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The Spitzer School of Architecture Studio: Fall 2012 Professor: Ali Hocek Project Team: Todd Hansmann, Michele Flournoy

We like the city street; it’s were all the action is. Our project proposal lies in understanding the attraction of the street’s social, economic and spatial arrangements to create a new form of urbanism. We used the form of a double helix to bring the street up into the building creating a new socio-spatial model that invites more opportunity for meeting. Each office can interact with the public as well as each other in this network of spaces. Rather than the traditional typology of office building lobby, office suite and personal office, our new building typology will house a variety of spatial models and office types, a mixture of retail and amenities, and a significant intervention of open space and public area. While one helix is reserved for office spaces the other is left open for public use and the connection space is utilized as a forum between the two. The flexibility of this form allows for program reduction or expansion as well as an entirely re-imagined program, including commercial and storage, office and residential, museum and park, etc. Essentially we are creating a mixed use property with more opportunity for meeting and mixed use …and thus more flexibility.


CIRCULATION

Sunken Level

Ground Level

2nd Level 13ft

Entry

Private

3rd Level 26ft

B

A

4th Level 39ft

6th Level 65ft

B

A

B

A

Green Roof Lobby

Cafe

Gallery

Beer Garden

Kiosks

Public Plaza Ramp to Subway B

A

Public Plaza

A

A

B

B

A

B

A

Entry Public Plaza

Public

DETAILS

5th Level 52ft

EXTERIOR FLOOR DETAIL, PATH & PLANTER SCALE: 1'-0" = 1"

C

A

South Fire Stair

B

North Fire Stair & Elevator


CES KIOSK SPA

PRIVATE ENTRY

PRIVATE ENTRY

CAFE

GALLERY

GALLERY

LOBBY

BWAY

SU RAMP TO

LOBBY

Customized Space Private Allotted Space

RAMP TO

CAFE

Office Space by Lots BWAY SUBreakout Spaces Conference Rooms Bike Storage Lockers / Showers

CONFERENCE

Randomized Space Public Open Space

Private Allotted Space

Randomized Space Public Open Space

Office Space by Lots Workspace Breakout Spaces Parkspace Conference Rooms Open Circulation Bike Storage Temp-space CONFERENCE Lockers / Showers PUBLIC ENTRY

BIKE PARKING

LOCKERS & SHOWERS

PUBLIC

LOBBY GALLERY CAFE KIOSK SPACES BEER GARDEN

STRUCTURAL CORE (ELEVATOR & FIRE STAIR)

STRUCTURE

Customized Space

ConnectionENTRY Spaces

BIKE PARKING LOCKERS & SHOWERS

Workspace Parkspace Open Circulation Temp-space

ELEVATOR & STAIR

FIRE STAIR

CES KIOSK SPA TERRACE

Beer Garden

FIRE STAIR

PROGRAM

GRE

TERRACE

Beer Garden

EN ROOF

ELEVATOR & STAIR

OF

GREEN RO

Connection Spaces

LOBBY GALLERY Service Hubs: Bathrooms, CAFE Print rooms, Kitchen/ Break / Library / Lockers KIOSKRoom SPACES BEER GARDEN Outdoor / Open Air Spaces

STEEL FRAME METAL DECK & CONCRETE

INTERIOR COLUMNS EXTERIOR COLUMNS

COLUMN FOOTING

FOUNDATION WALL

Service Hubs: Bathrooms, Print rooms, Kitchen/ Break Room / Library / Lockers Outdoor / Open Air Spaces


MODEL

INTERIOR


EXTERIOR


Ofcacek, Becca Dorff

The Meowhaus Project was an independent project that included a team of 8 architecture students. An animal hospice in upstate New York was in need of a separate housing unit for its disabled cats, our team took the opportunity to design and build a 140 sf structure for the cats. The project included: fundraising, marketing, social media, PR, schematic design, client presentations, construction documentation, cost estimation, material selection and purchasing, and construction.

CONCEPT SKETCH

The Graduate Architecture Club (GAC SSA) Phase I: Summer 2012 Project Lead: Todd Hansmann Project Team: Michele Flournoy, Michael Luft-Weissberg, Tiffany Kimmel, Michael Fiorelli, Claire Ross, Nick


AXONOMETRICS

PARTI MEDIA

Our team raised just under $6,000 for the project through the social media sites Facebook and Indigogo. We created a brand for our campaign including a name, logo and accompanying media.

INTERIOR LAYOUT CAT CUBBY / RAMP AREA

LITTER AREA

EXTERIOR SPACE VESTIBULE

PLANTER

INTERNAL CORE

VESTIBULE EXTERIOR SPACE

EXTERIOR SHELL


INTERIOR ELEVATIONS


The project was completed in 20 build days over the course of 8 weekends with an average construction team of four people per weekend.

WEEK 1

WEEK 2

WEEK 3

WEEK 4

WEEK 5

WEEK 6

WEEK 7

WEEK 8


UT H USE


OUT HOUSE The Spitzer School of Architecture Studio: Spring 2012 Professor: Elisabetta Terragni

CASE STUDY

ROOF

New York City’s water supply system is one of the most extensive municipal water systems in the world. But the system faces pressure from a growing New York City population. As such the seemingly endless amount of water that New Yorkers enjoy may eventually evaporate. Out House generates a possible solution to this problem by changing the way that New Yorkers use water through the reintroduction of the public bath house and shared water facilities. The renewal of these facilities and stimulation of their use is supported in two parts. First, by the deployment of water usage stations, called Out Houses, around the Bowery in areas of high density, where the public can use an Out House with a Metrocard or credit card. These stations would house not only water closets, but separately also offer bathrooms, kitchens and laundry facilities. The stations also serve as advertisements for the public bathhouse via their characteristic shape and design. Second, the construction of a new no-water-usage-residence with Out Houses attached to the exterior, as well as the repurposing of the warehouse adjacent to The New Museum into residential housing on the upper floors, and a bath house on the lower floors. The proposed new construction building has high density residential spaces that can accommodate the growing population of the Bowery. The existing warehouse has minimal plumbing infrastructure and could readily be converted by installing Out Houses on the exterior structure along with insulated piping to connect to the existing building water source. The Out Houses can be added or removed from the structure as the density or usage of the building changes.

RAMP & mEZZANINE

EXTERIOR WALLS

BASE

GRADE LINE

UT H USE CASE STUDY

WATER SYSTEMS

PROGRAM

E

TY

LIN

ER

OP

PR

ENTRY

The renewal of the public bath house will ease the stress on New York City’s massive but

The Outhouse system is highly adaptable to other sites, conditions, and users. The design


1

7

KEY

4

2

14

2

3

8

15 11

17

mechanical & utility

LOBBY

CAFE

KITCHEN

1

2

14 14

16

8

1

2

15

locker rm open to below refuse

DRY AREA

PUBLIC AREA

STORAGE

NEW BUILDING

MEMBER AREA

WET AREA GROUND FLOOR

MEZZANINE

refuse

EXISTING BUILDING SECOND FLOOR / GYM

RESIDENTIAL ENTRANCE

THIRD FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL

open to below

FOURTH FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL

FIFTH FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. N

9. SHOWERS 10. LAUNDRY 11. BATH HOUSE ENTRY 12. CHANGING ROOMS 13. TREATEMENT ROOMS 14. COLD BATH 15. LOUNGE / POOL AREA 16. MECHANICAL

CAFE MEZZANINE GYM LOCKER ROOM STEAM ROOM KITCHEN HALLWAY APARTMENT

mechanical & utility lounge area changing rooms

changing rooms

open to below

open to below

treatment rooms

turkish bath

open to below

residential lobby

1 13

R

GROUND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

PUBLIC AREA

NEW BUILDING

MEMBER AREA

EXISTING BUILDING

FOURTH FLOOR

12

7

11

11(sim)

5

3

3

8

1

2

5

11

4

FIFTH FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL

6TH FL / RES.

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”

RESIDENTIAL

7

8

8

9 7

8

8

8

8

8

8

7

10

8

8

7

10

NEW BUILDING EXISTING BUILDING

6 7

14

13 5

4

3 11

12

9

12

9

JACOB RIIS

2

1 New York City’s water supply system is one of the most extensive municipal water systems in the world. But this system can’t sustain itself under the pressure of a growing New York City population and the seemingly endless amount of water that New 16 Yorkers enjoy. Outhouses offer a possible palliation for this problem by changing the way that New Yorkers use water by reinvigorating the use of the public bath house. The renewal of the public bath house and stimulation of its use is supported in three parts; by the construction of the bath house itself, by the deployment of the Outhouse and the construction of shared water facility residences. The Bowery Bath house serves as a prototype for more extensive future use.

BUILDING SECTION

15

16

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’-0”


OUT HOUSE

UT H USE structural diagram 1”x6”x6” structural steel “L” beam frame structural steel clip anchored to upper & lower floor slabs of building steel “C” channel connected to capsule frame water piping, from building water source & waste piping Madras translucent glass finished flooring 4 1/4” structural insulated paneling w/ 3 5/8” foam core EPS rigid insulation & 5/8” OSB interior sheathing 1”polycarbonate plastic shell 3” diameter translucent glass light oculus 6” diameter translucent glass light oculus


OUT HOUSE 1

utility & utility mechanical & utility mechanicalmechanical & utility &mechanical

17

17

17

17 LOBBY

LOBBY CAFE

LOBBY

LOBBY

CAFE

CAFE KITCHEN

CAFE KITCHEN KITCHEN

KITCHEN

16

16

16

16

locke open to below

STORAGE

These interventions would not only enableCELLAR the CELLAR CELLAR CELLAR continued use of the public bath and shared water use facilities, but also serve as a prototype for more extensive future use. Furthermore, the use of these facilities would allow the city to more closely anticipate, monitor and distribute its water resources. The Out House system is highly adaptable to other sites, conditions, and users and its design utilizes ease of assembly, adaptability, and unit flexibility, as each unit is made of components that are pre-assembled off-site. The renewal of the public bathhouse will ease the stress of New York City’s massive but delicate water system and serve as a forum to pool and unite the Bowery community.

STORAGE STORAGE

open to below open to below open to below

STORAGE

GROUND GROUND FLOOR FLOOR GROUND GROUND FLOOR FLOOR

MEZZANINE MEZZANINE MEZZANINE MEZZANINE

ENTRANCE

ENTRANCE ENTRANCE ENTRANCE

SE SECOND SECON FLOO

utility & utility mechanical & utility mechanicalmechanical & utility &mechanical lounge area

2. SHOWERS

2. SHOWERS

3. W.C.

3. W.C.

4. STEAM ROOM4. STEAM ROOM

changing rooms changing rooms changing rooms changing rooms

open to below

open to below open to below open to below

lobby residential lobby residential lobbyresidentialresidential lobby

CELLAR CELLAR CELLARCELLAR

1. W.C.

lounge area lounge area lounge area

GROUND GROUND FLOOR FLOOR GROUND GROUND FLOOR FLOOR

5. LAUNDRY

5. LAUNDRY

6. LAUNDRY

6. LAUNDRY

7. SHOWERS

SECOND SECOND FLOOR FLOOR SECOND SECOND FLOOR FLOOR

7. SHOWERS

8. KITCHENETTE 8. KITCHENETTE9. LAUNDRY

9. LAUNDRY

THIRD

10. SHOWERS 10. SHOWERS


1

1

171

7

17 7

2

2

7

4 24 2

44

4

2

14 14

14 2 2 14

2 214 3

3

28

83 3

88 15 315

15 8 15

15 11 11

11 11 1

1

111 21 2

2 12

14 14

2

14 14

14 14 14

14 14 locker locker rm rm

locker lockerrmrm

8

8 14

8 1 81

28 2 11

2 21 15 15

2

15 15

15

locker rm

low

ENTRANCE ENTRANCE

refuse refuse

ENTRANCE

SECOND SECOND SECOND FLOOR SECOND FLOOR / GYMFLOOR / /GYM GYM / GYM SECOND FLOOR /FLOOR GYM

11. KITCHEN 11.11. KITCHEN KITCHEN 11.11. KITCHEN KITCHEN

openopen to to below below

open opentoto below below

open to below

refuse refuse

refuse

refuse refuse

THIRD FLOOR FLOOR / /RESIDENTIAL / RESIDENTIAL THIRD THIRD FLOOR FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL THIRD FLOOR /THIRD RESIDENTIAL

refuse refuse

refuse

FOURTH FOURTH FLOOR FLOOR / /RESIDENTIAL / RESIDENTIAL FOURTH FOURTH FLOOR / RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL FOURTH FLOOR /FLOOR RESIDENTIAL

FIFTH FIFTH FIFTH FLOOR FLOOR FIFTH / RESIDENTIAL FLOOR / /RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL / RESIDENTIAL FIFTH FLOOR /FLOOR RESIDENTIAL

NN

NN

N

treatment rooms treatment treatmentrooms rooms treatment rooms treatment rooms

changingrooms roomschanging rooms changing rooms changing changing rooms

to below open opentotobelow below open to below openopen to below turkish turkishbath bath turkish bath bathturkish

to below open opentotobelow below open to below turkish bath openopen to below

1 13 13

THIRD THIRD THIRD FLOOR FLOOR THIRD FLOORFLOOR THIRD FLOOR

12. cold12.12. cold cold 12.12. cold cold bath bath bath bath bath

13 13

13 12 12

12 12 4

4

124 4

FOURTH FOURTH FOURTH FLOOR FOURTH FLOOR FLOORFLOOR FOURTH FLOOR

13. hot 13.13. hothot 13.13. hothot bath bath bath bath bath

1

1 7 17

7 71 11 11

11 11 7

(sim) 11 11 11(sim)

(sim) (sim) 11 11 5

5

11(sim) 35 5 3

35 3

3

3

3

8

83 3

18 81 3

18 1

2

1 2

2 52 5

2 5 5 11 11

5

11 11

11

4

14. auxiliary 14.14. auxiliary auxiliary 14.14. auxiliary auxiliary flat flatflat flatflat

FIFTH FIFTH FIFTH FLOOR FLOOR FIFTH / RESIDENTIAL FLOOR / /RESIDENTIAL RESIDENTIAL / RESIDENTIAL FIFTH FLOOR /FLOOR RESIDENTIAL

15. auxiliary 15.15. auxiliary auxiliary 15.15. auxiliary auxiliary flat flatflat flatflat

6TH 6TH / RES. FL FL6TH / /RES. RES. FL /SCALE: RES. SCALE: SCALE: SCALE: 1/8” = 1/8” 1/8” 1’-0” ==1’-0” 1/8” 1’-0”= 1’-0” 6TH FLFL /6TH RES. 1/8” = SCALE: 1’-0”

16. toilets 16.16. toilets toilets 16.16. toilets toilets

17. shop 17.17. shop shop 17.17 s

scale: 1/4” = 1/4” 1’-0” scale: 1/4” = 1’-0 scale: = 1’-0” scale: 1/4” scale: = 1’-0” 1/4” =1


PARKIPELAGO


The Spitzer School of Architecture Studio: Fall 2011 Professor: Bradley Horn The fabric of the city is always changing; pushing out on the natural landscape, leaving no remnants of what existed before; what was once wetland area becomes the site of a skyscraper or subway station. Parkipelago allows its visitors to experience these two conditions as one.


PARKIPELAGO

ABOVE WATER ABOVE LEVEL ABOVE WATER WATER LEVEL LEVEL ASCENT ASCENT BELOW WATER BELOW LEVEL BELOW WATER WATER LEVEL LEVEL DESCENT DESCENT

OBSTRUCTION/ OBSTRUCTION/ PEDESTRIANPEDESTRIAN USE PEDESTRIAN USE OBSTRUCTION/ USE OBSTACLE MIXED USE MIXED MIXED USE USE OBSTACLE OBSTACLE VISION/VIEW VISION/VIEW VISION/VIEW CYCLIST USECYCLIST USE USE CYCLIST

RADIAL AXIS RADIALRADIAL AXIS AXIS


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

key: 1. learning center 2. manager's office 3. repair shop 4. rental center 5. obstacle course 6. bleachers 7. cafe

5 6

5

4

1

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

3 PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

SITE SECTION

The park is an extension of an existing pier, on the edge of the city’s reaching fabric. It captures the transition between wetland and skyscraper, and realizes the transition as an archipelago of islands, pushing, pulling and shearing to grow out of a wetland to become structures. The wetland is a salt marsh re-introduced into the city 6 as part of Parkipelago’s program.

2

FLOOR PLAN

SCALE: 18" = 1'-0"


TERMINAL GALLERY


The Spitzer School of Architecture Studio: Fall 2011 Professor: Bradley Horn The Terminal Warehouse was selected using a random system with the NYC Sanborn Map. The building has a rich history from beginning as a freight warehouse to a becoming a night club in the 80’s and early 90’s. It currently houses many individual artist’s spaces and private studios. The building has been extensively subdivided and all primary entries are from the street rather than any common building space. The intervention was created by re-imposing the Commissioner’s Grid on the building and forming the space for a common outdoor gallery.


erminal Stores

1891: $650,000 complex of seven-story warehouses. Designed by George B. Mallory, an engineer and naval architect

building occupants

61 11 AVENUE, MANHATTAN 10001 ndustrial / Manufacturing Owner: WATERFRONT N Y REALTY lock: 673 Lot: 1 roperty Characteristics: ot Area: 136,000 sq ft (202.67' x 711.25') of Buildings: 1 Year built: 1891 of floors: 9 Building Area: 1,129,200 sq ft otal Units: 42 Residential Units: 0 rimary zoning: M2-3 Commercial Overlay: None loor Area Ratio: 8.3 Max. FAR: 2 v

TERMINAL GALLERY

1893: The 1893 King's Handbook of New York City said that the million-square-foot warehouses were the only ones in New York with direct river, road and rail access.

Artist / Gallery

Architect

1891 Artist / Services

1900: a watchman discovered a fire in Store No. 1, at the corner of 27th and 11th; firefighters needed so much time to batter in the protective iron shutters that the fire did $150,000 in damage. 1891 1910 and 1912: the$650,000 architect Otto Beck 1891: complex ofreplaced seven-story warehou some of the midblock structures nine-story Designed by Georgewith B. Mallory, anbuildengineer and n ing architect

1891: $650,000 complex of seven-story warehouses. Designed by George B. Mallory, an engineer and naval architect

Fashion / Retail

1893: The 1893 King's Handbook of New York City said that the million-square-foot warehouses were the only ones in New York with direct river, road and rail occupants access. Eventbuilding Space / Marketing

Terminal Stores 261 11 AVENUE, MANHATTAN 10001 Industrial / Manufacturing Owner: WATERFRONT N Y REALTY Block: 673 Lot: 1 Property Characteristics: Lot Area: 136,000 sq ft (202.67' x 711.25') # of Buildings: 1 Year built: 1891 # of floors: 9 Building Area: 1,129,200 sq ft Total Units: 42 Residential Units: 0 Primary zoning: M2-3 Commercial Overlay: None Floor Area Ratio: 8.3 Max. FAR: 2 v

Food Service

1910 and 1912: the architect Otto Beck replaced some of the midblock structures with nine-story building

Shipping / storage Fashion / Retail

ect, which includes the High Line. 1910 and 1912: the architect Otto Beck replace 1891: $650,000 complex of seven-story warehouses. some the midblock structures with nine-story b Designed by George B. Mallory, an1932: engineer navalof the and Terminal Stores were permanently in the architect shadow of theing new Starrett-Lehigh Building one block

comes known as Death Avenue. For safety, men on

Event Space / called the West Side Cowboys, ride in front of Food horses, Service

south. Writing in The New Yorker in the critic Lewis 1893: The 1893 King's Handbook of New York City said Mumford praised the Starrett-Lehigh Building but also that the million-square-foot warehouses the only 1891-1929: So many accidents occur between fre singled were out the Terminal Stores as ''admirable.'' ones in New York with direct river, road and railtrains and street-level traffic that 10th Avenue access. comes known as Death 1934: The High Line opens to trains. Avenue. For safety, men on horses, called the West Side Cowboys, ride in fro 1900: a watchman discovered a fire in Store No.trains 1, and at waving 1983: Mr. Burke a groupred of flags. investors bought the the corner of 27th and 11th; firefighters needed so Terminal Stores for $12.3 million. much time to batter in the protective iron shutters 1929: After years of public debate about the haz that the fire did $150,000 in damage. 1984: Mr. Burke units, theinstalled City and ministorage State of New Yorkand andthey the New York now make up 60 percent of the buildings. earlier tral Railroad agree on the The West Side Improvement 1910 and 1912: the architect Otto Beck replaced expansions increased theincludes size to 1.2 square ect, which themillion High Line. some of the midblock structures with build-advertises the buildings as the feet,nine-story and Mr. Burke ing largest ministorage in the Stores country. 1932: facility the Terminal were permanently in th shadow of the new Starrett-Lehigh Building one b 1987-2001: Tunnel Club mainin the critic Lew south.Night Writing in occupies The New the Yorker 1891-1929: So many accidents occur between freight freight train tunnel area Mumford praised the Starrett-Lehigh Building but trains and street-level2011 traffic that 10th Avenue besingled out the Terminal Stores as ''admirable.'' comes known as Death Avenue. For safety, men on horses, called the West Side Cowboys, ride in front of 1934: The High Line opens to trains. trains waving red flags.

trains waving red flags.

Food 1929: After years of public debate about the hazard,

the City and State of New York and the New York Central Railroad agree on the West Side Improvement Project, which includes the High Line.

Real Estate

Services

1932: the Terminal Stores were permanently in the shadow of the new Starrett-Lehigh Building one block

Shipping / storage south. Writing in The New Yorker in the critic Lewis

Mumford praised the Starrett-Lehigh Building but also singled out the Terminal Stores as ''admirable.'' Equipment 1934: The High Line opens to trains. 1983: Mr. Burke and a group of investors bought the Terminal Stores for $12.3 million.

Real Estate

1984: Mr. Burke installed ministorage units, and they now make up 60 percent of the buildings. The earlier expansions increased the size to 1.2 million square feet, and Mr. Burke advertises the buildings as the largest ministorage facility in the country.

1984: Mr. Burke installed ministorage units, and they now make up 60 percent of the buildings. The earlier expansions increased the size to 1.2 million square feet, and Mr. Burke advertises the buildings as the largest ministorage facility in the country.

United Refrigeration

UPS Supply Chain Solutions

1983: Mr. Burke and a group of investors bought the Terminal Stores for $12.3 million.

Moves LLC

Obzee New York

Woodman & Woodman

Hanii

utions

Dsquared2

Erickson Beamon

es Company

Beyond 7 Boutique

Showroom Seven

rage

Presentation Products

Band Pro Film and Digital

Media Distributors

ment Service

The Lab

Squeaky Wheel Media

Corp.

Manhattan Neon Sign Corp.

Artex Fine Art Services

The Ad Store

Grimshaw Architects P.C.

Matthew Marks

Joey Showroom

Coleman Burke Gallery

Wallspace Gallery

J. Cacciola Gallery

Foxy Production

Bailey Gallery

Winkleman Gallery

John Connelly Presents

gency

s

Derek Eller Gallery

2011

Pathe Shipping Supplies Company

1987-2001: Tunnel Night Club occupies the main freight train tunnel area

Equipment

Chelsea Mini Storage

Shipping / storage

N

1983: Mr. Burke and a group of investors bought 1929: After years of public debate about the hazard, Terminal Stores for $12.3 million. the City and State of New York and the New York Central Railroad agree on the West Side Improvement Proj1984: Mr. Burke installed ministorage units, and ect, which includes the High Line. now make up 60 percent of the buildings. The earl increased the size to 1.2 million squar 1932: the Terminal Stores were permanently in expansions the and Mr. Burke advertises the buildings as th shadow of the new Starrett-Lehigh Building onefeet, block largest ministorage facility in the country. south. Writing in The New Yorker in the critic Lewis Mumford praised the Starrett-Lehigh Building but also singled out the Terminal Stores as ''admirable.'' 1987-2001: Tunnel Night Club occupies the main freight train tunnel area 1934: The High Line opens to trains.2011 Central Moving & Storage

Services

Winecare Storage

Food

Dean & Deluca

Event Space / Food Service

Live Auctioneers

Marketing

The Xchange

Fashion / Retail

Jason’s Catering

Artist / Services

9,200 sq ft 0 verlay: None

Union Square Events

Architect

711.25')

La Venue - Sodes

Artist / Gallery

XA, The Experiential Agency

building occupants

01

1891 1891-1929: So many accidents occur between freight

Marketing trains and street-level traffic that 10th Avenue be-

The Blue Agency

Equipment

Pitney Bowes Management Service

Artist / Services

Waterfront NY Realty Corp.

Services

1893: The 1893 King's Handbook of New York City 1891-1929: So many accidents occur between freight that the million-square-foot warehouses were the trains and street-level traffic that 10th Avenue beones in New York with direct river, road and rail comes known as Death Avenue. For safety, men on access. horses, called the West Side Cowboys, ride in front of trains waving red flags. 1900: a watchman discovered a fire in Store No. 1 the corner of 27th and 11th; firefighters needed 1929: After years of public debate about the hazard, muchof time toYork batter theNew protective iron shutter the City and State New andinthe York Cendid $150,000 in damage. tral Railroad that agreethe on fire the West Side Improvement Proj-

‘wichcraft

Real Estate

1900: a watchman discovered a fire in Store No. 1, at the corner of 27th and 11th; firefighters needed so much time to batter in the protective iron shutters that the fire did $150,000 in damage. Architect Artist / Gallery

Food


TODD HANSMANN

646.599.0662 TODDHANSMANN@GMAIL.COM


TODDHANSMANN@GMAIL.COM


TODD HANSMANN ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 2013