale gap that creates a climate for chosen plants that grows on rocky surfaces, cracks and gaps. allowing users to experience their prime climate.

excess water collected from rain collectors is accumulated here and recirculated to other required parts within the building

plants

TROMBE WALL

occuping

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a passive solar building design strategy that adopts the concept of indirect-gain, it radiates at night di

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CURTAIN used to zone out specified temperature controlled rooms within the building

height zones divided according to altitude of plants, air temperature supplied at these zones are different in accordance to their growing conditions excess collected rainwater is collected into fountains in the chamber which is further connected to a water collection point

THERMAL BLOCK outer stone wall has high thermal mass and can be thermally inefficient.

WALLED GARDEN where all the herbs are grown and then used in the cafe.

extruded seating from zoning wall extended to upper floor to create dynamic landscaping within the building.

glazed facade as a majority within the light vesselto maximise allowable daylighting for especially light sensitive plants

CAFE

ENTRANCE 2

where all the crops are grown and then used in the cafe.

TRANSITION FROM LIGHT TO DARK HT FROM DAR K TO LIG

sunken floor that allows low level shading for small outdoor flowerbed

CONNECTION RAMP

MAIN STAIRCASE taking advantage of skylight, natural lighting is mainly used to manipulate the change of mood as a user walks up and down the stairs.

EXTRUDED SEATING zoning wall extended to upper floor to create dynamic landscaping within the building.

irregular stone placement allows light leakage into staircase space creating everchanging light patterns within the staircase space

CO O

L

A

INCUBATION COLUMNS extended columns wraped with thriving vines stabilising the dark vessel extension.

TOILETS unisex cubicles with a combination of natural and artificial lighting from sklights

CONNECTION building a connection between the light and dark vessels. allows useres to experience the landscape at a different perspective.

B

OPEN

1:100 GROUND FLOOR


A D

A

R

K

V

E

S

S

E

N

L

CLOSED

B

MOISTURE CHAMBER highly humid chamber that has a rainwater collection system to regulate moisture levels for plants with such living conditions, mist system implemented for moisture control

DARK ROOM zone lit with blue and red lights showing how certain wavelengths of light can offer better growth conditions to plants.

reflective louvre panels that maximises natural daylight by rotation and reflection at different times of the day

space aims to allow users be within the plantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; environment and is guided into the plantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; space through gaps and pathways

extruded seating from zoning wall extended to upper floor to create dynamic landscaping within the building.

LIGHT LEAKS light entry is controlled with mechanical roof that allows required amounts of light to leak in at different times of the day

micro climatic vessels are hung from curved protruding columns that extends from ground level to the top of vessels

EXTRUDED SEATING zoning wall extended to upper floor to create dynamic landscaping within the building.

MICRO CLIMATIC VESSELS hung elements for providing specific prime growing conditions.

A

INCUBATION COLUMNS extended columns wraped with thriving vines stabilising the dark vessel extension.

DIRECT DESIRED LIGHTING crevice on the roof allows providable day lighting leak into the building to hit certain surfaces for specific type of plantation.

B

OPEN

1:100

FIRST FLOOR


D

A

R

K

V

E

S

S

E

L

rib structured roof

HEAT SINK

PLANT SCALE INHABITABLE WALL

light can only be captured at certain times of day

plants grow best under the combination of red and blue light

only allowing sunlight enter and affect a certain area

SCAFFOLD LAYERS

POCKETS OF SPACE

DARK ROOM

overview of landscape BALCONY

CONTROLLED LIGHT ROOM

PUSH & PULL

GLAZED

highly sensitive to human occupancy

CO2 conc.

temperature

SOIL

HUMAN SCALE INHABITABLE WALL

MICROBIAL CHAMBER

CAFE

CLAY

RADIATOR PIPE/CABLE

CLAY

ROCK 2: GYPSUM

THERMAL BLOCK

SOIL

ROCK 1: SOAPSTONE

ROCK 3: BALSALT

POINTS OF PLANT PLACEMENT

enclosed

open


1 : 1

C O M P O N E N T

T E S T I N G

Experimentation with tear shaped fragments for a series of detailed building components. Their organisation and connection methods are challenged through 1:1 prototyping. The idea is to create a mechanical element that responds to external weather conditions and external weather requirements.


STEAM

BEND I NG

PROC E SS

1. A jig is made to bend strips of timber into teardrop shapes with a constant radius. It is bent around a fixed core with steel plates around it to prevent direct bending by the handle

Wall component that allows for views and natural airflow across a space, that can be mannually/ mechanically controlled. Openings dependent on meeting the needs of a certain space within the building.

2. The handle is then clamped down for a while as the steamed timber dries up and takes shape.

3. Bent timber pieces are taken out of the jig and placed into drying racks that allows it to continue to dry while other batches are bent. The drying rack is made to ensure bent pieces are in shape.

Mechanical roof component that allows control over the amount of light entering a space in the building.

4. Once pieces are completely dry, they are laminated with PVA glue.

C O M P O N E N T

V A R I A T I O N S

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PHASE 1 & 2 PORTFOLIO - ELLIE TO  

PHASE 1 & 2 PORTFOLIO - ELLIE TO  

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