Issuu on Google+

WE REUSED MAGAZINES!


MARCH 2014 / CONTENTS CELEBRATING 22 YEARS

Volume 25 8 Number 3

6 In Our Issue

40

20

10 What Works

BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT

12 Turning Point BY LUCY M. PRITCHETT

14 Survival Skills BY MARIE BRADBY

16 Vote For Most Admired Woman 2014

26

18 T  he Agenda BY CATHY ZION

20 A  Purpose to Repurposing BY TORIE TEMPLE

26 22 Things BY ANITA OLDHAM

32 Restoring New Life BY JESSICA ALYEA

38 Wellness Watch BY MALI ANDERSON

40 Best Bite

BY MELISSA DONALD

42 Ready  To Change Your Life? BY MELISSA DONALD

46 Passions 48 Hot Happenings BY GIOIA PATTON

50

50 Before You Go BY TIFFANY WHITE

4

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


MARCH 2014 / IN OUR ISSUE

C E L E B R AT I N G 2 2 Y E A R S

Volume 25 8 Number 3

Women Say the

Greatest Things

I

n honor of all the contributions women have made to our world, we wanted to hear from a few notable women.

“Having family responsibilities and concerns just has to make you a more understanding person.” -Sandra Day O’Connor, first female US Supreme Court justice

“Cautious, careful people, always casting about to preserve their reputation and social standing, never can bring about a reform. Those who are really in earnest must be willing to be anything or nothing in the world’s estimation.” -Susan B. Anthony, civil rights leader

“If society will not admit of woman’s free development, then society must be remodeled.” -Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to become a medical doctor in the USA

“Never limit yourself because of others’ limited imagination; never limit others because of your own limited imagination.” -Mae Jemison, first African American female astronaut

ON OUR COVER

Read more about what Julee is doing on her blog on page 26.

Julee Lair, owner of D.I.Y. Louisville, is showing people how they can turn items such as recycled coffee sacks into useful and decorative items. This dress was constructed by using a dress found at Goodwill as a base and attaching magazine covers from our bright Derby and Most Admired Woman issues. A lot of staples, tape, and folding went into the dress by designers Anita Oldham, Tiffany White, Melissa Donald, and Jessica Alyea. — Tiffany White MAKEUP: ISIDRO VALENCIA / PHOTO: MELISSA DONALD JULEE IS WEARING: Nine West shoes, $24, available at The Nitty Gritty, 502.585.3377

WE ARE

ONLINE: 6

MARCH

2014

TodaysWomanNow.com TODAY’S WOMAN


Volume 25 8 Number 3

CELEBRATING 22 YEARS

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion

EDITOR IN CHIEF Anita Oldham

EDITOR Tiffany White

editor@todayspublications.com

ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Alyea

publisher@todayspublications.com

tiffany@todayspublications.com

jessica@todayspublications.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Miranda G. Popp

PHOTOGRAPHER/FOOD WRITER Melissa Donald

miranda@todayspublications.com

melissa@todayspublications.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kathy Bolger (and Riley)

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Rose Helm

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Joyce Inman

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Teri Hickerson

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Suzy Hillebrand

rose@todayspublications.com

joyce@todayspublications.com

teri@todayspublications.com

suzy@todayspublications.com

MEDIA ASSOCIATE Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com

OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Kaitlyn Tew

CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion

officeadmin@todayspublications.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com

kathyb@todayspublications.com

REPRINTS ARE AVAILABLE! Call (502) 327-8855, ext. 10, or email us at reprints@todayspublications.com with details and specifics. For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call (502) 327-8855. Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: (502) 327-8855 • Fax: (502) 327-8861 todayswomannow.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2014 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

BBB RATING OF

8

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


WHAT WORKS

BOBBI BUCHANAN, 48

Professor of academic writing at Jefferson Community and Technical College — Bullitt County campus; author of newly published book Listen: Essays on Living the Good Life; editor of online magazine New Southerner (newsoutherner.com) HOUSEHOLD:

Husband David Buchanan; son Aaron, 23; her daughter Rachel’s children, Chloe, 15, and Kylie, 8. NEIGHBORHOOD: near Mt. Washington, Ky.

10

MARCH

2014

Three things that work for Bobbi Buchanan

Interview by LUCY M. PRITCHETT / Photo by MELISSA DONALD

MORNING RITUAL

RECYCLING

CONNECTIONS

Part of Bobbi’s morning ritual is walking around her rural neighborhood with her two dogs, Honey (pictured above) and Baby. “The only thing that stops us is rain or extreme cold. Otherwise, we walk three miles. This is meditative for me. I enjoy looking at the changes in the landscape and observing the wildlife — deer, birds, and squirrels, and even a fox or two. It is a time to empty my mind.” Once she gets home, she goes immediately to her office and spends time writing in her journal. “I always come back with some inspiration or thoughts that I want to write down. I have a collection of hardback blank journals that people have given me or that I have bought. I write with a pencil, and the thoughts in my journal may become essays or poems.”

Bobbi has long been conscious of how much ‘stuff’ gets thrown away in the world. To that end, recycling and composting are major priorities for her and her family. “Very few things go in the trash. We have set up recycling bins in the pantry. One for glass, metal, and plastic, and one for paper. I buy large containers of yogurt or other food instead of individual servings, which cuts down on bulk. Once the indoor bins get full, we empty them into a 55-gallon container. It gets taken to a recycling center at the firehouse close by.” Bobbi also keeps a bucket on the back porch, and eggshells, vegetable peelings, and coffee grounds go into it. That gets emptied onto the compost pile. “It’s amazing how that all turns into a rich loam. It’s like magic. We use that nice fertilizer for our vegetable garden every year.”

As with many people, Bobbi has a love/hate relationship with technology. “I don’t have a smart phone. I try to resist the temptation to jump on the computer when I get the urge. Being digitally connected is convenient, but faceto-face communication makes my life richer. That is the kind of interaction I seek and crave.” Occasionally she will spend a day totally unplugged. Sometimes she just gets busy and doesn’t think about checking email or Facebook or any of the other distractions technology can hold. “I have a constant awareness of how much time I am spending online instead of in real life.”

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

11


>

TURNING POINT

<

HER WORDS OF WISDOM She writes the history she wants for herself. By LUCY M. PRITCHETT Photo by MELISSA DONALD

JENNIFER WHITE, 41 Adjunct faculty, Women’s and Gender Studies Department, University of Louisville Household: Husband, U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Jason White Neighborhood: Hodgenville, Ky.

12

MARCH

2014

Jennifer clearly recalls a turning point in her life. “My friend was looking for career guidance and I told her, ‘Don’t rush into anything. Don’t just settle for just being productive.’ I realized I had given her advice that I wish someone had given me.” At the same time, Jennifer, who has a master’s degree in English from UofL, was working full time as coordinator for the university’s military initiatives program. She liked her job and felt she was being productive. She was also at the end of course work on her doctorate and was researching for her dissertation on a woman who, in 1733, was convicted and hanged for the crime of infanticide in New England. The combination of her conversation with her friend and her research initiated a big change for Jennifer. “I could find very little information about Rebeka Chamblit. She was an unmarried woman who had a stillborn baby. Yet she was found guilty of killing that child. It was disheartening to think that a woman would live and die and be known only for one thing. “I recall thinking ‘No one is ever going to write a history about me. I have to write my own history every day. I owe it to myself to live it and write it every day.” Teaching is the one thing Jennifer wanted to do above all else so she sought opportunities. “I applied to two conferences and presented research papers at one in Washington, D.C. and one in Budapest. After the conference in Hungary, I took things one step further and traveled around Europe for a month. “I continue to write the history that I want for myself. That’s how I make choices every day.” TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

13


Survival Skills

“To be successful, students need to know what will be expected of them in the workplace.”

By MARIE BRADBY Photo by MELISSA DONALD

Debra’s Survival Tips: On fundraising ~

1. Always honor your

commitments to your investors. “If I propose to an investor that I am going to serve 3,000 low-income children with their donation, I need to be able to report that I did that at the end of the grant period.”

2. Your most effective Debra Hoffer is president of Junior Achievement Kentuckiana.

Inspiring Entrepreneurs

W

hen fundraising, “Never take ‘no’ for an answer until you’ve heard ‘no’ seven times, and then ‘hell, no!’” says Debra Hoffer, who has served as CEO of three nonprofits in the Louisville area. Since 2000, Debra, 56, has been president of Junior Achievement Kentuckiana (JA), which teaches financial literacy, personal budgeting, entrepreneurship, and career readiness to more than 56,000 elementary and high school students each year. “We are 100 percent privately funded,” Debra says. “We raise about $1.5 million a year. We get no government money.” Debra says timing is critical to fundraising for JA. “When you ask a potential investor for a contribution, the timing might not be right at the

14

MARCH

2014

moment, but it might be at a later date,” she says. “You wait until the appropriate time to ask them again — the next cycle or a year later. You say, ‘I know it wasn’t the right time last time, but would you consider again?’ I learned that from Ed Glasscock, who was the honorary chairman for our capital campaign that started in 2001. We would report back to him, and he would say, ‘Did they say “no” and “hell no”? If you didn’t get the “hell no,” then we go back.’” To be successful, students need to know what will be expected of them in the workplace, Debra says. “They need to set attainable career goals, and they need to be able to manage paychecks once they receive them. Plus, we want to inspire them to become the entrepreneurs of the future.”

fundraising tool is a firsthand experience with your mission. “Rather than going to their office and making a dry pitch, we like to invite prospective donors to our building so they can see JA kids in action.”

On finances ~

1.

 Start saving for college when your child is born. “Have it deducted from your checking account, and you’ll never miss it.”

2. Pay off your credit

card balance every month. “If you don’t do this habitually, you are living beyond your means.”

3.

When you get a raise, don’t fritter it away. “The ‘fritter factor’ can keep you from saving a down payment for a home.” TODAY’S WOMAN


ARTS

most

ADMIRED woman

❒ C.J. FLETCHER

COMMUNITY/NONPROFITS SPONSORED BY HOME INSTEAD

❒ RUTH BRINKLEY

❒ ALISON HUFF

❒ JENNIFER HALL

❒ DR. TAMI CASSIS

❒ SUREKHA KULKARNI

❒ JEANIE KAHNKE

❒ DR. TONI M. GANZEL

❒ JULIE SCHWEITZER

❒ MARTA MIRANDA

❒ ALICE GRAY STITES

❒ MARY KATE O’LEARY

❒ DR. LAQUANDRA NESBITT

Artist

Walden Theatre

Beaded Treasures Project

Arts Council of Southern Indiana 21c Museum Hotels

❒ CYNTHIA TORP Solid Light

ATHLETES/FITNESS ❒ KELLY FUST

So. Ind. Gymnastics School

It’s your turn to vote for the women you admire in the Louisville/Southern Indiana area. These women were nominated for the 12th Today’s Woman Most Admired Woman Award by the editorial staff of Today’s Woman. ONLINE VOTING

DEADLINE: MARCH 31, NOON

Vote online for one person in each category once per day per email address at TodaysWomanNow.com or mail (postmarked by March 31) your votes to Today’s Woman, 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223.

❒ ANNE JEWELL

Louisville Slugger Museum

❒ ANNIE LOCKE

Baptist East/Milestone Wellness Center; Pure Barre

KYK9

Muhammad Ali Center

Center for Women and Families Uspiritus (fka Brooklawn)

HEALTH/HEALTHCARE KentuckyOne Health Cassis Dermatology

UofL School of Medicine

Louisville Metro Dept. of Public Health and Wellness

❒ MARY SULLIVAN

❒ KATHY NEUNER

❒ LORA TUCKER

❒ DR. LORI SWEAT

CORPORATE

HOME/HOME STYLE

Metro United Way

Girl Scouts of Kentuckiana

❒ JILL JOSEPH BELL Passport Health

❒ BETH BIERBOWER Humana

❒ ANNE P. BYERLEIN YUM! Brands, Inc.

Clark Memorial Hospital Integrative Hormone Specialists

❒ ANN BROTZGE Colonial Designs

❒ LEILA DAVIS Tassels

❒ SANDY KIMURA Kimura Designs

❒ OKSANA MASTERS

❒ LAURA DOUGLAS

❒ JENNIE REES

❒ HEATHER HOWELL

❒ PENNY LOVE

❒ MARY ZAPPONE

❒ DIANE STEGE

Paralympic rower

Courier-Journal Horse Racing Reporter

❒ JOYCE SEYMOUR

Girls Louisville Invitational Basketball Tournament

BEAUTY/FASHION

LG&E/KU

Rooibee Red Tea RecoverCare

EDUCATION SPONSORED BY MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER

❒ LESLIE LEWIS-SHEETS Leslie Lewis & Associates

Design * Build * Renovate Eyedia

MEDIA

❒ DEBBIE BLAIR

❒ ANN BOWDAN

❒ SALLY BIRD

❒ BARBARA BURKE FONDREN

❒ ANGIE FENTON

❒ AMANDA GIBSON

❒ JANE GOLDSTEIN

❒ JEAN PORTER

❒ REBECCA KIMURA

❒ DR. DONNA HARGENS

❒ ELIZABETH WOOLSEY

❒ KATE MANN

❒ DR. RIFFAT HASSAN

❒ TRACY VARGA

❒ CHERYL LOWE

❒ JUNE BALE The Willow Tree Dot Fox

Dress and Dwell

Rebecca’s Wedding Boutique Blades Salon and Spa

Tracy Varga Image Consulting

BUSINESS OWNERS SPONSORED BY VEIN TREATMENT CENTER

❒ JUANITA BEACH Beach Mold and Tool

West End School

Community Montessori

UofL School of Business

Jefferson Co. Public Schools

UofL College of Arts & Sciences Highlands Latin School

FOOD/ENTERTAINMENT ❒ JULIE DeFRIEND The Oakroom at the Seelbach Hilton

WLKY-32

WHAS-11 Great Day Live

❒ LAUREN JONES WAVE3 Courier-Journal WDRB-41

❒ CHARLA YOUNG The Charla Young Show

POLITICAL ❒ KELLEY ABELL

Capitol Solutions, LLC.

❒ LANA AEBERSOLD Floyd County Council

Name:_______________________________

❒ KATIE BROPHY

❒ SARAH FRITSCHNER

❒ JULIE DENTON

Address:_____________________________

❒ DEBORAH CHARLTON

❒ PHYLLIS GARMON

❒ MARY LOU MARZIAN

City, State, __________________________ Zip:_________________________________

❒ PAT ARRINGTON KENNEDY

❒ EILEEN MOORE

Phone number: _____________________

❒ KATHY MILLS

❒ TOKI MASUBUCHI

Email address:_______________________

❒ T  IERRA KAVANAUGH TURNER

❒ ANNIE PETTRY

Comments about why you voted the way you did or any write-in votes: ____________________________________

Attorney

PMR Companies

Jefferson Animal Hospital Strategic Communications

Louisville Farm to Table

Wooded Glen Retreat and Conference Center

Horseshoe Southern Indiana Dragon King’s Daughter Decca

Kentucky State Senator Kentucky State Representative 

❒ SADIQA REYNOLDS

Chief of Community Building, Metro Louisville    

❒ CAROLYN TANDY

District Director for U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth  

TKT & Associates

____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________ 16

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


Reuse…Repurpose…Rejoice!

E THE AGENDA ON TWITTER

Meet women business owners at the @nawbolouisville Epic Awards on March 4 at @MellwoodArts #Epicaward Encourage single parents attending college at the @FamilyScholars Wine Women & Shoes at The Henry Clay on March 6. familyscholarhouse.org #Cheeringongrads @TodaysFamilyNow will be at Louisville Kids Fair on March 8-9

ighteen years ago, I was struggling with finding purpose in my 21-year banking career. Oh sure, I had a nice salary, office, title, benefits, and staff, but I didn’t feel like I was making a difference. So I “repurposed” the skills gleaned during that banking career and bought the then-fledgling Today’s Woman. I’d like to say it was an easy transition, but what in life that is worthwhile is easy? I’m certainly not alone in business ownership. During the past 20 years, women-owned businesses have become the fastestgrowing segment of our economy. Today, one out of every three businesses is owned by a woman. Yes, many women are “repurposing” their skills as they become frustrated with bumping the elusive glass ceiling in corporate work or are seeking more control over their lives and wanting to make contributions to their world. Is it time for you to repurpose your life and follow a dream of opening a new business? Don’t underestimate the skill set you’ve acquired. Stay-at-home moms learn skills in organization and multitasking. Many of those skills are transferable to a business where you can find your passion and purpose. Take an inventory of your strengths and weaknesses — and be honest. Seek out resources to help you assess your idea. Kentucky’s a great place to start your new business with a recent survey showing that it ranks number one in the nation for number of startups, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics (finally, a good ranking for Kentucky!). So start repurposing your career and rejoice in the results! Cathy Zion Publisher Today’s Woman

Don’t miss the Women in Business Expo at the Galt House March 13-14. wbcky.org Support women seeking employment by attending @dressforsuccess Gals and Guys Hats & Ties Auction & Fashion Show on March 21 at Churchill Downs #GetafabulousDerbyhat Get out the #Pearls&Pumps for March 22 Baptist Health Foundation at the Olmsted. #helpwomenwithcancer

TWEET AT US @TodaysWomanNow if you are also at these events or other events we should let our readers know about. 18

MARCH

2014

VOTE FOR

most

ADMIRED woman 2014

Who Do You Admire? Help us honor women who are making a difference! You can vote once per day per email address. See page 16 or TodaysWomanNow.com.

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

19


A PURPOSE

TO REPURPOSING

Creativity can shine through in many forms, but it’s not often for that beam of creativity to shine through garbage. With Americans producing more than 200 million tons of garbage each year according to the EPA, it takes thinking outside the recycling box to keep reusable items out of landfills. Generating this type of unusual resourcefulness is just what three local women have done by transforming what others see as garbage into useful household items or artwork. By TORIE TEMPLE Photos by MELISSA DONALD

20

MARCH

2014

TURN TO PAGE 22 TODAY’S WOMAN


FROM PAGE 20

G

ail Wilson started her blog, My Repurposed Life, in 2009 after the school she taught at for 19 years closed. Wilson says she loves the idea of giving new life to items — not just by dusting them off and giving them a new coat of paint, but by reinventing them. “There is a difference between refurbishing and repurposing,” Wilson says. “Refurbishing is repainting; repurposing is taking a desk and making it into a media center. You change its use.” Wilson’s blog is packed with projects and detailed tutorials on how she made her transformations. She starts her projects by finding pieces on the side of the road, in thrift stores, or with items that have been donated to her. “Headboards are one of the items that can be easily found and repurposed,” she says. With some chalkboard paint, Wilson was able to transform one of her donated headboards into a memo board. She says chalkboard paint is an easy way to repurpose just about any item. One of Wilson’s favorite repurposing projects was transforming her daughter’s childhood desk. “It had identical drawers on both sides, so I cut the desk and stacked the drawers to make a chest,” she says. “Now I have the same amount of storage space with a smaller footprint.” Wilson has made repurposing a lifestyle that she shares with more than 300,000 Facebook followers.

clothing seems to be better quality — the kind of “Older quality you can only get out of high-priced pieces

today,” says Holly Jenkins-Evans, owner of the online clothing store Past Perfect Vintage. “Just don’t throw away your clothes. Always donate them to a thrift store or vintage shop.” Vintage and thrift store shopping are increasingly popular ways to repurpose clothing. Jenkins-Evans has noticed her customers buying 1940s- or ‘50s-style garments and matching them with modern pieces. “I just sold a ‘40s jacket to a lady who wanted it for work, and she will probably pair it with jeans or a modern skirt,” she says. Unfortunately, not all garments are salvageable. For instance, dry-rotted clothing cannot be repaired. But if the garment is not wearable, there are other ways to repurpose it. “Use the salvageable pieces to restore another garment or to make something like a pillow,” Jenkins-Evans suggests. “Don’t worry about the age of a garment,” she continues. “If it looks good on you, wear it.” TURN TO PAGE 24

22

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

23


FROM PAGE 22

J

eans always seem to find a way into donation piles. But where others see a cheap pair of old jeans, Lynn Quire, owner of Good Garbage, sees a soon-to-be-made memo board. She engineered that in one of her workshops by pulling denim jean legs over fabric bolts and foam to create a memo board. At Good Garbage, Quire offers repurposing workshops for kids and adults to learn how to turn material that would normally be tossed in the trash into usable items. In these workshops, she has turned jean pockets into pouches, half-gallon milk cartons into gardening shovels, and paper bags into kites. Quire is not only passionate about keeping as much out of the landfill as possible, but also about keeping art in the lives of children. “I want to always keep my workshops free for kids,” she says. “I also want teachers to have access to crafting materials by offering weekly freebies for teachers.” Quire accepts donations and provides a wishlist on her website, Goodgarbage.org, where she lists needed items such as empty tissue boxes, shampoo bottles, and broken crayons. She then uses these materials in her workshops or donates them to local schools. Quire says she wants parents to understand that things like yogurt cups or items with lids can be stored in a box to use the next time their children say they’re bored. This has inspired Quire to make “I’m Bored” kits to help get parents started. In a true spirit of repurposing, Good Garbage shows adults and children that almost any garbage can actually be good garbage.

24

MARCH

2014

Repurposing Tips Since chalkboard paint can be pricey, consider making your own out of Plaster of Paris, paint, and water. Mix a ½ cup of plaster with a ½ cup warm water until the plaster dissolves. Then add 1½ cups of latex paint. A sealer must be used in order for the paint not to chip. This can be done by using any wax or polyurethane. Gail Wilson, writer of My Repurposed Life blog, adds another coat of paint for a sealer. For a budget-friendly all-purpose repurposing tool, try purchasing a jigsaw. It comes in handy for many repurposing projects. Use an ice cube tray to keep your earrings, rings, or buttons organized.  onsider making your own “I’m Bored” C kits to give away at birthday parties. Add saved materials such as yarn and a paper towel roll to a paper bag with instructions on what to make out of the items. Need ideas? Pinterest is always a good source. Turn an old window into a dry erase board by painting one side of the glass white. Dry erase markers wipe right off the glass. Check to see if the garment you are buying is truly vintage by looking at the zipper. Zippers that are nylon or invisible are newer; metal zippers are usually vintage.  intagefashionguild.org is a great V resource for tips on dating and caring for vintage clothing.  rtists from Urban Art Glass collect A shards of glass found on the streets, then fuse them into flowers and other artwork. These can be found on consignment at Good Garbage, located at 2020 Duncan St. in Louisville. Helpful tools to have on hand when repurposing furniture: Hammer, pry bar, tape measure, and speed square.

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

25


22THINGS Why 22? Because we are 22 years old!

Happenings, news, celebrations, and tidbits that caught Today’s Woman’s eye this month. By ANITA OLDHAM

1

Dress in Blue Day Save lives, promote colon cancer screening, and dress in blue on March 7! Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Kentucky and the nation. Spread the word about colorectal cancer and encourage your friends and family age 50 and over to get screened.

erby ny D So ma re comin g a e! ha ts ril issu p A e in th

CONTACT: 502.852.6318.

2 Wear

about joan rivers By GIOIA PATTON

* * * * * 3

Your

She’s been a household name since the 1960s. Rivers’ stand-up comedy signature question “Can we talk?” is a federal trademark.

4

Preview the newest spring fashions and benefit women’s cancer care at Baptist Health. FROM: 11am -2pm March 22 COST: VISIT: supportbaptisthealth.org

8

LEADERSHIP SUMMIT Leadership Louisville Center is hosting the Best of Leadership Summit on March 17-18. Several speakers and breakout session leaders will be there, but we thought you would want to know that Alice Houston of Houston-Johnson Inc. and Mary Moseley of The Al J. Schneider Company are opening speakers. Register at leadershiplouisville.org.

26

MARCH

2014

$60

Read Gioia Patton’s interview with Joan Rivers, in which she talks about her work ethic, what she’s like offstage, her relationship with her daughter Melissa Rivers, and what’s behind her firm belief that she can still take today’s female comics “with one arm tied behind my back if there was a stand-up contest!” Go to TodaysWomanNow.com.

Her Late Night talk show helped launch the Fox Network in 1986.

5

Since the launch of the Joan Rivers Classics Collection of jewelry on QVC network in 1990, sales total more than $750 million. She’s responsible for the huge popularity of red carpet televised events thanks to her trailblazing ‘Who are you wearing?’ fashion coverage, which began in 1994 during the two-hour period leading up to major show business awards.

6

7

Joan Rivers will be at The Brown Theatre with her stand-up act on March 21.

In 2009 at the age of 75, Rivers won season two of Donald Trump’s Celebrity Apprentice reality series competition.


2014

MARCH

27


22 THINGS

10

We met several women who repurpose and would love for you to meet them.

“I’m a creative artist by trade, so this is just what I do. I love creating things with my hands. I mainly create pieces based on a specific theme, based on what I need it for. I once used pages from Pride and Prejudice to make a chandelier.”

J

NINE

ulee Lair, creator of the community group and blog D.I.Y. Louisville, began using recycled materials such as typical household items as a cost-saving measure. “I run a craft group called D.I.Y. Louisville and have a blog with the same name. I also do a craft segment on WDRB,” she says. D.I.Y. Louisville has been together as a group since October 2010. “I started the group to find like-minded artists in the area. I try to use things that we already have around. Basically a lot of coffee sacks and typical household items like jars, cans, and bottles.”

Alana Gillet, who has been a member of the Jane Austen Society of North America — Greater Louisville Region for three years, will present the Contents of Women’s Reticule/Re-purposing Costume Jewelry on March 16. She will be showing examples of her grandmother’s costume jewelry that she has repurposed into different pieces. — Alissa Hicks

11

Our photographer Melissa Donald and calligrapher Jennifer Grove have a repurposing project where they create journals out of leather they find at thrift stores. They also repurpose maps and old buttons and shells. Their journals can be found at The Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft.

12 Janet Rauscher uses her design degree to repurpose midcentury furniture for Repurposed Modern, the store she owns and curates. “For me, it’s all about timeless design,” she says. “I like to get items that have distinctive design elements... something you can build off of... and quality! I like something that will continue to live on when someone has purchased it from my store.” repurposedmodern.com — Alissa Hicks

28

MARCH

2014

13 C

athy Wade began her repurposing career when she was in middle school. She now repurposes 100 percent cashmere sweaters into other items such as lap throws and infinity scarves. “I started sewing when I was in middle school. I just wanted different clothing. I used tablecloths and curtains and started making A-line skirts.” What’s her signature repurposing style? “I save all of my labels, and I also cover manequins in different things. I do everything by hand. I try to stay branded; I want people to look at my [items] and say ‘That’s a Cathy Wade.’” designsbycathywade.com — Alissa Hicks “…I grew up not wasting anything.”


22 THINGS Celebrate Women’s History Month by learning about women in your family and the decisions they made to affect your life for the better.

fifteen A Woman Making History

14

Dr. Rebecca Terry, a founding partner of Women First, became inspired by other successful women physicians at the University of Oregon where she did her Dr. Rebecca Terry is residency, because a founding partner of they weren’t placing Women First. limitations on themselves or their career aspirations. “This gave me a new way of looking at things and raising my awareness of being a woman’s advocate,” she says. Dr. Terry cites Eleanor Roosevelt as being a woman she admires most. “She was very smart…a woman who used her position of power to be an influence and promote agendas that promote equality and compassion.” — Tiffany White

“In Iroquois society, leaders are encouraged to remember seven generations in the past and consider seven generations in the future when making decisions that affect the people.”

21

— Wilma Mankiller, the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation

Teresa Taylor, a Fortune 200 executive, has some personal advice for other women in the workplace in her book The Balance Myth: Rethinking Work-Life Success. Here are some of her tips: Stop searching for balance. One 16 issue that holds women back is their search for balance. When it’s not there, they get frustrated — possibly turning down a promotion or leaving the workforce completely. Manage your time more efficiently. If I have one hour to work on a presentation at work or one hour to clean at home, I do the best I can for that one hour.

18

30

MARCH

2014

19

Combine work 17 your and family schedules. I used to keep two different calendars — one for home and one for work — but I was missing work deadlines, my kids’ activities, and other events. So I combined the calendars, which caused me to start talking about my family at work and integrating my two lives. It’s one life and one calendar!

It isn’t just a job. Work at a place and on something you are passionate about. Don’t just take a “job.” Then you aren’t choosing between work and life. It is your life.

TAKE THE PROMOTION. THE ONLY WAY YOU ARE GOING TO BE ABLE TO EFFECT CHANGE IS TO GET YOURSELF AND OTHER WOMEN IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE MAKING DECISIONS AND INFLUENCING CHANGE.

20

Celebrate International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month by heading to the Stirring the Fire photography exhibition about issues facing women and girls worldwide. AliCenter.org.

HOLLY GREGOR PRESENTS:

22 BE BRAVE, DO YOUR THING Find your gift through inspiration, education, and sharing WHEN: March 15, 10am-12pm WHERE: Canoe, 216 S. Shelby St, Louisville COST: $30. Register at 502.327.8855 or TodaysWomanNow.com

Come hear from Tori Murden McClure, president of Spalding University and the first woman to row solo across the Atlantic Ocean, as she talks about being brave. What’s next for her to accomplish? TODAY’S WOMAN


YOU

When you donate to Goodwill of Southern Indiana, you change lives. Through the power of your donations, we are able to serve over 5,000 children and adults with disabilities and disadvantages in Southern Indiana each year.

“Customer service is my passion, and I enjoy assisting everyone,” she says.

Have you lent your beautiful face to our magazines lately? You can order the photos we use in our magazines through our SmugMug account. Go to TodaysWomanNow.com and click on “Order Photos.”

Sullivan College of Technology & Design

Karen Wheeler, Sales & Leasing Consultant, will help you through the new and pre-owned vehicle purchasing process. She understands all the details involved in choosing the right vehicle and she’s a former Local UAW member with Ford Motor Company.

Byerly Ford Nissan 4041 Dixie Highway • Louisville, KY 40216 Call or Text: 502.802.2865 • Email: kwheeler@byerlyford.com

Order Today’s Woman Photos

The area’s finest products and services at your fingertips

Join the FASHION MANNERS CLUB! 1st - 4th grade young ladies

8-week class will include: • Being confident, not cocky • Meal etiquette • Dress for special occasions • Respecting adults & peers • Fun! • Shaking hands Call Abigail Mueller, 502.500.7071, for details or to register. 426 Wallace Ave. • Louisville

11 Southern Indiana area locations • goodwillsi.org

Laura Wagner, LMFT

Byerly Ford Nissan

Goodwill of Southern Indiana

FOR

Abigail Academy

HERE

– ADVERTISEMENT –

You only have one chance to make a first impression. Make foyers and entries set a stage for clients and guests. Wow them with an interesting light fixture or an unexpected pop of color! For more information about the art of an interior design education, contact Malandra Gibson at Sullivan College of Technology and Design. Learn more at sctd.edu.

What would it mean to: • live a life focused on more creating and less complaining? • start each day excited about becoming a better person? • end the struggle with your weight & dieting for good? I teach transformative tools that can help you change your mind, body and life -- one fierce choice at a time. Laura Wagner, Licensed Therapist & Certified Life Coach laura-wagner.com • 502.466.3613


New life is showing up in downtown New Albany: The 200 block of Pearl Street in 1954 and today.

RESTORING NEW LIFE Repurposing a business, a building, and a community By JESSICA ALYEA • Photo: DAVID BARKSDALE COLLECTION and MELISSA DONALD

W

hat happens when an entire community needs new life? After 150 years as a thriving city center, the bustling general stores and department shops of downtown New Albany — and downtown areas across the country — faced a troubling threat: malls and superstores. As small businesses struggled to survive or migrated to the suburbs, many downtown historical buildings were boarded up or sat empty, hollow reminders of a bygone era. But when the Develop New Albany organization formed in 1990, the group had one purpose: restore the downtown area to a thriving place to live and work. President of Develop New Albany Stefanie Griffith says a lot of it is about talking. “We want a booming downtown where people are walking, shopping, living, working, playing,” Stefanie says. “We’re trying to find the right people who have that passion, and it takes a lot of talking and building relationships to find those people.”

32

Develop New Albany is almost completely volunteer-based, with only one paid administrator. But Stefanie says that the board of directors, volunteers, and community partners such as Clean and Green and the YMCA are passionate about the revitalization of downtown. All that talking is working: In the past five years, more than 90 new businesses have moved into downtown New Albany, with the vast majority of those businesses being locally owned and operated, according to Develop New Albany. But it hasn’t been easy. “It’s been a long time coming,” Stefanie says. “It seems like it’s overnight you hear about new businesses and things, but people don’t realize how many years have gone into it previously. “Every time you get the ball rolling a bit, it rolls back down. You’d get excited about a new restaurant opening, then they’d go out of business. But we didn’t give up. We’ve got plenty of room to grow and great people. CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


“To see the amount of restaurants and new shops and having people from Louisville talking about us is awesome.” For the last several years, Develop New Albany has been focusing on building up Pearl and Market streets with restaurants, festivals, trolley hops, and other businesses. The group’s next focus: retail. “We have great historic buildings and niches that are getting people to believe they can make it down here,” says Stefanie, who is also co-owner of Strandz and Threadz boutique and salon in New Albany. “The retail and boutiques are our next thing. We’ve had places come in — the Opal Gypsy, Copper Moon. They’re coming in a little bit more now.” Among the recent businesses opening in downtown New Albany are My Magpie’s Nest, a specialty gift basket and food store; a Comfy Cow ice cream location, opening this spring; and a new stained-glass gallery coming soon. “It takes a village,” Stefanie says. “It takes a lot of people believing in the same goal. I think we’ve got a great group of people working on that.”

O

ne such person is Stacey Freibert, 53, owner of the future Seeds and Greens Natural Market and Deli set to open at the corner of Main and West First Street this fall. Construction will begin June 1 for Seeds and Greens, which will sell high-quality organic foods from local farmers and artisans, healthful home products, and nutritional supplements, as well as serve wholesome prepared foods and fresh juices. Formally a freelance graphic designer with experience in marketing and advertising, Stacey wanted a change once her two sons had grown and she had a little more time to herself. “I wanted to do something different than graphic design because I’ve done that for so long,” she says. “So that made me think about a business where I did something positive and interacted with people more.” When she heard about Develop New Albany’s push to get a food co-op downtown, she wanted to see that reality herself. “I feel like New Albany is just growing in leaps and bounds and what they’re doing down there is so exciting,” she says. “I knew I wanted to be downtown. I guess my motivation was to put in a store which is a store I want to shop at and that is nearby.” Maybe it’s her visual background, but Stacey has that special ability to see the big picture — to see potential on a blank canvas. She saw exactly that when she walked around downtown New Albany with her contractor and ended up at the threestory building housing Aunt Artie’s Antique Mall. Built in 1852 as a dry goods wholesale store, the 15,000-square-foot building served as a public entertainment hall, Civil War hospital, and grocery before becoming home to antique businesses in the 1980s. “The building is beautiful, and I can’t picture this going in a better location,” Stacey says. “It’s really neat that what was in that building for almost 150 years was a wholesale grocery and dry goods store. And I really do feel like it’s come full circle back to what it once was. It just feels like it was meant to be.” Stacey drew her own plans for remodeling the building, which include installing a storefront and glass windows in areas that are currently boarded up. She will keep the historical concrete floors and brick walls for that authentic general-store feel, but

34

MARCH

2014

she’ll be putting in a staircase and a deli bar on a raised platform with restrooms and storage areas underneath. A lover of antiques, she’ll also be incorporating repurposed wood into the remodel. “I do feel like when I’m done, it’s going to look really nice and will be such an improvement to this building,” Stacey says. “This just has so much potential than what it’s being used for and needs some repair. I could picture putting apartments up there someday or a great area for a microbrewery or Top: Stacey Freibert smiles near the door of the entertainment, building she purchased for her new business, going back to Seeds and Greens. Bottom: Stacey’s own design what it was origi- for her new storefront. nally used for.” As well as a financial investment, Stacey and her husband, Jeff, will have invested hours upon hours of time and energy into refurbishing the empty space into a new business. There’s a lot to do between researching the industry, buying the building, drawing up a business plan, the actual remodeling, finding distributors and suppliers, and marketing, but Stacey is loving every minute of it. “It’s extremely time-consuming, but I also have all this excitement and passion,” she says. “Preserving history … is really important to me.” Through this journey, Stacey is also repurposing her own life. “At one point, my 16-year-old said, ‘Mom, do you think you’re too old to do this?’” Stacey says with a laugh. “But I never had the opportunity before. You kind of get to that point where you don’t have so many responsibilities to your children and your time does free up. “I am so excited about being a part of this revitalization. It’s come so far so quick. It took a couple brave souls to have the vision. The people who have put businesses downtown appreciate these historic buildings. People haven’t torn things down and put things in that aren’t suitable. I have appreciated that, and to be a part of it now feels great to me.” TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

35


Professional Connections

CALENDAR

Networking and careerbuilding opportunities for women around town

BPW- Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Contact for information & reservation. Nadine Wilkinson 502.523.1698 BPW- Business & Professional Women- River City Every 2nd Wed. • Noon Lunch and Program noon-1pm The Bristol-Downtown 614 West Main Street 502.499.4420, bpwrc.org bpwreserve@gmail.com CBPW - Christian Business & Professional Women Every Second Thursday (Odd months only) • Noon Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Cathy Scrivner 502.664.4565 cbpweast@gmail.com EWI - Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tues. • 5:30 p.m. Contact for information & reservation Dotty Wettig dw1122@att.com The Heart Link Network Every 1st Wed. • 6:30 p.m. Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Barbara Madore 502.377.8625 40222.theheartlinknetwork.com

MARCH 2014

MLWPC - Metropolitan Louisville Women’s Political Caucus Every 4th Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Olmsted Bistro at Masonic Homes 3701 Frankfort Avenue Sherry Conner 502.776.2051 mayorconner@insightbb.com NAWBO - National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tues. info@nawbolouisville.org nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121 Network Now Every 2nd Fri. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com Southern Indiana Women’s Networking Group Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30 a.m. Holiday Inn-Lakeview 505 Marriott Drive, Clarksville info@soindwng.org

[ orking Great Netw Tip #3 Arrive on time. People won’t have settled into groups yet, and it’ll be easier to connect with others who aren’t already engaged in conversations. WIN - Women in Networking V Every 2nd Thurs. • 11:30 a.m. Buca di Beppo 2051 S. Hurstbourne Parkway Lee Ann Lyle 502-836-1422 info@win5networking.com win5networking.com WOAMTEC - Women On A Mission To Earn Commission Every 2nd & 4th Wed. • 11:30a.m. The Village Anchor 11507 Park Road Charlene Burke 812.951.3177 woamtec.com Women’s Business Center of KY funded in part by a cooperative agreement with the SBA

WIN - Women in Networking Every 2nd Wed. • 11:15 a.m. Oxmoor Country Club 9000 Limehouse Lane

Every 1st Fri. Roundtable • 8:30a.m. Location – TBA Sharron Johnson 502.566.6076 #104 sjohnson@cvcky.org cvcky.org/womensbusiness center.html

IAAP - International Association of Administrative ProfessionalsLouisville Every 2nd Thurs. • 6 p.m. Location Varies – See Website for Details. iaap-louisville.org

WIN - Women in Networking II Every 3rd Wed. • 11:30 a.m. Holiday Inn Louisville East 1325 Hurstbourne Pkwy Kim Fusting 502.267.7066 kimins@bellsouth.net gowin2.com

Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:30 a.m. Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Lynda Minzenberger 502.552.8768 lynda@catalystrealty.net

League of Women Voters Every 3rd Mon. • 6 p.m. Lang House, 115 S. Ewing Ave. Pat Murrell 502.895.5218 info@lwvlouisville.org

WIN- Women in Networking III Every 2nd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Laurel Lee 810.8919 win3louisville.com

ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thurs. • 6 p.m. Logan’s Steakhouse 5005 Shelbyville Road Joyce Seymour 502.553.9241 jespud@bellsouth.net

Legal Secretaries of Louisville Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Bristol Bar & Grille 614 West Main Street Elizabeth Harbolt 502.568.5446 elizabeth.harbolt@skofirm.com legalseclou-ky.org

34 36

presented by

WIN- Women in Networking IV Every 3rd Tues. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Wendy Manganaro 502.310.0025

wendy@socialabundancemarketing.com

Listings are on per month basis. To list your meeting for free, email your meeting date, time, location, contact info and website to advertising@todayspublications.com or call 502.327.8855 ext. 14. Deadline for inclusion in next issue is 3/8. TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014 MARCH

35 37


WellnessWatch

By Mali Anderson

Listen…then Cook With helpful kitchen tips and weekly guests, Phyllis Fitzgerald and Sarah Fritschner host a food program on Louisville’s own Crescent Hill Radio. Phyllis shares how the show started and how to listen.

Q: What prompted you to launch a radio show? A: It is my mission to teach people how to cook…and help the local economy by getting food that is nearby and raised by farmers we trust.

SHOPPING

Smart

Q: What is your background? A: I am a home economist and a devotee of local food. For 20 years, I appeared on the WAVE 3 Sunrise Show, mostly teaching about healthy food, cooking, and eating.

Q: When can listeners tune in? A: We record on Thursday mornings, and the show airs at 1pm on Saturdays. It can be heard online anytime at crescenthillradio.com.

We’ve all heard to avoid the grocery store when you are hungry, presumably because you’d buy more food than needed. It turns out that hungry shoppers are buying more calories, not necessarily more food. A Journal of the American Medical Association study found that food-deprived shoppers gravitated toward purchasing highcalorie foods. It’s all the more reason to have a healthy snack before heading out.

SLIM DOWN YOUR DRINK

Irish Luck Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day and improve your health without the help of a leprechaun. Treat your body to a leafy favorite: cabbage. High in fiber and low in calories, cabbage is also packed with vitamin C. Try both green and red varieties. Sláinte! SOURCE:

While plain black coffee won’t set back your weight-loss plan, if you are counting calories, you might want to skip coffee drinks topped with frothed milk. According to Starbucks.com, below are the calories counts for various 16 oz. Starbucks beverages. Brewed coffee Iced Vanilla Latte

B  ritish Journal of Nutrition

Hazelnut Macchiato Caffé Mocha Salted Caramel Mocha Frappucino

?? ?

38

MARCH

2014

5 190 240 330 430

Eat Your Plants?

I

nterested in trying a meatless diet but unsure how to start? Try stopping by EarthSave Louisville’s monthly potluck. Working to “educate people about the extremely powerful and documented effects our food choices have on the environment, our health, and life,” EarthSave Louisville promotes healthy, plant-based eating. The potlucks take place the second Saturday of every month, from 6-8pm at United Crescent Hill Ministries, 150 State Street. Call 502.299.9520 for more information. TODAY’S WOMAN


SmartStyles Products and services to fit your style

Sassy Fox Consignments

Boutique Serendipity

Sassy Fox upscale consignment, carrying a welledited selection of women’s name brand and boutique/designer clothing and accessories from casual to formal.

We have been busy getting out our FUN, TRENDY, CUTE spring jewelry. Come in & check out our designer Derby dresses… bursting in color! Westport Village 1201 Herr Lane Louisville 502.423.0058

150 Chenoweth Ln, St. Matthews 895.3711 10-5 Mon.–Sat. 10-8 Thurs. Find us on Facebook & Twitter

Facebook.com/BoutiqueSerendipity Hours: 10-6 Mon.–Sat. 10-7 Thurs. 11-4 Sun.

Olivia & Co. Finish your Oaks and Derby shopping early at Olivia & Co. Large selection of dresses & hats in stock now! Olivia & Co. has you covered from head to toe!

4903 Brownsboro Road 426.4046 info@oliviaandcompanyboutique.com oliviaandcompanyboutique.com

Like us on Facebook!

The Bridal Suite of Louisville The Bridal Suite selects gowns only from the most reputable design houses in the bridal market. Many of our gowns can only be found in our boutique because we believe your gown should be as UNIQUE as YOU! When it comes to your wedding gown — the most important gown you will ever wear — don’t settle for less than a gown from The Bridal Suite. 9948 Linn Station Rd Louisville, KY 40223 thebridalsuiteoflouisville.com

- ADVERTISEMENT -


Best Bite You’ll feel right at home at the Shady Lane Cafe. Try the homemade meatloaf sandwich made with Chorizo and Italian herbs and served with a Henry Bain barbecue sauce. Make it the perfect meal with a side of sweet potato fries and their original blue cheese coleslaw.

photograph by MELISSA DONALD

Shady Lane Cafe

4806 Brownsboro Center Louisville 502.893.5118 HOURS:

Tuesday-Friday: 11am-3pm (Lunch) Saturday: 8:30am-noon (Breakfast); noon-3pm (Lunch) CLOSED:

Sundays and Mondays

40

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN


READY TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE? Story and Photos by MELISSA DONALD

It’s been a great start to the new year for our weight loss participants. We are now in the second month and a total of 35 pounds has been lost, bringing each one of our ladies closer to meeting her weight challenge goals.

Before

JULIE SPENCER Age: 44 Weight: 175 - lost 10 pounds BMI: 30.3 Total inches lost: 3.25 42 40

MARCH 2014 2014 MARCH

Before

DEBBIE MOESSINGER Age: 63 Weight: 170 - lost 15 pounds BMI: 28.9 Total inches lost: 3.5

Before

BETSY WELLS Age: 28 Weight: 161 - lost 10 pounds BMI: 25.9 Total inches lost: 5 TODAY’S WOMAN WOMAN TODAY’S


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

43


THE FOOD Home Cuisine will provide three meals a day for both Julie Spencer and Betsy Wells for the duration of the program. Both Julie and Betsy have lost 10 pounds on Home Cuisine’s Paleo Diet. The menu completely eliminates gluten, starchy carbohydrates, dairy, sugar, legumes, and all processed foods. Home Cuisine’s chefs prepare portion-controlled food and have it ready for pickup at Rainbow Blossom twice a week. Left: Enchiladas with broccoli from Home Cuisine

THE EXERCISE JULIE’S SPECIALIST: Dr. Louis Heuser Heuser Clinic - River Road Location 2040 Metal Lane Louisville 502.893.7833 heuserhealth.com

DEBBIE’S TRAINER Heather Collier Fitness 19 109 Blankenbaker Parkway Louisville 502.244.0919 fitness19.com/centers/louisville

BETSY’S TRAINER Stephanie Bristow B. You Fitness - Springhurst Location 10513 Fischer Park Drive Louisville 502.930.2348 byoufitness.com

FITNESS 19 Trainer: Heather Collier

W

ith the help of her trainer, Heather Collier at Fitness 19, Debbie Moessinger has already lost 15 pounds! Fitness 19 is an affordable facility that offers the latest in cardio, strength, and free weight equipment. Debbie starts out her training by warming up, typically on the elliptical machine, for half an hour before she meets up with Heather. During her training session with Heather, she works with free weights, TRX, and other floor gym equipment such as the Hammer Strength leg press (shown here). She focuses on using upper and lower body muscle groups along with core strength training. Heather is also helping Debbie with her diet. Debbie has been keeping a daily food journal to track what and how much she eats. Portion control, the removal of sugar, and a balance of carbohydrates is how Debbie has been so successful in losing 15 pounds thus far. She is also sticking to a 1,200 calorie diet by measuring and weighing everything she eats. Nearly every week, Debbie meets up with a group of friends for an hour at Fitness 19 to work out together.

44 42

MARCH

2014

Fitness 19 has two locations in Louisville. Check out their website and blog for fitness and nutritional tips at fitness19.com.

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

45


*

PASSIONS

In relationships…play…community By BELLA PORTARO

Purses with a Purpose

MOM ENCOURAGEMENT

LOVERS OF ART, MUSIC, AND LITERATURE

REALmoms Conference will be March 7-8, at Crestwood Baptist Church in Crestwood. The twoday event will focus on encouraging mothers spiritually and practically. Find out more at 502.241.8534 ext 102 or

This festival honoring Hunter S. Thompson, as well as the lasting mark he has made on art, music, and literature starts March 31. facebook.com/ GonzofestLouisville

info@realmomsconference.com

“I have been fortunate to stay home while my husband provided for our family, and he’s done that very well. My problem is: He’s now retired, and it has really disrupted my life! He suddenly wants to change my routine. The house is not arranged to his liking. He wants breakfast and lunch at a certain time. He wants me by his side 24/7. I want my life back!

JUST ASK JOYCE

Q:

Find the

A:

WOMEN’S HISTORY:

W

hat began as a mission trip to Zambia with her family turned into a life-changing vision for local business owner Tracy Murray. During this trip, Tracy encountered many people who lived in slums because they had no education or trade skills. Using her passions for reading and sewing, Tracy taught women, men, and children in Zambia how to do both, creating purses with damaged clothes, beautiful African patterns, and other recyclable material. “Empowering these people to develop a love of reading and sewing allows them to support themselves and their family,” Tracy says. “That is just one part of the success story. The money they earn immediately impacts them, the village they live in, and the church they attend.” Her future vision for Zambia is to start a trade school with a library. Learn more at recyclocraftz.org

46

MARCH

2014

at TodaysWomanNow.com

Happy Birthday!

You may know that the Happy Birthday to You song was published by Louisville sisters, Patty Smith Hill and Mildred Jane Hill in 1893, while the sisters were experimenting with their kindergarten students. What you may not know is this was very controversial because the sisters taught this song and others to all students regardless of their financial background. This song helped to change Louisville and the world by helping children of all backgrounds learn to read. The sisters’ progressive actions will soon be honored at a park at the corner of Chestnut and 4th Street in downtown Louisville if Maggie Harlow, Marsha Weinstein, and Ashley Mast have their way. They are working on fundraising for the development of this park. happybirthdaypark.org

TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow

2014

MARCH

47


s g n i n e p p Ha

HOT

what’s going on in the month of March. By GIOIA PATTON

Ghost The Musical

m

PNC BROADWAY IN LOUISVILLE SERIES

Set in modern-day New York City, this multiple Tony Award-nominated musical is a timeless fantasy about the power of love. After Sam is mugged and dies on a Manhattan street just minutes after he and the love of his life, Molly, have had a romantic dinner, he finds himself trapped between this world and the next. With help from a phony storefront psychic, Sam tries to communicate with Molly in the hopes of protecting her from danger.

m

WHEN ~ March 11-16, various performances WHERE ~ Kentucky Center TICKETS ~ Starting @ $25 CONTACT ~ box office, 502.584.7777, or KentuckyCenter.org

George Strait: The Cowboy Rides Away

with special guest Vince Gill

m Barry Manilow’s

Copacabana DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE

“Her name was Lola… she was a showgirl…” Barry Manilow’s Grammy Award-winning song is brought to life with the story of Lola as told through the eyes of Stephen, a presentday aspiring songwriter whose imagination takes him back to a time when “music and passion were always the fashion.” This love letter to the Technicolor musicals of the 1940s features music by Barry Manilow. WHEN ~ running through March 30, various performances. WHERE ~ Derby Dinner Playhouse, Clarksville, Ind. CONTACT ~ 812.288.8281 or derbydinner.com

48

MARCH

2014

The only artist in music history to achieve at least one Top 10 hit each year for 30-plus consecutive years, Strait’s other accolades include receiving the National Medal of the Arts from President George W. Bush in 2003 and receiving the Country Music Association’s award for Entertainer of the Year three times, most recently in 2013.

Woman: m Celtic The Emerald Tour

HORSESHOE CASINO

Celtic Woman’s 2014 tour celebrates Ireland and its spellbinding Celtic heritage through an extraordinary presentation of traditional Irish anthems and pop standards. This show features the Aontas Choir, championship Irish dancers, bagpipers, drums, and the unforgettable, angelic voices of Celtic Woman.  hursday, March 13 WHEN ~ T

@8pm

WHERE ~Horseshoe Southern

Indiana Casino, Elizabeth, Ind.

 arch 7 @ 7:30pm WHEN ~ M

TICKETS ~ $45, $55, $65

WHERE ~ K FC Yum! Center,

CONTACT ~ 855.234.7469 or

1 Arena Plaza TICKETS ~ $78.50 & $99.50 CONTACT ~ box office or Ticketmaster outlets

702.777.2782


BEFORE YOU

GO

By TIFFANY WHITE Photo by MELISSA DONALD

NAME: Karina Barillas AGE: 44 JOB: Director of La Casita Center LIVES IN: Audubon Karina Barillas is making Louisville feel like home for the Hispanic and Latino community through her work at La Casita Center. As director of the nonprofit organization, she makes new immigrants’ assimilation into American culture easier by acting as a liaison to the mainstream community. “Sometimes it is hard for people who don’t speak English or are new to the area to feel this is the place they should be,” Karina says. “I want everyone to feel like we all belong to one whole community.” Karina and her staff train service providers on communicating with immigrants more effectively. La Casita provides food and clothing while working with the University of Pediatrics to help families who have children with special needs. A native of Guatemala, Karina has two children (Ali, 9, and Famitah, 8) and is a big fan of salsa dancing.

SONG SHE’S SINGING: “Amigo by Marc Anthony. I just love it!” BOOK SHE’S READING: “The Wicked series. I am starting the fourth book. My dream is to go to New York one day and watch Wicked on Broadway.” FASHION SHE’S WEARING: “My friends and I exchange clothing. I love scarves.”

BEAUTY PRODUCT SHE’S LOVING: “Lipstick that matches my scarf.” Read more about what Karina is doing on TodaysWomanNow.com.

Before I Go... “I sit in my car and offer my day to the supreme being of the universe.” 50

MARCH

2014

TODAY’S WOMAN



Today's Woman March 2014