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oman

TODAY’SW AUGUST 2015 / CONTENTS

“We all have to

work together.”

p.40

23

LOVE E W N E M . 16 p

WELLNESS WATCH

What’s in Jacob Heustis’s Pocket?

p.8

Theo Edmonds Makes Art the Focus p.10

HE STAYS AHEAD OF THE GAME p.12

BEST BITE p.38

p.36

5

PERFECT HAIRSTYLES FOR MEN p.24

WINNING LOOKS FOR YOUR MAN p.32

{HEALTHY { HIS SECRET FOR STAYING p.28

* **

HE’S CREATING A

BOTANICAL GARDEN p.48

BEFORE YOU GO p.50

Someone’s Husband Will Win! p.26

Let the body hair go! p.30


A Man? T

his month, I am sending my youngest son away from home. It is legal for me to do so — he is an adult now and headed to college. He will be increasing the number of men in our world — and I hope he will try to change our world for the better.

Grant Oldham eating out of the Man Bowl ($19.95 from Kitson).

As a mother it is shocking to realize that the baby I started with 18 years ago is now a man. I wonder if I have done enough of the right things to help him be one of the good guys. He will open a door for a woman, but will he really listen when she expresses her opinion? He has gained muscles, but will he have strength of character when things get tough? Will he overcome the inevitable failures and disappointments in life ?

Who are the role models to help guide my son and the millions of other young guys hitting the world this year? The great news is that as you read this issue, you will find a lot o great guys living and working right here in our neighborhoods. Men who are changing their worlds and ours along with it. We dedicate this year’s Man Issue to all of the mothers who have contributed to our society by helping their boys become men. Thank you! And to all the mothers of little boys — keep in mind that you are raising them to become men. Your good work now helps the world become a better place. — Anita Oldham

ON OUR COVER Luke Hancock is getting back into the game — but in a different way. Find out more about what he’s doing on page 42. PHOTO: Melissa Donald LUKE IS WEARING: Tommy Hilfiger suit jacket, $190, available at Nordstrom Rack; T-shirt, $25, available at Express; Lucky Brand jeans, $40, available at Nordstrom Rack; Rolex watch, $18,750, available at Davis Jewelers.

AUGUST 2015 / CONTENTS Volume 25 8 Number 8

PUBLISHER Cathy S. Zion publisher@todayspublications.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Anita Oldham editor@todayspublications.com EDITOR Tiffany White tiffany@todayspublications.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Lucy M. Pritchett CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Miranda G. Popp miranda@todayspublications.com ASSISTANT EDITOR/DESIGNER Jessica Alyea jessica@todayspublications.com OFFICE ADMINISTRATOR Jillian LeMaster offic admin@todayspublications.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Susan Allen susan@todayspublications.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Kaitlyn English kaitlyn@todayspublications.com Teri Hickerson teri@todayspublications.com Suzy Hillebrand suzy@todayspublications.com Joyce Inman joyce@todayspublications.com

TodaysWomanNow.com REPRINTS ARE AVAILABLE!

Call 502.327.8855, ext. 10, or email us at reprints@todayspublications.com with details and specifics For advertising information in Today’s Woman, call 502.327.8855. Today’s Woman

is published monthly by:

Zion Publications, LLC 9750 Ormsby Station Road, Suite 307, Louisville, KY 40223 Phone: 502.327.8855 • Fax: 502.327.8861 todayswomannow.com

Subscriptions are available by sending $18 to the above address for 12 monthly issues. Today’s Woman magazine is published monthly by Zion Publications LLC and distributed free to the people of metropolitan Louisville and Southern Indiana. Circulation 50,000 guaranteed. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of the publisher. Today’s Woman magazine does not endorse or guarantee any advertiser’s product or service. Copyright 2015 by Zion Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content in any manner is prohibited without permission from Zion Publications LLC.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER April H. Allman april@todayspublications.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Kathy Bolger kathyb@todayspublications.com PHOTOGRAPHER/FOOD WRITER Melissa Donald melissa@todayspublications.com MEDIA ASSOCIATE Alissa Hicks alissa@todayspublications.com CIRCULATION MANAGER W. Earl Zion EDITORIAL INTERNS Anna Patterson Avery Walts

BBB RATING OF

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WHAT WORKS

It All Fits in the Pocket by LUCY M. PRITCHETT / photos by MELISSA DONALD What Works for Jacob Heustis, 36, artist; musician; production designer for the award-winning film Men Go to Battle; set designer for Louisville Ballet’s upcoming production of Coppelia; new dad HOMETOWN: Louisville NEIGHBORHOOD: Highlands HOUSEHOLD: Wife, Ali Heustis, 3-month-old son, Wilder, and Ruby, a white Pomeranian

T

his artist has created a series of portraits featuring rich and famous American women titled Debutantes. Fittingly, each sparkling image is etched in a mirror with a diamond — a girl’s best friend. What works for him can be carried in his pockets.

UNIBALL VISION PEN — FINE POINT, BLACK INK I have been using this pen for 10 years. The fine point has a slight amount of bleed that allows for a little bit of line quality control but not so much bleed that I have to worry about it. The line stays consistent. I buy them by the 12-pack. I carry one with me all the time for sketching on the go. For finished works on paper, I use a dip pen and India ink. For drawing, I use a 2B or 4B graphite pencil. EARBUDS THAT CAME WITH MY iPHONE 6 I keep these with me in my left pocket. I like that they have a little built-in clip that keeps them from getting all tangled. I listen to and think about music more than just about anything else. When I was 3 or 4, I would put on a record and listen to Michael Jackson’s Thriller album or Tom Petty. These earbuds have great quality sound, particularly the low end. I listen to music when I am creating in my studio or just walking around. I made a “Dad playlist” that features Robert Palmer’s Johnny and Mary, Gerry Rafferty’s Right Down the Line, and Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson’s It’s My Lazy Day. LEATHERMAN WAVE This is a great tool that combines many tools in one. It has pliers, a couple of knife blades, wire cutters, scissors, different screwdriver heads, a saw, and a bottle opener/can opener. I had one that got stolen and then got this one as a present from my grandmother. I carry it in its leather holster that clips to my belt. Once, on a trip back from New York, I forgot to take it out of my carry-on bag. I didn’t want to leave it, so I ran back and bought a bag to check through and missed my flight I ended up being snowed in in Chicago for two days but finally made it home, as did my Leatherman.

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>

TURNING POINT

<

The Need for Art By LUCY M. PRITCHETT Photo by MELISSA DONALD

THEO EDMONDS, 45, co-founder of IDEAS 40203, Louisville’s contemporary art chamber of commerce; named one of Southern Living’s 50 people who are changing the South in 2015. Hometown: Jackson, Kentucky Neighborhood: Smoketown Household: Partner, Joshua Miller Website: ideaslouisville.com

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There is a step in clogging, the official dance of Kentucky, called the pivot. It is no wonder then that Theo Edmonds refers to the many turning points in his life as pivots. He was once a clogger with former Governor Martha Layne Collins’ Goodwill Ambassador program that traveled the country spreading Kentucky goodness and putting the spotlight on this lively dance. He began with a degree in theater and studio art, then made a career for himself as a healthcare strategist and administrator, then pivoted back to the art world. Now, not the least bit dizzy from all that pivoting, Theo is combining his artistic talents and business acumen and is working to put artists and arts into the hearts of corporations and the community. In 2013 he and partner Joshua Miller co-founded the country’s first artistled chamber of commerce, IDEAS 40203. Its aim is to connect artists with corporations, city leaders, and nonprofit organizations to create programs that promote new forms of economic development and positive social change. “Arts and culture for a long time have been separate and apart from community and businesses,” he says. “But art is not ‘apart’ and is intertwined with all aspects of our lives. “I believe in the transformational power of art. Artists are bright and creative and can bring their innovative thinking to corporations and communities. Why wouldn’t we want the best creative minds at the table to help solve problems of workforce development or help innovate poor communities?” Being an artist brings a great responsibility, Theo says. Artists can’t just walk into their studios and shut the door. “Artists need to make studio time but also make time to work in the world. An artist’s job is to help his or her community understand itself, and they can’t do that if they don’t know what is going on in that community. Artists need to be sitting on nonprofit boards, getting inside businesses and out on the streets. They will become better artists and better citizens.” TODAY’S WOMAN


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Survival Skills of R. Wayne Estopinal

By MARIE BRADBY / Photos by MELISSA DONALD

O

ne of the many fascinating things about R. Wayne Estopinal, nationally recognized architect, part owner of two professional soccer teams, and owner of a sports development complex, is his work ethic. Wayne gets up at 3:30 in the morning and rarely leaves the office before 8 in the evening. “It’s incredibly exciting to be an entrepreneur,” Wayne, 59, says. He owns the Mockingbird Valley Sports Complex and is part-owner of both the minor league team Louisville City Football Club and the major league soccer team the Orlando City Soccer. “But, it’s a ton of work.” TEG Architects, which Wayne founded in 1989 in Dallas, Texas, practices primarily health care architecture nationally. By 1991, he had moved the company to Jeffersonville, Indiana — his hometown. “A problem with health care today is they are working in a very competitive market with facilities designed in the ’50s and ’60s,” he says. The company focuses on efficiency and productivity. “We plan and design entire campuses like Our Lady of Lourdes Regional Medical Center in Lafayette, Louisiana, where we took a 46-acre site and master-planned it for a new replacement hospital, medical offices, and a surgical hospital,” Wayne says. “For Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana, we did a new replacement hospital. It’s just a stunning building that is a shining star of the community and is also a highly efficient health care facility.” Wayne is heavily involved in the day-to-day operations of TEG and its staff of 50. He learned from another architect to use weekends to get design work done, so his weekdays are spent with staff and clients and developing business. He says a growing number of women have entered the field. Another thing about Wayne: He was only introduced to soccer when his kids began to play. His daughter Ashley played for the Sacred Heart Academy, and his son Andrew played for St. X. “It was a great time for our family to be together,” he says. He noticed soccer was growing nationally and started investigating getting involved. So how are his teams doing? At the time of this interview,

Wayne’s secrets to success for a start-up business:

1. The key to success

in the first five years with a start-up is great determination. It’s definitely a marathon, not a sprint. (This comes from a guy who’s run 30 12

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it had been a wild weekend. On June 13, Louisville City played Rochester, the leading team in their conference. “We took a bit of a reality check,” Wayne says. “We got thumped 2-nil. On June 14, the other team that I am minority owner in, Orlando City, played D.C. United, and we won 1-0.” Louisville City is in fourth place in the eastern conference, he says. “Of the expansion teams, we are doing better than anybody else at this point in the season. “James O’Connor, our coach, has done really well putting a squad together. He’s scouted all over the globe. We have players from Denmark, Israel, the United Kingdom, and from all over the U.S. It’s a joy to get to know them.”

marathons.) It takes a great deal of persistence to admit that you will be learning and solving problems every day.

a very surreal feeling to know you’ve just staked everything on the decision to start a business.

4. Be prepared.

Every business I have started, I had no idea how much work would be involved.

that don’t work. You can’t be afraid of the things that don’t work. Refine them before they go to the client.

2. Be willing to take

3. Expect the

5. Establish a

6. Stay healthy. Take

risks. I remember that first trip to the office supply company in Dallas. When we walked out that door, I think we had $1,500 left to our name. That’s

unexpected. You will think you have put many issues to rest, only to find that you haven’t. You can’t get discouraged. You deal with it.

collaborative office culture. The staff has to have the confidence to be innovative. Any collaboration in any business will have things that work and things

care of yourself so you can be productive.

7. Be creative. Looking at things in different ways keeps you excited about what you do.

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28.)

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On the

CUTTING EDGE By Tiffany White / Photos by MELISSA DONALD / Illustration by SILVIA CABIB

Are you tired of wearing the same hairstyle? Get some inspiration from these men and find the right hairstyle for yourself.

2

1


(left to right)

1 URBAN TWISTS WITH A SHAPE UP DOMINIC COLLINS JOB: Assembly worker, GE Appliance Park WHERE HE GOES: Haircutz! Barber Shop WHY HE CHOSE THIS STYLE: “I wanted to try something different from what I had. I like to be a trendsetter and stand out in the crowd.” HOW HE MAINTAINS IT: Wear a do-rag or wave cap nightly and return to the shop as needed for re-twisting.

2 SHORTER STYLE

4 5 3

JOHN BUNKER JOB: Vice President of Finance and Operations, FSA Management Group WHERE HE GOES: Hair by Bennie & Friends WHY HE CHOSE THIS STYLE: “I wanted classic look. I become bored if I wear the same style for too long. This hairstyle allows for slight variations to keep it fresh but without changing the overall look.” HOW HE MAINTAINS IT: “I get a haircut every two weeks and use Gage for Men hair products. Since I travel a lot for my job, I might need a paste versus a pomade depending on the climate I am in.”

3 UNDERCUT WITH WAVES ON TOP JOSH SIMANEK JOB: Outside sales, Global Granite & Marble WHERE HE GOES: Hair by Bennie & Friends WHY HE CHOSE THIS STYLE: “I evolved into the hairstyle. I had let it grow out because I wanted it a little longer on the top. Also, it is easy to manage.” HOW HE MAINTAINS IT: “I get it cut every two weeks and use ¾ Cream by Gage for Men.”

4 MAN BUN

DAVE ISAACS JOB: Percussion director at Floyd Central High School WHY HE CHOSE THIS STYLE: He is actually growing it out to a longer style and this style became trendy at a convenient time. HOW HE MAINTAINS IT: He cuts his own hair with the aid of a mirror clipped to a microphone stand.

5 EVEN TAPER WITH WAVES REVEREND CHANNING BANKS JOB: Bus driver, Jefferson County Public Schools WHERE HE GOES: Haircutz! Barber Shop WHY HE CHOSE THIS STYLE: “It was a life change. I used to have very long hair which was part of my past lifestyle.” HOW HE MAINTAINS IT: Use a wave pomade such as Sport n’ Wave to hold the waves in place.

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Best Husbands 2015 Are you ready to brag on your husband? This month, you can do it as much as you wish as part of our annual Best Husbands contest. Starting August 10, readers can vote for the husband they think shines the brightest. The winner receives a $100 gift card to Fritz’s Salon & Spa for Men and bragging rights. The featured husbands were nominated by our readers. Go to TodaysWomanNow.com to start voting!

#1 ANTHONY BAKER

#2 ALAN BERRY

#7 STEVEN CAYTON

#8 JEFF CHANDLER

#13 JOE DUNMAN

#14 AARON EDELEN

#19 MARK HARVEY

#20 CARL HILTON

#25 GEOFF MALLETT

#26

ROB NORTHCUTT

#31 KIRT STAUFFER 26

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#3 KENDALL BOYD

#4 BLAKE BRITTAIN

#5 ASHLEY “AC” CARDWELL

#6 PHILLIP CARSWELL

#9

#10 TIM CROWDER

#11 ANDRA CUMMINGS

#12 CLIFTON DUKES

#15 ALBERT FIELDS, JR.

#16 CHRIS GILLES

#17 RALPH HAMMOND

#18 JOHN HARRYMAN

#21 DAVID HOUVENAGLE

#22 BRETT KENNEDY

#23 MARK LEHR

#24 JA CK LOWE

#27 ERIC PULLEN

#28 MATT PYLES

#29 RYAN RICHINS

#32 ERIC WIGGINTON, SR.

#33 DAN WILLIAMSON

#34 DENNIS WILLINGER

ADAM COOPER

#30

TOM SCHMIDT

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He Kicks It! By ANNA PATTERSON Photo by MELISSA DONALD

Darryl Tucker

I

n his younger days, Darryl Tucker led an active lifestyle playing football for the University of Louisville and then semiprofessionally for nearly 15 years. After damaging his knee, Darryl decided it was time to “retire” and began working as a claims processor for Humana. Darryl had never had a sit-down job before, and he found himself gaining weight. After reaching nearly 300 pounds, he knew it was time to get his health back in order. He began using the Humana gym during his lunch breaks, but it wasn’t until a trainer at the gym advised him to change his diet that he saw real change. Darryl took the trainer’s advice and lost more than 60 pounds. Darryl’s coworkers at Humana noticed his lifestyle change, and he eventually gained a following of people who would attend the gym and mimic his workout routine in hopes of seeing similar results. He would always be sure to tell them that 85 percent of maintaining your weight is watching what you eat. Darryl’s department director also saw his progress and promoted him to wellness director. He now oversees approximately 5,000 Humana employees and focuses his efforts on keeping them active and healthy. He has received his certificate in personal training and holds boot camps twice a week in the Humana gym. “I love to help people feel better about themselves and keep them going when they want to give up,” Darryl says. “I’ve been where they are, and I know from my experience they can succeed if they stick with it.” Nominate a woman for Today’s Woman Kicks It by sending an email to anita@todayspublications.com.

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LOOKS BOOK:

WAX ON, WAX OFF

Or laser...or pluck...or trim... Help your man take care of unwanted hair on both his body and face with waxing tips from Torilla Pellerin at Focus Salon. For a more permanent solution, Allyson Beam from Corbett Cosmetics talks about the benefits of laser hair removal. By ANNA PATTERSON

YOUR “MANSCAPING” SOLUTIONS LASER HAIR REMOVAL: Beam says laser hair removal is the current “manscaping” trend. Men tend to be hairy in several areas (chest, back, abdomen, etc.), and laser hair removal is able to wipe out all the hair at once. Irritation can often occur with shaving, especially around sensitive areas such as the neck and chest. With laser removal, Beam says, irritation is a non-issue. While some spots may sting during treatment, the pain is quick and temporary and the smooth, hair-free result is permanent.

+ BIGGEST PRO: The end result is permanent,

+ BIGGEST PRO: Waxing is less costly than laser hair

— BIGGEST CON: Permanent hair removal comes

— BIGGEST CON: Some irritation may occur post-waxing.

with no post-procedure irritation.

at a steep cost, with each session averaging at about $235 per session.* * According to WebMD

BEST TS PRODUC : TO TRY FOR THE NOSE:

Groom Mate’s Platinum XL Nose Hair Trimmer

FOR THE EAR:

Tweezerman Slant Tweezer

FOR THE UNIBROW:

Tweezerman Ingrown Hair/ Splintertweeze

FOR POST-WAXING:

Lycon Ingrown-X-IT Solution 30

WAXING: According to Pellerin, waxing is the most effective way to remove hair without subjecting it to harsh chemicals or laser treatments. She uses a hard wax for all areas of the body, which “shrink wraps” around the root of hair and removes its full growth cycle. Waxing, she says, keeps the integrity of the skin by providing natural exfoliation without over-sensitizing the skin. Her suggestions for those coming in for a wax treatment are to exfoliate the areas prior to the appointment to remove excess skin, refrain from shaving for a minimum of two weeks (for maximum results), and moisturize.

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removal, with some areas as low as $20 per session.**

To minimize red bumps and ingrown hairs, apply Lycon’s Ingrown-X-IT Solution after showering.

** Price specific to Focus Salon and S a

YOUR HAIRY SITUATION… If you have nose hair…

while laser hair removal provides a permanent fix, it can only be used for external hair. The best way to take care of those pesky nose hairs is to remove them via wax. Pellerin says that coating and removing the nose hairs with wax is less painful than plucking one at a time, and the results last longer. However, if you’re in need of an immediate solution, nose hair trimmers are the way to go.

If you have ear hair…

the solution is similar to that of nose hair. Laser hair removal can take care of hair outside the ear permanently, but cannot reach hair inside the ear. Waxing is the best and longest-lasting form of hair removal for this part of the body. Pellerin says they take great care to remove all ear hair at once without entering the ear canal. But for a quick at-home fix, a good pair of blunt tweezers can solve the immediate problem.

If you have a unibrow… if you want a “fix and forget” solution, laser hair removal is the best way to go for this part of the body. However, as men get older, eyebrow hair becomes wiry and unpredictable. A fine-tipped tweezer is best for removing those unruly eyebrow hairs. And as with nose and ear hair, waxing is also an option.

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WellnessWatch

By TORIE TEMPLE

The Truth About Gout

G

out is a kind of arthritis. It can cause an attack of sudden burning pain, stiffness, and swelling in a joint, usually a big toe. Gout is often a misunderstood condition that is associated with men, but gout doesn’t have gender boundaries. Take this quiz to learn the truth about gout with expert advice from Dr. John Van Arsdall of KentuckyOne Health and Dr. Charles Moore, rheumatologist with University of Louisville Physicians.

Secret to a Longer Life I

start every day by reading inspirational words. Some lists are devoted to living life longer and more fully. Other lists are about my connection to the divine. Psychologists have a formula for those who wish to live longer and enjoy life more fully: • Learn to like what doesn’t cost much. • Learn to like reading, conversation, and music. • Learn to like plain food, plain service, plain cooking.

T or F Gout is caused by too much potassium in the blood. FALSE: According to Dr. Van Arsdall, gout is caused by too much uric acid in the blood. “Years ago, we wouldn’t treat a uric acid level of seven,” he says. “Seven is now too high, and we would like to get the uric acid down less than six, sometimes less than fi e.” T or F Some medications could cause a gout flare-up. TRUE: “Medications can cause a gout flare-up,” Dr. Moore says. “Diuretics given to patients with heart failure who are swollen and need to get the fluid off have been known to cause gout.”

• Learn to like fields, trees, woods, brooks, nature. • Learn to like people, even though some of them may be very different from you. • Learn to like work, and enjoy the satisfaction of doing your job as well as it can be done.

T or F Soft drinks can lower uric acid levels.

• Learn to like the songs of the birds, the companionship of dogs, and the laughter and gaiety of children.

FALSE: “Soft drinks, high fructose corn syrup, and alcohol could cause a gout flare-up,” Dr. Van Arsdall says. “Also, large amounts of seafood could increase the risk of high uric acid.”

• Learn to like gardening, carpentering, puttering around the house, the lawn, the car.

T or F After menopause, women are at greater risk of getting gout.

• Learn to like the sunrise and sunset, the beating of rain on the roof and windows, and the gentle fall of snow on a winter day.

TRUE: “Women who are premenopausal typically do not get gout — it is very rare,” Dr. Moore says. “Estrogen helps get rid of uric acid. By the time women are in their 50s and 60s, the risk of getting gout is the same as men.” T or F Though it is rare, there are reasons women could get gout before menopause.

• Learn to keep your wants simple. Refuse to be owned and anchored by things and opinions of others.

TRUE: “One reason premenopausal women might get gout is kidney failure, like chronic kidney disease,” Dr. Moore says. “Some may have a genetic predisposition to gout — something in their metabolism that produces too much uric acid.”

For the secret of contentment is knowing how to enjoy what you have.

SOURCES: Dr. John Van Arsdall, KentuckyOne Health Physician Dr. Charles Moore, Rheumatologist with UofL Physicians

By Bob Mueller, vice president of Development at Hosparus, bobmueller.org

{ 36

What a man wants to hear from his wife:

“I’m impressed with how you handled that situation.”

{

Sometimes a wife will point out when her husband does not handle something well. So when he handles a particularly difficult situation well, let him know. — imom.com AUGUST

2015

I

Yeah, You Gotta Get Tested

n the United States, it is estimated that one in 38 men between the ages of 40 and 59 will be diagnosed with prostate cancer. It’s imperative men age 50 and older have a yearly prostate cancer screening, such as prostate specific antigen blood test.

“Routine screenings over age 50 can help healthcare providers find and treat cancer early. Often by the time symptoms appear, prostate cancer may be at an advanced stage where it is more difficult to treat and more likely to have

spread,” said Shiao Woo, MD, director of radiation oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center. “However, it’s important to get a second opinion from a prostate expert to be sure you’re receiving the proper treatment.” TODAY’S WOMAN


Best Bite Visit Brendon’s Catch 23, a historic, hip, and contemporary restaurant in the new Embassy Suites hotel downtown. Enjoy a world class and beautifully crafted seafood meal, such as this Seared Yellowfin una with roasted Yukon potatoes and asparagus, finished with a Bearnaise sauce. Served here with the cocktail The Bachelor Fix, a blend of vodka, cointreau, lemon, and Prosecco.

Text and photograph by MELISSA DONALD

Brendon’s Catch 23 LOCATION

505 South 4th Street in Embassy Suites Louisville, KY 502.909.3323 bcatch23.com HOURS:

Monday-Thursday, 4-10pm, Friday & Saturday, 4pm-12am 38

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THE

MENTORS

By AVERY WALTS Photos by MELISSA DONALD

Helping Each Other

Terrence Moorman (l) with Derek Anderson.

erek Anderson’s childhood was derailed when the basketball court became his home after he was abandoned at age 11. He played for hours when he wasn’t searching for shelter. “I was ridiculed and joked on for wearing the same clothes or not having the right pair of shoes,” he says. Terrence Moorman, 47, met Derek when Derek was a freshman at Doss High School. Terrence became an assistant coach there after playing college ball at Northern Kentucky University, and their connection was gravitational. Terrence says that Derek would stay at his house sometimes on the weekends and pick Terrence’s brain on all things college basketball. Derek’s spirit, hours spent on the basketball court, and a friendship through high school, helped him reach collegiate basketball at the University of Kentucky and the NBA. Derek continued to face barriers. Drugs, sex, and rock ‘n’ roll were constant temptations, but it took a friend’s near-death tragedy to change his trajectory. “It wasn’t until a good friend of mine was shot and paralyzed that I recognized that those temptations can’t be a part of my life,” Derek says. “I realized I had to focus on what my vision was, and that was to be a better basketball player and also graduate from college.”

He made it into the NBA and played for the Cleveland Cavaliers, Clippers, Spurs, Trail Blazers, Rockets, Heat, and the Bobcats. Now, his full-time job is entrepreneur and author who has written a book titled Stamina, sharing his experience. Derek returned to his hometown this past June for his youth basketball camp, Stamina Camp 15. Derek, 40, teaches the children at his Stamina Camp more than just dribbling and three-point shots. He preaches that the kids must project a positive attitude to succeed in any avenue of life. “You can have all the qualific tions in the world, but your character is how you’re going to make it and survive today,” he says. “Without a positive character and attitude, you will always lose.” Terrence says Derek empowered him to dream higher as well. “I want to empower young people to not be out doing foolish things and to create a place where people can come talk to mentors and role models, a place where they can enjoy their lives and learn to raise a family and be productive citizens,” says Terrence. Today, Terrence is the head coach of the boys’ basketball team at Western High School and the director of Derek’s Stamina Camp 15. Continued on page 42

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Passing the Buck

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chance meeting between Luke Hancock, 25, former University of Louisville basketball player, and team booster Mark Lamkin, 45, turned into a future career for the soon-to-be graduate. Luke joined Mark’s team at Lamkin Wealth Management earlier this year. “He’s probably helped me most by being a support. I don’t have to try and sell someone that ‘My name is Luke Hancock, and I played basketball at UofL and now you invest with me’ because that’s just not how it works,” Luke says. “But when you say, ‘Mark has been in the business for 25 years, he and I work hand-in-hand together, and I won’t make any of the decisions without his help’ — those types of statements are what people feel comfortable with.” Just as Mark learned from mentors along the way, so he is willing to teach Luke. “[Luke will] be working with my clients on getting referrals, really talking with them, learning this business, and sitting beside me in meetings,” Mark says. “He’s getting an education and although I am paying him, the time he’s spending on my team over the next 12 months is worth just as much as a salary is.” Luke’s accrued skills on the court align with those he puts into action off the court. He says getting to practice early and staying late was expected at UofL basketball, so it’s not an abnormal switch to his work now. Equally important are the life tools he learned under the leadership of Coach Rick Pitino. “Coach talks about how we’re a Luke Hancock (l) with Mark Lamkin. distracted generation,” Luke says. “You need to be personal. You need to be able to talk to someone and look them in the eye.” “I think Mark has a lot of good points about wanting to help people,” Luke says. “That really speaks to me because I want to be someone that people look to when they need help and have questions and need financial advice ” With a mountain of knowledge learned and yet to be learned, Luke knows he’s in good hands with Mark. ”I’ve heard this a lot: ‘You’re drinking from a fi e hose,’ because there’s a lot of information you need to learn,” he says. “But you go back to Mark

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Mark’s Start After Mark Lamkin’s aging grandmother filed for bankruptcy, her struggle spurred a financial interest that would eventually lead to Lamkin Wealth Management. “Literally from that day forward, I made the decision that I was going to be in personal finance because I didn’t want anyone else’s grandmother or mother or sister to have to worry about being in that same situation, ” Mark says. and ask questions and try to pick up on everything you can. It’s a slow process, but I’ve already learned so much from these guys that I know I’m going to be successful.” Mark says Lamkin Wealth Management will be a billion dollar firm in the n xt 10 years with the help of people like Luke, but his ideal vision for his future would be himself “on the beach with Continued on page 44 Luke running the practice.” TODAY’S WOMAN


todayswomannow.com / facebook.com/todayswomanmagazine / @todayswomannow


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Building a Future

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fter traditional school wasn’t working, Andrew Haynes, 19, enrolled in the YouthBuild construction program, earned his GED, and began working for David Foster this past April. David Foster and his brothers started Foster Brothers Construction in 1997. Starting the company turned out to be a successful career move and led to an eventual partnership with YouthBuild Louisville, a nonpro t organization providing education, counseling, and job skills for unemployed youth. With construction and real estate business genes in his family, construction was something Andrew says he often thought about doing. When David gave him the opportunity to work beside him, Andrew soon realized building homes related to life lessons. He says David has taught him how to take a situation and make it better, a parallel he sees while taking a project from demo to completion. Despite the skills he learned before entering Foster Brothers Construction, Andrew’s trade is still a work in progress. “I’m still learning. [David] didn’t judge me on what I knew, and he wasn’t expecting me to know a whole lot,” he says. “I respected that.” Empowerment, rather than servitude, is David’s game when it comes to teaching Andrew the skills to succeed in construction. YouthBuild does a great job at teaching the fundamentals, David says, and Andrew proved that fact when he was put to work on job sites. “There were no barriers with Andrew,” David says. “When he rst came here, he knew exactly what I needed and when I would need it. Anything I asked for, he was handing it to me. He caught on fast. He’s my right-hand man.” YouthBuild recently sent Andrew on a two-week visit to work on the gardens of Versailles in Paris, France. With experiences like this under his belt, Andrew says he recommends the organization to anybody.

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“YouthBuild does exactly what they say they’re going to do and more,” Andrew says. “If you come with an open mind, they’ve got everything for you. I thank them for changing my life and putting me where I am today.” Beyond the power tools and demolition jobs, David believes the skills Andrew is learning are a trade he can take anywhere in the future. Continued on page 46


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Gathering Information from an Early Age

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t an early age, Ron Marshall knew exactly what he wanted to do with his life. “Growing up in the inner city, I didn’t have a lot of opportunities to be around professional individuals,” he says. “I really enjoyed the relationship I had with student teachers and interacting with the principal. I knew I wanted to be a principal.” Today he is just that. After teaching for 11 years, he is now entering his fourth year as principal at Layne Elementary School, Ron, 39, draws on the influences f om his former educational mentors. He emphasizes the importance of consulting with his staff on making decisions to better the school environment for everyone. “When I became a principal, I made sure to listen to what the teachers had to say and included them in the decision process. This was not only for the sake of the kids, but also the adults at the school. We all have to work together.” The future holds an educational doctoral candidate diploma for Ron, something he wants to use to better the lives of students. But the main goal comes more from the heart. “I want to be the best principal and educator I can be for the sake of students, the community, and families,” he says.

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PASSIONS

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In relationships…play…community

By MARY ELLEN BIANCO

CREATING A

Botanical Garden rian Voelker (pronounced “Velker”) has been board president of Botanica for five years. The local organization has a master plan to develop the Waterfront Botanical Gardens, which will occupy a 23-acre site that was previously the Ohio Street landfill. The Founders’ Garden is already completed at the Heigold House facade, which stands at the north end of Frankfort Avenue near River Road. Brian’s experience with nonprofits and interest in gardening led him to join Botanica. “I come from a long line of German farmers,” Brian says. “I love to be around plants and landscaped places. It’s so relaxing to experience nature at its finest.” Brian works for Humana and was previously the managing director of a nonprofit theater company in Chicago. He moved to Louisville eight years ago since his partner, Chris, is from here. “I love Louisville,” Brian says. “I think it’s a very livable city.” He has a house with a yard in the Belknap neighborhood, where

he says he can exercise his green thumb. Brian estimates that he volunteers between 10 to 20 hours a week with Botanica. “I’m not a botanist, but I have experience to help this project grow,” he says. “It’s really like having a part-time job. It’s a labor of love.” In May, an option to purchase agreement for the garden property was signed with the city for the purchase price of $1, and a successful fundraiser was held at the location for the first time. Future plans include a two-year capital campaign with a goal for completion in 2019. “City leaders see this as a great community project,” Brian says. Views of downtown and the river are visible from the 40-foot-high former landfill. “It’s really unique to see the center space and imagine what it will look like,” Brian says. “We want to get the community excited about it.” Find out more at WaterfrontGardens.org.

Brian considers his volunteer work to be a labor of love.

Photo: MELISSA DONALD

B

“My wife is like a clanging gong. I find mysel staying at work longer, playing golf more frequently, and tuning her out. To say it is causing stress is an understatement. I love her, but I feel badgered. Nothing is ever enough. I can’t do anything as well as her dad. Now the kids have started complaining about things I do as well. How can I put a lid on this and gain the respect I desperately need?”

Q:

JUST ASK JOYCE

Find the 48

AUGUST

2015

A: at TodaysWomanNow.com

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Send your recipe to us and Today’s Woman might feature you in our Holiday Bites special. Sign up at TodaysWomanNow.com TODAY’S WOMAN


BEFORE YOU

GO

By AVERY WALTS / Photo by MELISSA DONALD

NAME: Josh Goodlett AGE: 35 JOB: Country music artist LIVES IN: Sellersburg, Indiana Growing up in Taylorsville, Kentucky, Josh Goodlett was surrounded by music. His aunt sang in a gospel quartet, his uncle had a country band, and Josh sang in church as a kid. But it wasn’t until about eight years ago that he decided to pick up a guitar and teach himself how to play. Since then, he has been on radio tours from Arkansas to Alabama promoting his single, Why You Gotta Be That Way, and climbing the country music charts. Josh’s debut album is yet to be named, but his time spent recording in Nashville has produced a collection of songs t for everyone. “Every song on the album pulls on a different heartstring,” he says. “There’s something for every walk of life on this album, and that’s what I set out to do.” His musical in uences come from his childhood surroundings and nationally known performers such as Kenny Chesney. “Kenny Chesney said that the song is where it’s at, and putting out the best song possible is what you need to do,” Josh says. “Following him inspired me a lot as far as putting out the best album possible.” Josh dedicates time to songwriting, regardless of whether the end result is a Grammy-winning hit or a toss in the trash. Everyday people serve as his inspiration. “I try to talk about real life,” he says. “That’s why I talk to people so much. It helps me write.” FASHION HE’S WEARING: “Cowboy boots and a baseball hat paired with a classic country T-shirt like Lynyrd Skynyrd.” LATEST MUSIC HE’S LOVING: “The Chris Stapleton album. It’s great!”

Before I Go (onstage)... “I try not to puke. I also

pray and thank God for allowing me to be in this position.” 50

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LAST SONG HE WROTE: “I wrote a song on the road called What Do Ya Say? It’s a really fun song about a guy and a girl just getting away.” LATEST PURCHASE HE’S PRAISING: “I’d say my new in-ear monitors. Getting a new piece of equipment is like getting a new toy as a kid.” TODAY’S WOMAN


Today's Woman August 2015  

This month, I am sending my youngest son away from home. It is legal for me to do so — he is an adult now and headed to college. He will be...

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