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TODAY’SW MAY 2015 / CONTENTS

Erika Williams Keeps Life Spicy

Do Your Clothes Fit?

p8

SAVE YOUR NECK p32

SHE’S

FIT!

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p22

23 R  EASONS TO BE HAPPY p14

p20

LOVE YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD p36

SHE’S KEEPING WOMEN SAFE p10

SHE’S HAVING

SEW MUCH FUN! p56

NOT A HERD MENTALITY p28 FIND THE

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PERFECT JOB

EASY-TO-EAT EGGS p54

Are You A Quitter? p46

DO YOU HAVE p52

NEW BLUES? MOM

Reaching Beyond Kentuckiana p31

p48

SURVIVAL

SKILLS

OF MISSY SULLIVAN p 12

Ja’Nel Johnson Has a Song to Sing p58


IN OUR ISSUE

Find Your Fit

THIS SHIRT LOOKS GREAT WITH OUR COVER SKIRT TOO!

This month, we don’t want you settling for anything less than the perfect fit in every part of your life. In this issue, we want to help you find your spot and love being there. Start with changing your perspective. If you are prone to starting projects before you finish them, read Bob Mueller’s essay about perseverance (page 46). When you read it, you’ll understand there’s no way for you to find the perfect fit if you quit before you see results. Next, make a few tailoring adjustments to your skirt, pants, or dress and feel your style confidence rise. We show you four ways you can transform your clothes instantly (page 22). Is your job draining your spirit? If you’re forcing yourself into no-win situations that are confining, read about how women like Hope Zoeller and Agnese Smith found their career niche by following their heart (page 48). Get ready — your journey for the right fit starts now.

ON OUR COVER Paige Conrad, 23, has found her right fit through mentoring girls as part of the Southeast Christian Church high school ministry. A former UofL Ladybird, Paige also coaches the New Albany High School dance team and says she feels satisfaction in giving back to the youth in her community. “Growing up, I had lots of mentors, and I recognize how important that was for me because it turned me into the woman I am today.” See more of Paige in our fashion feature on page 22. MAKEUP: Tina Marie Smith, Blades Salon & Spa / PHOTO: Melissa Donald / STYLING: Alissa Hicks PAIGE IS WEARING: Earrings, $28, available at Modern Elegance, 3921 Chenoweth Square, 502.883.4721;

Bangles, $44 and $48; Wrap tassel bracelet, $48; Clutch, $46, all available at Modern Elegance; Gingham blouse, $98, by Polo Ralph Lauren, available at Dillard’s 5000 Shelbyville Rd. 502.893.4400; Skirt, $119, By Antonio Melani, available at Dillard’s.

OUTFIT AT TOP: Earrings, $28, available at Modern Elegance, 3921 Chenoweth Square, 502.883.4721;

Bangles, $44 and $48; Wrap tassel bracelet, $48; Clutch, $46, all available at Modern Elegance; Floral blouse, $109, by Antonio Melani, available at Dillard’s 5000 Shelbyville Rd. 502.893.4400; Paisley skirt, $109, By Antonio Melani, available at Dillard’s; Shoes, $80, available at Modern Elegance.

WE ARE ONLINE: TodaysWomanNow.com REPRINTS ARE AVAILABLE!

Call 502.327.8855, ext. 10, or email us at reprints@todayspublications.com with details and specifics. For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call 502.327.8855. Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 todayswomannow.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service.

MAY 2015 Volume 25 8 Number 5

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Miranda G. Popp miranda@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Jillian LeMaster officeadmin@todayspublications.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/FOOD WRITER Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com MEDIA ASSOCIATE Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion

Copyright 2015 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

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TODAY’S WOMAN


WHAT WORKS

Spices Up Her Creativity by LUCY M. PRITCHETT / photos by MELISSA DONALD What Works Erika Williams, 27, account development manager, Pretty Incredible, a business development and communications firm in Jeffersonville, Indiana HOMETOWN: Louisville NEIGHBORHOOD: Clifton HOUSEHOLD: two cats and a roommate

F

ollow Erika Williams around, and you won’t ever get caught in traffic, your food will be just spicy enough, and your creativity will blossom. THE WAZE APP I couldn’t live without this. It is a crowd-sourced navigation app that will reroute you around road construction, accidents, and traffic jams. Since I live in Louisville and work in Jeffersonville, it has saved me many minutes sitting in traffic on one of the bridges or helped me avoid UofL game traffic. It is a very robust app. It talks to me and warns me of giant potholes and even shows me a photo of a location that might be difficult to find. It is so helpful for both local and out-of-town driving. VALENTINA HOT SAUCE This hot sauce is spicy but very flavorful. I use it by itself as a condiment or add it to a dish. It is tomatoey-tasting and not vinegary. It is great on pizza or in chili. I have a huge bottle and usually find it in the ethnic food aisle of the grocery. The black label version is extra spicy if you are feeling dangerous. You have to be ready for some heat. ARTOGRAPH ART PROJECTOR I bought this for myself for Christmas. It is a mini-projector that lets me enlarge an image onto a large piece of paper and trace it and use it as a starting point for a portrait. I use colored pens and markers to create portraits of interesting faces — of my friends or images I find in magazines. It works like an overhead projector, but the original image doesn’t have to be transparent. I like to draw but didn’t go to art school, and this lets me do some fun, creative things.

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>

TURNING POINT

<

A Healing Ministry By LUCY M. PRITCHETT Photo by MELISSA DONALD

TERESA OECHSLI, 48, president and founder of Hosea’s House for women in crisis; community relations associate for Christian Academy School System Neighborhood: Highview/Fern Creek Household: Husband, Jerry Oechsli Website: hoseashouse.com

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One can only hope that the murder of a friend is not the tragic impetus to a turning point in one’s life. But for Teresa Oechsli, that is just what happened. It’s not a pretty story, and one we won’t go into too much detail about, but suffice it to say that the murder of Teresa’s friend Jeanetta Mack Spencer resulted in hope and clarity for other women in domestic abuse situations. “When I first met Jeanetta, I felt an immediate connection to her,” Teresa says. “She was charismatic and had a beautiful spirit. I learned that her relationship with a man was putting her in danger. She shared with me her vision that there would be a house, a safe place, for women where they could feel loved and find a life again. In 2004, when Jeanetta was killed by her boyfriend, I wanted to honor her memory and life.” That is how Teresa came to open Hosea’s House, a multi-family refuge for women and their children in crisis. It took five years for the vision to become reality, and Hosea’s House was dedicated in 2009 on the anniversary of Jeanetta’s death. “The Hosea’s House ministry has been embraced not only by the women who live in the house, but by the community as well,” Teresa says. “It has resulted in major life transformation in families.” Hosea’s House has seen a variety of women struggling with homelessness, drugs, alcohol, and/or domestic violence. Since opening its doors, it has helped more than 60 families. It offers a haven for “women who have a desire to move forward and live a sustainable life on their own,” Teresa says. “We work to connect them to resources to help with budgeting, parenting, job skills, and help them to achieve their goals. Each woman pays $30 a week to live in the house. The stay can range from a few months to two years. Once a week, they go out into the community and help their neighbors in need, giving the residents a sense of purpose and being a part of and building the community as well.” TODAY’S WOMAN


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Survival Skills of Missy Sullivan

By MARIE BRADBY / Photos by MELISSA DONALD

S

ometimes it pays to listen to your heart instead of following the advice of your friends, no matter how wellintentioned they are. They don’t really know what’s deep down in your soul. So 25 years after a dream deferred, Missy Sullivan — a 43-yearold wife and mother of four sons, ages 8 to 14 — will finish medical school at the University of Louisville this month, coming full circle with a dream she began pursuing decades ago when she entered Bellarmine University as a biology major. “I wanted to go to medical school, but a friend convinced me you couldn’t get into medical school with a ‘B’ on your transcript, so that’s how I got away from it,” Missy says. Instead, she received dual degrees in economics and psychology and worked for 16 years in program management, fundraising, and human resources at Dayspring, a social services organization. But after the birth of her fourth child, she decided to pursue her old dream. In 2009, she was the first person admitted to the Post Baccalaureate Pre-Med Certificate Program at the University of Louisville, a program for students with non-science degrees who want to go to medical school. She finished the program in three years, taking her time, and in 2011, she started medical school at last. Missy says that going back to college as an older student to become a physician wouldn’t have happened without her support system: her husband Sean, relatives, and friends. “My mom retired and was able to help me so I could do the postbacc classes,” she says. “I decided if I could get into medical school, I would go. My youngest was 15 months old and by the time I got to medical school, he was 4.” After her years of hard work, Missy will begin her residency in psychiatry in July. “There have been many advances in psychiatric medications to where people can be treated and live normal lives. When I started medical school, this is not what I thought I would

Missy’s rules for rebuilding your dream: 1.

Take advantage of technology, but don’t let it waste your time. FaceTime came in handy if bedtime happened before I could get home. My husband and I have synced family calendars and shopping gets done online. Conversely, Facebook and most TV shows did 12

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not make the cut as a good use of my time. One of the things that got me through the first few years was Tegrity recordings (a lecture recording system). l didn’t go to class. I would go straight to the library. I could study much quicker. I could watch the lectures twice in the same amount of time. I could hit the pause button for things I didn’t understand.

2. Don’t put off

studying. Many people come into medical

do. In my rotation, I saw people get better who were profoundly sick. It had a huge impact on their lives.” Now that she’s nearing the finish line, she’s planning to show her appreciation to her mother and family. “We’re taking my mother, mother-in-law, and two of my husband’s aunts on a cruise with us to celebrate. They have been really helpful.” Missy’s sisters and friends also have stepped in. “Plenty of people have my kids over for playdates and know that I’m not going to reciprocate. They say, ‘We know you are so busy.’ My husband coaches our sons’ soccer teams. It really has been a team effort. My husband feels like he is graduating from medical school, too. It’s not just me.”

school thinking the first test doesn’t matter. I wanted to get every point up front because you don’t know if there will be some family crisis. I never dug a hole that required a lot of stress to get out of. This came in handy when two of my sons had health crises during my second year.

3.Multitask. I took

flashcards to my children’s sporting events and rode the bus so the time could be used to study.

4. Don’t skip church,

dinners with friends, dates with your husband, or your children’s activities. Church often focused me and reaffirmed that I was following a calling. My friends made me laugh and distracted me from the daily grind. My husband continually encouraged me and loved me even when my mood wasn’t so lovable. While I missed a few of my kids’ events, I was there for most of them. I would never trade my success for theirs.

5.Don’t make

promises you can’t keep. When I made a promise, my children knew they could count on me.

6.Have a backup

plan. Sometimes kids get sick or snow days happen. I think about what could go wrong that day and try to address it early. If one son wasn’t feeling well when he left for school, my mom was my backup plan.

TODAY’S WOMAN


23 THINGS Why 23? Because we are 23 years old!

A few things that caught Today’s Woman’s eye this month. By ANITA OLDHAM & ALISSA HICKS

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She Kicks It! By TIFFANY WHITE Photo by MELISSA DONALD

Phynna Wigginton

P

hynna Wigginton, 45, says staying in shape for her husband Eric became her motivator for running in the Kentucky Derby Festival minimarathon last month. “My grandmother told me to always keep it interesting. I like to look good for my husband, and he is the same way with me,” she says. Since Phynna stays physically active, running in the mini-marathon wasn’t too far-fetched. “I like hiking, biking, Zumba, and I work with free weights,” she says. The 13.1-mile run has become one of her biggest accomplishments, but preparing for it wasn’t easy. Phynna, an employee of UPS, registered for the marathon through her job, which enabled her to participate in the Norton Sports Health training program. Norton Sports Health created a personalized training schedule for Phynna that outlined the number of miles she needed to run, and she stuck to it. She also met with nutritionist Dr. Anna Grout. Phynna says she knew she’d be able to complete the race after she ran her first long practice run. “We were scheduled to run nine miles, and I didn’t think I would feel that great running for so long.” But, she says, “I could have kept running.”

Nominate a woman for Today’s Woman Kicks It by sending an email to anita@todayspublications.com. 20

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Do Your Clothes Really Fit? BY TIFFANY WHITE / PHOTOS MELISSA DONALD

D

on’t underestimate the power of well-tailored clothing. “People who come to me are really surprised by the impact that it makes. Anything that you invest a certain amount of money in is worth getting tailored so that it fits you perfectly,” says Cisa Barry, owner of Sew Fitting in New Albany. Cisa does alterations, repairs, bridal work, tailoring, and custom clothing. Selecting a good tailor, she says, is about choosing a reputable business that can do the type of work you’ve requested. Cisa shows you three ways tailoring can elevate the style and fit of your clothing.

Angie Fenton JOB: Editor-in-chief, Extol magazine and entertainment correspondent for WHAS11’s “Great Day Live!”

THE PROBLEM: “The length of the dress was so long that it made her look shorter.”

THE FIX: “We raised the hem to elongate her body.”

BEFORE AFTER 22

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Sandra Forster-Terrell JOB: Teacher, Atherton High School

THE PROBLEM: “The pants were very long, which made her look shorter. She is a teacher who is on her feet every day, and she didn’t want to wear skyhigh heels.” BEFORE

THE FIX: “We hemmed them and took off three to four inches of fabric. The nice, clean hem makes the pants more wearable. Since they are more straight and tidy at the bottom, they slim her and give her more height.”

AFTER

Angie Fenton JOB: Editor-in-chief, Extol magazine and entertainment correspondent for WHAS11’s “Great Day Live!”

THE FIX: Cisa filled in those spots with a black knit for a color block effect. “Color blocking is trendy and a good choice since we knew we couldn’t match the exact fabric and color.”

THE PROBLEM: “This dress had cutout panels on the side, Angie didn’t feel like it was appropriate to wear at a lot of venues.”

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BEFORE

AFTER


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Paige Conrad JOB: High school ministry at Southeast Christian Church

THE PROBLEM: “The hip curve of her dress was too high on her body. When she would walk, wrinkles around the hip seam would appear.”

THE FIX: “We removed extra fabric from the sides of the skirt so that the hip curve aligned with Paige’s body.” BEFORE

AFTER 26

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NOT A HERD MENTALITY

Janey Newton brings new ideas to age-old farming BY AMANDA BEAM

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C

ozy and unassuming, the office at Crestwood’s Foxhollow Farm where CEO Janey Newton sits could serve as her autobiography. Every book placed on the shelf, each item decorating the rectangular space, provides a brief glimpse into the ever-evolving story of her life. Teacher, philosopher, farmer, and leader — all these aspects of Janey and her mission to reconnect to the earth can be found in the objects around this room. Colorful works of art made by children’s hands cover the former educator’s walls. Her cell phone rings to the triumphant horn of a foxhunt, fitting for the third-generation leader of Foxhollow. And observing it all from on high rests a picture of Rudolf Steiner, a man ahead of his turn-of-the-20th-century time, who has shaped her views on farming and education for close to 50 years. But to confine Janey and her transformational views on schooling, agriculture, and healthy eating to only this office goes against the very freedom this follower of biodynamic principles advocates. While a trailblazer in the biodynamic method locally, the 63-yearold Janey doesn’t push her beliefs on others. She wants those who are interested to discover the benefits on their own, much like she and her siblings did when they took management of the land and switched to this organic, holistic approach to agriculture roughly 10 years ago. “We just made a conscious choice to do this, but also part of that choice is to take care of this land and these cattle and these plants and TODAY’S WOMAN


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people, and to ripple that out so people see they can have the healthy food,” Janey says. “That’s really important, the rippling effect.” In the past few years, these ripples have brought waves of opportunity to both Foxhollow Farm and other small businesses throughout Kentucky. Working with local partners through Foxhollow’s summer concert series as well as leasing their property to other growers, Janey relishes bringing the community together so all can benefit. Of course, this should come as no surprise. A fundamental tenant of Steiner’s — and now Janey’s — biodynamic model is the interconnectivity of systems. For agriculture, that includes balancing every aspect of the farm ecosystem, including plants, soil, animals, and people, so that the land can become self-sustaining. Janey includes herself in this circle of life. She refuses to reign over her property like a medieval lord. Stewardship is the term she prefers to use when speaking of their symbiotic relationship. “To me, stewardship means that I’m being given this resource, this gift for a small period of time in the life of the land,” she says. “I’m just one person. Right now my responsibility is to take absolutely wonderful care of this 1,300-acre piece of land. “I take it seriously, and I think of the land as a real organism, a real being, in a way. It really has its own qualities and its own needs like a human being.” Janey refuses to take shortcuts to reach her goals. Cultivating the soil, growing healthy, organic vegetables, and raising happy cattle are more important to her than an increased profit, a rare attribute to find these days. You can almost taste that connection in the quality of her meat and vegetables. “We’ve become disconnected to the true nature of animals, to the true nature of the plants and the earth,” she says. “We’re looking at an animal as an asset, rather than ‘this is a being, and I want to make sure it lives a good life,’ and then when it becomes food, that it’s going to be healthy.” When Janey speaks of the holistic method, her cheekbones rise in delight. For her, healing the land and its inhabitants is more than a job. It’s a moral and spiritual imperative. “The spiritual aspect of what we’re doing is treating the land and the animals and the plants as living beings, and their needs are just as important as mine, just as important as a loved one’s,” she says. “And so I’m going to try and get to know that plant, that animal, that piece of land as well as I can to support its growth.” Those ideas also translated in Janey’s founding of the Waldorf School of Louisville 22 years ago. Much like with agriculture, creativity, integration, and social consciousness form the basis of the Waldorf philosophy. While Janey is no longer an instructor at the school, it still holds a special place in her heart. Teaching, though, still plays a prominent role in her life. Her daughter, Maggie Keith, works at the farm, the fourth generation of family to do so. In addition, Janey likes to share her knowledge and experience with others in the agricultural business as well as consumers of her products. Eventually, she hopes the biodynamic ideas of sustainability and interconnectivity will transform America’s current way of farming. Until then, she continues to plow ahead in her beliefs. “Right now it’s almost like going through the jungle,” she says. “You’re creating the path. And hopefully other people will follow.”

To me, stewardship means that I’m being given this resource, this gift for a small period of time in the life of the land.

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Reaching Beyond Kentuckiana W

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@TodaysWomanNow if you are also at these events or other events we should let our readers know about.

Learn what it takes to walk in their shoes…

M

M

e are continually amazed and appreciative at the response we get from our readers. One woman recently wrote, “I found it to be so rich in wisdom. The magazine feels like a loving friend.” That’s exactly what we want to be…your loving friend. We spread this love thorough out Kentuckiana but we’ve recently learned that it has reached the people of Zimbabwe in Southern Africa, where women continue to be oppressed despite attempts to obtain economic and social equality. Last month, we were thrilled to learn that Naomi Thomas had bravely published the first issue of her magazine entitled The Voice in Zimbabwe. We first heard from Naomi back in March of 2012. She emailed that a friend of hers had brought back copies of Today’s Woman from a visit to Kentucky, and wrote, “God so clearly spoke with me that day about starting my own woman’s magazine in Zimbabwe, as I was so inspired by yours.” At that time, she requested permission to reprint articles from our older issues to help launch her efforts, and we readily agreed. Quite frankly, I had forgotten about her interest and passion to start a women’s magazine until she emailed me the following, three years later: “Well it’s been almost forever but forever is a long time anyway! I am emailing you to let you know that FINALLY my first edition called The Voice is landing in Zimbabwe, and I just want to say thank you to you for being such a great help. You have no idea how much your articles have inspired me. “I felt a bigger need for family than I did just for women. The hope is to bring encouragement, healing, joy, peace, restore family relationships, and basically be used as an evangelistic tool in Zimbabwe, as we are going through some very difficult times both economically and spiritually as a nation. I got some advertising for the magazine because I couldn’t pay for it all [and] I had to sell my home. It’s been the longest and hardest season yet. I keep looking forward to the bigger picture [and] the impact that this magazine will have on our people’s lives here. “It’s been a long, hard journey as you may well know but God has been faithful, and I am well into the second issue already. I am very tired but I feel fulfilled, and as you will read my testimony, you will see how far God has brought me. So, once again, thank you.” Thank YOU, Naomi, for sharing your journey, for being a voice for women and families in Zimbabwe, for persevering, for believing in yourself. I’m overwhelmed in what you’ve accomplished and proud that Today’s Woman was a small part of your vision. Cathy Zion Publisher Today’s Woman

Come meet the MOST ADMIRED WOMAN WINNERS on Tuesday, June 23, 5:30 p.m. at The Olmsted. Reserve your spot at TodaysWomanNow.com or 502.327.8855

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LOOKS BOOK:

SAVE YOUR

NECK Slowing down the process of aging skin on your neck is simple, but you need to start early and be consistent.

By TIFFANY WHITE / Photos: MELISSA DONALD / Makeup: TINA MARIE SMITH, BLADES SALON & SPA / Model: MACKENZIE HALL

Skin care procedures for your neck depend on the imperfections you’re trying to eliminate, Richardson says. For a problem with skin laxity, ReFirme is a TRENDS device that uses radiofrequency and infrared heat Treatment & Aesthetic Center. “Most women apply makeup and sunscreen to boost collagen, which tightens the skin. For to the face but forget about the neck and chest,” she says. An aging neck, hyperpigmentation issues or redness, she suggests Richardson says, can be caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. “Extrinsic using a Fotofacial, which combines IPL (intense pulsed light) with involves sun exposure and some chemical pollutants. Intrinsic refers to radiofrequency to target unwanted brown and red pigment in the skin. genetic factors that play a role in the loss of skin elasticity,” she says. However, if you’re dealing with both skin laxity and pigment Here are tips on how to retain the youthful appearance of your neck. issues, the Clear & Brilliant laser works well because it helps with tone, texture, and unwanted pigment. “It creates a crosshatch pattern of cell disruption beneath the skin surface that can help tighten the skin and Pilar Varon, owner of Skin Care by Pilar, Step-By-Step says a basic regimen is all you need to eliminate some abnormal or unwanted pigment,” Richardson says. Or you could use a chemical peel, which is a less aggressive and keep the skin on your neck in good shape. She suggests using a expensive option. pharmaceutical skin care line instead of over-the-counter products Micro-needling, a procedure Varon uses, requires using because they produce better results that last longer. “The molecules Rejuvapen, a small pen-shaped device with nine microneedles that within these pharmaceutical skin care lines penetrate deeper, create very small perforations in the top layers of the skin. “As you absorb more deeply, and work from the inside out,” Varon says. age, you still have collagen, but it falls asleep,” 1. Use a gentle cleanser to remove dirt and oil from your neck. she says. “When you have the perforations 2. Use a hydrating serum to firm your neck. in your skin, you are stimulating the skin’s 3. A lways apply a sunscreen, regardless of the season, and natural repair process by producing collagen never use an SPF lower than 30. and elastin to heal the area at a rapid pace.” For longstanding results, she suggests getting 4. At night, stick to the same regimen, but follow the serum one treatment every three weeks for with a hydrating repair cream instead of sunscreen. six to 10 total treatments.

S

ince the skin on the neck is thinner than on the cheeks and jawline, women need to be vigilant about protecting it, says Dr. Leesa Richardson, owner of The Vein

IS! TRY THggestions

AGE GUIDE In Your 20s

“This is the time to s om e su e r a in e n r protect your natural e e H om on that w ld do beauty. The most u from Var ho e group s ck. important thing you ever y ag utiful ne can do for your skin for a bea in your 20s is to wear sunscreen with an SPF of 30 every day.”

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In Your 30s “Skin

begins to show its first signs of aging with the appearance of fine lines, wrinkles, and uneven skin tone. It’s important to continue the use of moisturizer with at least SPF 30 sunscreen and include a retinol cream with vitamin C.”

In Your 40s “Ask your esthetician if your skin condition qualifies for a dermabrasion and more aggressive treatments. It’s important to look for products that are packed with peptides, which even skin tone and increase collagen production. You also want to look for a richer moisturizing cream that contains hyaluronic acid and roxisomes, which restore damage by oxidation.”

In Your 50s and Beyond “Hormonal

changes and slow cell reproduction can leave skin dehydrated and feeling dry. It’s necessary to use products with glycolic acid to rev up cell turnover and keep skin smooth.”

TODAY’S WOMAN


SmartStyles Products and services to ft your style

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The Right

Neighborhood By MEGAN SECKMAN

Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Woman traveled around the city to find out how women are fitting perfectly into their neighborhood of choice.


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LIVING IN CRESCENT HILL Gina Stipo, classically trained chef and educator of the Italian culinary arts. Single, but looking for a dog.

Q: How does your neighborhood fit you? A: I moved to Louisville last year after spending 13 years in Tuscany. Crescent Hill felt like Europe to me. I love the small, contained architecture of 90-year-old houses — Louisville doesn’t tear down houses and build McMansions. In Europe, no one has more than one bathroom, and that’s what I have here: a small place with a strong sense of community where I can grow my own herbs and vegetables in the backyard, have a drink with neighbors on the front porch, and walk to shops and restaurants, an amazing library, and parks. Q: W  hat are a few of your favorite Frankfort Avenue things? A: The Frankfort Avenue Beer Depot, Eggs Over Frankfort, the Irish Rover for a beer, Blue Dog bread, Fabulous Finds, Margaret’s. The trees and the sounds of trains, church bells, and backyard roosters crowing make me feel like I’m still in Tuscany.

Q: How long do you see yourself here? A: U  ntil I’m done. Moving back was like starting over, but this area fits my career. I can grow ingredients for cooking in my backyard, and I’m surrounded by beauty. I’ve taken culinary tours back to Italy, hosted cooking classes, prepared private dinners in Louisvillians’ homes, and am looking to open an authentic Italian restaurant here. I love it. I’m not done yet.

Crescent Hill MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE = $279,250

I

n 1849, the Louisville-Frankfort Railroad line brought many prominent Louisvillians to the area to build their summer homes and helped to build the community into a true suburb. The Fairgrounds were built in 1853 at the current St. Joseph’s site and hosted the city’s expositions for 20 years. Now the area boasts a mecca of al fresco dining options, a beautiful library, parks, and locally owned shops and eateries within walking distance.

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Germantown

S

MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE = $114,000

ettled as small farms and butcher shops by German immigrants in the 1870s. Known for flooding until Beargrass Creek was rerouted, “Frogtown” became heavily developed in 1890 with the construction of Louisville’s largest number of shotgun houses. The area is undergoing a transition to a younger demographic, renovating older homes, and planting urban gardens, apiaries, and chicken coops.

LIVING IN GERMANTOWN Heather Burks, co-owner of Nachbar and Eiderdown. Wife of James Gunoe, mother of Calvin, 6, a dog, and three cats.

Q: How does your neighborhood fit you? A: A  s cheesy as it sounds, Germantown chose us. My husband James and I wanted a bar or restaurant for a long time. Shortly after we bought a house in the neighborhood, a friend called us and said there was a sign on Charley’s that said, ‘Gone crazy, call for serious inquiries.’ We called and the lady who owned it lived across the street. She looked down from her window and said, ‘I’ll be right down.’ It was the perfect size to start Nachbar and fit our beg-and-borrow budget. It was the right fit for starting something new.

Q: Describe the feel of Germantown. A: I love that the neighborhood is a perfect combination of old and new. You’ve got your old-school people that have been here for generations and young people who are moving in. Both groups take real pride in the neighborhood. There is a deep sense of nostalgia here. You meet people from Prospect and bring up Germantown and watch them smile and reminisce about going to a bar with their grandfather and ordering buckets of beer. It’s got that small community feel, full of like-minded people who you wave to at the Kroger, despite its very urban location.

Q: What does the neighborhood need? A: This neighborhood has such potential. I’d like to see a more pedestrian-centered strip on Goss. A coffee shop, deli, and more well-run, thoughtful restaurants would be nice. I don’t want it to saturate, but people in this neighborhood want to stay — they don’t want to have to go anywhere else to eat or hang out.

Q: Do you want to stay? A: W  e remodeled our house, and these businesses are probably all I’ll ever do. This is home.

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LIVING IN SMOKETOWN Susanna Crum, co-founder of Calliope Arts (a fine arts printmaking studio and gallery) and art educator. Wife of Rudy Salgado; cat, Fritz.

Q: How does your neighborhood fit you? A: We are artists, and artists are nomadic by nature. They travel to academic settings to find work and to surround themselves with engaging people. Smoketown has allowed us to be rooted. We could afford to start our printmaking business here — to become stakeholders, not just renters who return to the suburbs at the end of the day. It’s a double investment for us: as business owners and residents. (They rent a space with a printmaking co-op/gallery on the bottom floors and residential apartment on the third.) The mix of residential and industrial is fitting for our live/work lifestyle. We can not only afford the area, but we also love the historical architecture, the industrial feel, and I feel the most creative around the diversity this neighborhood provides.

Q: W hat does it feel like to be a resident of Smoketown? A: I feel a sense of ownership. I think that makes people feel safe. People in this neighborhood are here for a reason; I feel safer walking down the street here than in other neighborhoods where I might hang out on the weekends. The main driver is that Smoketown is undergoing great change. There is the classic gentrification going on, but Youthbuild and the Shepherd Square revitalization are making the neighborhood a strong community. I canvassed for the Vision Smoketown Survey, a comprehensive self-evaluation of the neighborhood’s needs, and got to know a lot of my neighbors. Everyone wants what is best for this neighborhood.

Q: So what does the neighborhood need? A: A  strong neighborhood association is in the works and would organize the business owners and engage the community. More sit-down restaurants and a coffee shop/laundromat would be nice, and more gathering places for events and kids is essential.

Q: How long will you stay? A: We signed a lease for four years and will probably

Smoketown

renew it. I like it here.

A

MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE = $58,217

historically black neighborhood dating back to the Civil War era located one mile southeast of downtown Louisville. The name originates from the large number of smoke-producing, coal-burning kilns in the area during the early brickmaking days. Characterized by narrow streets and densely populated shotgun houses, it reached its peak in 1880 with a population of 15,000. The population decreased in the 1960s after high crime rates dissuaded new residents, but with the influx of new businesses and residents, Smoketown is now a neighborhood on the rise.

TODAY’S WOMAN


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LIVING IN NEW ALBANY Jessica Bergman, vice-president of advancement at Union College. Wife of Matt, mother of Gus, 4, and Javier, the self-appointed mutt and mascot of downtown New Albany.

Q: How does your neighborhood fit you? A: Since I have a longer commute and often travel for work, this neighborhood fits me because I can have a whole weekend without ever having to get in the car. New Albany is extremely convenient, diverse, has parks, coffee shops, restaurants, and when I walk my dog, Javier, everyone stops and chats. It has that small-town feel even though it’s only seven miles from downtown Louisville. I feel very cared for here. There’s a strong sense of belonging, hospitality, and support. And the resources of downtown Louisville are right across the river.

Q: How did you choose New Albany? A: I grew up in Louisville, and my family was pushed out of the city with the UPS expansion. Then I went away to college. When I decided to return to this area, my husband and I thought, ‘What would it be like not to live in a traditional house?’ We found our building — an old commercial building in downtown New Albany — and built a loft on the top floor. We thought we’d be here three to four years and then sell it, but we fell in love with the community. We rent the bottom space to Louis Le Francais, and it works for us. It’s not traditional — our “backyard” is actually a 20-by-20-foot space on our roof — but there are plenty of parks and walkable space around town. We have no plans to leave.

Q: What does New Albany need? A: A  little bodega or grocery store would be nice. There are more people living downtown now, so I think there is enough critical mass to have a place to buy milk and bread. The big controversy right now is whether to make the streets two-way and reroute traffic to bypass downtown in order to slow people down and make it more pedestrian-friendly. I support this idea. It’s a small town, and people like to walk.

New Albany MEDIAN HOME SALE PRICE = $136,896

C

laimed by George Rogers Clark in 1779, the city was founded in 1817 by the Scribner brothers and named after Albany, New York, their hometown. Due to its location along the river, the city boomed with shipbuilding, glass factories, and cabinetry businesses. Home of vocational education and the oldest-running high school radio station in the country.

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Make Sure

QUITTING Doesn’t Fit By BOB MUELLER

M

y dad used to tell my brother and sister and me: “I want you to know that persistence is a habit. And so is quitting. One of the greatest favors I can do for you is to make sure you have the habit of persisting and never develop the habit of quitting.” I never did develop the habit of quitting. It was simply not accepted in my family. Once you started something, you finished it. You finished the food on your plate. You had perfect attendance in school. You practiced the piano for at least a halfhour every day. You sold your required share of magazines for the school fundraiser. That was just something expected in my house, and I’m so grateful for it today. Every single day, I watch people cave on stuff that I know if they had just stuck to it, they would see great things. Perseverance opens doors in life you’ve always dreamed about. People with handicaps and disabilities always amaze and inspire me. They could decide the world is a terrible place to live and give up. They could believe God dealt them a horrible hand. But countless times, they take their challenge and do what many say is impossible. They turn their handicap or disability into a powerful tool that allows them to live the life of their dreams. All of us are driven by faith or fear. Both are the same. Faith or fear is the expectation of an event that hasn’t come to pass or the belief in something that cannot be seen or touched. A person of fear lives always on the edge of insanity. The person of faith lives in perpetual reward.

Life’s real rewards – love, happiness, and contentment – come through our internal growth. When you stretch yourself, you grow, and life’s rewards are obtained through this growth. Ultimately, the journey is about uncovering the deeper level of greatness God has placed within you. Will it take effort? Sure! It’ll take every last bit of effort and energy you have to realize your potential. Walking through your fears will help you find your freedom. Lock these words into your mind and heart: Do what you are afraid of. If you’re afraid of death, volunteer in a nursing home, an assisted living center, or at hospice for several hours a week. If you’re afraid of rejection, ask someone you’ve always wanted to meet to lunch. If you’re afraid of public speaking, take a course in public speaking or join a local Toastmasters Club. If you’re afraid of failing, do exactly the thing you are afraid to fail at doing. Fail miserably and discover all the opportunities failure offers. A sailor who fearfully watches stormy seas lash his vessel will always steer an unproductive course. But a wise and experienced captain keeps his eye firmly fixed upon the lighthouse. He knows that by guiding his ship directly to a specific point, the time spent in discomfort and fatigue is lessened. And by keeping his eye on the light, there never exists one second of discouragement. His light, his harbor, his future is within sight. Today, choose to persist without exception. Hold fast to your dreams. Stay the course. Do not quit. Persist.

BOB MUELLER is senior director of mission & stewardship at Hosparus. www.bobmueller.org

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A Perfect Job

BY BOBBIE SHUNNARAH / PHOTOS: MELISSA DONALD

Few things in life fit just right the first time around. We might have better luck finding the perfect fit with a pair of shoes than a job. Some know exactly what they want to be when they grow up. Others fall into their day jobs by circumstance or coincidence.

W

hat’s the key to finding what fits? Is there a magical formula for finding your niche in a job? “It doesn’t happen overnight,” says Hope Zoeller, founder and president of HOPE (Helping Other People Excel), LLC, a consulting business that offers leadership development, training, and coaching to individuals and groups. “If someone would have told me years ago I was going to end up with my own company, I would have said ‘no way.’ Looking back, I realize everything I did led me on this path. Stepping away from the corporate world into a role with a training consulting company was a step toward what I ultimately wanted to do — leadership development.” In 2005, Hope left a human resources role with a Fortune 500 company to pursue a position with a training consulting firm. She learned of the role from a fellow grad student who approached her about working with him. Armed with a master’s degree in training and development and doctorate in leadership, Hope was seeking a position more in line with her educational background and passions. In the five years Hope served as chief training officer, she learned how to solicit business, build a client base, develop a website, cultivate training, and manage a budget, all skills needed to launch her business in 2010. Facilitating leader success is a good fit for Hope because she has the ability to connect and engage with people. She thrives on helping multiple organizations at one time. “With leaders, there’s no onesize-fits-all. I aim to meet people where they are, adjusting to individual needs.” When seeking a job that fits, Hope recommends doing things that are in line with your passions. This may mean returning to school or joining organizations pursuant to your interests. And if you don’t know what you want? “Spend some time thinking about it,” she says. “Explore things. When considering consulting, I spent six months interviewing other consultants. I gained perspective and awareness to potential challenges. Work toward what you want, because it won’t happen immediately.”

“With leaders, there’s no onesize-fits-all. I aim to meet people where they are, adjusting to individual needs.”

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2015

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Re-entering the Workforce

“You have to be willing to take risks and step out of your comfort zone to do the things you never imagined you could do.”

For Agnese Smith, exceptional child education teacher at Wheeler Elementary, finding a fitting job unraveled a little differently. A stay-at-home mom for 14 years, Agnese re-entered the workforce the same day her youngest child started kindergarten. While attending an event at her son’s school, Meredith Dunn, she learned of an opening for a full-time instructional assistant. She applied, was hired, and for the next three years supported one teacher in all phases of instruction. Through this, Agnese discovered her passion for working with students who learn differently and decided to return to school to earn her master’s in arts and teaching and certification in learning and behavior disorders. Through networking and applying for jobs online, Agnese secured a teaching position at Wheeler after she graduated from Bellarmine in December 2014. What she likes most about her job is the satisfaction of tailoring instruction to fit students’ learning needs. “I like working with a variety of students, a variety of learners, and trying to figure out how to get the most out of them, what motivates them. I have a sense of accomplishment,” she says. “You have to be willing to take risks and step out of your comfort zone to do the things you never imagined you could do. I had to believe I could do this. And I did.”

What Fits a Nurturer Fairly new to the workforce, Erica Parsley, RN with Kosair Children’s Hospital, is exactly where she’s supposed to be. Having served as a nanny and knowing she wanted to explore a career in the medical or science field, Erica pursued an undergraduate degree in nursing from the University of Kentucky. When she graduated in December 2013, she relied on networking to help her find a job. “One of my peers knew I was close to graduating and seeking a job,” Erica says. “She was a nurse at Kosair and spoke highly of the unit and team. She told me of an opening and encouraged me to apply. I went into the interview with an open mind but left feeling it was the right fit for me.” Erica says her experience as a caretaker for small children prepared her for her role as a pediatric nurse. “In this line of work people skills are a must. I am a nurturer by nature. I enjoy being with people and serving as a liaison between the healthcare world and patients. It’s a very family-centered approach because you’re not only taking care of a patient’s needs, but also the needs of their family.” Erica loves working with children of all ages. “Following a patient’s care from start to finish and providing support to patients and their families is so rewarding.” Erica’s biggest piece of advice for new graduates is to job shadow. “It gives you an idea of what your day-today activities will be, and you’ll only realize this by observing,” she says. Internships are another good idea. “While in nursing school, I was required to complete rotations and internships. This helped me gain valuable floor experience and realize my preferred area of interest and what fit for me.”

“Following a patient’s care from start to finish and providing support to patients and their families is so rewarding.”

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WellnessWatch

By TORIE TEMPLE

Postpartum Depression P

ostpartum depression is a term most moms and moms-to-be have heard, but often missing from the plethora of information available about PPD is an issue camouflaged behind it: Postpartum anxiety/obsessive compulsive disorder, which is shown to be more prevalent than postpartum depression. According to a study released by The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, one in 10 new moms will show symptoms of postpartum anxiety/ OCD. Test your knowledge on this perinatal mood disorder and learn more with Christy Weber, licensed professional clinical counselor, and Jennifer Molina, prenatal and postpartum certified yoga instructor and birth and postpartum doula.

T or F The “baby blues” is another term for postpartum anxiety/OCD. FALSE: “Baby blues are normal new mom worries,” Weber says. “Eighty percent of moms can experience baby blues with symptoms like some weepiness, a little sadness, or feeling tired. Fifteen to 20 percent of women suffer from postpartum anxiety/OCD with symptoms like excessive anxiety, irritability, and feelings of hopelessness.” T or F Symptoms of postpartum anxiety/OCD will go away when hormones balance out. FALSE: “The symptoms of baby blues last about three weeks and go away on their own,” Weber explains. “Symptoms of postpartum anxiety/OCD will not go away on their own. The symptoms can start during pregnancy or anytime during the first year postpartum. Women experiencing persistent symptoms should seek professional care.” T or F Moms suffering from postpartum anxiety can have alarming thoughts. TRUE:“Intrusive thoughts are scary thoughts we fixate on, such as something horrible happening to our kids or us doing something horrible to our kids,” Molina says. “Sometimes rational thinking goes out the window when moms are sleep-deprived or suffering from postpartum anxiety, but just because you have these thoughts doesn’t mean you will act on them.” T or F Postpartum depression and postpartum anxiety/OCD are the same perinatal mood disorder. FALSE: “Moms can experience PPD and postpartum anxiety/OCD one at a time or both at once, but they are different,” Molina explains. “For symptoms of both PPD and postpartum anxiety/OCD, go to postpartumprogress.org.” T or F One of the best things for a mom with postpartum anxiety/ OCD is to mingle with other moms. TRUE: “New moms’ groups and community support are really helpful,” Molina says. Here are a few local moms’ groups: Babyology — babyology.com, 502.721.7727 The Diaper Fairy Cottage — diaperfairy.net/TheCottage.htm, 502.708.1018 Green Line Wellness — greenlinewellness.com, 502.426.2777 Owltree Yoga — owltreeyoga.com, 502.396.9687 For more information, visit postpartumsupportkentuckiana.com, postpartum.net, or call the warm line at 502.541.1818.

SOURCES: Christy Weber, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor specializing in perinatal mood disorders at Breckenridge Counseling Center 502.303.2449 breckenridgecounseling.com Jennifer Molina MPH, 200 RYT, Birth and Postpartum Doula; founder of Owltree Yoga Center owltreeyoga.com 502.396.9687

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Best Bite Have a bright start to the day at newly opened Con Huevos. This sunny dish, the Chipotle Poached Huevos, layers a housemade corn biscuit topped with chorizo, poached eggs, and served with a chipotle gravy and avocado.

Text and photograph by MELISSA DONALD

Con Huevos LOCATION:

2339 Frankfort Avenue Louisville, KY 502.384.3027 conhuevos.com HOURS:

Tuesday-Friday, 7:30am-2pm Saturday and Sunday, 8am-3pm Closed Mondays 54

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TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WOMAN


PASSIONS

A

*ewing Passion In relationships…play…community

By MARY ELLEN BIANCO

“I can’t stop my husband from texting women and messaging them on Facebook. I’ve begged him to stop. He swears he’s doing nothing wrong, just talking to JUST ASK JOYCE them. When I look at the conversations, they seem innocent enough, but these girls are in their 20s and he’s 40! They’re flirtatious. He’s not really, but it still bothers me. Am I overly jealous, or should I be concerned?”

Q:

Find the

A: at TodaysWomanNow.com

LOOKING FOR:

T

hroughout her 30-year career as a business and technology teacher, Colleen Murphy relaxed using the skills her mother taught her. “Sewing took all of the stress away,” she says. “I just loved it.” Colleen was an only child, and her mother sewed all of her clothes. “When I graduated from college, she said I was on my own,” Colleen fondly recalls. “I bought my first house, and my mother did help me make the window treatments.” Colleen is now the owner of Sew Much Fun, a sewing school business she started after retiring from JCPS in 1984. “Retirement has been the best time of my life,” she says, adding that one benefit she enjoys from running the sewing school is the mental challenge. Colleen’s husband, Bob Payne, works alongside her as the owner of

his photography business, Photo Fashion. He takes and posts pictures on the Sew Much Fun website and does tabletop photography for artists. “Bob and I also work out three times per week,” Colleen adds. “Our quality of life is great.” Colleen uses her teaching skills in seven classes each week. People of all ages can learn clothing construction, quilting, fashion design, and home decor. “It’s a lot of fun and a bonding experience,” Colleen says. Teens ages 13 and up can also study the basics of sewing. Three of Colleen’s students are high school seniors interested in fashion design. “I try to do whatever I can to help them along the way,” she says. One former student attended the Parsons’ School of Fashion, and several others are also in the field.

Contact Colleen at sewmuchfunky.com or 502.899.3693. 56

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* Great Husbands * Someone who deserves a makeover * Great Guys for our Man Issue * Party Girls Enter them @TodaysWomanNow.com

TODAY’S WOMAN


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BEFORE YOU

GO

By TIFFANY WHITE Photo by MELISSA DONALD

NAME: Ja’Nel Johnson AGE: 27 JOB: Health reporter, WFPL LIVES IN: Old Louisville Ja’Nel Johnson didn’t grow up thinking she wanted to become a journalist. In high school, she excelled in biology but wasn’t interested in pursuing a career in medicine. “I really began to like my English and theater classes more, so during my senior year, my guidance counselor suggested I take a journalism class in college,” she says. Ja’Nel took her first journalism course at Claflin University in Orangeburg, South Carolina, and she quickly became hooked. “Journalism mixes the writing and English components,” Ja’Nel says. “It kind of came naturally, and I am an inquisitive person. I love talking to people.” A native of Gary, Indiana, Ja’Nel moved to Louisville from Omaha, Nebraska, where she worked as a news director for independent radio station KVNO. Ja’Nel says being a newcomer to Louisville has been advantageous for her in the job at WFPL because she is able to glean information from people in the community about healthcare issues happening in the city. “People have been very nice, and knowing that I work in a community where people care about health is very helpful too,” she says. In her free time, Ja’Nel takes salsa classes and has an obsession with fitness. “I discovered Kiera Lashay’s workout videos in December, so I am doing one of her 30-day challenges.” BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE’S LOVING: “I like the Cetaphil bar and moisturizer for my face. When I first moved to Kentucky, my skin went crazy. I also use B.L.A.C. mineral powder and eye shadow.” FASHION SHE’S WEARING: “I like Ann Taylor and The Limited, but lately I’ve been going to Goodwill to find some stuff. I found two pairs of pants, three skirts, knee-high boots, a dress, and a cashmere sweater.”

Before I Go... 58

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“I say a little prayer.”

SONGS SHE LIKES SINGING: “I come up with little songs randomly. I am always writing something on Evernote or on a napkin. I wrote a hip-hop lullaby for my 3-year-old niece based on a Ludacris song.” TODAY’S WOMAN


Today's Woman May 2015  

Find Your Fit - This month, we don’t want you settling for anything less than the perfect fit in every part of your life. In this issue, we...

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