Page 1


Shari Mendelson

Todd Merrill Studio with essays by

Dallas Dunn Ezra Shales

Self published using Lulu.com New York, NY


Copyright © 2016 Todd Merrill All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher, addressed “Attention: Permissions Coordinator,” at the address below. Todd Merrill & Associates, Inc. 80 Lafayette Street New York, NY 10013 www.toddmerrillstudio.com Printed in the United States of America Mendelson, Shari. Shari Mendelson / Todd Merrill. Shari Mendelson “Artifacts” December 14, 2016 - January 17, 2017 1. artist — monograph. First Edition. 25 Book design by Michael J. Ruple


Contents

Acknowledgments.................................... 7 “The Terror of Knowing What This World Is About” Ezra Shales ............................................ 65 Introduction Todd Merrill............................................ 9 Todd Merrill Studio.................................... 67 Work..................................................... 10 Curriculum Vitae....................................... 68 “Artifacts” Dallas Dunn ........................................... 22


Acknowledgments

I owe a huge “thank you” to Todd Merrill and his team — both present and past — for their support and hard work on my behalf. Todd Merrill’s vision has brought my vessels to new audiences and for this I am extremely grateful. Thank you to Ezra Shales for contributing his thoughtful essay for this catalogue.

I would like to thank my family, friends, and neighbors who have not only supported and encouraged this body of work but have saved their recycling for me — from a single unusual bottle that they thought I might find interesting to giant bags full of coke bottles — I could not have made this work without their contributions.

For the past eight years my work has been influenced by ancient glass and ceramics. I am indebted to the ancient makers whose work is a constant source of delight, curiosity and inspiration.

Lastly, thank you to my husband Rick Briggs. His tolerance when our home looks like a recycling center, in addition to his critical eye, support, and good humor is invaluable.

7


Introduction By Todd Merrill

and environmentally inspired and creating works that resonate with collectors and museums alike. Her work floats in the grey space between the fine and decorative arts. It is both beautiful and thought provoking. This is why curators at venerable institutions like the Museum of Fine Arts Boston have chosen to put her work on permanent display and collectors around the world have gravitated toward her work - often not knowing quite why until they touch it, when it reveals it’s true identity one layer at a time.

Shari Mendelson’s work entices and betrays us with its highly aesthetic exterior. We can ponder the layers of “glaze,” and sparkles of “mica,” and still, mysterious chemical compositions leave us guessing. That is until we get closer and touch.... Recycled plastic, often with expiration dates still visible, gum wrappers and bits of monofilament reveal themselves. It is brilliantly re-purposed trash! The scourge of our century, remnants of what we leave behind, is clogging the seas and landfills and entering the bodies of living creatures at a microscopic and cellular level.

We are proud to represent Shari Mendelson and present her growing body of “Artifacts”.

Shari’s fascination with ancient civilizations makes a serious statement about what has been left behind from bygone worlds and what we, intern will leave behind. She is at once steeped in the decorative arts, historically

Todd Merrill 9


Work 10


Vessel with Blue-Green Neck and Six Handles, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 23 x 13 x 13 inches


Blue Urn with Found Greek Key, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, paint 33.5 x 11 x 11 inches


Animal with White Cage Cup, 2015

Recycled plastic, hot glue, acrylic polymer, paper, found metal, resin 9 x 5 x 8.5 inches


Round Bottle with Extra Long Neck, 2015

Plastic bottle pieces, hot glue, resin, paint 15 x 6 x 6 inches


“Artifacts” By Dallas Dunn

Using recycled plastic, artist Shari Mendelson creates work that references the legacy of past civilizations while addressing modern issues of sustainability. By transcending their original utilitarian form the works appear as fragile glass, expressing a timeless continuum of what we, as a culture, leave behind.

ship between the rare, ancient works that we value in museums and our contemporary throwaway plastic culture. Formally, her interest is in the exploration of structure, form, scale, texture, color, opacity and translucency. The resulting works are whimsical, diaphanous, rough-hewn, and surprisingly elegant vases and pitchers.

Mendelson spends hours studying ancient Greek, Roman, and Islamic artifacts on view at various museums such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art. With equal parts reverence and play, she reinterprets these ancient works in plastic. Some of her pieces are a close facsimile of the original; others evolve out of the working process and take on a form of their own. Her pieces are coated with glaze-like layers of resins, polymers and paint that alter the color of the plastic, vary the levels of transparency and opacity, and emphasize or obscure the original material.

“I think about the great civilizations that have risen and fallen and what the remaining objects of our time will say about us to future civilizations,” Mendelson has said. “It helps bring attention to the fact that plastic bottles—as these ancient vessels once were—are the symbols of our time.” The lifespan of plastic bottles contradicts their ephemeral purpose. It can take millennia for plastics to biodegrade, which begs the question, Is Shari Mendelson single-handedly salvaging our legacy?

At first glance, her work might look like the glass or ceramic on which it is modeled yet upon closer inspection, a logo, a familiar embossed pattern or an expiration date reveals the actual plastic material. Conceptually, Mendelson is interested in the relation-

Dallas Dunn Director, Todd Merrill Studio

22


Yellow and Green Urn, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint, mono-filament 13 x 3 x 3 inches


Pink and Silver Vessel, 2016

Plastic bottle pieces, resin, acrylic polymer, paint, candy wrappers, glitter 16 x 12 x 12 inches


Glitter Vessel with Semicircles, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, glitter, paint 13.5 x 6 x 6 inches


Winged Animal with Vessels, 2015

Recycled plastic, hot glue, resin, wire, acrylic polymer, paint 9.5 x 2.5 x 7.25 inches


Round Vessel with Crown, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint, wire, crushed glass 25 x 18 x 18 inches


Blue Vessel with Decorative Long Neck, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polimer, glitter, paint 12.5 x 5.5 x 5.5 inches


Silver Linings, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, glitter 31 x 13 x 13 inches


Ennion-Like Vessel with Ten Handles, 2015

Plastic bottle pieces, hot glue, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 15 x 6 x 6 inches


Shell Vessel, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 25 x 13 x 13 inches


Animal with Blue Cage Cup , 2015

Recycled plastic, hot glue, acrylic polymer, paper, found metal, resin 11 x 5.5 x 11 inches


Large Purple Vessel with Yellow , 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint , mono-filament 28 x 16 x 16 inches


Blue Syrian Vessel with Long Neck, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint , mono-filament 15 x 5.5 x 6 inches


Yellow-Green Heart Shaped Vessel , 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint, glitter 19.5 x 16 x 16 inches


Blue Bottle, 2015

Plastic bottle pieces, hot glue, resin, acrylic polymer, glass, paint 15 x 11 x 10 inches


Syrian Bottle with Long Neck, 2016

Recycled Plastic, hot glue, acrylic polymer, mono-filament, paint 15 x 5.5 x 5.5 inches


Green Vessel with Three Double Hands, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 30 x 14 x 14 inches


Glitter Vessel with Blue Neck Semicircles, 2016

Recycled Plastic, resin, acrylic polymer, glitter, paint 19.5 x 11 x 12 inches


Jug with Handle, 2015

Plastic bottle pieces, hot glue, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 19 x 15 x 15 inches


Shiny Blue Vessel, 2016

Plastic bottle pieces, hot glue, resin, acrylic polymer, paint 11 x 4.5 x 4.5 inches


The Terror of Knowing What This World Is About By: Ezra Shales

engineered body that are a parallel achievement of balancing constraints. The plastic has remarkable abilities to withstand and maintain the pressure of carbonization and endure the acidity of toxic soft drinks.

“Not everything is possible at any one time” –what a banal bit of common sense, and yet extra-enlightening if pondered while slowly savoring a specific work of art. The temporal awareness implies that a piece by Shari Mendelson is as imbricated in her built environment in 2015 as, for example, John Chamberlain’s metal S (1959), with its rent automobile grille, exemplifies the tidal flow of postwar affluence. We can linger over a curvaceous fender in a John Chamberlain crushed steel assemblage and realize that there were designers in old Detroit who modeled cars sensuously, building them up full-scale in clay; we might do well to call these self conscious formgivers “sculptors,” too.

We ought to marvel at the nubs that keep these bottles erect –feet that did not exist when I was a child and my plastic soda bottle terminated in a black cap glued onto a perfect hemisphere. Today’s foot vacuum-molded into a penta-pedal form in one action does what once required two units assembled in three steps. These molded feet morph in Mendelson’s hands, becoming a resource. She lifts the existing genius out from quotidian life and redirects that energy into what we commonly call art. We suddenly attend to the nub as a rosette, or a rippling curve of intentions.

Heinrich Wölfflin, the first art historian to put two slide projectors side by side to encourage trans-temporal contrasts and biocular looking, and the author of this grandfatherly-sounding warning that “Not everything is possible at any one time,” intended to convince his students that art is grouned more than we might believe in style and materiality. Wölfflin invoked the concept of visual culture avant la lettre. Today, he might note that today’s cars could never imbue the world with such a second life; they are born to tear or melt or crack, not to bend into mysterious and carnal involutions. Today’s throwaway soda bottles have a savage hyper-rationality and taut,

Historically, bottles have been anthropomorphic: we drink with our lips from their lips, stand them on their own feet when we need to get up and go, and grab them from their waist, shoulder, or neck, as we might a lover or dance partner. Shari Mendelson’s forms are bottles with no lips; they are all feet. The vacuum formed plastic feet turn into pontil marks, suggestive of hot glass imprinted with molds or stamps, pinched into pattern. It is Mendelson’s genius that our collective carbon footprints 53


become a thousand points of reflective, shimmering rosettes. She turns them into ornament seemingly retrieved from the necks of ancient Greek urns and the necklaces of Assyrian royalty. But the necks of these bottles ask that we do not touch them. They are not misanthropic, but they are asocial decorative arts, speaking as much about the recklessness as much as the beauty of autonomy –or is it the dream of autonomous sculpture that Chamberlain’s nightmarish scraps also probed? One can’t look at a Chamberlain without thinking of Warhol’s Orange Car Crash Fourteen Times (1963) or Jackson Pollock’s death or so many other not-so famous fatalities from the

era before seatbelts and airbags. One can’t see a Mendelson without associating them with the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and the crackle of our own detritus underfoot, even as we march up the stairs of a subway to breath in pleasure from a museum’s ancient glass flasks, brittle and yet beloved. The pressure of pint-sized carbonized beverages somehow bleeds into the white walls of galleries and forms an “exploding plastic inevitable” that is a haunting, quiet, elegy, an object with its own implicit happening. Ezra Shales Professor, Massachusetts College of Art And Design

65


Todd Merrill Studio The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), The Museum of Art and Design (New York), The High Museum of Art (Atlanta), and The Brooklyn Museum (New York), amongst others.

For over fifteen years, Todd Merrill Studio has exhibited and purveyed the finest selection of prewar American and European studio and custom furniture. Shortly after Rizzoli published his seminal book on the subject, “Modern Americana: Studio Furniture from High Craft to High Glam”, 2008, Merrill launched Studio Contemporary, representing the work of an international group of established and emerging contemporary artists. Today, their work is sought after by a wide range of art patrons-from collectors and decorators, to curators and museum academics.

Currently, Studio Contemporary represents the work of Niamh Barry, Colleen Carlson, Ezra Cohen, Sophie Coryndon, Marc Fish, Stephane Graff, K. Gretchen Greene, Markus Haase, Molly Hatch, John Hersey, Beth Katleman, Karl Springer LTD, Gary Magakis, Shari Mendelson, Gareth Neal, Soraya Osorio, Jake Phipps, John Procario, Yard Sale Project, Chris Rucker, Antonio Pio Saracino, Robert Scott, Erin Sullivan and Clemens Weiss

While each artist uses his or her own chosen media-from textile to porcelain, to marble and LEDs--their joint curation at Studio Contemporary relies upon their shared drive to push those materials to their absolute aesthetic limits. The result: dynamic, handmade, and unique pieces that contribute to today’s increasingly relevant “grey space” between art and design.

Throughout the year, the gallery exhibits at the best art and design fairs worldwide, including: Collective Design Fair (New York), Art Miami (Miami), Design Miami (Basel, Miami), FOG: Design + Art (San Francisco), Pavilion of Arts & Design (New York, Paris, London), Masterpiece (London), Gallery Seoul (South Korea), Spring Masters (New York), The International Fine Art and Antiques Dealer Show (New York), Zona MACO (Mexico City), Salon Art + Design (New York) and The Winter Antiques Show (New York).

The gallery has progressively cultivated and established new artists and their repertoires, placing their work into private and public collections which include The Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum (New York), 67


Curriculum Vitae

Her work is in the permanent collection of The RISD Museum (Providence, RI), The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA), The Museum of Old and New Art (Tasmania, Australia), The U.S. State Department and the Cooper-Hewitt Museum (Washington, DC). Her work has been featured in publications including in “The New York Times,” “Ceramics Now,” “Glass Quarterly,” NY Arts, and “Art on Paper.”

Shari Mendelson is a sculptor living and working in Brooklyn and Upstate New York. She has been the recipient of three New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships (1987, 1997, 2011), and a Pollock Krasner Foundation Grant (1989). She has participated in residencies including in 2014 rat the Bau Institute/Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. Also in 2014 she was a visiting artist at UrbanGlass in Brooklyn, NY, and in 2015 she was an Artist in Residence at the Corning Museum of Glass. In 2017 Mendelson will have a Toledo Museum of Art GAPP residency. She has had solo exhibitions at Pierogi, Black + Herron Space (New York, NY), John Davis Gallery (Hudson, NY), two person shows at Sideshow gallery and has been included in numerous gallery and museum exhibitions including The Museum of Old and New Art (Tasmania, Australia), Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (Houston, TX) and The Brooklyn Museum (Brooklyn, NY). 68


Judy Mannarino, Hewitt Gallery of Art at Marymount Manhattan College, New York, NY 2016 “Drawing for Sculpture”, curated by Courtney Puckett, TSA, Brooklyn, NY 2015“Pleasures of the Flesh”, curated by Ellie Murphy and Kelly Parr, Outpost, Ridgewood, NY 2015 “Trade Routes”, curated by Susie Silbert and Tam my Pittman, Proteus Gowanus, Brooklyn, NY 2015 “3 Who 3D”, Valentine Gallery, Queens, NY - 3 person show with Mike Ballou and Kurt Steger 2015 “Material Location”, curated by Susie Silbert, Agnes Varis Art Center, Brooklyn, NY 2015 “A View from Camargo”, curated by Saul Ostrow, FiveMyles Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2014 “Art Miami”, Todd Merrill Studio Contemporary, Miami, FL 2014 Pierogi XX: Twentieth Anniversary Exhibition, Brooklyn, NY 2014 “FOG Art Fair”, Todd Merrill Studio Contemporary, San Francisco, CA 2013 “Art Miami”, Todd Merrill Studio Contemporary, Miami, FL 2013 “The International Fine Arts & Antique Dealers Show”, Todd Merrill Contemporary, New York, NY 2013 “Women’s History Month Invitational”, VanDeb Editions, New York, NY 2012/13 “Modern Times”, self curated, Lesley Heller Workspace, New York, NY 2012 Mic:Check, Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY

Solo and Two Person Exhibitions 2013 “Shari Mendelson”, John Davis Gallery, Hudson, NY 2011 “Finders Keepers” with Ilene Sunshine, SAAHP Gallery, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 2010 “Translations from the Ubiquitous Largesse” with Paul Baumann, Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2008 “Here Comes the Sun” with Lori Ellison, Side show Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2000 “Squarey” with Susan Wanklyn, Cheryl Pelavin Fine Art, New York, NY 1998 “Artist’s Rendering”, Saint Peter’s Church, NYC 1997 “Shari Mendelson”, Pierogi 2000, Brooklyn, NY 1996 “Shari Mendelson”, Black and Herron Space, New York, NY 1994 “Shari Mendelson: Sculpture”, Mercer Gallery, Monroe Community College, Rochester, NY 1992 “Shari Mendelson and Avi Adler”, Butters Galery, Portland, OR 1989 “Shari Mendelson: Sculpture”, Littlejohn-Smith Gallery, New York, NY Selected Group Exhibitions 2016 “106 Green Presents”, Brennan & Griffin, NYC 2016 “Onion by the Ocean”, Organized by Essye Klempner and Elisa Soliven, Underdonk, New York, NY 2016 “Altered States”, curated by Hallie Cohen and 69


2012 “Beautiful Garbage”, curated by Portia Munson, BYRDCLIFFE Kleinert/James Center for the Arts, Woodstock, NY 2012 “Freecycle”, curated by Beatriz Olivetti, Jackson1, Long Island City, NY 2012 “Small Scupture (by Big People)”, curated by Kate Teal, Big & Small/Casual Gallery, Long Island City, NY 2012 “Studio for the Absurd - Goodbye Amsterdamn”, curated by Virginia Pierrepont, M55 Gallery, Long Island City, NY 2012 “Trash Talk”, curated by Lisa Dahl, Art Connects New York/Spattered Columns, NY, NY 2011 “Discourse Matters”, Dolphin Gallery, Kansas City, MO 2011 “Marie Celeste”, curated by Liza Statton, Artspace, New Haven, CT 2011 “Williamsburg 2000”, curated by Larry Walczak, Art 101, Brooklyn, NY 2011 “Upcycled”, curated by Barbara Lubliner, Ernest Rubenstein Gallery, New York, NY 2011 “It’s All Good”, Sideshow Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2010 “Works on Paper”, Big & Small/Casual Gallery, Long Island City, NY 2010 “Mendelson, Agid, Markley”, curated by Mery Lynn McCorkle and Tom Jancar, Jancar Gallery, Los Angeles, CA 2009 “Transform/Transmute”, curated by Kendall Baker, The Visceglia Gallery, Caldwell College, Caldwell, NJ

2009 “Radiant”, curated by Carleen Sheehan, The Center Gallery, Fordham University, NYC 2009 “Tikkunim”, Curated byTamar Benzikry-Stern, Howard House Fine Art, Seattle WA. 2008 “In-Site”, curated by Jerelyn Hanrahan, Governors Island, NY 2008 “Surfactant”, Rupert Raven Contemporary, Newark, NJ 2008 “Geometric Abstraction”, Mckenzie Fine Art, NYC 2008 “Supermarket 2008”, Konstnärshuset , Stockholm, Sweden 2007 “Punchbowl”, Metaphor Contemporary Art, Brooklyn, NY 2007 “The Seed Project “, Winkelman Gallery, NYC 2007 “Pillow Talk”, curated by Mery Lynn McCorkle, Ruth Bachofner Gallery, Santa Monica, CA 2005 “Medium Rare: Works on Paper”, Sarah Bowen Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2004 “All the Numbers I Know”, curated by Meredith McNeal, The Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2004 “200 Drawings: Annie Herron Selects form the Pierogi Flat Files”, Carlsbad Museum and Art Center, Carlsbad, NM 2003 “Mind’s Eye”, curated by Mery Lynn McCorkle, SolwayJones, Los Angeles, CA 2003 “4-SQUARE”, curated by Annie Herron and Larry Walczak, eyewash@Fish Tank Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 2003 “Recession 2003 $99 Show”, curated by Tim Thyzel, Cynthia Broan gallery, New York, NY 70


2002 “Atmosphere”, Metaphor Contemporary Art, Brooklyn, NY 2002 “Funky Abstraction”, curated by Jonathon Wahl and Linda Levit, Elsa Mott Ives Gallery, New York, NY 2002 “Round/Rounded”, curated by Don Voisine, Konos, Brooklyn, NY 2001 “Aether” (traveling exhibition), curated by Linn Meyers, Untitled (Space Gallery) , New Haven, CT 2001 Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh,PA 2001 “Cross Pollination” , curated by MeryLynn McCorkle and Susan Joyce, Holland Tunnel Gallery, Brooklyn, NY, 2001 Los Angeles Arboretum, Los Angeles, CA 2001 “Out of Hibernation”, Im n Il, Brooklyn, NY 2000 “Selections”, Eyewash, Brooklyn, NY 1999“Rage for Art”, Pierogi 2000, Brooklyn, NY 1999 “Valentine ‘99”, curated by Annie Herron and Larry Walczak, Eyewash, Brooklyn, NY 1998 “Translucent”, Transamerica Pyramid Lobby Gallery, San Francisco, CA 1998 “The Art Exchange Show”, Adam Baumgold, New York, NY 1998 “Visible/Invisible”, White Box Gallery, Philadelphia, PA- catalog 1997 “Art on Paper”, Weatherspoon Art Gallery, University on North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC

1997 “New York Drawers-The Pierogi 2000 Flat Files”, Gasworks, London, England 1997 “New York Drawers-The Pierogi 2000 Flat Files”, Cornerhouse, Manchester, England 1997 “Parallel Universes”, curated by Amy Cheng, 8th floor Gallery, New York, NY 1997 “Redefinitions: A View From Brooklyn”, Main Art Gallery, California State university, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA-catalog 1997 “Hair Do”, curated by Nancy Brett, The Work Space, New York, NY 1997 “Surface and Shadow: Abstraction Revisited”, Islip Art Museum, East Islip , NY 1997 “Current Undercurrent: Working in Brooklyn”, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, NY 1997 “...Just what do you think you’re doing Dave?”, Williamsburg Art and Historical Center, Brooklyn, NY 1997 “The Art Exchange Show”, Annie Herron Productions, New York, NY 1997 “On Air”, curated by Paul Villinski, Saint Peter’s Church, New York, NY 1996 “Informed Choices”, The Rotunda Gallery, Brooklyn, NY 1996 “The Art Exchange Show”, NYC 1996 “Multiples” Pierogi 2000, Brooklyn, NY Fellowships and Awards 2017 Toledo Museum of Art, GAPP Residency, Toledo, Ohio (upcoming) 71


2015 Corning Museum of Glass, Visiting Artist Residency, Corning, NY 2014 BAU Institute/Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France 2014 Urban Glass Visiting Artist Fellowship Residency, Brooklyn, NY 2011 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship 1997 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship 1990 Yaddo Residency, Saratoga Springs, NY 1989 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation 1987 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship

Ceramics Now, “Three-in-One, A conversation with Beth Katleman, Molly Hatch and Shari Mendelson”, Lilianne Milgrom, June, 2015 Brooklyn Independent Media, “Shari Mendelson: Brooklyn Made”, Produced and Directed by Kecia Cole, June 2015 Corning Museum of Glass Blog, “Freezing Time and Recreating the Past: April Artists-in-Residence” , Kim Thompson, April 2015 Hyperallergic.com, “An Annual Floor-to-ceiling Cross Section of Contemporary Art”, Allison Meier, February 28, 2014 Hyperallergic.com, “Making Connections, Seeing Double at Art Miami”, Jillian Steinhauer, December 5, 2013, online Hyperallergic.com, “Two Must-see Sculpture Shows in Williamsburg: Barsamian at Pierogi, Mendelson at Sideshow”, Hrag Vartanian, July 16, 2010, The New York Times, “Currents Q&A Talking with Shari Mendelson”, Penelope Green, June 24, 2010 Glass Quarterly, “Shari Mendelson at Jancar Gallery”, Annie Buckley, Spring, 2010 The Forward, “The Greening of Art: Artists Step Into Activist Roles With Eco-Art”, Carmela Ciuraru, February 5, 2010 NY Arts, “Beyond the Shore”, Max Blagg, November/ December, 2008 ART CAL, “Surfactant at Rupert Ravens”, Patti Jordan, June 20, 2008 New York magazine, “Here comes the Sun: Lori Ellison

Education 1986 MFA State University of New York at New Paltz, New Paltz, New York 1984 BFA Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 1981 Munson William Proctor Art Institute, Utica, New York Curatorial Projects 2012 - 2013“Modern Times”, Lesley Heller Workspace, New York, NY 2005 “Medium Rare: Works on Paper”, Sarah Bowen Gallery, Brooklyn, NY Selected Bibliography The New York Times, “Old Collides with Not So Old at the Armory”, Roberta Smith, January 22, 2016 Upcyclist.co.uk, “Artefacts made from plastic bottles by Shari Mendelson”, March 8, 2016 72


and Shari Mendelson”, Jerry Saltz, online The New York Times, “Here comes the Sun: Lori Ellison and Shari Mendelson”, Roberta Smith, April 11, 2008 Hragvartanian.com, “Here comes the Sun” at Williamsburg’s Sideshow Gallery, Hrag Vartanian, online Wagmag, “Here comes the Sun: Lori Ellison and Shari Mendelson at Sideshow”, James Kalm, April 2008 Art on Paper, “Medium Rare at Sarah Bowen”, Amanda Church, September/October, 2005 Los Angeles Times, “Tastes of a Visual Smorgasbord”, Leah Ollman, August 22, 2003 The New York Times, “4-Squared”, Holland Cotter, February 7, 2003 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “Transcendent Works Reach for the ‘Aether’”, Mary Thomas, September, 2001 Pittsburgh Tribune, “Three Art Stories at Carnegie Mellon’s Regina Gouger Miller Galllery”, Kurt Shaw, August, 2001 The Tribeca Trib, “At Cheryl Pelavin, art with delicate strength”, Jeanne Wilkinson, December, 2000 NY Arts, “Shari Mendelson @ Cheryl Pelavin”, James Kalm, November, 2000 The New York Times, “Rage for Art(Pierogi Reborn)”, Roberta Smith, February 19, 1999 The New York Times, “Couples Making Art a Deux”, Maureen C. Muenster, February 14, 1999 The New York Times, “Shari Mendelson”, Grace

Glueck, July 24, 1998 The Philadelphia Inquirer, “White Box Gallery”, Edward J. Sozanski, January 23, 1998 The Suffolk County News, “The Islip Art Museum”, John Lee, October 16, 1997 Metalsmith, “Shari Mendelson:Sculpture, Installation and Drawings”, Marjorie Simon, Volume 17, Spring 1997 Selected Collections RISD Museum, Providence, RI Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA Museum of Old and New Art, Tasmania, AU U.S. State Department, Washington, DC British Airways, Harmondsworth, UK Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, New York, NY Hood Museum of Art, Hanover, NH Recent Teaching 2015-2016 Parsons School of Design, New York, NY 2016 Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY 2015 University of the Art, Philadelphia, PA


Shari Mendelson  

Brooklyn-based artist Shari Mendelson makes hand-made sculptures that are constructed out of discarded plastic bottles and inspired by ancie...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you