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Volume 23 8 Number 6

Celebrating 21 Years PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion

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Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2013 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

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TodaysWomanNow.com

Today’s Woman


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Mostoman Admired 2013

Driven. Confident. Persistent. Grateful. Nurturing. Creative. Irreverent. Modest. Optimistic. Playful. Frugal. Passionate. These are some words the Most Admired Woman winners came up with when asked to describe themselves. While some stumbled and stammered and others rattled off adjectives without pausing for breath, each woman gamely embraced the challenge to share with us a bit of who she is and let her personality come through. The following profiles are based on interviews that turned into delightful conversations, complete with welcomed moments of rambling and going off on tangents that showcased the women’s intelligence, grace, and wit. The photos, too, are representative of who these women are — the clothes are all their own, the magazine providing only a request that they wear color. Together, the words and photos give a glimpse into the lives of 12 remarkable women, each having earned our admiration in her own inimitable way. The Most Admired Woman 2013 nominees were selected by the editorial board of Today’s Woman magazine. Reader votes determined the winners.

Arts ~ Leslie Broecker.................................................8 Athletics/Fitness ~ Chancellor Dugan...................12 Beauty/Fashion ~ Heather French Henry.................16 Business Owner ~ Patti Swope...............................20 Community/Non-Profits ~ Cathe Dykstra ...........24 Corporate ~ Jane C. Morreau..................................28

Education ~ Dr. Doris Tegart.................................32 Food/Entertainment ~ Claudia DeLatorre...........36 Health/Healthcare ~ Charlotte Ipsan...................40 Home/Homestyle ~ Leslie McCarthy......................44 Media ~ Claudia Coffey............................................48 Political ~ Judge Angela McCormick Bisig................52

Most Admired Woman Hall of Fame................56

Written by: Yelena Sapin Photos by: Melissa Donald Makeup by: Lorie Karnes, Glitzy Glamor Designs (except Leslie McCarthy – Makeup by: Brianne Drexler, Z Salon)


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Mostoman Admired Now starring 2013

Leslie Broecker

I’m always on the move, always have a project

President of Broadway Across America-Midwest

leslie Broecker

perfectionist

Arts

arts

Up at the crack of dawn

Gardening Nothing more exciting than a brand new show

Driven


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Hometown: Louisville, Ky. Notable first: Leslie is the first second-generation Most Admired Woman winner. Her mother, Carla Sue Broecker, won in 2004 (Homestyle). Ironic twist: As much as she loves music, Leslie can’t play an instrument. “My parents sent me off for violin lessons and guitar lessons, but I never did pick it up.” Best thing about living on the farm: Most of the land is wooded with lots of wildlife. “We ride ATVs through the land, and it’s really fun.” Unexpected tidbit: Leslie makes gingerbread houses to relax, then blows them up on her vast property for fun. “The foxes really love to eat the leftovers.” Favorite musical: Hello Dolly. “I think it’s probably the best-constructed musical, and I love the music.” Most underrated show: War Horse. This year, it will be here during the Kentucky Center’s 30th anniversary. “I believe a show like War Horse is why we build theaters.”

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fter 27 years in the business, Leslie Broecker still gets goose bumps just talking about the theater. Responsible for bringing Broadway shows to the Kentucky Center in Louisville and to four other cities in the region, she also serves on the industry’s Broadway League and is a lifetime Tony Award voter in New York. This requires her to see every show on Broadway, which is like requiring a kid to taste every piece of candy in the candy store. “There’s nothing more exciting for me, still, after all these years, than to see a brand new show!” Leslie says. Leslie’s love affair with the theater goes back to her family. Both of her parents had been involved in community theater, and Leslie had dabbled with it while attending Louisville’s Walden School. “Music and the arts — I grew up with it,” she says. “I remember working with my dad on projects on the back porch, and it was to the soundtracks of West Side Story or Anything Goes. All of my memories are connected with those old musicals.” Finding herself more suited to being behind the scenes rather than in the spotlight —“I think it was my lack of talent in performing,” Leslie says with a laugh — she went on to study radio and television production in college. In 1987, Leslie was hired away from a local radio station into the marketing department of Louisville’s Broadway Series (later acquired by Broadway Across America) where her father had become executive director after many years of volunteer work. “I had worked in the Kentucky Center ticketing office when it was first built, and I was very fortunate to actually find a career in it,” Leslie says. “I can’t imagine working anywhere else. Even on its worst day, it’s the best job.” How do you decide which shows to bring to Louisville? Louisville is a very

sophisticated theater town, so when I’m putting the season together, I try to have a nice balance of something there for families, as many new shows from New York as possible, and of course every now and then, you want to throw in that chestnut, that beloved “I-remember-when” kind of show. This season, it’s West Side Story. And we don’t shy away from edgy shows. I don’t see my job as a censor, but rather as an educator. I think it’s incumbent upon us to communicate what shows are about. Do you always get the shows you want? I travel to New York and put all the

packages together, but there are lots and lots of variables. It’s like a jigsaw puzzle: It depends on if and when the show is going out on tour and when the Kentucky Center is available. We share it with the orchestra, the opera, the ballet and other arts groups, and they have their dates, too. But Louisville is very well regarded, so we do get shows very early on the tour.

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Leslie Broecker

President of Broadway Across America-Midwest

What is it about musicals that you love so much? I love when a number in a

show comes together and they hit the notes at that perfect pitch where you just have to close your eyes and turn your ear to hear it. I get goose bumps. And every night is different. For me, it’s all about that immediacy and the beauty of the music in your heart. I know it sounds kind of corny, and people laugh at me because when a show’s really good, odds are I’m missing most of it because I start to well up. Do you ever want to be on stage yourself? I think ultimately every person who

works in theater would love to be on stage, but I probably would be too nervous. I think my calling is making sure that everything runs smoothly backstage and growing the people I work with in and out of the business and into success. How do you unwind? I run pretty much five days a week, every morning — not very far, just about three miles, purely to offset good food and good cocktails. I’m the third generation living on our 99-acre farm, and I love to garden. When I retire from theater, that’s absolutely what I would try to do. It’s very therapeutic. Last night I got a glass of wine and wandered the garden, cut the asparagus that I put in three years ago, and then made dinner. I love to cook, but I don’t do it as often as I’d like because I travel and stay very busy. I’m up at the crack of dawn, usually 4:30 or 5 o’clock, but I’m usually sound asleep by 9. And you’re involved with the Kentucky Derby Festival? My

great-grandfather was on the original founding committee, and both my parents served on the board as well. I love the Derby Festival. I take two weeks’ vacation [from Broadway Across America] and just get in the trenches. I’m chair-elect of the foundation now, but my day job is to do propane for all the hot air balloon events and to support that. When that’s over, I immediately move down to the Waterfront and work with production on the concerts and all of the events down there. Working with the people that volunteer, and the things that we’re able to bring to the community at such reasonable prices or for free — that’s really rewarding. I know I drew the lucky stick in life, and I like to do my part to pay that forward. How would you describe yourself?

Driven, impatient, a perfectionist, passionate, happy. I’m definitely driven. I’m always on the move, always have a project. I never sit and watch movies because I can never sit that long. Except for Star Trek. I can watch Star Trek movies, or musicals. And I hope “caring” would be another word. I always like to look out for folks. Also, I’m very casual.


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Chancellor Dugan

Bellarmine Women’s Head Coach of Bellarmine University’s Women’sCoach Basketball Basketball

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athletics/fitness


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Hometown: Louisville, Ky. On becoming a reader: Chancellor wasn’t a big reader when she was young because of her dyslexia, but she started improving once her parents got her a subscription to Sports Illustrated. “I just read it from cover to cover every week, and then reading textbooks wasn’t as hard after that.” Surprising Tidbit: Everywhere she’s coached, Chancellor has offered money back to fans if they don’t have a good time watching her team play. “No one’s come up and asked for money back yet, and I hope they don’t.” Best Christmas present: Chancellor doesn’t remember if she asked for it, but she got a basketball when she was 12 years old. “My dad put up a goal on our brick patio, and I would spend hours out there just shooting by myself.”

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ports have always been an outlet for Chancellor Dugan. Growing up dyslexic between two sisters who did well in school, “It was the one thing I excelled in,” she remembers. A talented swimmer, she spent many hours in the pool and made it to nationals. Knowing since fifth grade that she wanted to become a coach herself, she pursued a degree in physical education, spending her first semester at Bellarmine University before transferring to Eastern Kentucky University. “I kind of wanted to get away from home for a little bit and maybe see another coach’s style,” she says. Chancellor enjoyed shooting baskets on her family home’s patio, but she had never really played basketball until a professor at Eastern, who was also the assistant basketball coach, noticed her footwork with a soccer ball and asked her to try out for the team. “I knew I was the worst,” Chancellor says with a laugh, “but since I’m 6-foot-3, I guess they figured they could teach me.” Chancellor learned quickly and became a valued asset to the team. She fell in love with the game and went on to coach high school teams before transitioning into the college arena. After serving as assistant coach at University of Alabama, at Morehead State University (where she also earned a master’s degree in health), and at Eastern Kentucky, Chancellor spent eight years as head coach at University of Southern Indiana. In 1999, she was hired as head coach for Florida Atlantic University, where she remained for 13 years. Last summer, Chancellor was asked to come to Bellarmine University. “It feels really good,” she says of coming back to Louisville. “The whole Bellarmine community, not just the athletic department, is like a big family.” Chancellor hopes to build her team up to where they’re a talking point every year and to someday win a national championship. “I’ve got a great group of girls,” she says, “and I want to make them proud.”

What is your favorite thing about coaching? I think it’s just being able to work

with people. I love going out and recruiting, and being a coach is the ultimate in team-building and collaboration. What I love about basketball is having the five players who are on the floor all working together for a common goal. And it’s so rare, especially with females, that you get a whole team of 14 or 15 people all going in the same direction without hidden agendas. If you can get all those different personalities to really work and be focused on what the team goals are, it’s so much fun. It’s such a good ride, and it doesn’t really matter what your record is at the end of the year — you’re going to look back and say, “Man, that was a special team and a special group.” And you’ll probably cut down some nets along the way just because everybody sacrificed for the good of the team.

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Chancellor Dugan

Head Coach of Bellarmine University’s Women’s Basketball

What do you try to teach your girls? I think what I’m teaching them on the

basketball court and what they’re learning at Bellarmine go hand in hand. I hope we’re teaching them responsibility, and how to set goals, and how to go about achieving them. I think about the letters and emails I get from former players thanking me for being tough on them and making sure they got up and went to their 8 o’clock class even when we got back from a game at 4 a.m. I know I’ve done my job when they walk across that stage and get that degree, and I hope I’m teaching them how to be poised and confident women. Last year was challenging for you. You lost your mother on the day of a big Florida Atlantic game. You changed jobs. You moved. You know, it’s

funny; they always say don’t change your job, don’t sell a house, and don’t buy a house when you lose a loved one, and that all happened to me. My life was like a bad country song last year. I always knew I was strong physically, but I think being strong emotionally has surprised me a little bit, being able to stay in the moment with what I was supposed to do and who I was supposed to help that day. I was able to finish up at Florida Atlantic with the best record they had there and then go out and get this job. It was like one door closed and then a huge, unbelievable opportunity opened up. I think that is the biggest thing that has surprised me. I guess I’m a lot stronger than I thought I was. What motivates you? I’ve always said I wanted to be the best at whatever I do, from swimming to whatever sport I was in. And I want to win a national championship. I said that to a room full of reporters once when I was young and cocky, but that’s really something I want to do. And I want to give back, to leave a little bit of happiness where we’ve been. I think about that young girl who’s sitting up there in the stands watching, and I want her to want to be a part of our basketball program. I started out wanting to please my parents, and then wanting to please my coaches, and then wanting to please my boss. And now I want to please the Bellarmine community and Louisville, to make them happy and proud that I’m their head coach. What is your favorite time of the day? I love to get up early and go running, when

everything is just like it’s new. It’s my thankful run or walk, or whatever I’m doing, when I’m just thankful to God for everything. That’s my one time when I feel like I’m just me. How would you describe yourself? Quiet, confident, strong,

powerful, funny. That’s probably something people don’t know about me, but I crack myself up. I don’t know if people are laughing with me or at me, but I do like to laugh. I do like to have fun.


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Most Admired oman Beauty/Fashion

Fashion Designer Heather French Henry

“Never let them see you sweat.”

2013

Heather French Henry

Owner/Designer, Heather French Henry Collection

Why she’ll always be Miss America.. Feeling Beautiful

Lmve FeelGood Movies

is greater than

Being Beautiful


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Hometown: Born in Augusta, Ky., and raised in Maysville, Ky. Philanthropy: As the daughter of a disabled veteran, Heather is determined to bring national attention to the needs of American veterans through the Heather French Foundation for Veterans. “If giving away everything I had meant that no veteran would ever be turned away from anything, I would be the first in line to make that happen.” Ironic twist: In high school, Heather rebelled and refused to take home economics. “I was a staunch believer that women should not be pigeonholed, and I felt that home ec would have been a waste of my time.” She regretted that decision in college, where better sewing skills would have been helpful. Guilty pleasure: Heather doesn’t watch much TV, but she does watch Duck Dynasty. “Si is a Vietnam vet, and he cracks me up.” On being Miss America: The title comes with a lifelong responsibility, the weight of which no one fully comprehends until she gets the job. “You have no idea what you’ve gotten yourself into,” Nicole Johnson, Miss America 1999, whispered to Heather when she crowned her.

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lthough she will always be known as Kentucky’s own Miss America 2000, these days Heather French Henry is focused on designing gowns rather than wearing them. Heather had dreamed about fashion for as long as she had dreamed about wearing the coveted crown. Both her mother and grandmother sewed, and Heather remembers watching her mother work on costumes in the back lots of movie companies that came through and filmed in their area. In high school, Heather showed an aptitude for both academic and creative subjects — “I was in calculus and trig, and in chemistry and biology, as well as in all the arts,” she says — but what she loved most was draping fabric on the body form in the art room and drawing designs. With encouragement from her art teacher, Heather enrolled in the fashion program at the University of Cincinnati and stayed on for graduate studies. She earned a Master of Design in 2001 after taking a year off to fulfill her duties as Miss America. During the whirlwind year of her reign, Heather also married Steve Henry, an orthopedic surgeon, who was at the time, lieutenant governor of Kentucky. They welcomed their first daughter in 2001 and their second two years later. For the next several years, Heather explored different opportunities that came her way. She hosted a morning show on WDRB and devoted herself to raising her family and supporting her husband’s political career until he left politics in 2007. “I knew immediately I was going to go back into fashion and dove right in,” Heather says. She now has three fashion lines: an evening gown line called the Heather French Henry Collection, a cocktail line called Heather by Heather French Henry, and a prom line called Frenchy by Heather French Henry. “Not a day goes by that thousands of designs don’t pass through my head,” Heather says of her passion. “It’s something that I eat, sleep, and dream about.” Where do you get your inspirations? Everything inspires me —

television, nature, architecture, paintings. Flying on a plane and looking out the window at all of this wonderful texture that’s laid before us on the earth like a huge quilt, I immediately see clothing. When I see fireworks, I think of beaded gowns. It’s almost to the point that it’s obsessive. Music is probably the biggest inspiration. But I think what going to school for design taught me is that instead of waiting for the inspiration to come, you have to learn how to put yourself in that mode.

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Heather French Henry

Owner/Designer, Heather French Henry Collection

How has the pageant world prepared you for what you’re doing now? I think in the trek to becoming

Miss America, you learn to question yourself instead of berate yourself, to rein in those fears and make it look more like confidence. And standing in front of judges — there’s a lot of backbone that gets built in that process. It took me half a decade to win Miss Kentucky. I think in that final year, given the combination of design school, life, and all those years of formulating my own opinions, I finally stood on the stage being able to tell them who I was, unafraid to be myself but also knowing, all those times that I was nervous, how not to show the fear. Being able to do that, to have that poker face, is important in the fashion business like in any business. Never let them see you sweat. What experiences have been transformative in your life? I would

say that it probably goes all the way back to high school and not being chosen as cheerleader in front of the entire school body ­— the only one not chosen. So many people and kids today take those first negative experiences and push themselves down with it. And to me, although for a moment it might put me down, it just makes me so mad. And there’s nothing that inspires me more to just drive forward than being told “No,” or that I’m not good enough or talented enough. All those times I’ve lost — and there have been plenty — have helped to make me the person I am. That’s where I have grown the most, in being able to handle that. How do you juggle your career and family? Sometimes well, and sometimes not so

well, but that’s life! Steven does a wonderful job of helping. We’re both in this very fast-paced life, involved in a million things, and we’ve never had a nanny. I think that when you learn to do it yourself and to juggle it yourself, it builds a great family bond. It’s always been Steven and I and the kids; it’s just this big unit that travels around. When I go to do appearances, it’s almost expected that we bring the kids because that’s how we’ve always been seen in public. I think the challenge is to make our children still feel like they’re the priority. Are we always successful at that? Maybe not, but I drop the kids off at school in the morning, and Stephen always picks them up in the afternoon. No one ever does it for us. And when we do go out of town, my parents are the ones who come to watch the kids. It’s all family, and that’s very important for us.


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Mostoman Admired Business Owners

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Patti Swope

Chairman, Sam Swope Auto Group

Sam Swope Auto

Have you seen her on the golf course?

Winner: Business Owner

(I could probably change a tire...)

Kentucky Humane Society

mAnimals

Enthusiastic

curious

Patti Swope


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Hometown: Louisville, Kentucky On being recognized in public: Sometimes people aren’t sure who she is. “They say, ‘You look familiar. Do I know you from somewhere?’ Or the other one I get a lot is: ‘Do you do the news?’” Unexpected tidbit: Patti has ridden motorcycles for years. “In 2008, my sister and my dad and I went to Europe and did a motorcycle tour through the Alps. It was two weeks of pretty hard riding, but it was beautiful — the best motorcycle riding in the world.” Ironic twist: Too busy with her executive responsibilities, Patti can’t keep up with the details of the auto industry. “I don’t really know a whole lot about the different models and engines and what’s coming next. If someone asks me a question like that, I’ll just refer them to one of our experts.” Personal note: Patti is a newlywed, having just gotten married in May. She chose Paris as her honeymoon destination. “That’s a city I’ve always wanted to see, but I wanted to save it for a special trip with someone and make it very romantic.”

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t may surprise some to learn that the public face of the Sam Swope Auto Group didn’t originally intend to join the family business founded by her father. Growing up watching him put in long hours even on weekends and holidays, Patti wasn’t sure she wanted to follow in his footsteps. Not that she didn’t know her way around the dealerships — she’d been working in the business since she was 15 doing everything from cleaning shelves and stocking parts to driving delivery trucks — but she had other interests. After high school, Patti went off to the University of Denver to study geography and urban planning. Finding it difficult to land a job in her field, however, she started working as a waitress but soon ran out of money. Broke, she came back to Louisville and took her father up on his offer to let her sell cars at the dealership until she figured out what to do next. “Like a lot of kids who are fresh out of college, I took a job to make some money,” Patti says. She quickly discovered she enjoyed the people and customer service aspects of the business, and she’s been with the company ever since. Patti learned the ins and outs of the organization by taking on ever-increasing levels of responsibility in different departments in the company. “I’ve done just about every job in the dealership [except being a technician or a service advisor],” says Patti with a laugh, “which is probably a good thing because I don’t know much about engines or the mechanics of a car. I could probably change a tire, but that’s about it.” Currently executive vice president of business development and spokesperson for the Swope Group, Patti succeeded her father as chairman of the board after he retired last year. You do a lot of philanthropic work. What are your favorite causes? The Kentucky Humane Society is my

personal favorite, and I’ve been involved with the Louisville Zoo for a number of years. I’m also on the board of the Louisville Orchestra, which is a little bit outside of my normal nonprofit efforts. I have to be honest and say that I don’t really know a lot about orchestral music — I wouldn’t even know what to do with a musical instrument — but I do think that having a strong arts scene is very important in making Louisville an attractive community for both businesses and individuals looking to locate here. Between your day job and your volunteer responsibilities, it sounds like your schedule is packed pretty tight. Yes, it’s always very full from

the minute I get up to 8 or 9 at night. But I’m

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Patti Swope

Chairman, Swope Auto Group

probably not too different from most working women. Like every working woman I know, I get home and still work, whether it’s stopping at the grocery on the way home, or laundry, or whatever needs to be done. So, how do you relax? My husband and

I are both animal lovers. We have four dogs and four cats, and a couple of other cats that are hanging around. We love to take our dogs for a walk in the woods. I also love to get in bed with a good book. It helps quiet my mind. Usually I will just read for a little while, and then I’m sound asleep. And I love to play golf. How did you get involved with golf? A girlfriend of mine said, “You know,

you ought to take up golf. You’d love it,” and she mentored me into the game. She was right; I’m crazy about it. I love being outside in the sunshine and fresh air, and it’s great exercise being out there for four or five hours and moving around. It’s also a huge mental challenge. And the best part is that it gives me a really good excuse to travel, which I’ve always loved. I just travel to beautiful resorts around the world and play golf. What kind of trips have you taken? I like to do what I call adventure

travel to places where there’s some sort of wildlife viewing involved. I’ve been to Rwanda to see the mountain gorillas with a contingent from the Louisville Zoo and the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International, and I’ve also been to Tanzania, Botswana, and other areas of Africa. I’ve been to Churchill, Manitoba, to see the polar bears, again in connection with the Zoo. I’ve been to Ireland and Scotland to play golf, and also to New Zealand. You have access to many different vehicles. What do you drive? I drive a

crossover SUV, mostly because I can throw my golf clubs in the back. Plus, when you have animals and you’ve got to haul them to the vet, it’s a little easier to have room to do that. But I switch around and drive something different every couple of months. It’s a nice perk, and it’s a little bit of research too, so I can know something about our products firsthand.


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Most oman Admired Community/NonProfits

Cathe Dykstra found her voice She helps women break through the poverty barrier

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Cathe Dykstra

President, CEO, Family Scholar House

She’s Fearless!

Ideas are generated at the baseball game.

Chief Possibility Officer

“It’s a mission, a passion. . . not a job.”

Addicted to shoes


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Hometown: Born in Evansville, Ind.; Raised in Columbia, S.C. “But I fake ‘Louisville native’ really well. I’m very acclimated here.” Family tradition: Much of Cathe’s family has worked in banks: her grandfather, her father, her uncle, and her four cousins. “It was like, ‘Which bank do you want to work in?’” Shopping weakness: Shoes. “I’m an addict!”

Workplace motto: What’s next? “We’ll take a moment to celebrate or commiserate with whatever has happened, but then we need to get busy because there’s work to be done.” Unexpected tidbit: Cathe gets some of her best ideas watching baseball games. “I lose myself in the game in a way that opens my mind up to think about whatever. And that thinking about whatever leads me to other things.”

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Cathe Dykstra

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he title that most aptly describes Cathe Dykstra’s position at the Family Scholar House is found right under her name on the nonprofit’s website: Chief Possibility Officer. The organization’s mission is to help struggling single parents break out of poverty by providing their families with housing and other support services while they earn college degrees. In other words, to open up a whole new world of possibilities. Looking at the arc of Cathe’s life, it’s striking how her skills, experiences, and passions perfectly aligned to put her at the helm of Family Scholar House. Cathe’s career began in North Carolina, where she went into banking after getting an economics degree from Wake Forest University. “I was making loans to people who didn’t need them but not to those who really did,” Cathe says. She was “on the wrong side of the desk” and left to take a job at a financial organization that helped seniors stay in their homes. “That was probably my first step to being an advocate for others,” she recalls. The next step was becoming a Parent-as-Teacher advocate under North Carolina’s Smart Start initiative. After a divorce, Cathe moved to Louisville with her daughter to be closer to her family, who had relocated when Cathe was in college. Eventually, Cathe found her way to the Center for Women and Families, where she directed the center’s Economic Success Program. In 2005, Cathe joined Project Women, which, under her leadership, has blossomed into the Family Scholar House. Today, the organization operates several student housing facilities in Louisville and is making plans to expand services to other areas of the state and beyond. “When we help one individual in a family,” Cathe explains, “the entire community benefits.” What have you learned from the families you serve? Statistics tell us all the

time that the educational attainment of the mother, in particular, will significantly impact the educational attainment of the child. And, that people with resources will have access to even more resources — which I also saw in banking — while people without resources will have access to way fewer resources. The playing field starts out slanted, and it just continues to tip because there are fewer opportunities. Our whole goal is to break the cycle of poverty, and we believe that education is the rising tide that lifts all boats. It levels that playing field in a way nothing else can. Some of your students are fathers, but the vast majority are mothers. What is it like to work with women?

The beauty of helping women is that women are open to being helped. And in mentoring someone, they mentor you back. There’s this exchange that

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President, CEO of Family Scholar House

happens, so my life is richer for the women I’ve been involved in working with. When I look at the extraordinary work that our parents are doing to go to school, to raise their children, I think, “Wow, they’re amazing!” Often they’re the first in their family to go to college — sometimes the first to graduate from high school — and this is the scariest thing they can imagine doing. But I really want women to believe in themselves and to recognize that they are so capable of changing their world in so many ways, one of which is how they raise their children. They’re raising the next generation of leaders. And how would you describe yourself as a leader? We have a blame-free

zone because I don’t want anyone to ever be afraid to say, “I made a mistake.” I’ve never seen blame be useful. When something occurs that’s a problem, it’s like, “OK, what did we learn from it, and how do we keep it from happening again? Where do we go from here, and who’s going to lead that?” Often the opportunity for somebody to lead the next thing after having a bad experience just makes them put their whole heart in it because they want to fix it. And the self-esteem, the self-respect, the selfawareness that comes from leading is so important. By developing, encouraging, and nurturing the next generation of leaders, and other leaders that may be of your same generation, you have an opportunity to do different things because the initiative you started is moving forward with many hands. There are lots of people rowing the boat. Is there something you have learned about yourself through your work? When I was

a child, I was terrified: socially awkward, shy, and quiet to an extreme. But somewhere along the way, I found that my voice could be used to help others who don’t have a voice. So while I wouldn’t maybe advocate for myself, particularly when I was young, I could advocate for others who didn’t have the same opportunity to be heard that I did. To me, that was meaningful. That was something worth doing. I tell people I have the easiest job in the world: I do whatever God puts in front of me and just try to not get in my own way. How would you describe yourself?

Collaborative. Nurturing. Creative, but more like in an innovative kind of way. And fearless. I don’t mean ‘not cautious.’ I mean setting aside your personal fear. You can’t be putting your energies into thinking about, ‘What if I fail?” You have to be thinking about, “What if it succeeds beyond my wildest dream? Who else can I get involved in it?” And that doesn’t mean I’ve never made mistakes. I’ve certainly made some big ones. But I’ve learned from them, and I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to pick myself up and dust myself off and look for what’s next.


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Mostoman Admired Corporate

2013

Jane C. Morreau

Senior Vice President and Chief Production Officer, Brown-Forman

Adventurous “I am always pushing myself!” She addresses

what women need in the corporate world

Morning exercises

“I won’t settle for less…”

She Loves watching sports… & Loves math!


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Hometown: Louisville, Ky.

Family: Several years ago, Jane’s husband returned to art after a 30-year career as an attorney. Her daughter is a nurse, and her son just graduated from college. “I’m very proud of both my children.” Unexpected tidbit: Jane loves tackling home improvement projects, whether at her own house or at the houses of family and friends. “I love to paint and put up wallpaper! It’s a form of relaxation for me. And when it’s done, there’s this great sense of accomplishment.” Favorite drinks: Although Jane prefers wine — “My favorite is our SonomaCutrer” — she likes to experiment with recipes from Brown-Forman’s R&D department. Her favorite cocktails are Herradura tequila margaritas and Woodford Reserve Manhattans. Volunteer activities: Jane is on the executive committee and the board of directors of Metro United Way. “I can bring my strategic thinking and my financial background, and I’ve actually learned a lot.”

2013

Jane C. Morreau

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rowing up as the middle child and eldest daughter of seven children, Jane C. Morreau always knew she was going to go to college because her stay-at-home mother impressed upon all her girls the importance of being able to earn their own living: “Because you never know what life may throw your way.” Jane wanted to be an elementary school teacher — “To this day, I say I’m going to teach someday,” she says with a chuckle — but when she enrolled at the University of Louisville, she decided to pursue a different field. “They didn’t really need more elementary school teachers,” she recalls. “So I thought, ‘OK, I’m going into accounting.’” Accounting happened to be one of the collegelevel classes Jane got to take as a high school senior, so she already knew she had a knack for it. “There really weren’t many women in the field,” she says, but that didn’t deter her. Jane became a CPA and went back to UofL for her MBA. She spent 11 years working at Kentucky Fried Chicken Corp. (now known as Yum! Brands) before joining Brown-Forman in 1991. Over the last 22 years at Brown-Forman, Jane moved through several different roles with increasing levels of responsibility. Having started as manager of financial analysis, she became senior vice president and director of finance, accounting, and technology in 2008. A member of the company’s Executive Leadership Team, Jane was named to her current position of chief production officer in January of 2013. “I’m out of my comfort zone a bit, which is good,” she says. “It’s stretching me, and that’s exciting.”

How did you juggle family and career when your two children were young? My mother and father would

help out, and I shared a nanny with one of my good friends. One week my kids were at my house, and one week they were at her house — we trashed each other’s houses every other week. And my husband was an attorney on his own, so he was more flexible and able to help more. But I think the responsibility of the home still fell on me in terms of things like making sure homework was done and lunch money was there. But I always drew a line with work. You didn’t have BlackBerrys and iPhones back when my kids were really young, so I would say, “That’s it, I’m going home,” and turn work off. Sometimes I would turn it back on after the kids went to bed. I’ve been fortunate in that respect because I had a lot of support and flexibility many women don’t have. There aren’t many women in executive positions. Does that concern you? Absolutely. I’m actually

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the executive sponsor of one of the employee resource groups at Brown-Forman called GROW, which stands for Growing Remarkable Outstanding Women, and we are going to our

Senior Vice President and Chief Production Officer, Brown-Forman

Diversity and Inclusion Council to present some findings about barriers that are preventing women from getting through the pipeline. There’s a nice feeder pool of women, but they don’t make it through. And why is that? I think maybe some women are never given the candid feedback they need. Men don’t want to give that to women because they think they’re going to cry or something, and they don’t want to mentor or sponsor women because it looks “funny” for a woman and a man to be going out for a cocktail when it’s fine for two men. And I think when you look at aspirations of women and at studies on what happens to them, they just get squelched along the way. They’re not given that confidence. Of course, I experienced a lot of this stuff myself way back when. We’ve come a long way over that period of time, but it’s still a challenge. What do you like to do when you’re not working? It drives me crazy if I sit still,

so when the weather is nice, I love to get out and garden a bit in the yard. And with all my siblings, there’s never a dull moment. There are 22 nieces and nephews on my side, and my husband has a few on his side, so with graduations, first communions, and weddings, there’s always something going on. My husband and I also try to have a night out to ourselves a couple of Saturdays a month. I also love sports. I used to play everything when I was growing up — volleyball, basketball. Even as an adult, I played in volleyball leagues. How do you keep fit? I’ll meet up with a friend of mine — she actually works at BrownForman with me, so we meet at work at 6 in the morning – and we do core strength training and a little bit of walking or aerobic type of stuff. And we meet up every Saturday morning too, religiously. Sometimes, since I’m down there already on a Saturday, I’ll go on to the office and do a few things to get ready for the next week — with the kids out of the house, I don’t feel guilty about that — but I won’t stay the whole day. I still cut it off after that. How would you describe yourself? I am very down-to-earth.

I grew up in a very modest background, and I’m proud of what I’ve accomplished, but I’m very grounded. I’m hardworking. I have a huge work ethic. I’m very loyal to my company, and my family is very important to me. I never rest on my laurels. I’m somebody who won’t ever settle, always pushing myself and trying to learn new things and ask questions. I have a skeptical nature about me, too. I think that comes from the math and science side of me. I’m curious. I’m strategic. I can be creative in terms of thinking of doing things in different ways. I also think I’m very fair. Tough, but fair. I’m adventuresome. And generally when people get to know me, they see that I like to have fun, and I’m not this serious person all the time.


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Dr. Doris Tegart

EDUCATION “It just opened doors I didn’t know were there.”

Dr. Doris Tegart Pushes for Change Mentoring Women

Provost, Bellarmine University

She always wears cowboy boots, but she’s known for her

SCARVES

We laugh a lot at work :D

She’s an Early Bird

BELLARMINE

university


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Hometown: Leavenworth, Ind. What might surprise some people: She’s usually too busy to cook, but Doris knows her way around the kitchen. “We grew up on the farm cooking everything, and I can cut up a chicken in about two seconds.” Signature style: Doris always wears cowboy boots, but she’s best known around campus for her scarves. “I’m not sure how it got started, but now it won’t stop. People even bring back scarves for me when they travel.” Early-bird habits: Doris likes to get up before dawn to enjoy the solitude and do some work, but she’s learned to delay her emails. “People would ask what I was doing up at 3 o’ clock in the morning, so now I email them later so they don’t think I’m weirder than I already am.”

I

n one way or another, Doris Tegart has spent her whole life in education. “There weren’t many career options for women back in the day,” she says of the time she was first starting out in Indiana’s poorest county. “There was the secretary/nurse/teacher thing, and being a teacher appealed to me.” Part of the appeal was due to how she was raised. Doris grew up living and working with 25 of her first cousins on her grandfather’s farm. She greatly admired her grandfather. “He was a teacher as well as a farmer, so I always had that model,” Doris says, “We all went to college, and almost everyone became a teacher.” After earning a degree from Indiana University Bloomington, Doris went back to her home county and taught primarily first and second grade. “I loved it,” she says. “I did it for seven years, but I soon realized that if I wanted to really effect change in people’s lives, I had to step onto a bigger stage.” Doris enrolled in graduate school at IU and ultimately earned a doctorate in education/administration and women’s studies. Nineteen years ago, Doris came to Bellarmine University as an assistant professor at the School of Education, having taught at McKendree University before that. “I’ve had about 10 different jobs [at Bellarmine],” Doris says with a chuckle. “I like to do different things.” Before being named provost in 2011, Doris had been senior vice president of academic affairs. In her current position, Doris works with administration, deans, and faculty to promote academic growth at the university. Her commitment to education comes with firsthand knowledge of how it can transform people’s lives. “It did for me,” she says. “It just opened up doors that I didn’t even know were there.” You’ve been in administration for many years. Do you miss teaching?

I do. I miss teaching those young kids who were so honest and so ready to learn, so eager. I think it was very formative for me to be with people every day who would say things like, “Your hair really looks bad today,” you know? Kids just say those kinds of things, and I miss that honesty. And I love the creative thinking kids have. But one of the best moments I ever had teaching was at Bellarmine. I was teaching math at the time, and a man came in to hand in a paper for his daughter and said, “You know, I had a hell of a math teacher when I was growing up.” It turned out that that teacher was my grandfather. What is the most challenging aspect of your job? The challenging thing

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2013

Dr. Doris Tegart

Provost at Bellarmine University

for me in any situation is patience. I think we all know what needs to be done on certain educational issues, but just dealing with the society that we live in and the lack of resources, I’m not always satisfied with the speed of change. That’s at every level, but things move particularly slowly at a university. I know that’s probably the way we should do it, that we should study and make sure everyone has a say in what we do, but I have to remind myself about that sometimes. That comes with age as well — you learn to be patient and to move forward in any way you can. Where does your ability to get the job done come from? I think it’s just

living, just getting to survive and deal with other people. And it’s also about hard work. When you grow up on a farm like I did, there’s a lot of physical work. My grandfather had an orchard, and all of us worked hard hours in the summer, sometimes 10 hours a day, picking and selling fruit. You learn how to work hard doing that. You’re surrounded by young people on campus. What do you wish they could learn from older generations? I think they can tell us a lot,

really, rather than the other way around. I know a lot of people would say to them, “Don’t focus totally on technology; there are also people skills that you need,” and that’s obviously true. But I think their way of thinking and doing things needs some recognition as well, because it’s fantastic. WHat inspires and motivates you?

I probably have the most supportive husband in the world, and family as well, but I think that the greatest commonality we have, and the motivator, is probably humor. My daughter is a comedian in New York, and my son is an attorney here in town, and it’s a delight to be with them. We almost have our own family language in terms of references and humor, and it comes through in everything we do. And, we laugh a lot at work. If you could sit in on some of our meetings at Bellarmine, you’d be surprised. How would you describe yourself? Well, humor is a big part,

certainly. I guess I shouldn’t say I’m “irreverent” — maybe there’s a nicer word? Hopefully, I’m also a good listener. I would say “innovative,” too. And I do question everything. I’m the one who always asks, “Why are we doing this, and what’s the outcome?”


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Admired oman

Food/Entertainment

2013

Claudia Delatorre

Owner, Cake Flour Bakery

“Yum!” Says everyone who

eats her pastries…

You can find her @

Cake Flour

“I am not leftbrained!”

A Natural and Organic Baker

Eco-Friendly

Learned at the French Culinary Institute


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Most Admired

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Hometown: South Plainfield, N.J. On the Web: cakeflouronmarket.com

Favorite food: Sushi. “I like it all: eel, salmon, tuna. I just love Japanese food in general.” Favorite pastry: Palmiers. “When I was traveling with my husband in South America, I was eating them like there was no tomorrow because they were just so amazing. And now I make them at the shop, so that’s kind of cool.” Surreal moment: The Food Network called the shop twice about featuring her cake on the show, and both times Claudia happened to be out. They didn’t leave a callback number the first time, and she figured it was a prank. “Then I finally got on the phone with them, and I’m asking ‘Is this a joke?’ I just couldn’t believe it! Kind of like when I got the phone call [about being chosen Most Admired Woman]. I was like, ‘Is this for real? Really?’”

C

ooking and baking have been a part of Claudia DeLatorre’s life since she was a little girl. She remembers frying plantains and experimenting in the kitchen with her sister, which was so much the norm in her family that no one gave it another thought. The expectation for Claudia when she was growing up was that she would go to college and pursue a traditionally prestigious career. Claudia did earn a degree, but she went to work for a nonprofit organization in Washington, D.C., instead of becoming a doctor or lawyer like her parents hoped. “I know they are probably somewhat disappointed that I didn’t fulfill that route,” she says, “but I’m just not left-brained in any way.” Claudia loved her nonprofit work, but it exacted an emotional toll. When marriage and motherhood brought her back to New Jersey to be closer to family, she began to reassess her life. It was important to her that her daughter see her happy and fulfilled in her career, so Claudia did some soul-searching and enrolled in the pastry and baking program at the French Culinary Institute in nearby New York City. “It was wonderful,” she says. “I really enjoyed it.” Claudia found internship opportunities in the city, then went to work at a catering company. “It’s kind of funny because it’s all come full circle,” she says of her early start in the kitchen. Seeing Claudia succeed professionally made her family come around as well. “My mom said, ‘Wow, you can actually do something with this,’” Claudia says with a laugh. In 2007, Claudia and her husband moved to Louisville with their two children, now aged 9 and 6, for her husband’s career. Unable to find a pastry chef job and with her husband’s encouragement, she took the plunge and opened Cake Flour on Market Street a year later. Claudia is mindful of the environment and uses eco-friendly materials at the shop in everything from energy-efficient appliances and lighting to recyclable and biodegradable containers and packaging. Her products are made from natural and organic ingredients, sourced locally whenever possible. Several years ago, Claudia’s flourless chocolate cake was featured in an episode of The Best Thing I Ever Ate on the Food Network. “It was surreal,” she says of the experience. “Just so cool!” Why did you choose baking and pastry as your culinary focus? I just

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love the process, and the steps, and the patience you need because it’s hurry-up-and-wait. Sometimes when you’re making something, the components alone might take several steps, like when making puff pastry. It’s a long process, but I love it. We make everything from scratch at the store, and I love that surprise, that anticipation of what it’s going to look like at the end. I mean, I know my product, but even though I’m sure, there’s still that little part of me

2013

Claudia Delatorre

Owner, Cake Flour Bakery

that’s wondering, ‘What if it comes out wrong?’ And another thing is that whether it’s a birthday cake, an anniversary cake, or whatever, I’m coming into the life of this person, being a part of that moment of making it special. It’s not a big deal in the grand scheme of things, but they’ll remember that cake. And it’s immediate gratification for me because I’m making this other person happy and excited. What’s the best thing you ever ate?

I do have certain food moments in my head, and I remember the month, the year — it’s just what I do. One is the duck I had at Prime restaurant in Las Vegas in November 2002. It was fabulous. And I have two favorite ice cream moments: leche merengada, which is like an iced milk with a hint of cinnamon, in Spain in June 1993, and dulce de leche tentacion from an ice cream chain called Freddo in Uruguay. It was just awesome. How did you get over your initial fear of going into business? I don’t

I love cake!

think I really have. I made my own job because I couldn’t find one, but the fear still lingers. I really like what I do — I wouldn’t be doing it if I didn’t — but I’ve had to put on many hats and do all these things I have no idea about. It’s like jumping into that pool that you know is really cold and you don’t want to do it, but you just do it anyway. I didn’t go to business school, and I’m just thankful for the Internet so I can read up and figure out how to make things better. Each day is a new day, and you just keep on going. You just make it work. And I’m very grateful for my employees. How do you like Louisville? It’s so

wonderfully green here. Everything is really beautiful. And the number of farmers markets here is really amazing. The only thing that’s missing for me is the ocean. There’s just something rejuvenating about the water. It’s so tranquil. We used to always go after work — you see the sunset, and the water’s a perfect temperature. What do you like to do when you’re not working? Sleep! I’m usually at the shop

between 4 and 5 in the morning to get ready for the breakfast rush. That just comes with the territory. And at night, I’m just kind of vegging in front of the TV, maybe with a glass of wine. It doesn’t sound really exciting, but that’s basically what I do. And I spend time with the kids. Sometimes we have movie night. It’s amazing what kids do to you. It doesn’t matter how awful of a day you may have: When you see your children, they just instantly make you feel better. I have to treasure these moments because one day they’re not going to be so excited to see me anymore. How would you describe yourself?

Creative is the first thing that comes to mind. Passionate. When you’re passionate about what you do, you give your whole being to it. Also, old-school and traditional. I believe in the classics. Modest. Thankful. Intense. Funny. Generous. Caring.


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Mostoman Admired

Health/Healthcare

The Ultimate Optimist

Leading Care for Norton Women & Children Fun-loving, freespirited

2013

Charlotte Ipsan

President, Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital

She’s

Persistent

We have a blast at my house Charlotte Ipsan:

Rule-Follower but Risk-Taker

I want to pursue my Doctorate of Nursing


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Charlotte Ipsan

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hen Charlotte Ipsan was a little girl, she loved to play nurse with her Julia Barbie doll, which wore a white nurse uniform and cap. It came as no surprise to her family that she set her mind on a nursing career early on, foregoing some “easy A” classes her friends took in high school to load up on science, biology, and Latin. Charlotte’s efforts earned her a scholarship, and she went on to study nursing at Indiana University Southeast. After graduating, she took a job at Kosair Children’s Hospital. “I always wanted a lot of action,” she says, and the demands of pediatric health care promised to keep her on her toes. Not one to shy away from challenges, Charlotte kept taking on more responsibility during her seven years at Kosair. Building on her nursing experience and innate entrepreneurial skills, she eventually moved into managerial and administrative roles that allowed her to help more people than when she was at the bedside. She later transferred her skills to Norton Healthcare, where she spent more than 20 years in various roles. Along the way, Charlotte obtained a master’s degree in nursing with a focus on neonatal care from the University of Louisville. She also served as instructor and course director and managed the advanced neonatal nurse practitioner team of the Department of Pediatrics. In 2009, Charlotte returned to Kosair as vice president of Kosair Children’s Medical Center. She was promoted to system vice president of pediatric services for Norton Healthcare and Kosair Children’s Hospital two years later. After an exhaustive nationwide search for the right person to lead the new Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital, Charlotte was selected as the hospital’s president effective May 2012. “I do need constant challenges and change to think that I’m providing value,” Charlotte says, “and every step has been a new adventure for me.” Did you ever think about someday heading up a hospital when you began your nursing career? If people

asked me then if I ever thought I’d be a hospital president, I’d say, “No way!” At the time that seemed so boring, but being a bedside nurse, and then a neonatal nurse practitioner, and having all the mentors along the way, and learning to integrate business, program development, and some entrepreneurial skills that I find fascinating — I think all that led me to where I am today, to where I can help so many more people. And it certainly helped being at the right place at the right time.

Chair on page 40 provided by Contemporary Galleries.

President, Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital

What motivated you to keep learning when you were young?

My dad always said, “The sky’s the limit — you can have anything you want as long as you’re willing to work for it.” And my mom, when things would start to get harder and harder in school, would say, “You know how to do that. You’re smart.” So I’d think, ‘OK, she said I’m smart, so I must be able to figure this out.’ I guess my parents knew how to motivate me, but then as an adult you have the opportunity to make decisions for yourself. And you’ve decided to keep learning. You’re currently pursuing your doctorate degree. I like to learn, and

education is very important to me. I want to be a doctorate of nursing. People ask me, “What do you need that for?” and it’s just that you don’t start something and not finish it, and it can’t hurt me to have more education. Where do you find the time? It’s probably something genetic, because I really don’t need a lot of sleep, and I don’t like to waste time. Also, I have a remarkable support system. My husband is there, and I have four awesome kids — three sons and a daughter — and they’ve loved being part of that process. How did you do it — work and school — when your children were young? I’m

not unique; women do that all the time. You just do what you have to do. I always look for a silver lining, and when I was studying and reading, my kids would say, “OK, we’re going to read, too.” So they’ve all done extremely well and value education. During the time I was divorced and sometimes worked doing pediatric home health, my two oldest sons would be there with me — you could bring your kids along at that time — and my oldest son would be by my side, watching, and my second oldest would have his head in a book. And interestingly, my oldest son is in health care now, and my middle son is in law school. So they’ve taken something from these experiences, too. What do you do to relax and take care of yourself? Honestly, I think that laughter is the

best medicine. We have a blast at my house. We also reflect a lot about thinking positive. I always tell my kids, “You have plan A, B, and C. You never let plan A going awry stop you. You always have an alternative plan because life is what you make it, and you’re the only one responsible for your happiness.” How would you describe yourself?

Well, there’s got to be a word for “not normal.” I am a rule-follower, but a risk-taker. I’m probably the ultimate optimist. Fun-loving, free-spirited — I don’t think I’ve ever met someone I couldn’t find some way to like and have fun with. And I’m very driven. Impatient and driven don’t typically go together, but that’s who I am. I just can’t waste a minute of the day. Being very driven and being the ultimate optimist — it’s served me very well to be that way. And I’m very persistent. And not shy!

Hometown: Floyds Knobs, Ind. Unexpected tidbit: In 2005, Charlotte started a small trucking business from the ground up and obtained a Disadvantaged Business Enterprise and Women’s Business Entity status — “Because they said I couldn’t.” Professional recognition: The American Hospital Association appointed Charlotte as its representative to the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care for the 2012 to 2014 term. Hobbies include: Reading — “I’ll do something educational, then do a trashy novel” — and dancing. “I used to dance in high school. But I don’t dance in public, just at home with my kids.”


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Mostoman Admired

“Don’t stay in a rut! “

She started her business in the church basement!

Breast Cancer Survivor

Leslie McCarthy

President and Owner, Making Ends Meet

The

Fabric Lady

Shelbyville

Making Ends MEET “I love to experiment and play.

Home/Homestyle

2013


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Most Admired

oman

Hometown: Hamilton, Ohio. “I’ve lived in Kentucky for almost 35 years. I love it here.”

Ironic twist: Leslie loves shopping for things she can use for projects and in the store, but she hates shopping for herself. “I raised two sons, so I’m more familiar with the men’s department.” Personal note: Leslie is a breast cancer survivor. “When I was diagnosed in 2004, I spent three days under the covers. Then I decided I had to get up and keep moving and enjoy what time I’m given. Doing art got me through my breast cancer. It’s just a healing thing.” Backstage jitters: Leslie was nervous about doing the interview and photo shoot for this issue. “I’m much happier out in my own little world, where people can come to me and I can help them, and I’m not put at the front of something.”

2013

Leslie McCarthy

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fitting motto for Leslie McCarthy might be, “If you don’t like it, figure out how to change it.” Growing dissatisfied with the clothes her mother made for her, Leslie took over the sewing machine at age 13. “I wouldn’t let her sew for me after that,” she recalls. “I just started doing my own thing.” Leslie parlayed her love of sewing and crafting into a degree in fashion merchandising and went to work in the industry. When she realized it wasn’t for her — “I was miserable,” she admits — she opted for something different. Settled in Shelbyville by then, Leslie got a job at an antique store and started a side business making and selling appliquéd sweatshirts, which were popular at the time. Looking to improve her growing family’s dire financial situation — if you don’t like it, change it! — Leslie leased a little room in the basement of the church where she was involved with youth ministry and began selling fabric. It was just about trying to pay some bills and “making ends meet,” and that became the name of the business. Once the church started receiving many calls for “the fabric lady,” Leslie felt it was time to move out. Her husband rented her a small space, but Leslie panicked at first: “I thought there was no way I could pay $200 a month in rent.” Her husband’s faith in her proved justified, however, and within five months, Leslie was ready to expand. From its humble beginnings in 1989, Making Ends Meet has grown to now occupy two connected houses in downtown Shelbyville. It offers an extensive selection of fabrics and home décor products, original artwork and decorative items by Leslie, and a variety of classes in its art studio. Several years ago, the business Leslie created by doing what she loves was recognized in Southern Living magazine as one of the best fabric stores in the area. “I did do a little happy dance then,” she admits.

How did you get started in art? A lot

of it is self-taught. I have a passion for it. I could do it day and night, just play with it in one form or another. The fibers, the fabrics, and painting on fabrics are really my big thing. A friend of mine had talked me into taking this art class involving fabric once. I had never done any of that kind of stuff, and I fell in love with it and started taking every class. And a couple of years ago, we opened up our studio and started giving classes. Where do you get your creative ideas? I don’t really know. They usually come

in the middle of the night. I’ll wake up at about 5 o’clock in the morning, and it’s like, ‘Oh, I can do that,’ or ‘I can create this,’ or ‘I think this is what I’ll do today.’ Or it may be a piece of fabric that I’ve seen, and I’ll springboard from that.

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President and Owner, Making Ends Meet

What have you learned about yourself over the years? That it’s very

important for me to keep play in both work and in everything else I do because it adds a little fun. It’s funny because I never had a business plan going in. And I didn’t have any money. I just started with the last $2000 my husband and I had to our name, and I just thought, ‘I’ll try this, and I’ll try that.’ I think I’ve learned that if something isn’t going right, you figure out what else to do. You don’t stay in a rut. And my husband has been very supportive in everything. How do you encourage creativity in others? I think there are no mistakes in art;

there are just creative possibilities. There’s good in every piece. You just have to find it and figure out how to best display it. But if you do something you really don’t like, then you cover it up and start over again. And you have to let go of the fear. You have to be willing to walk in and say, “I’ll just give it a shot.” We try to create an atmosphere at the studio where people feel it’s safe to do that. What do you like to do when you’re not working? Well, I don’t cook, that’s for

sure! I have some friends who are absolutely wonderful cooks, and the big joke is that if they come to my house, I just let them do their cooking, but if they want supplies, I’ll usually have to go to the art studio to get them. My parchment paper, my spatulas, whatever — they’re always in the art studio, not in the kitchen. And thank goodness my husband cooks! But I’m one of the few lucky people who can go to work and consider it play, and then go home at night and want to do the same thing because I enjoy it. Do you have a favorite time of day? I love that early morning time when I just have a few hours to myself to kind of do what I want to do. I come in to work at about 8 o’clock in the morning, and that time between 8 and 10 o’clock when there’s nobody in the store, I am able to sit down and try a new project or get the busy work out of the way so I can enjoy being in the studio. How do you stay involved in your community? Every year, we pick one cause and

figure out what to do for them. We take a project and have a play day or work day at the studio. I also work a lot with Presbyterian Church. I’m on the Shelbyville tourism committee, too, and on the business committee downtown. They asked me to be a part of it because you need somebody who’s in business to give input. I think you have to be positive in all economic times and try to find new ways to make it work. How would you describe yourself?

Playful. Energetic. I have lots of energy for life and for projects I tackle. Creative. Compassionate. Experimental. I love to experiment and play.


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Most Admired oman Media

It’s all very exciting! Hugs tosonmy Jack

She’s Funny!

2013

Claudia Coffey

WHAS-11 Reporter/Anchor

Breaking News…

Claudia Coffey

Down on the farm

Focused

Louisville: One of the most beautiful WHAS TV places to live “I need my quiet time!”


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Most Admired

oman

Hometown: Louisville, Ky. On the web:

claudiacoffeyheartproject.org/ claudiacoffeyheartproject.org and claudiacoffey.com

Most star-struck moment: Interviewing Tom Hanks. “I’d never been so nervous in my life!” Then he started sneezing, and Claudia gave him a tissue. “I kept thinking, ‘My goodness, I just offered Tom Hanks a Kleenex! Should I save it?’” Most likely to be seen at: The gardening center of her local Fern Creek Walmart. “They know me there!” Biggest misconception: That someone does her hair and makeup. “I have to do it all myself. I learned what looks good on TV through trial and error, and by seeing a tape of myself and being very embarrassed.” Reality show-worthy moment: After living in big-city apartments and condos, Claudia is having fun taking care of things around the farm. “If you could see me pushing a lawn mower, that’s a sight! And doing some weedeating — not very well, but I’m learning.”

2013

ClaudiA Coffey

S

ince she was 15 years old, Claudia Coffey knew she wanted to be in TV news. After graduating from Assumption High School, she combined her interests in history, politics, and journalism by double majoring in political science and journalism at Indiana University Bloomington. She then got her master’s in international relations from Georgetown University. “My mother is originally from Germany, so I was always fascinated by what’s happening in other countries,” Claudia says. Kicking off her television career in Greenville, Miss., Claudia went on to work at TV stations in Little Rock, Ark.; New Orleans; and Milwaukee before making her way to Washington, D.C. There, she worked at CBS Newspath and filled in on the Fox News Channel and Fox affiliates across the country covering a variety of local, national, and international news. “It was such an honor to work at our nation’s capital,” Claudia says. “To report in front of the Capitol, in the Rotunda, in front of the Supreme Court — they were moments I will never forget.” Claudia’s experience in Washington included winning an Emmy Award for her coverage of the Salahis, the infamous White House party crashers. “I’d always imagined I would win an Emmy for something that’s a huge investigative report, that’s groundbreaking, that’s Watergate, and here I was chasing down two reality show stars, shouting questions at them,” she says with a laugh. “I chased them down the street for maybe three or four blocks, and it was just the most surreal thing.” In April 2010, Claudia’s career came full circle, bringing her back to WHAS where she had interned during college. Since sharing with the public the story of her young son Jack’s heart condition, Claudia has been working with the American Heart Association and other organizations to raise awareness of both pediatric and adult heart disease.

How does it feel to be back in Louisville? Oh, I love it! I love the people.

Believe it or not, I still love our weather — those beautiful seasons when the daffodils bloom and the tulips are coming out. I think it’s one of the most beautiful places to live in the country. And of course, my family is here, and I get to see them more often. It’s exactly what I imagined being home would be like. As a single mother, is it easier to juggle things here compared to in D.C.? I think it’s tough any time you have a child

and you’re trying to work. The balance for a working woman is always difficult. I’m still trying to find it. Even though I’m back home, I still have so many more responsibilities because my son’s getting older and there are more activities going on at school and things I want to be a part of.

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WHAS-11 Reporter/Anchor

And no matter what size market you’re in, TV news is always demanding, always busy. There’s always something happening every day, and you never know what you’re going to face when you walk through the door. So, how do you make it work?

There’s always a backup plan. There’s always somebody there who can stay with Jack longer or work on homework. And being here, where my family is, I can go to them for help, and he just thinks it’s cool that Mom’s on TV. He’s 6. He gets it. And I usually have an extra suitcase full of clothes in my car, which people laugh about, but if I’m off to cover breaking news on a moment’s notice, I need to have a change of clothes. But it’s all very exciting. How do you spend your free time?

I cherish my weekends. I’ve learned to say no and not overcommit myself. Time with my family, especially with my son, is priority No. 1 on the weekends. Recently we’ve been doing a lot of hiking and being outside. I also love gardening, and I like to cook. I live on a farm in southeastern Jefferson County, and we have a garden, so we’re very much a garden-to-table kind of family. I’m excited to get the fresh vegetables out and grill them. How do you stay grounded? At night, I’ll put on some music and do a combination of yoga and Pilates. And that’s my quiet time, my prayerful time, my moment to have my conversation with God. I have my prayerful meditation time in the mornings, too. If I’m going into something I’m fearful of, something I’m nervous about, I just pray that it’s taken out of my hands and that I’m given the strength to deal with it in the way God wants me to. And in the evenings, I like to say, “Thank you.” Thank you that I made it through the day. Thank you for bringing me home. Thank you for a wonderful child. Thank you for the beauty of everything around me. And sometimes I’ll write in my little garden journal about what bloomed today, or that I heard the owl last night and it helped put me to sleep. My life and my world can be so stressful that I have to really bring it down to the most basic, simple level. Back to real Claudia, not TV Claudia. How would you describe yourself? Optimistic, focused,

driven, dedicated, and humorous. I think I’m funny! Especially with what I do, I have to have a sense of humor. Also, loyal. And despite having to ask people questions, I think I can be sensitive, too. And loving. A good mother. A good daughter. And happy with myself. I’m just in a good place. Appreciative. I’m grateful. Fashionable? I think I’m a little fashionable, but I think I’m more frugal and practical.


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Hometown: Louisville, Ky. Noteworthy: This is Angela’s second time on the cover of Today’s Woman. She was first featured in the January 2007 issue. Unexpected tidbit: Nobody can tell when she’s behind the judge’s bench, but Angela often has her feet tucked up onto the chair under her robes. “I spend long hours sitting on my bottom when I’m at work, and it helps me be more comfortable. It’s easier on my back, too.” Unusual family pet: A rabbit named Billy Idol. “He’ll snuzzle up in your lap for as long as you want to pet him. And he’s pottytrained! We get him out of his cage during UofL games for good luck.” Family tradition: Waffles every Sunday morning. “We all get up and sit around the table, and we have fruit and waffles. We make them with an old waffle iron.” Favorite food: Pasta. “I love making it. I could eat pasta morning, noon, and night.”

ngela McCormick Bisig’s path to the judge’s bench began with a desire to be involved in government. Active with the student council in high school, she served as president of the Student Government Association at the University of Louisville, where she majored in political science. A particularly memorable course that examined the influence courts wield over the direction of our country made her reassess her career goals. “Whether it’s the case of Brown vs. the Board of Education or the Gore-Bush presidential election, it’s the judges who take those laws and apply them to real situations,” Angela says. She realized she didn’t have to be “out there creating division along party lines” as a politician but could still have a role in governmental influence through the judicial system. Angela went on to earn a degree from UofL’s Brandeis School of Law and practiced in private firms for several years. She found civil law unfulfilling, however, and went to work for the Jefferson County Attorney’s Office as a criminal prosecutor of domestic violence and sexual assault cases. “It was tough, but I loved it,” she says of the roughly seven years she spent there. “I felt like I was really working in the trenches with people.” Angela enjoyed her time as an attorney and considered it invaluable experience for becoming a judge, the aspiration she’d always had in the back of her mind. Though she was daunted by the idea of running a campaign — “That’s the unsavory part for me,” she confesses — Angela threw her hat in the ring and was elected to the Jefferson County District Court in 2002. After becoming chief judge, she ran for and won her current seat as a circuit court judge in November of last year. Angela is also deeply involved in the community, particularly in organizations that help women and families and promote intercultural awareness. What is one of the biggest challenges of your position? I’ve sat in juvenile court and

seen youth whose parents I had once prosecuted, so I knew what they had grown up seeing. You tend to want to try to reach out, especially with the kids, and say, “Hey, I know what you’ve been through.” It’s always that balancing of looking at people who have had some awful things happen to them but also trying to make good decisions to keep the community safe. You want to leave emotion out, but you don’t want to leave out what you’ve learned over the years about who does well when given probation and who doesn’t. It costs society a lot of money to lock a person away, but it is also horrible to think that someone you didn’t put away for whatever reason would go and hurt somebody else. How do you keep your work from seeping into your personal life?

Sometimes it doesn’t leave me. I try not to take it home, but I do. I just have to say to myself, “I’m todayswomannow.com

going to do my best and make the right decision,” because I have to be able to lay my head down at night and sleep. I know I’m not perfect, but I know that I’m going to try very hard to get it right. I also run, but I’m not a really good runner. I just run three or four miles very slowly. If you see me, I’m just chugging along, but I can make a list of things to do in my head. Also, I love to paint! I’m always careful to say I’m not a good painter, but I do enjoy it. Just using that whole different part of me helps. So, you have two sides, the creative and the analytical. They reinforce one

other. I think the creative side gives a release valve so the other side is not making me crazy. My parents were always very accepting of any interests I had, so I always felt free to try things. I also love languages, and getting involved in international associations, hosting dinners, and having guests. And I love to cook, which is a good thing because I have three sons ages 18, 16, and 14, and two stepchildren, so eating out can get expensive. But cooking is relaxing to me, and I think it’s a good “I love you” for my family. It’s something my husband and I can enjoy doing together. You were prodded by a professor to run for student government. Is that part of the reason you work with local girls’ groups? Probably, and I

think part of it is just being grateful. Other women reached out to help me and mentor me when I was younger, so I want to be sure I’m not just looking ahead, but also thinking of all these young women coming up behind me. We need to encourage them and tell them that somebody’s going to be calling the shots, and it really should be them. It may sound scary, but if they care about people and they’re smart, they’re going to bring a lot to the table. People often say you don’t look like a judge. What do you say to that? A

lot of times on the bench, I put my hair up and wear glasses to look serious about what I’m doing and to convey that this is not play. But when I’m out in public, I don’t think it means that you don’t care if you want to wear something girly and frilly or put on a pretty pair of shoes. That’s just fun, and to me, it’s art. I don’t think it means you’re not serious about what you do. How would you describe yourself?

High-energy, passionate. And I hate things that aren’t fair. Not just in a legal context — I really just chafe when I feel that someone’s been wronged. I will always rail against things that aren’t fair. My mother says I was like that even when I was small. And I guess the last thing is that I always try to be a good friend, a good wife, a good mom — you can’t ever leave those out.

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JUNE 2013 June 2013

presented by

Networking and careerbuilding opportunities for women around town

BPW- Business and Professional Women- New Albany Every 3rd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Culbertson West 904 E. Main Street New Albany Ann Windell 812.282.9310 BPW- Business & Professional Women- River City Every 2nd Wed. • Noon Lunch and Program noon-1pm The Bristol-Downtown 614 West Main Street 502.499.4420, bpwrc.org bpwreserve@gmail.com CBPW - Christian Business & Professional Women Every Second Thursday (Odd months only) • Noon Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Christine Ward 502.931.2918 cbpweast@gmail.com EWI- Executive Women International- Kentuckiana Every 3rd Tues. • 5:30 p.m. Contact for information & reservation Dotty Wettig dw1122@att.com The Heart Link Network Every 1st Wed. • 6:30 p.m. Inverness at Hurstbourne Condos 1200 Club House Drive Barbara Madore 502.377.8625 40222.theheartlinknetwork.com IAAP- International Association of Administrative ProfessionalsLouisville Every 2nd Thurs. • 6 p.m. Location Varies – See Website for Details. iaap-louisville.org

NAWBO- National Association of Women Business Owners Every 3rd Tues. info@nawbolouisville.org nawbolouisville.org National Association of Women in Construction Every 2nd Mon. • 5:30 p.m. Call for meeting location Patty Stewart 812.288.4208 #121 Network Now Every 2nd Fri. • 11:30 a.m. Hurstbourne Country Club 9000 Hurstbourne Club Lane Lee Ann Lyle 502.836.1422 lee@lalcomputers.com

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Every 1st Fri. Roundtable • 8:30a.m. Location – TBA Sharron Johnson 502.566.6076 #104 sjohnson@cvcky.org cvcky.org/womensbusiness center.html Women’s Council of Realtors Every 3rd Thurs. • 11:30 a.m. Wildwood Country Club 5000 Bardstown Rd. Lynda Minzenberger 502.552.8768 lynda@catalystrealty.net ZONTA- Advancing The Status of Women Every 1st Thurs. • 6 p.m. Logan’s Steakhouse 5005 Shelbyville Road Joyce Seymour 502.553.9241 jespud@bellsouth.net Listings are on per month basis. To list your meeting for free, email your meeting date, time, location, contact info and website to advertising@todayspublications.com or call 502.327.8855 ext. 14. Deadline for inclusion in next issue is 6/8. Today’s Woman


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2013 June JUNE 2013

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oman HAll of fAMe

Past winners of Most Admired Woman

Arts 2003

2004

Helen Starr

Carlton Ridge

2005

2006

Bekki Jo Schneider Laura Lee Brown

2007

Lynn Ashton

“We’ve had a couple of rising stars that have really broke through the glass ceiling. These are not just women, but exceptional and talented women. Rosy Napravnik is a good example. She’s setting the bar pretty high for women in the jockey world.”

Athletes/ Fitness

W

Most AdMired

2003

Patti “PJ” Cooksey

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Barbara Sexton Smith

Kim Johnson

Summer Eliason

Delanor Manson

Leslie Broecker

BeAuty/ FAshion

2008

Jennifer Bielstein

2004

2005

Tori Murden McClure

Julie Hermann

Business owner 2003

2004

2003

2004

Brenda Light

Phyllis Reed-Johnson

Martha Neal Cooke

Alice Houston

2005 2006 Margaret Schneider Cenia Wedekind Browning

2007

2005

2006

2007

Zenda Stackelbach

Christina Lee “Christy” Brown

Teresa Bridgewaters

Teresa Bachman

2006

2007

Geron Cadden

Kirby Adams

2008

2009

Janice Geralds

Angel McCoughtry

2008

2009

2010

2008

2009

2010

2010

2011

Janet Rowland

Raquel Koff

Kelli Flint Campbell

Tricia Burke

Debbie Scoppechio

Jeannie Unruh

Dr. Kara Mohr, PhD.

Liz Lewis

2011

2012

2013

2011

2012

2013

2012

2013

Mary Beth O’Bryan

Terri Waller

Heather French Henry

Debra Walton

Pat Koch

Patti Swope

Kim Carpenter

Chancellor Dugan

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Today’s WomaN Woman


Community/ nonprofit

2003

2004

Kathy C. Thompson

EduCation

2003

Susan Ivey

(addEd in 2005)

CorporatE

“I pray every morning and read The Dream by Father Ron Knott. A portion of it says, ‘Translating the dream into reality takes great courage.’”

2005

2006

Diane Downs

Dr. Jo Ann Rooney

2005

2006

2007

2007

2008

2009

Carolle Jones Clay

Phoebe Wood

Lynn Pendergrass

Beverly Cox Keepers, Ph.D.

Barbara Flanders Wine

Dr. Shirley Willihnganz

Diane W. Kirkpatrick

2005

Helen Donaldson

2007

Judy A. Lambet

2010

2010

2011

2012

Diane Murphy

Dr. Rita Hudson Shourds

Dr. Cynthia Crabtree

Sara York

2011

2012

2013

2013

Jill Jones

Karen Lee

Jane C. Morreau

Doris Tegart

food/

2006

Elaine “Cissy” Musselman

2009

Virginia K. Judd

2008

2009

Denise Vazquez Troutman

Jeri Swinton

2010

2011

Lynnie Meyer

Sheila Day

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Elizabeth Kizito

Helen Friedman

Susan Seiller

Kathy Cary

SueAnna Masterson

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

Grace DeluiseKoenig

Judy Schad

Terri Lynn Doyle

Summer Auerbach

Nancy Grantz

Claudia DeLatorre

“As far as artisan cheeses are concerned, we are seeing an increasing number of men beginning to produce the same cheeses. So often, women are trendsetters. And in my particular field, it was crazy women with a handful of goats who started this whole thing, and now everyone is jumping on the bandwagon.”

todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow @todayswomannow todayswomannow.com

“I think people are going to continue to be more interested in the quality of food they’re ingesting. Women do the majority of grocery shopping, so they’re becoming more knowledgeable in labels and what exactly it is they’re buying.” 2013 2013

JUNE JUNE

>

2013

Cathe Dykstra

“[Being recognized as a Most Admired Woman winner] made me want to continue to reinforce the importance education plays in the lives of students and continue to place great emphasis on gaining as much education and training as you can.”

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2012

Lori Redmon

EntErtainmEnt

2004

Sharon Darling

2008

Deb Moessner

55 57


HealtH/ HealtH care

“[Being selected as a Most Admired Woman winner] opened the door for me to meet and create long-term relationships with many awesome women leaders within our community. 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Sue Stout Tamme

Mary Norton Shands

Jerri Quillman

Joanne Berryman

Dr. Kim Alumbaugh

Political

W 2008

2010

2011

2012

2013

Dr. Kerri Remmel, M.D., PhD.

Dr. Mollie Cartwright

Becky Beanblossom

Charlotte Ipsan

2009

Dr. Anees Chagpar Rebecca Booth, M.D.

Homestyle

Most AdMired woMAn Hall of Fame

58 56

2003

2004

Betsy Wall

Carla Sue Broecker

2005

2006

2007

Donna Dusel

Lenora Paradis*

Lawren Just

2008

2009

2010

Liz Wilson

Tracie Utter

Andie Frisbee

2011

2012

2013

Cindi Sullivan

Joan Waddell

Leslie McCarthy

JUNE

2013

2003

Anne Meagher Northup

media 2003

2004

2004

2005

Dawne Gee

Liz Everman

Janice R. Martin

Crit Luallen

2005

2006

2007

2006

2007

Jackie Hays

Jean West

Melissa Swan

Joan Riehm*

Bobbie Holsclaw

2008

2009

2010

Vicki Dortch

Rachel Platt

Janelle MacDonald

2011

2012

2013

Renee Murphy

Candyce Clifft

Claudia Coffey

“In my field, I can really see how the digital age has boomed in the last five years. People expect so much information from us and all other platforms. Social media, our website, and TV are almost on par as far as the hierarchy of how people get information.”

2008

2009

Martha Layne Collins

Eleanor Jordan

2010

2011

Virginia L. Woodward

Tina Ward-Pugh

2012

2013

Shellie May

Angela Bisig

*Deceased

Today’s WomaN


Today's Woman June 2013  

Driven. Confident. Persistent. Grateful. Nurturing. Creative. Irreverent. Modest. Optimistic. Playful. Frugal. Passionate. These are some wo...

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