Page 1

S01-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:31

Page 1

08

Environment Minister Eroðlu

stresses the price that Turkey will pay if it fails to become a party to the Kyoto Protocol

08

11

Virtuoso Þirin Pancaroðlu breathes new life to Turkish harp

The story of a scarf

activist: How to make someone hate your nation's founder

YO U R WAY O F U N D E R S TA N D I N G T U R K E Y

Featurýng News and Comment from

SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2008 WWW.SUNDAYSZAMAN.COM YTL 1.50

TENSION

BENEATH POLITICAL CURRENT CRISIS LIES SHIFT IN CAPITAL

Turkey continues its breathtaking Euro 2008 journey draw through extra-time. Arda Turan, Semih Þentürk and Hamit Altýntop scored for Turkey in the shootout. Luka Modric and Ivan Rakitic also missed their penalties for Croatia. Darijo Srna scored Croatia's only penalty. After a scoreless 90 minutes in normal time, Ivan Klasnic gave Croatia the lead in extra-time with a header in 119th minute. "Super sub Semih equalized in injury time with a hard shot from inside the area. Turkey will face Germany in the semifinals next Wednesday in Basel, Switzerland. Both Germany and Turkey finished second in their groups in the first round. CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

PHOTO

M. BURAK BÜRKÜK

PHOTO

REUTERS

‘It's not over till it's over’ whenever or wherever the opponent is Turkey. The Turks showed their battling qualities in the Euro 2008 group stages, rallying from 10 down to defeat Switzerland 2-1 and scoring three times in the last 15 minutes against Czech Republic to snatch a thrilling 3-2 win. With Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoðan watching from the VIP stands, Turkey on Friday night again accomplished the featwhen keeper Rüstü Reçber saved a penalty shot from Mladen Petric to send Turkey into the semifinals with a 3-1 shootout win over Croatia after a 1-1

AYÞE KARABAT, ANKARA Turkey's most influential business organization, the Turkish Industrialists and Businessmen's Association (TÜSÝAD), organized a meeting on Thursday and called for a "national convention" on a new constitution but failed to criticize judicial interference and anti-democratic interventions, once more turning eyes to the "economic side" of the political crisis Turkey is passing through. According to many analysts, the economic base of the recent fight in the political arena is the reflection of a capital shift between the "big Ýstanbul bourgeoisie" and the rising "Anatolian capital," which supports the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party). Ýstanbul Bilgi University's Professor Erol Katýrcýoðlu examined the closure case against the AK Party in one of his articles and wrote that there is an obvious relationship between these discussions and the two different capital structures. He provided some statistics: "If we define powerful actors of the economy as companies with more than 500 workers and look at their share in added value, we can see that in 1985 it was 66.1 percent; in 1993, 58.5 percent; in 2001, 56.9 percent; and in 2004, the latest available data set, 49 percent. CONTINUED ON PAGE 06

AK PARTY’S DEFENSE

STRONG FOR THE INDICTMENT; WEAK FOR A DEMOCRACY MANIFESTO KERÝM BALCI, ANKARA

Keeper Rüþtü rides his luck to become hero

Turkey goalkeeper Rüþtü Reçber wasn't supposed to play at the European Championship, but when he did in Friday's quarterfinal against Croatia, the 35-year-old did enough to become a national hero. When the the match ended 0-0 after 90 minutes, and 1-1 after extra time, Rüþtü made a decisive save as he stopped a penalty kick by Mladen Petric. Rüþtü raised his arms and ran towards his teammates to celebrate Turkey's best ever result in the competition -- the semifinals, where Turkey will play Germany. CONTINUED ON PAGE 18

Featuring news and articles from

The response submitted by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) to the Constitutional Court was found disproportionately strong compared to the weak content and lack of internal logic of the indictment, but many said it didn't meet the expectations of the grassroots, which was awaiting a "democratic manifesto." AK Party sources were largely responsible for the heightened expectations, as they spoke in the past of a response that would be translated into several languages and distributed across Turkey. From the very beginning the AK Party was readying its supporters for a "respectful closure": Let them close the party and let us leave a text that will guide Turkey to a true democracy in the future. CONTINUED ON PAGE 04


S02-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:36

Page 1

02 SUNDAY’S ZAMAN

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

FOCUS

Since first observed in Turkey 2002, 92 people have died of CCHF in the country, including 27 so far this year. The fever is much more prevalent in central Anatolian and eastern Anatolian provinces, especially Tokat, Çorum, Sivas, Amasya, Yozgat and Gümüþhane.

‘Awareness of týck-borne dýsease must be raýsed’ NURSEL DÝLEK ANKARA

The cases of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), a viral disease transmitted by ticks, is increasing year by year, a fact that Associate Professor Zati Vatansever says is due to lack of awareness of the disease in rural areas, where it is most common. "Mostly seen in rural areas, transmitted to people by ticks, increasing between the months of April and October, coming suddenly and killing within two weeks," reported the dailies and television news broadcasts over the last several months. CCHF seems to be the new threat to the Turkish population. Experts say the disease, whose victims have increased fivefold in the last five years, will become an even bigger problem in coming years. Seen six years ago for the first time in Turkey, CCHF has killed 134 people in the country thus far. Infecting two doctors and one other medical staff member at the Ankara Numune Education and Research Hospital, the seriousness of disease has reached an alarming point.

CCHF and Turkey

ENJOY TODAY’S ZAMAN AT THESE TOP HOTELS

CCHF entered world medical literature back in the 1940s. In the summer of 1944, it was seen in Russian soldiers transporting agricultural products in Western Crimea for the first time. In 1956, the same disease was witnessed in Congo, which is how the disease got its name. The history of the disease in Turkey does not go back that far; CCHF was first observed here in the summer of 2002. Esra Demir, working as a nurse at the Tokat Social Security Authority (SSK) Hospital, in 2002 suddenly felt unwell and was taken to the Ankara Hacettepe University Hospital. Despite all the attempts to treat her, she died after one week and her reason of death was recorded as unknown. However, six more people died in a short period in Tokat, a province in the Black Sea region, and the deaths were announced as "deaths with unknown reasons" to the media. The Ministry of Health at first thought that this unknown disease resembled Q fever, a disease caused by infection with the bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Yet upon finding that the symptoms were not quite the same as those of Q

PIRIL HOTEL ÇEÞME

"Smiling Face of Çeþme" 444 0 232 www.pirilhotel.com

HOTEL KARBEL

Phone: +90 252 617 00 13 info@karbelhotel.com www.karbelhotel.com

fever, blood samples were sent to the laboratories of the Pasteur Institute in France. The tests conducted there finally confirmed that the disease was CCHF. Detection of 327 CCHF cases in Tokat province shows that it is one of the most affected regions in Turkey. Thus the question arises, why Tokat? To understand this, we must explore the conditions causing the disease in the province and the characteristics of infected ticks.

Female ticks pose greater threat Vatansever, associate professor at the department of parasitology at the veterinary school of Kafkas University, has been conducting research on ticks since 1989. And since 2004, when the disease began to spread, the professor has been analyzing CCHF-infected ticks and the domestic and wild animals that carry them. There are 850 tick species in the world, with 32 of them present in Turkey; however, not all ticks carry the CCHF virus. The virus is carried by ticks of the Hyalomma marginatum marginatum species. Virus-carrying ticks lodge in small wild animals such as mice or rabbits and in wild birds. They mature on these smaller animals and then move on to large wild animals, cattle and people. After the ticks feed on their host, they detach themselves and while male ticks die soon thereafter, females die after laying their eggs. Stating that the real threat is posed by female ticks, Vatansever noted: "Three to 5 percent of eggs of a tick bearing the CCHF virus are also contaminated. In this sense, female ticks present more of a threat than males."

How ticks choose a host Unless ticks find a suitable host, they live for an average of one year. In temperatures of 16-18 degrees Celsius, their life spans can extend up to three years. The characteristics of virus-carrying ticks are different from other ticks. The ticks of the Hyalomma species are also known as hunters. These ticks burrow into soil, unlike many other ticks that live on plants. They can feel vibrations and heat, while also being able to smell and identify carbon dioxide from exhalation. Vatansever noted that the infected ticks attach themselves to people who are sitting or lying down, not

SHERATON HOTEL ANKARA

Phone: +90 312 4576000 www.sheraton.com/ankara

KORUMAR HOTEL DE LUXE

Phone: +90 256 618 15 30 Gazi Beðendi Mevkii P.K. 18 09400 - Kuþadasý / Aydýn www.korumar.com.tr

LUSH HOTEL

Phone: +90 212 243 95 95 Sýraselviler No:12 Taksim/Ýstanbul info@lushhotel.com www.lushhotel.com

RIXOS BELDÝBÝ

Phone: +90 242 824 97 00 Beldibi Kemer 07985 Antalya www.rixos.com

Number of CCHF cases and fatalities by year Year 2002-2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

Cases 150 249 266 438 717 --

Deaths 6 13 13 27 33 27 (*)

* Approximately, according to the numbers calculated from media reports ** (Data from Ministry of Health)

moving. "They feel vibrations and sense heat and carbon dioxide emitted from people and gravitate toward them. They start climbing from a person's feet and look for an area on which to attach themselves." Ornithologist Ahmet Kütükçü emphasized another crucial point. He said migratory birds, particularly storks, play an active role in spreading the disease. "Yet the real host for the ticks are not birds, but rodents," he noted. The number of CCHF virustransmitting ticks is increasing in the world, and this is related to an increase in suitable conditions, which include heat, humidity and proper hosts, Vatansever noted. He also explained that while only 40 percent of tick species can reproduce under normal weather conditions, the ecological changes caused by global warming have led to warmer weather, which prolongs the life span of ticks and facilitates their reproduction. Virus-carrying ticks are able to survive in regions where ocean climates -- typical of the Black Sea region -- and semi-arid climates -- typical of central Anatolia and eastern Anatolia -- meet, and those types of ticks prefer areas with small trees and cattle. Conducting field studies on the range of virus-carrying ticks, Vatansever found that Çorum, Amasya, Tokat, Yozgat, Sivas, Erzurum and Artvin are at the highest risk. The least hazardous regions are the Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts, Vatansever said.

'Rural areas should be more concerned about risk' Number of reported tick bite cases in high risk provinces Sivas:...................................... 129 Yozgat:.................................... 113 Çorum:.................................... 107 Erzurum:.................................... 65 Gümüþhane:.............................. 62 Amasya:..................................... 36 Çankýrý:...................................... 31 Kastamonu:............................... 22 Ankara:.......................................23

Taking a closer look at the deaths caused by ticks reveals that cattle owners, farmers and shepherds are the most at-risk population. In addition, soldiers, campers and picnickers, veterinarians, forest workers and health staff working in infected areas are at risk. The percentage of deaths among elderly people over 70 is also striking. Noting that the CCHF-transmitting ticks live on cattle and wild animals, Vatansever said it is pointless to worry about ticks in urban areas. However, the professor complained about ignorance in rural areas. "People in rural areas live with ticks from their

HOTEL DOÐA

RIXOS BODRUM

Phone: +90 252 337 11 22 Zeytinli Kahve Mevkii Bodrum/Muðla www.rixos.com

RAMADA PLAZA ÝSTANBUL

Phone: +90 232 7126839-7127193 Musalla Mah. 1005 Sk. No: 17 Çeþme Ýzmir info@hoteldoga.com www.hoteldoga.com

RIXOS PREMIUM BELEK

Phone: +90 212 315 44 44 Fax: +90 212 315 44 45 info@ramadaplazaistanbul.com www.ramadaplazaistanbul.com

CM Y K

Phone: +90 242 710 20 00 Ýleribaþý Mevkii P.K. 116 Belek/Serik/Antalya www.rixos.com

GOLDCITY TOURISM COMPLEX

Phone: +90.242.510 02 00 Kargýcak/ALANYA info@goldcity.com.tr www.goldcity.com.tr

BLACK BIRD HOTEL

Phone: +90 212 511 74 54 Gençtürk Cad. No: 51 / 53 Þehzadebaþý / Ýstanbul www.blackbirdhotel.com

childhood to adulthood, and they think they know about ticks. When they see photographs of ticks in newspapers, they say that the ticks in the photos do not resemble those living in their villages. They are exposed to tick bites every summer, but they remove them on their own. The village people do not want to believe that CCHF-carrying ticks can be fatal. And then they want to believe the nonsense alleging that the ticks are sent from Israel. Unfortunately it is very hard to do away with these kinds of beliefs," he said, adding that he believes if rural people had just a little concern over the ticks, they would take simple measures to protect themselves.

Tick bites kill within two weeks The CCHF virus is transferred to people and animals via tick bites. While the virus does not necessarily kill animals, it is often fatal for people. Symptoms of the infection are sudden fever, nausea, headache, vomiting and diarrhea. Bleeding of different parts of body may also accompany these symptoms. Hürrem Bodur, the chief of the Department of Infectious Diseases at Ankara Numune Hospital, explained the course of the disease, saying: "There are platelets circulating in the blood in the human body functioning as bleeding clotters. But entering into human body via tick bites, the virus causes the number of platelet cells to decrease, which damages the veins and which, in turn, causes hemorrhage. External hemorrhage in parts like the nose and ears or internal hemorrhage, causing parts of the body to appear bruised and purplish, may occur as a result of decreasing platelets," Bodur said. Experts say that disease symptoms appear within one to three days or 10 days at most after the virus enters a person's body. It is vital for a patient to stay in the hospital after infection. Patients who survive after two weeks become permanently immune to the disease. Raising awareness is of crucial importance to effectively combat the disease. Experts have suggested that more action be taken in high-risk areas by the ministries of health and agriculture. A regular inspection of the animal population in problematic regions is another important step to take. Widespread education campaigns need to be conducted to raise awareness of the people in rural areas.

HYATT REGENCY ÝSTANBUL

Phone: +90 212 368 1234 Fax: +90 212 368 1000 istanbul.regency.hyatt.com

CLUB FAMILIA

Phone: +90 232 722 22 22 (pbx) Ali Ören Mevkii, Çiftlikköy Çeþme/Ýzmir info@clubfamilia.com www.clubfamilia.com

RIXOS TEKÝROVA

Phone: +90 242 821 40 32 Tekirova Beldesi P.K 137 07995 Kemer/Antalya www.rixos.com

RIXOS KONYA

Phone: +90 332 221 50 00 Ýstanbul Yolu Selçuklu 42250 Konya www.rixos.com


S03-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:39

Page 1

NATIONAL

SUNDAY’S ZAMAN 03

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

ÝSTANBUL ANKARA ÝZMÝR ANTALYA ADANA ERZURUM EDÝRNE TRABZON KAYSERÝ

27° 28° 35° 34° 34° 21° 32° 27° 29°

KONYA ÇANAKKALE DÝYARBAKIR SAMSUN BURSA GAZÝANTEP ESKÝÞEHÝR MALATYA KOCAELÝ

34° 31° 34° 26° 30° 35° 29° 30° 30°

PHOTO

ALÝ ÜNAL

Beýng lýttle black fýsh

Prisoners in Erzurum Special Type Prison are not allowed to use Kurdish on the telephone.

Kurdish still a ‘mountain language’ in Turkey’s prisons EMÝNE KART ANKARA

It was 1985, when playwright and Nobel laureate Harold Pinter, along with the late Arthur Miller, visited Turkey on behalf of International PEN to investigate the situation of writers in Turkey, a visit that inspired him to write his play "Mountain Language" three years later. "One of the things I learnt while I was there was about the real plight of the Kurds: quite simply that they're not really allowed to exist at all and certainly not allowed to speak their language," Pinter said in an interview at the time, after his play was performed for the first time at the Royal National Theatre in London in October 1988. He was responding to a question on why he wrote the play. "For example, there's a publisher who wrote a history of the Kurds and was sent to prison for 36 years for simply writing a history of the Kurds," he went on saying, in an apparent reference to the thensituation of prominent sociologist Ýsmail Beþikçi. "… The springboard, in answer to your question, was the Kurds, but this play is not about the Turks and the Kurds. I mean, throughout history, many languages have been banned -- the Irish have suffered, the Welsh have suffered and Urdu and the Estonians' language banned; the Basques' language was banned, you know, at various times," Pinter said. Taking into consideration the recent adoption of a bill by the Turkish Parliament that allows full-time state broadcasts in Kurdish, one might be tempted to file Pinter's remarks away as "ancient" quotes, belonging to the time when Turkey had not introduced reforms expanding freedoms and rights in line with its European Union membership process. However, the reality argues otherwise: Hundreds of complaints have been filed by prisoners, particularly since early 2007, to several chambers of the Human Rights Association (ÝHD) regarding a ban on the use of Kurdish in telephone conversations with their families.

Article 88 entry (p) Sevim Salihoðlu, secretary-general of the Ankara-based ÝHD, told Sunday's Zaman that both the headquarters in the capital and ÝHD chambers in several cities have been receiving a lot of complaints on the issue of Kurdish language usage in prisons since early 2007. "Sometimes, a complaint letter is signed by 10 prisoners. I can surely say that we have received complaints from more than 200 separate prisoners," Salihoðlu added. The relatively high number of formal complaints the ÝHD has received suggests the problem affects many more. The ongoing problems are related to a Justice Ministry guideline outlining rules for "Management of Criminal Execution Institutions and Execution of Penalties and Security Precautions." Article 88 of the guideline outlines "the right to talk on the telephone." Entry (p) of the same article says: "Speaking takes place in Turkish.

However, if the convict doesn't know Turkish or if it is determined that his/her relative -- via examination in location of the relative with whom the convict notified [authorities] he will talk to -doesn't know Turkish, the talk is allowed and recorded. If it is understood as a result of examination of the records that talk is used for activities which have the possibility to constitute a crime, then the convict is not allowed to talk in any other language than Turkish with the same relative." Lawyer Ömer Halefoðlu, member of administration board of the ÝHD Diyarbakýr branch, shared similar complaints by three prisoners with Sunday's Zaman. "I've been convicted at Erzurum Special Type Prison. Around since one year. I'm not allowed to have telephone talk in Kurdish which is my mother tongue with my family. My mother and my aunty cannot speak at all Turkish. That's why, I can't talk to them since one year. I'm demanding legal assistance from you in order to be able to talk in my mother tongue," Fettah Karakaþ, one of those prisoners, wrote in broken Turkish in a letter dated April 15, 2008. Regarding three complaints, one from 2007, the ÝHD Diyarbakýr office sent letters to the Justice Ministry, Parliament's Human Rights Commission and the Prime Ministry's Human Rights Presidency (BÝHB). So far, only Human Rights Commission Chairman Zafer Üskül, of the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party), has responded. He basically and briefly referred the ÝHD to "The Guideline Concerning Management of Criminal Execution Institutions and Execution of Penalties and Security Precautions." "In a response letter to Üskül, we will list problems stemming from the guideline itself. For example; we will explain the arbitrary practices of security forces during examination of the relative with whom the convict notified authorities he will talk to, and we will explain that the final report after these examinations does not always reflect the truth," Halefoðlu told Sunday's Zaman in a brief telephone interview. Sources from the Justice Ministry also referred to the entry (p) of Article 88 of the same guideline, when approached by Sunday's Zaman. "The minister has asked for detailed information regarding news reports on the issue, and it is still being assessed whether there is a trouble in the implementation of the guideline," the sources, who requested anonymity, told Sunday's Zaman, referring to recent Turkish media reports on the issue. As Pinter's 20-minute-long play begins, the audience sees a group of women waiting all day through snowfall to visit their imprisoned husbands and sons. As Salihoðlu explained, almost all of those relatives subject to grievances due to the guideline are old people who cannot speak Turkish at all. And the majority of those old people are female, needless to say because they lack even a primary school education. The ministry's final evaluation and the response to hundreds of complaints will give a clue on whether Kurdish is still a "mountain language" in Turkey.

There are certain books that are unforgettable and that shape the lives of people who read them. They may differ from person to person, but one of those books is definitely "The Little Black Fish," written by Samad Behrangi, an Iranian of Turkish descent who was killed by the Shah's regime at the age of just 29. Behrangi was a teacher and with his books he tried to teach children the value of justice, freedom, solidarity and questioning what they hear. He used many political allegories and maybe this is why his books were banned not only in Iran but also in Turkey after the coup in 1980. Even before the coup, some teachers did not like his books at all and became suspicious of students who read them. The story is told through the voice of an old fish speaking to her 12,000 children and grandchildren. She describes the journey of a small black fish that leaves the safety of the local stream to venture into the world. The path of the little fish leads down a waterfall and through the river to the sea. Along the way the fish meets several interesting characters, including a helpful lizard and a dreaded pelican. With both wisdom and courage, the fish travels far indeed, and the tale ends with the little black fish as an example for all the others, especially for the little red fish, but is also open-ended. When I was a child, it drove me crazy not to know what happened in the end to the little black fish. It was always a question

CM Y K

AYÞE KARABAT a.karabat@todayszaman.com

for me as to why the little black fish, although it met other fish along the way that were similar to it, left them and continued its journey alone? Why couldn't it stay with them? More then 30 years later, I think I have found the answer: The aspects that characterize the little black fish are its endless courage and ability to think independently. I know many people who started their lives as little black fish but ended up as ordinary fish. They were the leftists who defended the rights of workers and wanted to establish a society based on social justice, but after a point in their lives they started to defend the rights of the big bourgeoisie. I know some people who when they were little black fish defended freedoms, but now think that a woman's right to dress however she pleases is nonsense. I know people who were against coups and became victims of them, but subsequently turned into supporters of the new kind of coups in the form of e-memoranda, interference by the judiciary or post-modern processes. I know people who promised a new constitution when they were acting like little black fish, but became compromise seekers with the

traditional statist mentality. There were other little black fish doing journalism and defending freedom of expression, but then they started to accuse their colleagues of being the agents of clumsy psychological operations when they saw the stories about the interesting meetings between Deputy President of the Constitutional Court Osman Paksüt and Turkish Land Forces Commander Gen. Ýlker Baþbuð. There were little black fish that said the "Kurdish problem is my problem" and "if the state made a mistake it must apologize," but ended up as fish that rebuked a prominent Kurdish intellectual in his room. There were little black fish that used to say that they were against all kinds of violence but unfortunately they are not able to follow policies independent from a man imprisoned on an island. There were little black fish strongly defending the rights to freedom of belief, but who are not able to show the same sensitivity for other's religions when the time comes to do so. The more unfortunate thing is that the little black fish of the past are today accusing those who are able to remain little black fish of being traitors and perpetrators of plots. The ex-little black fish are trying to humiliate the still-little black fish by saying that the latter are political converts. But who said being a little black fish is easy? It is possible to end up as a grilled little black fish. But this does not have to be the end of the little black fish; some will continue to fight the current.


S04-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:54

Page 1

    

 

 

  







         

                  $              $               „          ˆŠ‰  @ @ “    ”   ‚‚   @ @ X •ˆ{$            * € =    @  @ $    “ 

       ˆ•                    @   ‡–•          ”  ‚‚‡                 

                     

    

“           @ “                 }

  

  €          @  X@`{  

    $           $    $    —    

  € =    

             #          



   ……     $   Ž   ‘# € =  ˆŠ™‚  $            $    

 } ‹#          _                    

 Ž ‘   # _           $          $  }                      $   €     

   @`                 €     $     

   …      € =           

                  #  

#   $  $@ @    @` š    <=        }  ……                    ……    $                      

   #’         $    $ 

                $$     

      # !       

           $ 

\šš

˜*œ˜_†œ|†

          

          

 

                                   !  

                #$%   #     

  

      $   $            

         #$ #     $  $         & 

   *         

        +  <=         >  >

   @    X>\^_`{ !  @    @     |}    }    

 ~   $  #                  <     |}                     $   >\^_`# € $           

  $                   $       <=

 #€ >\^_`    ~ $       $ $ ‚ # €   $    „   

„   \   * X„„\*{…† „ ‡ˆ          

        ‡ˆ‰         $  $   

             ˆŠŠ‰

  

    $ ’         $                      

    #

_         $   

 

  

€ =    

                 $  

 $     ‹#            

  

    # Œ   ‚‚ €  Œ    X€Œ{  

                

  

          ‹ #!  

        

  

  $   $    

       $     Ž‘           $    $               Œ                  $ $             #

      >\^_`<=    

        $  $           $ \  

             

          

|  ‹#’  $      

        „      

                    ~              >         # @  € =  …     *  !        ‹ #€    $   

 $          $ # €    $                            $             X   {                $  @       |    }                 `     #Ž` ‘       _            _              $                     $$            —          $            >          $       >      ~        

 $     #|            ‚‚‰ ˜†            

                                     Œ  ‚‚‰ ’=  _ +   ˜† 

             

      <                 $        

  _ +     #Œ                        ……       

       

  >     



       

       <=         >\^_` ’=  _ } @  @   › $ ˆŠŠŠ ‚‚

     

       

>       

   $   



       !  

           >                      

    $                  

  $  # $   $  

                

  $  

             #€ =   œ+€< =$    $  › … $š  _ „  €  @    #  $ #   $  €     

#„   }               }  

       $       Π       $      

  #                

  _                   $      $        }  †œš

CM Y K



          

            # #                   #    #        $  œ      >          #

  #   $          €  Œ              $                 

                  >     $ }  

                     $   $   „ „     #Œ   $   _  Œ     $~#     ž   €            $      $ 

           $            <     $“        €        

 #    #    €` 

             

 ~           $   $ #         #          !=   $               

 $#  # š     !=      €`       €      $     # #$ #  #€`  ’ }< < }Ÿ             #’                

     # >      $  €`          $ } <  *$    X@\{  >      }       $ 

   ~\    $    $    $  $     >   

          # €  # 

      >     $ Œ   €`               >         $    

       €`                    $            }  ~            >    €  ˜       €`                 >    ›  >           # #         $“       “    

      “           #  #  #   #……€`   $ #     …  # …… €`   $  †_ +     €`                   \ $      $       $  ~   #<      Œ       Œ$          

   „

              €` #  >    _ +   

 ~  €`       …   

        !  \  *€    ’€  $     $ $ 

     $  €`   €        

       $ #„   $$          #    >     €   €€`           $    $<   $ €`    >   \$ €`             $    #„  %       $    €` $         !    

    # !  ”   

  ! X>{  $ ¡ `}     $ $  €`   \   $         $  #_  €`Ž   €`     ‘      „ 

    <  ”           €`      #   >     *  ^=       

    €                     $

      #        

         @   @     $         #   ^=

 €`             >            $ $                 < Ÿ  

›  X!{    $@  @          €`  

 $        >       < Ÿ            €`  #š         š  

                   <    €` 

    #  €   < Ÿ                   $   €`                                $   €`    $      $$                       ~                                          Œ€`                                      $                                          $            #              #                    $        „ €`        $    @  @       Œ            $                 


S05-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:55

Page 1



    

        

_  ˜     

 …     <   

           Œ  #$ #      …š $  Œ         $  š ˆ‡       $  ~  —$                …      _˜          $        Œ  # #        !   œ   $      —$           …       $    $…         — $   ” @ ”       $               _˜   …      !    œ   _˜  $   …        $ …      $    $       …        $          <   ˜   —$      $  Œ    @   $         ‚‚Š…‚ˆ‚     $ @    $    …

 $     $ …  _     €             $  $    €            $     $ ‚ˆ   ‚‚ !      †  >  }         @          

 _  ˜      …   šˆ‡ _˜ …            !    …               …  $                 !      ~    —$    _˜@   $ ‚‚‡Œ ‚‚‡!   ~

      $         $  $         $    ”  !   # #          $   _˜                 —$    ……   $    $        ˜ Œ      _˜                           $     $   Œ  \     @} *$         $  _˜… @}    ›

` —$  ##  Œ    @} >     …                —$     $           <     @} $  _˜      ‹ # @} *$                                —$  @}    #„         _ …         š $          @}*$    

\šš

    

*_˜_*>

     !  " # $

    „  œ  …!                      >        <    !                  >  }         $    $         …         $     †   #„   —$    $     “     …            #   !     †          $  $ œ   @   €                    $   #Œ $†             $   ‡      $ 

             

           !"  

   #$        †      …    —$  # <     \    >  } $   …          } $  …      $       <<@        $ >  }       ……      Œ          @         ~  •…  $ $ 

CM Y K

Œ  ~  Œ      _˜<   … $    ˆŠ•– Œ              _ €   … $ Œ  $        …   _˜         _ …                        € <   

_ !  !  œ  œ \   — — — $      *  > >  ˜`          Œ *$     <  @   †   X  $       { Œ X     { >  X    …  {>        @} *$


S06-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:57

Page 1

    

 

 

 

 



—  Œ   $  ”   \   ˜       „ *<             ` ¢˜      <            $     }   ”  \         €$  ~ $               <     $  $~      \       £   £                   $             $ ¤‡‚‚‚ š  £$           $      $        <          “@      £† ~       

      œ    $            $   

  ”  \  @  €    $           

| $ ˜      $    Œ

     <           <   ˜     $    …  $   €             £      †  <œ£      $         ~   €  <               $        £              $             _  ›    !    X_œ›{                $       ’— ˆ‚ $        $ _œ›   ’—ˆ   @  £             š    >~                £                     $      …    

$;6*'9#6'4%11.'4

<82704; :DB4A \               $                   }     Œ               „  *  Œ     ˜  †                        

   

     ¥        …                     “              …

     “              ¦ „ €         ‚            …   }  \ £  ~ $                    …          ‡ 

$   $˜† Œ       ¥    œ $ —  — ¦   *                          ‹ ¥§—      £   $  @            @     <   ! @    $$  …   > Œ† ¦  <      ”  \   …    <    † ~   …  €         …   €   $   £     $           „   $ ”  \  $       | $ 

!    

                                                                 

% !  &   | Ÿ=         

      $ |…  $ €     …   $  €     €    

  $          Œ                               ¥€        

\šš

|>€ ¡|¡_`

                  $          ˆŠ™‡            # `= = Ÿ        ‹         €                     €=   €  <=  <   ^   $=  _  œ}  `  ` `= = `=   `=   `     †   †Ÿ >  > ¡ = ¡=  ’ } €         $                    $     $     €     €          <>   €   `= = Ÿ       ~      $    ‚‚‚    ¥Œ       $      

                 €        ¨…

 £ ¨ £         ¦ `= = Ÿ       ‹ ¥*           €` Ž  @   @  ‘ $      …          $ ¦ š   $       Œ   Œ   <   £ €  X©>|€{      €   ©>|€  ª  @ ›   €      …             \©>|€$ €   ™ $  “ …    $   €   >       €     ›                     …             $   ¥@       €                  _   

 €                  ‡‚‚       … ¦›      „  ©>|€£   

  ›          $  @     X©>€{    ~       $  …    $      ›   ©>|€   …  …     $                    ©>|€  $    $   …      €  

% ! &       '  %#        

+ /

     %      ;         $ <      =  >  '  %  ?;   @ ?; B & &    #   '     &  #$          $…… | $$      Œ              $        …       ¦  Ÿ=            „       ¥  $   ¦        …       $      €     £  ¥…  $   ¦€              $        …        …   >‰…•ˆŠ‡‡   | $ €     ` €+       *$$   œ  $ $$   $     | $   $ $˜            $   €  $     ¥  }¦ €          !$ ™ ˆŠŠ•  £«       $  € ! X>`{  …    …     $  „  X*{  

 $        _ … …@ €  €           …  !$™           €`   €                     !$ ™   Ÿ=       !$ ™   | $$     ¥ ¦  €     $     $    $ $    Œ     

  €  }  *=} €¢=          *        X’{     ~ $    !$™¥  ¦ ¥€          _  ˜  $ $   $ … ~    €   …  $€ $…

                       !$™       $| $¦€¢=  _   $             €`       ’  Ÿ     Œ    @   †X< {€`              $ 

  

          ’  Ÿ   €`       $ €     $$ | $        …          $                 €    … | $  ¥!                $                 €`             ¨ £€` ¦’  Ÿ <   ’  Ÿ€`                   $$           €   … Œ          Œ     ! XŒ!{                    

*   +     _   <$    … …   >$   ^=\   ~  …

   €        >$          $…   | $   €        

     $ $         ^= \   }     …          €     <$   €   $ | $$ …     €`   $           ¥ ¦$   ¥©>|€               

        £  

   £      >  $     £                  £€  £ ¦<$   !  `         ~    ©>|€£     …          ¥ | $         …                 ©>|€ —£     ˜>|€        –‚‚  $$     …  ˆ‰‡   ¦ Œ     

    £ † +} <                 

  €     ¥Œ€`   €            

    $ €               ¦


S07-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:58

Page 1

    

        

\šš

€—| ©†€—

 

    

       

’  $  $       @     $$  ~       $   $                     „       $  ”     …} $    $ $            €       …              $  $     $ …           …         …  $   

,   

  "  

/ ' #  '      / $ %#+    I   &   JLLNO  &   & '   $

 $      

   

      

  €  

        £                   £  

 €        $              $‚    $   $–‚   ‚‚™   ˜    €   @ $ X š<{@  ¡  <   > £       

 …   $ˆ‡  $ š $ ‚‚• ‚‚™           €  

 !           

 $  ‚‚™    $ˆ™     €     ˆ‡   

 

     ‚‚™            >   € œ    X|{ <             

 “       …         

 £   $ 

    }        €   

        ‚‚™  $ Š‚                  ¡ =  $=  <  \ > ¡=  œ}  _}=Ÿ ‰‚        <     …

ˆ–    £ˆ‰

   $  ™‰       $    Š‚     

       …        $  ‡     £    >         €      ™‰    £       $‰‚ …             @          –‚‚‚‚   ‡‚‚‚‚     $  ¥    $           ¦¡ =  @ $  €  @  \   $         \ …   £       >  €   ~Xœ€{  $      …            > ¥           ` „  £  Ž``‘

„       $     ¦                 …                   $ $  ™‚     

 £  $

  …

$              

 $   $     …  €     $ Š‚   ‚‚™          £ $    $ˆ    >   £         $‡‚‚‚‚        $™‰     

 ‚‚™   €         £     €   …       $  $      ’` –‚ ’` ‰‚      $           $          $$ 

    @  $   ~                >  $             >    š Xš{   | `  Ÿ  £ $    $‰              ‚‚™ £    $     $ ™  Š      †   £ 

     ™‚‚‚‚‚   `  Ÿ‹¥\            

    „        ˜> `}  *$ ¦ <             €         ‚‚™  $   ‚  ¥ˆ‡‚  

  }     –‚ …               £          ’` ‰ˆ  š     $ …   ¦€                  ’` ‡‚&   „          

         

€      

     >  <    $      ‚‚•£                     £ … ¥                             

    $     $              $ … ¦                                             …    “     $              ‚‚™                    !

     <   š       $       

     !  `  `= = ^ = = † 

€   `=   €  ’ }  €Ÿ = _}=Ÿ ŒŸ=  < ` $+

CM Y K

  

" ‡‚ ‡‚ –‚ ‡‚ –‡ ‰‚ ‰‚ ‚ •‚ ‰‡ •‚ ‰‡ ‰‚ ‚

!   

" ‡‚ ‡‡ –‚ ‡‚ –‡ ‰‚ ‰‚ ‚ •‚ ‰‡ ‰‚ ‰‡ … …

  $     $      …   ¥¦X

   {        ˆŠ••$_   $          †          ˆŠ‰‚                 

    …  }  £ $             …     š         >   $ˆ‡‚‚  _     $               @  $Œ £   >                †„  $     _ \   £   >           _ >      $         $   >  …      $   …                 …  $  >   $$ˆ‡Š‚™‚      >         $       _ €  ˆ‡‡•    ˆ‡Š•>     $             >          > £      _  ˜     > £  $        _  \     _         $      $

                        $  …     Œ  *   \       ~     _        

   

   @   $    …$                         …  …     $                  \    $    ˆŠ‰‚ ˆŠ•‚   ˆŠ™‚  œ            …     $  …          ˜     $                                $  

    $        …          _ €    Œ  €         ~ ‡     $£     Xœ{     $     $     …            …    …     $              $  $      …   …       …

    }                 £

        „                 £ …  

$ $    

  Œ    ……     $  ……  $ $   €           $         

$            …      

      >€ $            ` €$_ @X`€_@{

   ‚ˆ‰   ‚‚‚ …

    Œ      ‚     

 –‚‚‚‚‚         ` @      “$  …            ”} “       …$…  \ Š‚       £   …     €     ˆ–  ~ $$‚‚ œ    ~      Œ  >€ $ $  $ …     $ }          \    

                 $    …       Œ£          ’      …    $ €$$

         $                 Œ   >            … €              $  

$€} $~       $            …$         $    … $}…        @ < œ   $            >                  …>   —             

$ $ $ *                         $         $…         _    >  $      $  < }            $  ~        …          …      

$         $ \             …

   $     …      $  < } 

        …           $       * †    > € $“   …              `  ž      …                         $    Œ                $      $                }             …              $    

   }    …             $    …      <  £          

     > € $£  

         X‡  {      … >     …    $       >    $   …           $          

  $  …    €    ¥ £   $¦š          ‹¥_  ¦             


S08-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:59

Page 1

    

 

 



"       #         $ 

 \šš

>       …

               *$             > $ $#  #   …  $     <          $      €+  „        $            †  @   <}   –ˆ               <     <}  $           $      

         $…   $    ˆŠŠ™    !$ ™       

                     Π              

     … $     $ ! €=   `  ˆ         #Œ   €+ $Œ€ Ž`  ‘#   ˆŠ•ŠŒ       #!   Œ#<}    $                  >               @  @          …                  ……   $      >        $     $    …    …  !$™ #Œ ˆŠŠ™Œ …      | $ ˜    \ >

 ›   @ #   š   $        ”          $    …             $         „      …      …                    ~                 > …  $  * $      $    $                $         > $     # $  …  #    $       >          ” ‚‚‚                      …   $      <}          $   …            

š†˜*^š<€†



> Q &O              # /R#   %U &O       /R

 VL          '   &&    W '   O / X  /Q Z$       ˆ  ˆ‡ #Œ        $     Œ $ Œ   $ Œ 

 @

%>   Œ  $    …   $  Œ                Œ   $   # \          

’                            €        `+ #Œ    $    # >              

$     $$ >  

$                     €        #       …  #            >    $   …   $ $   $ …  €       }                    $~             $   $    …      Œ †  $ ˆŠŠŠ       $                  ˜   

           #Œ      Œ      #   <                $…     „             $  ––… …  ª 

<}          \       …            Œ  !$   ˆŠŠŠ     ˆ•         

     ˜    >    … ………     $ #Œ        Œ      # „    …       

          \         †  $  ‚‚‚          ~   €<   @††+              >              

   ‹#„     „     #Œ   …      $             $   …           $    $…            …           $  $   #         #   $                #             Ž   ›            ‘# …       $         

$   $                 

     €  Œ      \  *„X\*„{    …       >           $ \*„           @                                  <}             ‚‚‰  @    $ $  ~    _    €     X_€{               @                $ @  <}       $# $ #            #!         $    €          $               Œ …        # \    ª   <}   #„  “     Ž    ‘#                      $        ¤‡‚‚‚‚    @               $ @  <  <}     …

      #Œ    €+ #             …    $           €+           …

         #             €+ Œ                     $               Œ  €+     #

_      !      › _ Ÿ          $        `          $      <                       _ Ÿ   ‹ #„      $   ‚ˆ †    $  $        ‚ˆ „  $                     …  š  $                         Ž    ‘  # _       _ Ÿ    >     $        …  `     \   

          $             $             ˜†> @      ‚‚Š…‚ˆ‚   …            …

 _˜         <  ’== =                `      $   ‹ #Œ     $   `       š       # ’== =         #€  Ž $ ‘   ˆˆ         $  $   

"#  $%  &% "'(

\šš

     

˜ €!!_*>€—@Œš¬—˜

!  . /     

         ˜>                                 }     €       $# \ ª}        _   @     $    `     

 $@$    $  $$   $  

#€ $ $   $ $  ˜†>           Œ   $…     $             …`        $ #

CM Y K

*

        ~     `       ¤‚$ _ Ÿ …    $ ‚ˆ…   $             #@          ‚ˆ                # _ Ÿ                                 #    ~    $     $  š       $ …     }     }…     Ž $ ‘                       $  Œ           …        œ   $     …     $        # _ Ÿ $    `               

          $             $            $   $  Œ    $                            …‚ˆ           …          $      …‚ˆ    #„  $ $                      …  $    …     !   …

      $  …

      # _ Ÿ            …             $  }    $ ˆ…ˆ‚‚™ @       $      _ Ÿ‹#˜          `       $ \               š

    $          $                 …         

             §†                … ‚ˆ       #

/  1   ˜† `       ‹              ˜† !    @     @  @  X˜†!@@@{  ~      `          $       –•  …  }    _   …                     ‡    ˆŠŠ‚    …   ‚‚™…‚ˆ  ~   $      ˜†!@@@     …  }    $}               


S09-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

03:01

Page 1

 

    

 

 

   !      "#$%     



          &    &   #$ '( 



 . /  /+ /( *. 01) 

 

Â&#x20AC; $ Â&#x2026;    Â&#x2026;           ` ¢ Â&#x153;                     $        Â&#x201E;            ` ¢ Â&#x153;  $                     ~       _              Â&#x2026;                      Â&#x2026;             ` ¢ Â&#x153;    $       $  ~   Â&#x2026;      $   ~   $             Â&#x201E;           $                           ~     $ Â&#x2026;

  Â&#x201E;$Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;  

to protect and serve  

4

            $                                      \      $     Â&#x2026;          $                 $     $            $               Â&#x20AC;                                        Â&#x152;       Â&#x2026;    $                                $       Â&#x161;               $         Â&#x20AC;                                       $                   $Â&#x2026;    $          }       Â&#x2026;   X>!{        $                           >!Â&#x2013;Â&#x201A;     $                   $                                          $       $                Â&#x152;                 

    $   Â&#x20AC;  Â&#x2026;   >! Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;!   Â&#x2026; $ $  >!        Â&#x2013;Â&#x201A;  Â&#x2026; $           $              _         $             >!Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021; ~   $>! Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201A;       !   

  >!Â&#x2030;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2122; $  Â&#x2026;         >!Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;

- %( ) *. -/ *      Â&#x2026;   $   $         

   $      $                       Â&#x2026; }                    $ Â&#x2026;                    $             

    Â&#x2026;

       <                   Â&#x2026;    Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2039; _    

       $       Â&#x2026;            $    

Skincode for uneven pigmentation: YTL 87 Piz Buin tanner: YTL 87 Artistry MultiProtect SPF 30: YTL 47.79

 %( )  *+,#

3        

Â&#x201E;                 #\  Â&#x152;  %#                               Â&#x20AC;         $        <                   !                         

    <     $               Â&#x201E;    

#

 ' [  \ @  V  ' ]  J 

2#3  V ! V '  # V  [  \

 ' 

*3% #)

 # V &

 [ 

\ ! V '

&# ,

^& J ]'  J @  V  V 

                      $    ­      Â&#x2026;    }    Â&#x2026;         Â&#x161;   $          $                          Â&#x152; Â&#x152;           ~  

               \             $   Â&#x2039;

 )* / J  ' @  V 

2 #)  # V &

'  ' ! V '

CM Y K

Â&#x20AC;             $  ­Â&#x201E;Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2026; @             $       

  Â&#x201E;                  }        $    $        }  $Â&#x2026;              Â&#x201E; Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2026;@   $           Â&#x2026;   

  $  $     $ Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2026;@                 

                 $Â&#x2026;    Â&#x201E;   $         Â&#x2026; $ Â&#x2026;              Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2026;@     

  Â&#x2026; $    Â&#x2026;     Â&#x2039;XÂ Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2030;{Â&#x2013;Â Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â Â


S10-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

03:00

Page 1

10 SUNDAY’S ZAMAN

CULTURE&ARTS

SELAHATTÝN SEVÝ

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

CULTURAL AGENDA CONCERTS

PHOTO

Israel's Silver-Garburg Piano Duo will mark Israel's 60th anniversary with Turkish music lovers in four concerts. The duo will be performing the first concert on June 23 at Ýzmir's Ýsmet Ýnönü Art Center; the second on June 24 at Ýstanbul's Anadolu Club; the third on June 25 at Ýstanbul's Akbank Art Center, and the last concert will take place June 26 at 8 p.m. at Ankara's Bilkent Concert Hall. Scottish rock band Travis will take the stage at next Friday's Binboamania Fest at Ýstanbul's Parkorman, headlining a lineup to also feature live gigs by British cult rock band New Model Army, the Turkish alternative rockers Mor ve Ötesi and thriving indie rock band Sakin. The festival will open its doors at 4 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.biletix.com Folksong ensemble Kardeþ Türküler celebrates its 15th anniversary with a concert on Tuesday night at Ýstanbul's Turkcell Kuruçeþme Arena.

FESTIVALS The 36th Ýstanbul International Music Festival runs through June 30, offering 22 performances, including symphonic concerts, chamber music concerts, instrumental recitals and vocal ensemble concerts. Festival program at www.iksv.org/muzik/english/index.asp The 22nd Ýzmir International Festival runs until July 22, featuring 10 performances by internationally acclaimed performers in its lineup. For the full program, visit www.iksev.org/en/international_izmir_festival The 15th Aspendos International Opera and Ballet Festival in Antalya runs until July 3, featuring nine performances that include classics such as "Swan Lake," "Turandot," "Aida" and "La Bayadere." For a detailed program, visit www.aspendosfestival.org

MUSEUMS Ýstanbul's Pera Museum is currently hosting two exhibitions. The first is a collection of prints, paintings, sculptures and ceramics by 20th century Spanish artist Joan Miró and is on show until Aug. 31. The other collection, titled "Collage-Décollage," featuring the work of contemporary artists Burhan Doðançay and Jacques Villeglé, will be on display until July 13. Tel.: (212) 334 9900 The Rahmi M. Koç Museum in Ýstanbul is hosting the interactive exhibition "Brain: The Mysterious Journey" until June 30. Tel.: (212) 369 6601 Archaeological finds from Artemision, the Temple of Artemis near the Aegean archaeological site of Ephesus, are on display at an exhibition titled "Artemision: Temple of a Goddess" at the Ýstanbul Archaeology Museum. The museum is located on Osman Hamdi Bey Road in Eminönü. Tel.: (212) 520 7742 A collection called "Pinhole Photographs," showcasing 67 photographs taken using the "pinhole" technique, is on show at the Ýstanbul Museum of Modern Art until Aug. 24. Tel.: (212) 334 7300

EXHIBITIONS The Derinlikler Art Center in Ýstanbul's Teþvikiye district hosts a selection of the works of 26 master Turkish painters, including Devrim Erbil, Komet, Bedri Rahmi Eyüboðlu, Burhan Doðançay and Nuri Ýyem, until July 12. Open every day between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. except Sundays. Tel.: (212) 227 2664 The "Summer Mix" exhibition at Ýstanbul's Ýlayda Art Gallery runs until June 30, featuring works by 20 Turkish artists in the disciplines of painting, photography and sculpture. Open every day between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. except Sundays. Tel.: 227 9292 Photography artist Ahmet Naim Danýþoðlu is showcasing his collection titled "Recycling" until July 12 at the Leica Gallery in the Ýstanbul Photography Center in Beyoðlu. Tel.: (212) 238 1160

‘The Frozen Waterfall’ MARION JAMES ÝSTANBUL

Culture shock! The very words pull you up with a start. They call to mind confusion, depression, the shock of the new, isolation, strangeness and being a stranger. In the expat page of Today's Zaman, the weekday sister paper to Sunday's Zaman, articles often deal with culture shock. How non-Turks ("foreigners") perceive Turkey and the Turks, and how they adjust to the customs and ways of their host nation. But the mailboxes of Today's Zaman columnists reveal that the paper is also avidly read by the Turkish diaspora: those Turks who are expats, living in countries to the west or to the east of their native Turkey. From the gastarbeiters -- the semi-skilled guest workers who went to Germany in the 1960s -- to medical graduates going abroad to widen their skills base, many Turks live outside of Turkey. Do Turks, too, experience culture shock when they leave the lands of Anatolia to study or work abroad? If so, is it to the same extent as an expat in Turkey? The whole subject is treated expertly and sensitively by Gaye Hiçyýlmaz in her novel, "The Frozen Waterfall." Herself a Turk living in the UK, Gaye draws on her own experiences, and those of her friends, to tell us the story of Selda and her family. Selda, the youngest of the five children of Turgut Bey and Selda Haným from Ýzmir, lives with her mother, grandmother and sisters when her father and brothers go to work in Switzerland. As the years go by, and she only sees them on their annual trip to Turkey, she is pained to experience the change in their relationship. "Now, when she saw them on their summer visits, these brothers had become distant. They were more like relatives from another town. She hated it most when they talked

to each other in German, which she could not understand. She felt that they were shutting her out of their world, and she did not like being silent." Then, one day, the long awaited air tickets come, and Selda, her mother and sisters are to travel to Switzerland to be reunited with the men of their family. Hiçyýlmaz sensitively captures a young girl's nervousness about traveling abroad. Selda's grandmother sows the seeds of doubt in her mind with her prejudices about the Swiss. Foreigners, she claims, are not as clean as the Turks: "People say they walk straight from the street into their nice rooms with all the street filth still on their shoes." Mixed with the excitement of traveling, and being reunited with her father and beloved older brothers, is fear. Fear of the unknown, but also fear of losing touch with her friends. She exchanged addresses, and promises to write and remain friends forever, but deep down inside she knew many of her friends would never write. But Selda fears above all things failure. Inability to speak the language would hamper her -- "she would not be able to say anything at all in German, let alone anything clever." Her sisters' taunts underscored this insecurity. "You think you know everything, but you don't!" "I know more than you." "So what? You just wait. In Switzerland you won't know anything ... I expect we'll all be bottom of the class." Amidst all these fears of the future, Kemal Amca comes to the rescue with a special day tour around Ýstanbul. At night as he bids them

farewell he explains he showed them the Bosporus Bridge so that she could be proud of Turkey when in Switzerland, "and tell them that we too have fine things. You can tell them, but with a smile, that we are not some poor, forgotten people knocking like beggars at the door of their country, but that we too have made great things." Expectations and reality; hopes and disappointments; dreams and their semi-fulfillment. Even the flight to Switzerland is not as she had imagined. "In films, people always settled themselves coolly and elegantly into half-empty planes; they leant back in wide seats and sipped clear drinks as they watched magnificent views from the plane windows." Not struggling with getting hand-baggage into the overhead locker, and squeezing past a passenger sitting in the same row to reach your seat. It was pouring with rain when Selda and her female relatives arrived in Switzerland. Even her father looked different, with his beard. But she gasped in amazement when she saw the mountains, they were breathtaking, as was the lake which stretched farther than she could see in each direction. Her first day of school, as expected, was a day of not understanding. The teacher smiled kindly, and another pupil tried to help, but Selda understood nothing. Over the first few weeks and months things gradually became clearer, but they were still different. Hiçyýlmaz summarizes this clash between expectation and reality with the words, "She had known, of course, that this foreign country would be dif-

ferent, but she had not realized that everything about it would be so different. Now she felt that she had been foolish." Selda realized that to survive and learn she needed to be observant: her eyes had to do twice the work as her ears and tongue were temporarily redundant. It is this being struck dumb, the helpless sense of being unable even to express your wishes as a little child does, that is often the most serious contributor to culture shock for the expatriate. Selda finds a friend who empathizes as he, too, had been a foreigner in a strange land. "Only Ferhat understood, because he had lived it." But in the words of Ferhat's encouragement, it does get better. Selda finds her way to triumph through the difficulties. One of the crystallizing moments for her own understanding is when she sees, for the first time, a frozen waterfall. The relentless movement of water, stopped by the winter freeze, seemed to her a picture of her own life in culture shock. "There, at the top, where the water first fell over the edge, was the frozen waterfall. It was as though the stream had stopped and hung there in the air, like the swelling crest of a winter wave in wind-whipped Ýzmir Bay. But this wave had not rolled on. It had not broken and foamed against the rocks; it hung there, just under the sky." Selda finds the key to understanding her anguish in her new setting as she watches the frozen torrents that pour forth no more. As her experiences in "The Frozen Waterfall" are like a mirror to the pain an expatriate feels, this wonderful story can help many readers enunciate their emotions, and begin to find their own way like Selda to flourish where they are planted. "The Frozen Waterfall" by Gaye Hiçyýlmaz, Published by Faber & Faber, 6.99 pounds in paperback, ISBN: 978-057119495-7

YOUR ENGLISH BOOKSTORE ! Visit our boutique store: including family area for parents, children and youth. Dumlupýnar Sok No 17, Kadýköy, Ýstanbul Call us on 0216 550 4961 for directions.

Open Mon-Sat (except Tues): 10:30-18:30 We can ship books to your door. Email requests to serakitapevi@superonline.com

‘CROSSFIRE'

‘KING OF ITHACA'

by Andy McNab Published by Transworld 6.99 pounds in paperback Fiction: thriller

by Glyn Iliffe Published by Macmillan 12.99 pounds in paperback Fiction: historical

Body-guard to a TV crew on the streets of war-torn Basra, the life of ex-operator Nick Stone is saved by a reporter's swift action as a roadside bomb explodes. When the man vanishes within hours, Stone is asked to find him. The trail leads from Iraq to Bermuda, London and Kabul.

It was a time of myth and mystery. It was a time of heroes. Greece is a country in turmoil, divided by feuding kingdoms and desires for wealth, power and revenge. When Eperitus, a young exiled soldier, comes to the aid of a group of warriors in battle, his incredible adventures start.

CM Y K

‘PUTIN AND THE RISE OF RUSSIA'

‘FAME SCHOOL STAR MAKER'

by Michael Steurmer Published by Orion 20 pounds in hardback Current affairs

by Cindy Jefferies Published by Usborne 4.99 pounds in paperback Children aged 11+

The country that came in from the cold. a brilliant analysis of Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin and the key role a resurgent Russia has to play in world affairs. The questions remain about what constitutes Russia's national interest. This is an insightful biography of a truly global figure.

Since Tara and her band won the international Battle of the Bands competition, they've become famous across the country and in huge demand. But Tara hates being in the limelight and is dreading performing at a massive summer concert. This is the 11th book in this smash-hit series.


S11-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:59

Page 1

CULTURE&ARTS

The ongoing Ýstanbul International Music Festival will reintroduce çeng -the long-forgotten Ottoman-era classical music instrument from the harp family -- to the world music lexicon next week, one of the festival’s many “benefits” as its slogan suggests. Audiences will witness the rebirth of the çeng in the historical atmosphere of Hagia Eirene on Tuesday night when composer Hasan Uçarsu’s “Concerto for Harp, Çeng and Orchestra” gets its world premiere with a performance by harpist Þirin Pancaroðlu, accompanied by the Tekfen Philharmonic Orchestra. The concert starts at 8 p.m. and is aptly titled “Old World, New World.” It also features Tchaikovsky’s “Capriccio Italien, Op. 45” and Dvorak’s “Symphony in E minor, Op. 96, No. 9” from “The New World” in its program. The project to reintroduce the çeng to classical music listeners is the brainchild of Pancaroðlu, Uçarsu and instrument producer Mehmet Söylemez. The concerto, titled “Davetsiz Misafirler” (Home Crashers), following its world premiere, will get its first performance abroad in July in Amsterdam as part of the upcoming 10th World Harp Congress. The çeng, or Turkish harp, believed to have descended from ancient Near Eastern instruments, was a popular instrument in the Near East and Ottoman culture until the 17th century, when it began to lose its popularity. The word comes from the Persian word “chang,” which means “harp.” The basic aim of the project is to turn the çeng back into a part of musical culture. The 30-minute “Concerto for Harp, Çeng and Orchestra” has been composed in two different arrangements, one for a symphony orchestra and the second for a chamber orchestra. Composer Uçarsu explains how he brought together the harp and the çeng, which are, after all, related to one another: “I had before me two different instruments and two different cultural worlds represented by these instruments. … With its mechanical system and improved modern capacity, the harp is actually more suited to concertos. As for the çeng, which is more Eastern and has been forgotten, it possesses a calmer, more serene, contemplative nature. It is an instrument that pursues a deeper strain of thinking. Anyway, it’s for this reason that for hundreds of years, its sounds accompanied high-level meetings [in the Ottoman court],

SUNDAY’S ZAMAN 11

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

Þirin Pancaroðlu

breathes new life into Turkish harp The 5,000-year history of the çeng The harp, which throughout history has appeared in various civilizations in many different forms and sizes, was also used in Mesopotamia. The çeng was first seen in Iran around 3,000 B.C., and around the sixth century it earned its more delicate form seen in miniatures. This instrument, which was at the peak of its popularity during the Middle Ages, arrived in Ottoman musical culture by way of Iran. Until its disappearance in the last quarter of the 17th century, the çeng was an indispensable part of traditional Ottoman music. The çeng’s popularity began to dwindle with the spread of the ud, the Turkish lute. The çeng, which over centuries became thinner and thinner as an instrument, also became more and more difficult for people to play. Unable to compete with the ud in terms of keeping in tune, the çeng lost its popularity over time. The last written source that speaks about the çeng is Evliya Çelebi’s 17th century “Seyahatname” (Book of Travels). According to Çelebi, while there were many ud players to be found in Ýstanbul in 1660, there were only around 10 çeng players to be heard in the city.

CM Y K

or gatherings of poets, artists and philosophers.” Uçarsu’s concerto, inspired by Ottoman music, will be presented to audiences in its final form as a modern piece that contains traditional timbres. Says Uçarsu: “During the composition of this piece, I thought about how these two separate instruments could express the differing cultural values they represented, and so I based the concerto on a widened and freer interpretation of Ottoman instrumental music.” A recording of the concerto will be made in collaboration with the Ýstanbul Technical University’s (ITÜ) Center for Advanced Studies in Music (MIAM) in the days following the premiere. Pancaroðlu, the general architect of the project, first came across the çeng in Ottoman miniatures. Pancaroðlu, praised by The Washington Post as being “a great talent of international caliber,” says she was very excited to discover the existence of this small harp in the Ottoman-Turkish culture, although it had been almost entirely forgotten during the last few centuries. She explains that because the word “harp” itself is not a Turkish word, she has seen many people in Turkey confusedly mistake the harp for a “foreign” musical instrument. Pointing out that Turkish culture does indeed have its own version of the harp, the acclaimed virtuoso says: “This is actually an instrument that has a place in the music of almost every Eastern culture. It was brought to the West through Hellenistic culture. And thus the West, in naming it the harp, actually took this instrument over as its own and developed it, bringing it to where it is today.” Further following the traces of the instrument in the Near East, Pancaroðlu found out that the çeng had also inspired many different branches of art. “Its body, unlike the Western harp, has a long, beautiful, lightly bent appearance, and just as the çeng was a fixture of many miniature paintings from the 14th to the 17th centuries, it was also a very popular motif among poets of the time. A poet from Bursa named Ahmed-i Da’i wrote in the 14th century his ‘Çengname,’ a poem that uses the çeng to talk about life philosophy.” The final traces of the çeng are found in Ýstanbul, and they date as far back as 350 years, Pancaroðlu explains. “We know, for instance, that the çeng used to be played in the Ottoman court, or even by the women in the harem.” Ýstanbul Sunday’s Zaman


02:54

Page 1

12 SUNDAY’S ZAMAN

June 14 A cargo train was hit by a mine blast on a track in the southeastern province of Muþ injuring three railway workers were injured, security sources said. The outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) is thought to have planted the mine. June 15 Top aides to Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert traveled to Turkey to resume indirect peace talks with Syria, Israeli media reported. The television reports said the aides, Yoram Turbovitch and Shalom Turgeman, had arrived in Turkey to resume the talks. Two goals in the last three minutes gave Turkey a remarkable 3-2 win over the Czech Republic in a winner-take-all Euro 2008 thriller, earning a quarterfinal meeting with Croatia. Turkey finished with six points, three ahead of the Czechs, who were eliminated along with co-hosts Switzerland. Some 1.53 million high school graduates planning on pursuing a higher education vied in the national Student Selection Examination (ÖSS) in all provinces and districts of Turkey and in Nicosia, the capital of the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (KKTC), as well as Geneva, where three Turkish national soccer team players took the exam. Eight people were injured in a blast in a cafe in Ýstanbul’s Beylikdüzü district. The cause of the blast, which damaged the cafe and neighboring buildings, was unknown. Earlier tensions in relations with neighboring countries have been gradually disappearing, Iraqi Kurdish leader Massoud Barzani said, noting that these relations are improving. Barzani was speaking with executives from his Kurdistan Democratic Party’s (KDP) offices at a meeting held in Salahaddin, Arbil. “Tension with some neighboring countries has begun to disappear and relations are changing for the better,” Barzani added, in apparent reference to relations with Turkey. Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Barham Salih expressed willingness to include Turkish companies in new tenders to develop the country’s oil and gas fields, calling Turkey a gateway for Iraq to open up to Europe. “I spoke with Energy Minister Hilmi Güler and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoðan and told them that we have been planning to include some major Turkish companies on the list of companies which will invest in the Iraqi oil sector,” Salih was quoted as saying in an interview with news station NTV over the weekend. US Democratic presumptive presidential nominee Barack Obama voiced support for the Ýstanbul-based Greek Orthodox Patriarchate, calling on Turkey to grant religious freedom to the patriarchate. Obama’s remarks came in an interview with the Greek bureau of Voice of America, Greek media reported over the weekend. The Justice Ministry released a statement announcing that it has no authority to give orders to public prosecutors, in response to an appeal from the Constitutional Court for the justice minister to start legal probes into publications critical of the court’s recent rulings. June 16 The ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) submitted its final written defense in the closure case filed against it at the Constitutional Court. The AK Party turned in its defense statement ahead of the deadline in an attempt to speed up the legal process to avoid lingering ambiguity. M.D., a patient suspected of having Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF), died in the central Anatolian city of Konya. EU foreign ministers agreed to ease the economic isolation of Turkish Cypriots via adopting certain amendments to the EU’s Green Line Regulation, which was approved back in 2004. The measures “aim at enhancing trade and economic integration on the island,” the EU ministers said in a statement, adding that they would help “support” both Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot leaders in finding a negotiated settlement to end the 34-year division of the island. The unemployment rate increased to 10.7 percent as of March 2008, up from 10.4 percent in the same period of last year, the Turkish Statistics Institute (TurkStat) announced. Joining other independent central banks across the world in a move in line with market expectations, the Turkish Central Bank raised its key interest rate by 50 basis points to 16.25 percent in a bid to fight

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

ALMANAC

Event of the week TODAY’S ZAMAN

21.06.2008

Newspaper exposes secret military plans to ‘remake' society An alleged military plan to reshape society made its mark this past week. The Taraf daily claimed in a report on Friday that the Turkish Armed Forces (TSK) had devised a comprehensive secret plan of action to intervene in politics and civilian life, basing its story on a leaked military document. According to the document, the military's "Information Support Activity Action Plan" went into force in September 2007 and is composed of a series of "measures" against the government, which the military deems the source of a "religious reactionary movement." Taraf's story comes at a time when the Constitutional Court is at loggerheads with the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government; last month the court annulled a bill sponsored by the AK Party that would have allowed the Muslim headscarf to be worn on university campuses. The Turkish General Staff released a statement on Friday afternoon denying Taraf's report. "There is no such official document approved by the commanding ranks in General Staff records," the statement said. The military document Taraf published defines the plan's goals as "bringing public opinion into line with the TSK on issues the TSK is sensitive about, preventing the development of incorrect opinions about the TSK, ensuring the unity and solidarity of opinions and actions within

PHOTO

S12-22-06-08.qxd

the TSK." The same introductory chapter issues a caveat, stressing the need to avoid "conflict with other state agencies" and also avoid "the image of intervening in daily politics." The plan also emphasizes that it is necessary to "bring universities, presidents of the higher judiciary, press members and artists into line with the TSK because they have the power to influence public opinion, and to ensure that these individuals act in the same way as the TSK." Of note is a secret meeting between Constitutional Court Justice Osman Paksüt and Land Forces Commander Gen. Ýlker Baþbuð, also recently exposed by Taraf. The plan claims the AK Party government and its municipalities are organizing activities to spread an Islamic lifestyle in society. The document also defines a new constitution drafted by the AK Party as against the idea of "nation-state."

soaring inflation stemming largely from high energy prices. June 17 The Turkish General Staff said a group of Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) terrorists had been killed in northern Iraq. A statement posted on the General Staff’s Web site said close to 21 members of the outlawed PKK were killed late on Monday as the group attempted to infiltrate Turkey from northern Iraq. Turkey opened accession talks with the European Union on two more negotiating chapters and urged France, a firm opponent of Turkish membership that will take over the bloc’s presidency next month, not to raise obstacles to further progress in the slow-moving accession process. “We expect that the French presidency will be a fair, impartial and transparent presidency as we have been told on various occasions. We believe our EU accession process will be further advanced during the French presidency,” Foreign Minister Ali Babacan told a joint press conference with his Slovenian counterpart, Dimitrij Rupel, whose country holds the EU’s rotating presidency,

after an accession conference in Luxembourg. The Ankara Chief Prosecutor’s Office announced that President Abdullah Gül cannot be prosecuted in connection with an embezzlement case for which a former prime minister is currently under house arrest. The prosecutor noted that under Turkey’s current Constitution, the president cannot be tried for any allegation other than treason. Presumptive US Democratic presidential nominee Obama once again voiced commitment to the official recognition of an alleged genocide of Armenians in the final years of the Ottoman Empire. In a letter sent to an influential Armenian diaspora lobbying group, Obama said he shared the group’s view that Washington “must recognize the events of 1915 to 1923, carried out by the Ottoman Empire, as genocide.”

the reporters in the Ugandan capital of Kampala, set to host a meeting of OIC foreign ministers, Ýhsanoðlu said Muslim countries also fully supported Turkey’s bid for a non-permanent seat on the UN Security Council. The UN is confident that a revived peace process will conclude in a deal that has so far proven elusive to reunify the ethnically divided island of Cyprus, UN Undersecretary for Political Affairs B. Lynn Pascoe said. Speaking at a news conference in Nicosia at the end of a two-day visit to the island, Pascoe said there are “huge expectations” internationally that “Cyprus will make it this time” after 34 years of repeated failures to reach a UN-brokered agreement.

June 18 Organization for the Islamic Conference (OIC) Secretary-General Ekmeleddin Ýhsanoðlu said that Arab countries had received “very positively” Turkish mediation in Israeli-Syrian peace talks, expressing hope that the talks would yield a favorable result. Speaking to

June 19 Turkey’s most influential business organization, the Turkish Industrialists and Businessmen’s Association (TÜSÝAD), proposed holding a convention for a new constitution that would bring together all segments of the political spectrum and society. The convention, TÜSÝAD suggested, would be made up of 50 members, three-fifths of whom would be representatives from political parties. The rest of the members would be representatives of civil society organizations and the academic world from various segments of society. The convention could work for 18 months, TÜSÝAD suggested, to draft a new constitution for Turkey that would meet international standards. Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoðan said fatal accidents at shipyards in Ýstanbul’s Tuzla district have recently overshadowed Turkey’s success in the shipbuilding sector. Erdoðan was speaking at a meeting held at Ýstanbul’s Dolmabahçe Palace with a number of ministers and representatives from shipyard unions to discuss recent worker deaths at the notorious Tuzla shipyards. The European Parliament warned that the closure of Turkey’s ruling AK Party could bring membership negotiations with the candidate country to a halt, adding to European criticism of the court case, as Washington urged Turkish judges to heed the electorate’s choice while deciding the final verdict. Hans-Gert Poettering, president of the European Parliament, dismissed prospects for terminating accession negotiations with Turkey because of institutional problems faced by the 27nation bloc in the aftermath of rejection of a reform treaty for the EU in a referendum in Ireland over the weekend.

REUTERS

Photo of the week

PHOTO

Turkey marches into semifinals of UEFA Euro 2008 Turkey equalized in dramatic style with the last kick of extra time before beating Croatia on penalties after their breathtaking Euro 2008 quarterfinal ended 1-1 on Friday night. The Turks, who also reached the semifinals of the 2002 World Cup, now meet Germany in Basel on Wednesday. Extra time had finished in heart-stopping fashion after an absorbing encounter with two goals in the last three minutes. Ivan Klasnic headed Croatia in front at the near post after a good run and cross by Luka Modric in the 119th minute. But there was still time for comeback king Turkey, which twice rallied from behind to win in the group stages, to equalize in nerve-tingling style as Semih Þentürk's left-foot shot took a deflection past keeper Stipe Pletikosa. Croatia then made a mess of the penalty shootout, with Luka Modric and Ivan Rakitic missing the target before Turkey's 3-1 shootout victory was clinched when Rustu Recber saved from Mladen Petric. Turkey trio Arda Turan, Semih Senturk and Hamit Altintop were all successful with their spot kicks. "We fought and fought and the players keep outdoing themselves, said Turkey manager Fatih Terim. "Our people can celebrate now. This victory is very important for us. If our people are proud of us then we're proud of our people."

June 20 A forest fire that erupted in the Gelibolu (Gallipoli) district of the western province of Çanakkale on Wednesday was brought under control. A statement released by the Forestry and Environment Ministry said the fire affected 80 hectares of red pine forest area. The role played by Turkey in its region is greatly appreciated by neighboring countries, which have encouraged Ankara to use its clout to resolve more disputes in the area, Foreign Minister Babacan said. Babacan made his comments to reporters on the sidelines of a foreign ministerial-level meeting of the OIC, also saying that many of topics on the OIC agenda were related to the geography surrounding Turkey. The Constitutional Court granted an extension of the deadline for the pro-Kurdish Democratic Society Party (DTP), facing closure, to prepare the oral defense it will argue before the court.

CM Y K


S13-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:56

Page 1

TRAVEL

SUNDAY’S ZAMAN 13

S U N D AY, J U N E 2 2 , 2 0 0 8

Waterfalls by the Munzur Mountains TODAY’S ZAMAN, CÝHAN

Kemaliye’s historic homes

PHOTOS

Historic structures by the Munzur Mountains

Kemaliye’s Stone Road

Kemaliye’s Dark Canyon

Gateway to the Stone Road

KEMALÝYE

Kemaliye has two particularly strong selling points, the first of which is the natural beauty of its location amid the lush greenery and superb unspoiled scenery of the Munzur Mountains. The air up here is enthrallingly fresh, and this is a great place for lovers of outdoor activities, with possibilities for walking, climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, even hang-gliding

PAT YALE KEMALÝYE

Wow! It's not often that travel writers find themselves at a loss for words powerful enough to describe what they've seen, but when they do you can be sure that they've stumbled upon something truly amazing. On the bus into Kemaliye, I'd heard fellow passengers muttering about the Taþ Yolu (Stone Road), and had thought it sounded rather romantic, a bit like the Ýpek Yolu (Silk Road), which has always had the power to conjure up exotic images of Oriental fantasy. Common sense told me that was probably nonsense. It was a road, after all, and presumably one that lacked asphalt. Then I glimpsed the Taþ Yolu, an extraordinary feat of human endeavor that exceeded my wildest imaginings. Let's rewind a bit. The Taþ Yolu is a road that links Kemaliye in Central Anatolia with Divriði, the remote town, sort of near Sivas, that just happens to possess, in the 13th century Ulu CamiDarüþþifa complex, Turkey's most unexpected world heritage site. It's a road that was more than a century in the making, and when you see it you can immediately understand why. It trundles along a ridge high above the Euphrates (Fýrat) River, and, in the course of its progress, passes through a phenomenal 4,722 meters of separate tunnels, each one of them laboriously hacked out of the mountainside. As if that in itself were not enough, the road and the tunnels pass through the so-called Karanlýk Kanyon (Dark Canyon), a rocky gorge so deep that the sun barely penetrates its bottom, with the river sauntering through it a great deal more calmly than it has any right to. The Taþ Yolu and the Karanlýk Kanyon are names that should be on every tourist's lips. So why aren't they? Well, it probably comes down to their location. Tell a friend that you're going to

Kemaliye, and 99 times out of 100 the response will be a blank look, followed by a quick, "Where's that?" Flick through the indices of the main guidebooks aimed at foreign visitors -Lonely Planet, Rough Guide or the Blue Guide -and you won't find one word about Kemaliye. Look in Âzer Bortaçina's "Doðu Anadolu" (Eastern Turkey) guide, on the other hand, and you will find more than 20 pages devoted to it. Something wrong somewhere, surely? The reasons Kemaliye has slipped below the foreign tourism radar are probably twofold. In the first place, it's not very easy to get to. Although it's now possible to drive there from Divriði, Divriði itself is pretty hard to reach. There are daily minibus services from Erzincan, Elazýð and Malatya, but they're somewhat unreliable. The bus service I planned to take from Malatya, for example, was cancelled, whereupon I found myself redirected to a carpet shop and thence to a nearby car park. From there a minibus eventually conveyed me to Kemaliye, a sequence of developments that it would have been pretty tough for someone with no Turkish to work out. The second reason also has to do with location, although in a rather different sense. Look for Kemaliye on a map and you will see that it's fairly close to Tunceli, a town that acted as the northwestern outpost of the troubles that tore the southeast of Turkey apart in the 1990s. Kemaliye itself had nothing to do with this, but inevitably fell victim to the security arrangements that bedeviled traveling around this part of Turkey until quite recently. Now suddenly Kemaliye is waking up to its tourism potential. It has two particularly strong selling points, the first of which is the natural beauty of its location amid the lush greenery and superb unspoiled scenery of the Munzur

Mountains. The air up here is enthrallingly fresh, and this is a great place for lovers of outdoor activities, with possibilities for walking, climbing, kayaking, mountain biking, even hang-gliding (although you can also take a less energetic boat ride through the Karanlýk Kanyon). In spring and early summer the yaylas (high plateaus) break out in a rich carpet of wild flowers. A few lucky visitors may even get to spot the wild goats that live on the mountainside. But Kemaliye is also a town with a history. As Eðin, it was a place with a mixed Turkish and Armenian population, which had its name changed to Kemaliye in 1922 to commemorate its part in the Turkish War of Independence under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. Traditionally, local houses were built from wood and stone. The ground floor was made of stone interspersed with strips of mulberry wood, while the second floor, which would have accommodated the family's living quarters, was usually made of wattle and daub faced with wood. Some houses had a third floor, while almost all of them had an open-sided loft area edged with wood. Their huge doors were studded with hand-carved nails and adorned with intricate metal door knockers; the

TIPS

WHERE TO STAY

Bozkurt Otel Tel.: (446) 751 2551 Haci Ömer Konukevi Tel.: (532) 214 8456 Bahçeli Evi Tel.: (446) 751 2065

HOW TO GET THERE One afternoon bus from Erzincan, Elazýð and Malatya at 3:30 or 4 p.m., returning at 6 a.m. Car rental to explore villages and Taþ Yolu: Kanyon Rent A Car in Kemaliye Tel.: (446) 751 2025

upper knockers were designed to give off a deeper sound than the lower ones, thereby enabling people to know immediately whether a man or woman was at their door. You'll still find many of these houses surviving today, especially if you wander up to the upper part of town. Upper Kemaliye harbors two fine mosques, the Tasdibi and Orta Camis. A mountain stream pours down beside the Orta Cami, ensuring that those inside have the sound of gushing water as a constant backdrop to their prayers. Just below the Orta Cami, a restored flourmill is back in noisy business, while across the way the attractively decorated Lökhane serves freshlymade fruit juices and "lök," a sweet made from mulberries mixed with walnuts. On the outskirts of town heading for Malatya you'll see an especially fine stone building with what looks like a wooden gazebo on its roof. This was once the Armenian church and now houses a small, rather dusty museum of local ethnographic artifacts. But you certainly shouldn't end your visit without heading out to some of the surrounding villages, which, with their cobbled streets and rickety houses, have a wonderfully rustic charm about them. In an afternoon you can easily drive round Apcaða, Ergü, Kozlupýnar and Yeþilyurt Villages, places where old men and women sit for hours doing nothing at all, where a puppy snoozes beneath the makeshift kennel of a donkey saddle, where a donkey feasts on fallen mulberries, and where an invitation to coffee can wind up with the reading of the grains ("dollars coming your way, along with two suitors"). Unfortunately, even in the villages it's almost impossible to find an old wooden building that has not been faced (or defaced) with what the locals call "saç," ugly corrugated iron without which -- or so they assure visitors -- the many semi-abandoned houses might long since have collapsed. Kemaliye is hardly some forgotten mountain Shangri-La then -- and the arrival of a high-rise Housing Development Administration of Turkey (TOKÝ) development is surely to be lamented -- but it's still the sort of place where a travel writer can arrive planning to stay for two days and still be there a week later.


S14-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:54

Page 1

    

        



 $ 

* +       , . š€’£> €€†

  

\šš

—  …         $                        €     ……@< _ * ˆŠ–‰

"                  €              $   

        $    >  X{   ”       X€` {          <   ~                  €` $           `          „  $          $ $       $         …  $    *   $            Œ         

               `  $  `             $          \  

                  $        ”  $}   $=        ~#>  €   ~†€  #      $               „>  €    ~Xœ€{ $  $   $>+            ˆŠ‰‡ ~       _   

            

                             œ€   ~š          ~ …     $@         ˆŠ•‚    

  ˆŠ™‚      ˆŠŠ‚ $              $\               $      ~ œ€   

      „   $     ~   _  *    

  ~  * 

                     œ€   $         $   ª}   $ $*_  Ÿ           

  ! @                  $       $  <$ $

 ~       Œ                Œœ€ ~ }        $      Œ  $     $     “          $

;(). #  - ;%% "'   .   #/  ( . (.  < *    %3)=  % !>

     }                       „      

4  5 !                     ~     

    ˜  $}        $

Π   

    `=}=†$ “¡= | @} > “ $= <  >    $ 

        

     ~     $ ˆŠ‰‚

      $   „

      

    ^  $           _   „ 

  ~  }  $                 $             „ }   ~         $

  Œ   –™    $     ~€         ~$           ’—–‚$ Œ          •$    X„{$      $      ˜   œ} ˜    \

 ˜       $      _

6&1                    $              @                 $                                    

    

                            $  \            $        !               š$   

 $                     Π      $   $  $                   $           

                       $  †              <  $           Œ $       `                        $                     < $      „             $                                „  $                 $ $      Œ   $  $  $

                     _ *     ˆŠ‡` *   | | µ +_ *  @<      ª}       

     $                /24 6   7

 

    

Œ    €  !      †  

~  _   @     Œ   #† #         $$   $      _  ”  ˆ ‚‚™      $   $      _   †        $             _  ˜        

 ˆ‚ X     {             $    <       €          *                † _……_˜  $  ……             @    Œ                $     

   _ ­ „  Œ        $          @  _˜              $          †<      _  $            $             „  $ <      !            _                     #_   #    $       $ ~       † $~   $$     $                    €     _     $ ‹     $        Œ        $       

         _˜  $           ‚   €  ˆŠ™Š     _˜        $ $         _   •  $      $         ……      }       ……  „$   Œ     % ˆ{€ _     $   

    $  ” ˆ  $                   }  _˜          $   } œ    Œ   $ ~  {  _˜              

$       $  _˜     

    $    $   #†   #    $ <   $  –{_˜    …}  $ $    Œ      $  …  }                  !   œ <  <  œ    œ                _˜€ … $    _˜       {€       _˜œ  …!  

     Œ      $ œ   !                 $ _˜<    †  _˜           ‹ _˜     _˜ @  < _  _ @    _  !   €            _˜ ‡{„  _˜      >    … Œ       $        _    

~    _          _    $         X    { 

_˜                         $  Œ     #† #          _˜ <                              †     $   @           _    $ $      ‹  $                 @   $      ˜  >       %€       …  $

  … $      _   ~      !    "

   #$$%  &(() " *  +   &(          

%&' (

"  )

      

    

    

 

š   < !}œ}€¡

$% &!'$'( @_ š 

)&)* +'*,$_ … …@

!.$),( &),)/ _ _ !+'$$3 !:;&'(   _  :&, '+: !<<)= >(* +)*%)$$% )*3 .$&) €  *    &)%* !$ †_ =:, :=; +:?, < †_ %!3%* (.&*), @ ´€ _ =<)*%, @.&, ! _

-, A''' @@ _ 3)$), B !)((< œ    >'& &+-C @  š =&' /%*/)& @  š !)=('$$3 +)*% <     3=+ +''<:= * $    *    š  $% :+!/$* @ Œ   ‹$ ‹   \  ‹ £   –ˆŠ’ $  Œ>€†<˜— † $ ‹ ³Š‚ˆ‡ˆ!‹‚ˆ‡ˆŠ•„$€ ‹‹&& }      ‹!}œ}€¡ €     ‹³Š‚ˆ‡™• !‹³Š‚ˆ‡™‰––    $$   

CM Y K


S15-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:39

Page 1

 

    

 

 

" 

            $  $        ย…$                 ยŒ   ย„   ย…    $$         !     $                X $    {         ย…        ย…        $      ย„       _   ย˜       

 

#$    # X ยซ            {     ยš        $    ~           #>    $          #              ยœ   ย€ $ \ย’       $    ย“      $          ย…   $  $                                                       $

       @  ย€ @  _   ย† ย€ #   #   <

0=3A4F 58=:4;

3>รฆD 4A6รง;     

 

          ย…             ยŒ   $        

       >               ยŒ       $   ย…

     !             ยŒ    } $       $$  ย…               ย…          @         #              ย…  }  # Xย€  ย‰{   $       ย…            ย…

 X  {  }                ยˆยŠย•ย‚ ยˆยŠย™ย‚ 

         }               $    ย€                            ยœ  >  @        $   &$   ย†         $        ~         $      $ ยย•           ยย‚ย‚ย•          ~       ย…          ย… $  ย€`                                $       ยŒ             #     #  $ย…

     $    ย…   X  ~ {         $        ยœ            ย…                           

/ * 

  #  $#           $ ย‹         $ $#  #    ย… $ ~           $                   \                                   #  #        $             $ $        ย…                  >        Xยญ{ $ $ $   $          $  

         #  #ยŒ   $  $             ย„      %  @   #         $          #Xย€ ย–{\ $      $                 } $   X  {       

12//34"35

      

    

0  $ ,  

6  5,

      ยŒ          >$  !    ~  ย…  }$ ย”  ย€  Xยœ@{ >$         ย… Xยˆย™ยย–{          ยš   

     # ย…   #   ##\     $| $@ยŸ ยŸ   | $      !> $  ย…     ย—!>                   ยŒ ~           $       _    $ ยŒ       $            >$       $ยŒ  ยŒ       #*  ย”ย—  ย…ย… ย’   

#   $         ยŒ   +  ยข \+

   $  $ย…

          ย…           ย… $ย†           ย…

   ย’  > $ ย”      ยˆย       ย‡            | $    $         ย€    |}            \+

    ย‡ย‚ย‚ย‚        ยœ}  +  ยข$   >        ~ $     >                   \                 $                            ยŒ   $                  ย„      $                 $ #_  ยŒ  ยŒ  $     #   ยœ}            } $ย…  ~       ยœ}              $\+

$                

                 ~       $         $     $ *         }     $ย…       ยŒ               ย…         ย—             ยš   ยŒ  ~  ย…       }   ย…

    _ _    $    $      ยŒ  $ $ ย…      $   $   ย…  ยŒ < $            $     ย…        $  !  _           ยš          ย…    ~    $                   ~~         $     

รง7B0= H8;<0I

!

 ,   5รง:A4C 4AC0=     

>             $         ยŒ            \  ย…  ยœ}>     $   ยŒ $       ยž         ย…        $  $_   $      ยŒ    \ ยŒ  

  }ย…           }    ย€    _   ย…       $ ยŒ  \  

  ยŒ  $     ย…      $   $           $ย…   $             $       }        > ยŒ                  $           ยž     ย…   $      ยŒ ยŒ  $  $           $     ย…ย…    $   _<     ยŒ $           ยž   $   

 <  ย† > ยŒ      ย€  \  $    

  ยœ}>   $ยฅ               <        ยš               ยž             $                                       ย…           $               $   ย…ย…     ย…          $ยŒ      ย…                  ยฅยŒ        $ยŒ    *ยŒ            ยž          ย…      ยฅ  >        ย…         $ \}$    ยŒ   > ย—$ ย„    $          >ย–ย‡ <  $ ยŒ   ยŒ   

     ย… ย…  >  ~  ยŒ ย…ย˜> ~ ยฅ      ย…      <      ยŒ  ย…

  $ $ ยย‚ยˆย‚     $      ย…ย…<    ย„                  $$              ย…     ยž          ยŒ      \    $ $     ยž  $ ยŒ   $ ย…  ยœ}   $ $  ย…           \  ยŒ     $     $     ยŒ             

ย’ยŒ     #  $  #$       % \                               ย…         $         ~ ย…ย… ย… ย…$ย… }ย… ย…       _                 ย€   ย€        $  ย… }       $           ย…ย…     ย…ย…           ย…                              # } #   $    ย„    ยŒ     

                           }     ย’          ย•ย‚        ย“ $          $  }$                  $  ย…                                       }   _   ย˜       ย…$               $                                >    <    $     $    ย…         <    #$  #  $    ย€                         >     

                             $       $    ย…  ~ $          $     

 $             

       $         ย…               $  

           ย…           ยœ    ย… ย…               ~      $         ย€     $         ยŒ#~ #%                ย…          ย…              $$       ย„      ย…        $  $ ย…         ย…  %ย€      ย…           ย„         ย…        $     $   $     ย‹           $           $ ย…  ย“     $          $  


S16-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:52

Page 1

    

 

 

 



             !"#$%& #

7

(:8;$<== " > )%*  661<=6<162631326L1==J61620(1 J31<= :%

/" + G 661==6J1<= 631==621<=6F1==671==JJ1==0(1 J31<=;*@A8B !661== 6J1<=6<13262162641<=67162JJ1== 0(1J31==(E/(@> )%* 3 !6J1==621==6L1==J61==0(1 J31==;8=F> )%/! 6J162621626L162J61620(1J31==

"1"35.&/5

(:8;$<=$ #! H > )% >+  661626<162621626F16267162 J61620(1J<162> )&/ 6J1==63162641<=6L132J61==0(1 J<162;*@> )%$  661==6J132621==6F162671<=J6132 0(1J3162

6/53"$&"#-&

(:8;$<== " > )%*  661<=631==641<=671==J61<=0(1 J3162 *# H > )%;%%66132 631626413267162J61320(1J3162 ;*@> )%3! 6J1<= 6312=6F16=671<=J612=0(1J316= (E/(@> )%* 3 ! 661<= 631==641<=671==J61<=0(1J31== ;8=F> )%/!661<= 631==641<=671==J61<=0(1J31==

#6%%)"$0--"14&% 0650'4)".&

(:8;$<== " > )%*  6<1<=621<=6F1<=671<=J61<=

."%&*/&6301&

(:8;$<=% >+ :+ !%661626<1<=6213=6F1326712= JJ1==0(1J31==;*@/ !+ 661626<162621626F16267162J6162 (E/(@&/$!"3! 66132631== 641626L1<=J616=

*  

+  8    !  +!---%      /#  0  " %%   !  -  $'    '$ )  ' 1/#% 23  ' 34 % 567748

9  8

 ,:  ,,

           $$   $          … $ …     ¥$$ ¦  …   $     …     Œ£    

 … $$    $ …     …       ”$ } \ @  @ › } > _    > £    > !   £       ˆ‡ ¥    …      $        ¦     $_    > ¥Œ $     … $     $  €             $¦ „  ›  @ ˜     * ”$ }       … $¥$$ ¦  … $…  Š $    <       $   $      ‰       … … $     ˆ‚™‡         ˆ•      $ …   ‡ˆ          •™         $ Š‚ ! $   … $    •    $ …     $               ~ ˆ        Œ      ™    ¥$$ ¦  ˆ‚ …

/ 9! 1  '  /; 0;''      ' 0

///1    /

  % * & -'  - -      %;    

    0

///1    <==  & -'    /



<€\€* €†€†

41&&%3"$&3

            

             !  "#$      %&!%    % ' ! ( !  )  &*    + '  &*   &*     &*     !  "#$ 

           <     >}   š      ˆ•‰  $    $ @     @  <  <   $ !  …    $ >$             —$     >    >     >    $ œ   $  ‡ ” ˆŠˆ š € @   `     $    …         €   

         „  Œ   !      ” ˆ `   €        

*, :

 !   0 "''&    & %  >%%     ?    @ !AA  9  ! $;B &  $ * $ '  /    9%)!     ' -                !-D    % 

 %



 !0         %



!0  ?   %    !-D 

\šš

(:8;$<=;--#> ? 66132 631626413267162J61320(1J3162 > )&/ 661J=6<13=641== 6L1J=J61==0(1J<1J=;*@ A8B ! 661==6<1==621626F1<=6L132 67132J61==JJ1==0(1J31==(E/(@ > )%* 3 ! 661==6<1<=641== 6L1<=J61==0(1J<1<=;8=F > )%/!661326316264132 67162J6132

           @       $  @      @

       *$ ’  X*’{š  ˆŠ‰Š>  ’    ž  … >$        … @

 *            …         *’$    ’  € $*$X† ’  { ˆŠŠ‚   *$ ’   š      ˆŠˆ œ        >  ˜   $        •  >  }   @          *<  ˜  

€     X‰  {      $ $        …    $XŠ•  {   XŠ–  {    ‰ˆ‚…  $      ‡™      $ •               !       –Š‡      –      $ ™       ˆ–     …… …   ……  –‡ X‡ˆ™  ‰    $     { €       … 

  $   „    …  $    $ ™    $$    –      <  … $      …  ˆ™  $$          ˆ‰‡     $$    ˆ    $    ~‡    … $  €    ”$ }   $ $         

#   )   '  - @37  1 $'  ;    +%1E- '  ) + '  + '  '% ' 1 '       #9 %   "    #9 %    1    0 ! FF6  #9;'!> 

* <&

9 ;% 9"=

 %    

? # @BB

."%&0')0/03

 ! > €$  <    @      _  €$    *     ›   _    $    >€$ €   –‚‡€$      @        „        €$       … „ €$          @      —     €$     $  …         $  €$       >€$ @  \   _    € …! >  @ š   @          

*  8 9%  #0 % E'   ' *-%  9%  ' 0   + /* 9;    *   

'!  

'!   ' *-%     ;'   %'  ' '  + /* 9;   -!! %   0   '

 '

% +  + /* 9; >0'GH   >0'GH  

 

"3""   3

5  













































 













                          



                          





                                                      









 



                          



 













 





                          

 /' - ' &!%%!    /' - ' &!%%!     5!  @0  @  %8  $' 5!  @  %@8  5!  @0  @  %@ *@8  $' 5!  @  %@8   5!  @0  @  %@ *@8  $' 5!  @  %@8  5!  @0  @  %@ *@8   $' 5!  @  %@8  5!  @0  @  %@ *@8   $' 5!  @ 0  8   5!  @0  @  %@ *@8   $' 5!  @  *8 /' - 

!  



   $~    $     

  $             Œ Š$Š  >  ‹

  

$ ; ;

 

_    Š  $   ˆ Š     _     Š  $   ˆ Š     _  –$–$  Š$Š   ˆ Š

)%  66J &!  66= 6F6 3  622 624 /!  62L < B %) ! 66L 8%! ' !  333 = L37I  <: J)  =<6J 322 2222 <: >% =J6JJ26<4=JG<G3@%J) =<6J3<7J6JJ@%>% =J6JJ33647<GJ46= $!'J) =<6J322<<33 $!'>%  =J6JJ7<F23= L !J) =<6J32226==L !>% =J6J<<346== &!  'J) =<6J3223232 &!  '>% =J6JJ7J3L6=G66 M J)  =<6J 3<L J672 3  J)  =<6J 3JF 636= %! J)  =<6J 367 =3<6G<< %! >%  =J6J J4J 7<62 $  J) =<6J334LJ3F $ >% =J6JJ3<<<== J +J) =<6J3J46=J4 J +>% =J6JJ4<4=<L M! J) =<6J334<4=2

  

 073I3  ! 06==I<  07JI6  "# 06=6I6 $!% 07FI3 & '

06=<I6 ()%06=6I4 (!06=6I4 * 06=2I7 *+ 06=<I= *%-# 06=6I7 /!!06=6I= 3%  06=6I= 8!)06=6I2


S17-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:34

Page 1

*_˜_*>

  

    

        

\šš

  

7 +

   



       †   > < š$  }…    $$#       

         $  

     #\      # $    #        #    …           ##  …  

    # š$     …$                    $              € Œ    …                  …  <   $  $   €  €  –‚  š$           ¤ˆ‚       $   ¤‚‚   Œ  €              $ š$ 

  ¤–ˆ  $ ‰‡         $   ¤‚‚        

  …$  $         $ š$   *$ > ”  @     $      Œ     …           $    $               –Š      $       š$    >  \  @   <      $              $              X   {                    > ”  `

   ›   \    š   œš                @    ‚‚•        œ  „ <  ‚‚–<    @   …  …      $ †       $  $  $  @  $   ¤‚‚    $ }

  ! _ @           „      …     !$‰$ @  

 š$ #   Š‚    

      ¤‡¤‡‚#\    …  ”  ‚‚• ”  ‚‚™ –‰         š$  $$  Š‚        $    $  $    $    > …        š$            $     $         <        $     $  š$    _        $  œ    >        $  ¤‡•‚‚‚‚    €   $              $  $                  

   €    Œ  ¤ˆ‚‚  $          ‚‚‡  @   !   Œ          $ ¤•‡‚‚‚  ¤‡‚‚‚‚       ˜>        ¤‰‚‚‚ „              

               $…       …    $…                

 _    $   š$       …  $                     @     $       …       

  … …  †     $      $     …        }   ˆŠ•‰      š$  ~…                        @    $                  …      $               $  !

  $                                …        $     Œ  …     $         }           $        8" !7

   :/ "!;  :!

    

\      …        $ …      Œ  $           œ}>  >  $ Œ    ~  „                   ”      ‚‚‰ …     \                        „ …$     €$$ } œ}    Œ       $  \              …       

      $   œ} „    Œ  …          $    \    Œ  €$$  #\ $ … #  _            #\ $                   #        \        

  $ \  €$$ #Œ    €$ } X€$${  \  $ $            

         # * $  >

  ˜  †         _               #  …

         œ}# >

   *       Œ   $  …  €$$#   \           # ˜            Œ            ’  €    

\šš

    

*_˜_*>

 *           +/     0         & 1!2 

  *          +/   * // 

    !      ' ' † / [O   #      

 '   $ Œ            …

  \     $    \  ˆŠ‚  „ 

     Œ     € >  \            Œ #  #$     _     …  $       „ …  # #    #Œ   

              …     \        œ} ~$    # Œ          \    $  $ $   \    

      ……  $…         } $  $  ” ˜          \                …$     Œ     €$$   $     $  Œ      œ}   ‚‚‡    \     ” ‚‚• #Œ      \       Œ        #       \  \$$ # Œ           \  $$      # \  > €$       … 

Π$         $$

1  \           Œ         $                œ}…_ $       $     Œ                „<  _  œ    Œ    €   @         >  >   @   \            …   Œ    „ <  #   \   $        #

3  "&&! >       ˜†      $               …      $       Œ       —$       !    Œ    €  _   €  XŒ€_€{  …      ˜>  >  …  $     

† `    …     $ $ $ Œ               >     

 $˜†    $

  $   #>     …   $                        # …     >   …      š   @     >  $    €  >  …    Œ            $      !   >  …$ …

 \   œ}   $…  Œ  \        —$  >       —$  ‚‚‡…  $   ž … $        —$    …

"! # 

CM Y K

     $ \}$      >     ˜>…$ …       #>         ˜>   #  ”  —   >     š ˜   #Œ     $    €        …        #         \}$ …  

       —$       $    ˆ™…    …           >         !       >    !    } …     >      $   !        —$  @   >               †  >  }     >        <  … €        ” ˆ– _ …

      Œ     _ š      € …       š     #    #    $            >        Œ       œ  \  


S18-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:33

Page 1

B?>ACB

C^aaTbWPbaTb_TRcU^a8cP[hQdc]^UTPa                             !""#$  % &      '  (    )    *& + ,   %&,    * )      %&-  *. 

\šš

\šš>

€

*_˜_*>

 

 

 /

 ?    / /"     &  $

   3) J(  <Q  # %

%#      ;     '  =</  JLLN "'   &      %#  U   <   &$ %# '   XWV    W$

"      7>>?@              $…  >}  …ˆ            $@}*$–…         `         _ ‚‚™ $                _  @      …                       Œ     $    _ \>     … @     $              $ @   Œ š $  ˆŠ             $$                 *++        ›      

               }  …      …$>  ™–  <    _  @   $  _  ˆŠŠ‰        @   ˆ…‚

  >  <               …     _                  $   …   ˆ…ˆ ˆŠŠ• … ‚‚   $     ¡ =

  @        €          …    $       _ œ+ µ X{>

 ^ X  {_ <µ} ŸX  {+ 

 X  {      

 €   $   *++    ˆˆ•  …   $    $ ˆˆ    

  $ 

   >                               $     • \       

-]^]  ()  3# .

    †RBR     '  %#  JXW "      ' WW     ;   &   V‡‡\       &O  %#   VWL$ % ;      %# &  O  W  '  VVZ    '  W  # U# ?  &  W  '    '' &    Q †   %# '  ] / &  ];   [$ U#  ##   #  @   '    '  O   %#  XWJO          ' <</  $ %#   O  =</    & ' I O   ' %#  <  %    U#   †RBR$ % XˆWW &#O       #        # 'O #      '     '   ' ;    '   VL   $ †RBR     '   ;   '   'O &        #  & $ †RBR   '   '      W   '   ' '  JLLN  ;$ ‰   O          '     $

    ˆ‚                  …   ” >   $    \    † `                 $         –‡…        ~    >    –™€ $   ™     $        $              œµ    $   $š     $    €              `  ~          ‡• $   $   *$        …   < $        `  ~  

              $ ˜Ÿ  <    >         <        $…  ‹@  ˆŠŠ‰       <  †   #„  #  $    #Œ           $    „            € 

 ~             $   …           ~ $#  ‡… …           …   *++‹#„$   \  $      #€      *++                     $#< …  @      …     @       €  œ               @      œ <$              <¢    $    $…         \  ’  <            $ %&

 " !"

>    $ …     $ Œ  _ ‚‚™       ›   #— #            ~        ”  >    <   …      „  @   ˆŠ™‰     ”  >         ˆ…ˆ     $  ”   €       $   $_   ‚…‚ „ $ _ Š‰!   \

 € †             …  >  `        …     ‚‚„ @    „         >     $$      !      …    _    œ  €…œ           $   $ ”    >           ”   $ 

   ~   …  > `   …  \   ”  $  Œ          _ ‚‚      $< …ˆ$  $>       …   $ >    Œ _ ™™    > ˜  …‚ >   ” >    $ Œ ~   …   š œ >              $    > % € >      œ        _  ‚‚™      …ˆ      ‚‚      — €      …                            $     $ ”   @    …    ˆŠ…  $   >   *…ˆ       _ ‚‚™…ˆ    >  $      …ˆ      œ !

     „ @  >   …‚   ˜        –…ˆ   

 $>€ $ˆ…‚          !            $     $ –…ˆ <         €  „  @  >                        ~        …   €                        $    $    …     @  —

"     3 Œ             …  >            >         >         —€  !$œ   $   <  $      €@   

    >  > $     @          €    @       *      ~     $ !$  @        >  Œ @@               Œ           #Œ     >     Œ   @$  Œ  #        #   $   $    š … …    # €   >        …       Œˆ…‚         $ €}}

  ~      š œ  Œ   € $         œ  œ  €       > $     $  #Œ        $         # Œ * $         „          $            !   €        ˆ…ˆ *     …       $ %$

%  !"

V    VX ;& @Z[\  > %

CM Y K


S19-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:32

Page 1



    

        

"! !         \šš

€

      $  …  ” \      € Œ           $                  „ $    > $                   !   š                   \       <       $       …     ‡   ‚… …    <   *  œ

            …                    ¥’  ~                                

         …  ¦ Œ      $  *    >     *   œ

   ¥Œ   Œ       X   „ $ {¦ Œ        …

  

 ›  „           ¥Œ  $            ¦                 Œ       _$          $             †  Œ `     € …                      

6             „                   

      ›  ~ ™    $  ˆ „ $    ‡ˆ…•  …       ~     <     … 

>  ‰              $  _    >      Œ        * 

>  `}    >   $     …   > $   ” ”   ž      $  $  ”                  …        ‚…    $ Œ       `}           —       $      >        ‚‚      $     $            ˆˆ     $              ~    >                 <     *        $  >    

    $    ¥     ~       $ $  

 ¦>    …           …   $  „ $  !   €           

 ‚‚‰ $   ~  Œ                          $  ¥  Œ     Œ                      ¦ !   $            @  @   ”‡ š   ! …  …   *   !        „ $     …

   $    $      $ * †ˆ       !   š      –ˆ              $  $   

!           …                    …         >  ‚‚– !    …       $  $  „              …     $           >      '   

6   &9 9.            € €Ÿ Ÿ   $             œ !     $  ‚ˆ„ œ @   €Ÿ Ÿ >    $       …       ~  ˜               $    $ ˆ™Š‡ œ     $    ‚‚‚ €Ÿ Ÿ   …   œ !  \  ~                  $ _      …               

   œ              œ       €       $         €Ÿ Ÿ $  $                    ˆŠŠ‚ \        $  ¥>              …             ˜         $        ŽŒ $ œ  @$‘    …  $  „ Œ …    ˆŠŠ‚  $      •‚ @              Š‡  Š‡ %$        …  ¦   €Ÿ Ÿ          $        Œ    —   ˆŠ™Š      œ !     ˆŠŠ‰

        €Ÿ Ÿ       ‚‚‚             $  

   •‰          $œ     €   ›„   €Ÿ Ÿ     

    

                

       Ÿ € }     $       •‰ ‡ˆ‚‚     $         ˆ‡‚       $    $ …       ˆ• €Ÿ Ÿ       ¥„ Œ                     

  œ      _  „                 $     „   …   ‚ˆ   ¦ €Ÿ Ÿ   $   $   \   ’  >  œ     €      $       €Ÿ Ÿ   ~   $  }    $     $  $…   \ $           …  \   $              …      ¥€            $$      >  …        …    †   $         …  œ        “     $ <  ¦ €Ÿ Ÿ ™‚‚  ‡ˆ‚‚

\šš

   

š€’£> €€†

3                    & & 45678 8     0                9 :((6          

 

                         …                              }      …  €Ÿ Ÿ     }                  } Œ $>

 $    `œ @$\      $       € $           $  ~ …       … $$                

3

        €Ÿ Ÿ                  $  $ ‚‚Š     …        ¥        $    “ \ } œ    \ }…    Œ                   

       …  $     ¦ € $ €Ÿ Ÿ         $          %¥€_$ $ „ €Ÿ =$ $         _ }  “         “       %

 $    …    $    

  €Ÿ = €Œ  $$            @

   $ ‚‚‚     ¦

_` # 3(

]'          W $ /ŠŠ  Q    ; W   O  &   &'    / #       & '    ; $ ‹%  VZ &'    %#$ % ' & ; ˆLL  <Œ  

 # [   & # & ; '  $ %      ' &'   =[

 Z\   Œ &      W    O   JLL   O  J    W  #  &'     =[$ %  ;W  

    &' &  %#  VˆL   $ ‰  #  ' &   W &      $‘ /ŠŠ      W

   & '    ' %#          JLVJ ‰ ]'     $

Turkish Golf Federation boss Ahmet Aðaoðlu displaying his golfing skills.

CM Y K


S20-22-06-08.qxd

21.06.2008

02:42

Page 1

Michael Stipe declares videos dead Michael Stipe thinks the music video is a "dead medium" _ but the R.E.M. singer still wants the band's songs to be accompanied by some kind of visuals. So instead of hiring a top video director to create a clip for their new song "ManSized Wreath," they hired an advertising agency. New York, AP

SELMAN EÞTÜRKLER

WWW.SUNDAYSZAMAN.COM SUNDAY, JUNE 22, 2008

PHOTO

The Offýcýal Gazette: the world’s only paper wýth no readershýp concerns E. BARIÞ ALTINTAÞ ÝSTANBUL

Turkey's Official Gazette, where new laws must be published before they go into effect, is a drain on the nation's budget, as it uses up nearly YTL 18 million every year without any significant return. In comparison to Turkey's privately owned newspapers, which have to struggle with strict press laws, financial difficulties and overall low newspaper readership rates, the Official Gazette has it good. In fact, it is much better off than most newspapers in the world. It is only newspaper in Turkey that does not have to worry about the usual challenges of being in the media business, such as finding advertisers or ensuring effective distribution, since it is the only press organ funded by the state in a country where the total circulation of all newspapers does not even top 5 million copies. The Official Gazette, which survives mainly on state funds, insists on using obsolete distribution methods in this golden age of communications technologies; although it has made good use of its huge budget in terms of printing technology investments -- the newspaper has the most cutting-edge printing equipment at all times. It also does not need to worry about finding news sources or stories, unlike most other newspapers. The history of the Official Gazette (Resmi Gazete in Turkish) dates back to the final period of the Ottoman Empire. It was first published on Nov. 11, 1831 under the name of Takvim-i Vekayi as a weekly publication. On April 23, 1920, the day Parliament opened, the name of the newspaper was changed to Ceride-i Resmiye and it was also changed into a daily. Later the name was changed to Resmi Ceride and finally to Resmi Gazete. Currently this newspaper, published by a general directorate under the prime ministry, retails for 30 YKr. On days the newspaper has more than 96 pages, 10 YKr is added to the retail price for each additional 32 pages. Advertisers pay YTL 10 for every single line of ad space - and that's the untaxed price. The yearly subscription fee is YTL 195. If one decides to go and pick up the newspaper from its publishing house's department of circulating capital, as some public agencies still do, the annual subscription fee falls down to YTL 75. Overseas subscriptions cost $350, with airmail charges included. The Official Gazette publishes all decisions and applications of the state, including Constitutional amendments, laws, regulations, bylaws, decrees and public tender announcements. Under Turkish law, judicial decisions -such as the recent Constitution Court decision to annul constitutional amendments that would have lifted a ban on the Muslim headscarf on university campuses -- also have to be printed in the Official Gazette. The expression, "This law will go into force upon being printed in the Official Gazette," is placed at the end of all bills adopted in Parliament. The Official Gazette still uses distribution methods abandoned long ago. However, reading it online is free of charge. Issues from the past year are sold at regular price. The paper has a total of 6,940 subscribers and it prints 10,157 copies daily. The daily is published 354 days a year. The budget allocated for the Gazette this year is YTL 18.7 million. It employs a total of 131 people, 36 being public servants and 95 being workers.

Bankruptcy ads on the house! Another publication has an easy life like that of the Official Gazette is the Commercial Registry Journal, published daily by the Information Services Department of the Turkish Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges (TOBB) . The newspaper employs 25 people and has 293,477 readers who constitute a captive audience, as subscriptions are required to do business with public agencies. Only annual subscriptions are available at the journal. The subscription fee is a towering YTL 8,000. All fees, including the advertising prices, are fixed only after the approval of the Ministry of Industry and Commerce. According to officials at the journal, it was founded on a French model. The daily is, on average, 875 pages long. In Turkey, everybody who wants to begin commercial activities must register their legal status with this newspaper. This journal also has the highest number of advertisers in the Turkish press. In 2007, a total of 574,050 advertisements were placed in the newspaper. On average, it prints 2,287 ads a day. It is delivered to subscribers by mail and private cargo as well as through distribution companies. Advertisements cost 20 YKr per word for regular companies and 1.3 YKr for cooperatives. Announcing a start-up business -- required by the law -- costs YTL 30. However, if you go bankrupt, the costs will be on the house, as announcements of ending trade activity are free of charge. An individual copy of the journal retails at YTL 1.

CM Y K

www.todayszaman.com - June 22, 2008  

your gateway to Turkish news

Advertisement