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APRIL 2009 COMPLIMENTARY

Greening Your World

Behind The Beams Of A Green Renovation

Abuzz With Activity

Keeping Bees In The City

C’mon, April Showers! Umbrellas Worthy Of The Rain


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4521 Sharon Road, Charlotte NC 28211 • 704.532.9041 or 888.400.4447 • (Located across from SouthPark Mall) Hours: Monday-Friday 10:00-7:00, Saturday 10:00-5:00 www.DiamondsDirectSouthpark.com Diamonds Direct Birmingham | Mountain Brook, AL | 205-201-7400 Diamonds Direct Crabtree | Raleigh, NC | 919-571-2881


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April 2009

Contents 60 62

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63 54

78 D E PA R T M E N T S 12 From The Publisher The Green Light: You Have It!

14 Girl Time Tips, Trends, And Fancies

22 Queen City Jewels Happenings You Don’t Want To Miss

26 On The Move Women Making Strides; Business Success Stories

27 Work Notes Tax Tips For Job Seekers

28 Money Talks Banking On The Environment

54 Fashion

70 Diversions Nesting With Sticks And Stones At Ciel Gallery

74 Meet Our Advertisers Dr. Scott Young Gives Clients A “Young Smile”

75 Meet Our Advertisers Be An Ageless Wonder With Help From Posang Nature

76 Meet Our Advertisers Advanced Reproductive Concepts Helps Couples Achieve Parenthood

78 Health Matters Clean For Spring — The Natural Way

Why So Blue? You Can Find Jeans That Fit!

80 Health Flash What You Need To Know To Stay Well

60 Beauty Hello, Fresh Face Cosmetics Good Enough To Eat

88 The Meeting Place Professional And Social Meetings

62 At Home Behind The Beams Of A Lovely Green Renovation 6

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90 Tomorrow’s Charlotte Woman Charlotte’s Future Fabulous Females


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Today’s

Charlotte Woman

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Business/Lifestyle

Volume XII, Number 11 April 2009 PUBLISHER

Belva Greenage

46

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Fern Howerin EDITOR

Michelle Young Hubacher ASSISTANT EDITOR

Karsen Price ART DIRECTOR

Anita O’Hara SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Carrie Boyd ADVERTISING SALES DIRECTOR

Gail Williams SALES EXECUTIVE

Barbara Herd BUSINESS MANAGER

Nikki Wilson WEB DESIGNER

Cliff McNamara CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Leigh Barrett CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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Jennifer Bradford-Epstein Meaghan Clark Fiona Harmon Melinda Johnston Tracy B. McGinnis Monique McKenzie Debra Moffit Karsen Price Lee Rhodes Corey Stewart Joanna Zikos

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CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

53 PROFILES 30 The Many Shades Of Green Writer Jodi Helmer Details 365 Ways To Green Your World

34 2008 BusinessWoman Of The Year Wray Ward’s Jennifer Appleby Takes The Honor

F E AT U R E S Libby Mack Shares The Sweet Result Of Keeping Bees

46 To Market, To Market Meet Some Of The Women Producing Locally Grown Food T O D A Y ’ S

Quail Hollow Championship Is On Course With An Eco-Approach

53 C’mon, April Showers! Umbrellas Worthy Of The Rain

C H A R L O T T E

W O M A N

5200 Park Road, Suite 111 Charlotte, NC 28209 704/521-6872 www.todayscharlottewoman.com Today’s Charlotte Woman is published by Today’s Woman Inc., and is distributed on a complimentary basis throughout the greater Charlotte area. Subscription rate is $20 per year for 11 issues plus the TCW Resource Guide.

OnTheCover

40 To Bee Or Not To Bee?

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50 Greening Of The Greens

Augusto Photography Armando Bellmas James Brown Markus Perry Scott Stiles Alicia Towler

AWASH IN SPRING SHOWERS. ENJOY OUR ANNUAL GREEN ISSUE! COVER PHOTO COURTESY OF: ©iStockphoto.com/Steve Cole

Copyright ©2009 Today’s Woman, Inc. All rights reserved. Copying or reproduction, in part or in whole, is strictly prohibited. Today’s Charlotte Woman and Today’s Woman Inc. do not necessarily endorse the views and perceptions of contributors or advertisers.


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Our new magnet is attracting a lot of attention.

Advanced magnetic breast imaging technology, now available at Presbyterian One of the best ways to fight breast cancer is to catch it in its earliest stages. Thanks to the superior imaging quality of our new 3T MRI, our doctors are able to detect even smaller growths and tumors in women at high risk for the disease. Even if you don’t have a family history of breast cancer, take the first step toward early detection. Schedule a digital mammogram today by calling 704-384-4177, or visit presbyterian.org/scheduling.


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todayscharlottewoman.com Ba l l a n t y n e R e s o r t C o n t e s t

Mom’s The Word Tell Us About Your Mother … In Just Six Words Craft a six-word bio about Mom, and you could be selected to win a night’s stay at Ballantyne Resort, including $100 worth of spa treatment in the Resort’s world-class spa facility. What better way to celebrate Mother’s Day than with 24 hours of pampering? Enter TCW’s Mom’s The Word Contest daily starting April 1 at www.todayscharlottewoman.com. Entries are only accepted via e-mail. Bios must be exactly six words. The first 100 entries receive a free eco-friendly shopping bag.All entries will go into a random drawing, and the winner will be announced May 8. Need inspiration? Visit the Web site for some of our favorite six-word bios! The Six-Word Memoir project was launched by SMITH Magazine in 2006. SMITH’s first book, Not Quite What I Was Planning: Six-Word Memoirs by Writers Famous & Obscure, is packed with nearly 1,000 six-word stories. Check it out at http://smithmag.net. No purchase required. Contest begins April 1 and runs through April 30. Open to legal U.S. residents ages 21 and older. Beginning on April 1, 2009, visit www.todayscharlottewoman.com and click on Contests; follow the links to enter online.All entries must include a valid e-mail address and be exactly six words long. One entry per e-mail. Employees of Today’s Woman Inc., sponsors, their affiliates, subsidiaries, agencies and suppliers, and the families of each are not eligible. Void where prohibited by law. All federal, state, and local regulations apply. For Official Rules and other conditions of participation, visit www.todayscharlottewoman.com after April 1.

I n s i d e r B e au t y

Po p Q u i z

Heavenly

So You Think You Are Eco-Friendly?

Beauty Products Check out our editor’s picks of heavenly — and natural — beauty buys.

How green are you? Take our quiz and see! Our Blog

They Tore Down My Memories And Slapped Up A Roundabout Web Editor Karsen Price laments the latest ecology-damaging events surrounding her childhood home. 10

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Green Your World Don’t Just Hug A Tree … Plant One! It takes sunlight, water, and proper installation to ensure a tree will survive for generations to come. But a tree gives so much back! This month, take a nice leisurely stroll down any one of Charlotte’s arborlined avenues, and you’ll see why The Queen City looks so good in green. Then, check out the Tree Planting Guide on our Web site, and start digging!


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FromThePublisher

The Green Light

G

o. We all have the green light — the one that allows us, and even encourages us, to engage in the greening of our nation, starting with our own little corner of the world. A collective awareness has been rising for years, and since the first Earth Day, celebrated on April 22, 1970, women and men have realized we have the power to change the course of ecological destruction. We can no longer wait for someone to tell us what to do. The responsibility — and the power — is in our hands. We have the signal to move forward, to increase speed, to go. Our individual actions need not be as complicated and involved as taking salt water from the Pacific and delivering purified drinking water to Charlotte. Practical information on how we can each do our part, in ways both big and small, is just a few page-turns away. Dig into this month’s annual green issue of TCW for practical information on topics that range from beekeeping to buying locally grown produce to no-nonsense, everyday tips for helping Mother Earth stay healthy and beautiful. On page 40, a local beekeeper (in Myers Park!) offers sweet insight into the fascinating — and ecologically sound — practice of keeping bees. Libby Mack’s is a lesson in turning an unusual interest into a passion, and area residents benefit from the tasty results. Then, turn to page 46 for the story of

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nearby farmers, many of them women, who are providing savvy consumers with great vegetables grown just a few miles away. Farmers markets throughout Charlotte and its surrounds provide a sense of community and pride for their vendors, as well as their customers. Anyone who has spent an early morning considering the fresh, ripe strawberries and gorgeous, red tomatoes piled high on wooden tables tended by these women knows what spring really tastes like. On page 30, meet Charlotte author Jodi Helmer, who has published a book of 365 helpful, simple tips to put you in a recycling frame of mind throughout the year, at least once a day. We’ve included a sampling, and we’re guessing that even the greenest of you will find something new to add to your arsenal of eco-action. As you read this month’s issue, Robert and I hope you will feel like you are in the driver’s seat on going green or going greener. Recycling and conservation are some of the most important actions we can take for our world, our state, our city. Your plan need not be complicated — just do something. You have the green light, so let’s go! Green looks so good on you,


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Wow!

What a Great Smile! Smile created by Dr. Ross W. Nash Photo by Deborah Triplett

Ross W. Nash, DDS General Dentist Providing Cosmetic Dentistry

69725 Caldwell Commons Circle • Cornelius, NC 28031 nashinstitute.com Appointments: 704-895-7660

Of the nearly 8000 American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry members worldwide, there are only 264 accredited member dentists. Of that elite group, only 43 have earned the exclusive level of Fellow. In Charlotte, only 1 dentist has achieved Accredited status, and in all of North and South Carolina, only 1 has earned the level of Fellow: Accredited Fellow Ross W. Nash, DDS.


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GirlTime COMPILED BY MICHELLE YOUNG HUBACHER

What Goes In Your Red Recycling Bin (I bet you’ll learn something here; we did!):: No. 1 and 2 Recyclable Plastics (milk jugs, detergent bottles, soft drink bottles) — Remove lids and rinse containers before placing them in the bin. Put the lids in the garbage; they are not recyclable. Glass — Remove and discard lids; rinse containers and place in the bin. Newspapers and Inserts — To prevent newspapers from being blown by the wind (and ending up in my yard), you may stack them on top of, beside, or beneath the bin. Magazines and Catalogs — Place magazines and catalogs with newspapers in the bin. A brown paper (not plastic) bag may also be used to hold recycled reading material. Cardboard — Make sure that all cardboard boxes are empty, cut into pieces no larger than 3x3 feet, flattened, and stacked neatly at curbside (do not place in the bin). Spiral Paper Cans (as in “biscuits in a can”) — Remove and discard any plastic or metal lids and rinse or wipe out any food particles before placing the can in the bin. Steel Cans — Steel food containers should be rinsed thoroughly and then placed in the bin. Telephone Books — Place unneeded directories in or under the bin. Aluminum Cans — Rinse and crush cans before placing them in the bin. Junk Mail — Remove or shred potentially sensitive information such as credit card applications before placing unwanted mail and envelopes in the bin.

Take It To The Curb Recycling In Charlotte

T

he city of Charlotte does not mandate residential recycling, but with its CURB IT! residential recycling program, there is really no reason not to participate. Each household is outfitted with a handy 18-gallon red bin. Your job is to learn what goes in the bin and get it to the curb each week on trash day. CURB IT! is one of the largest in-house programs for curbside recyclables collected by city workforces in the Southeast, and it is the

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Mixed Paper — Most types of paper can be placed in recycling bins. Gift Wrap — Recycling paper gift wrap is an environmentally friendly way to clean up after parties and holidays.

What Does Not Go In Your Bin largest in the Carolinas. Right now, 43 to 45 percent of all Charlotte residents participate in the recycling program. Still, Charlotteans throw away six times more refuse than they recycle! According to city officials, participation (calculated using the average recycling tonnage for particular areas) is lowest in the west and north collection zones. An increase in recycling in these areas could help increase efficiency, decrease cost, and protect the environment. So take aim at the red bin.

· Wax-Coated Paper Products · Styrofoam and Styrofoam Products · Pizza Boxes · Old Clothing · Small Appliances · Regular Household Garbage You can pick up additional bins — at no charge — by visiting one of the CURB IT! recycling distribution locations. Check out www.charmeck.org, and click on the Garbage/Recycling/Bulky Items tab (or call 311) to find out which location is most convenient for you, and to get more information on Charlotte’s CURB IT! program.


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Walking The Course And Taking A Stand Against Violence

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his year’s Quail Hollow Championship will give women another reason to walk the greens, in addition to seeing some of the biggest stars in golf. The Avon Foundation, in collaboration with the PGA TOUR Wives Association and the Quail Hollow Championship, is sponsoring the inaugural Walk the Course Against Domestic Violence on April 28, at Quail Hollow Club. As part of Quail Hollow Championship week, participants in this first event of its kind — a benefit walk on a PGA TOUR course — will have the option to walk a 9hole or 18-hole route to raise funds and awareness for the domestic violence cause. In this country, a woman is beaten or abused every nine seconds, and in North

Carolina, 84 women lost their lives to domestic violence last year. The goal of Walk the Course Against Domestic Violence is to draw

attention to this important issue and work toward changing the course of domestic vio-

lence for all victims and their families. Funds raised will be awarded by the Avon Foundation to North Carolina domestic violence organizations, including United Family Services’ Shelter for Battered Women and the Shelter of Gaston County. Walk the Course Against Domestic Violence is a non-competitive, family-friendly event. Fundraising is voluntary but encouraged, and fundraising incentive prizes are offered to help inspire the participants. Top fundraisers will have the opportunity to meet PGA TOUR golfers at a special reception after the Walk. Participants can register online at www.walkthecourseagainstdv.org, or by calling 866/646-2866. >

Everyone Should Have A Young Smile. Scott A.Young, DDS · Practicing Dentistry For 26 Yrs. · BSE - Biomedical Engineering Purdue University - 1978 · CMC - General Practice Residency · Creative Restorative Excellence & Advanced Dental Education. · Member: Charlotte and NC Dental Society, Academy of General Dentistry and American Dental Association

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GirlTime bio-identical

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Blue Is The New Green Mercedes Drives A Sustainability Program Ronald L. Brown, MD Fellow, American College Ob/Gyn Member, N. American Menopause Society

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enerable carmaker Mercedes-Benz is hoping its Blue-TEC models will put consumers on the road to recognizing that the days of the loud, dirty diesel are far behind them. Technology has come a long way since Mercedes-Benz debuted the original diesel engine more than 100 years ago. In that time, the company has gone from the world’s first diesel engine to what it is now touting as “the world’s cleanest.”

Designed to scrap the noise, odor, and dirty emissions often associated with diesel, BlueTEC technology, which Mercedes calls “green technology for luxury performance vehicles,” is currently available on three 2009 SUV models: the ML320, the R320, and the GL320. According to Richard Mikels, general manager of Beck Imports of the Carolinas, each of the three cars can go over 600 miles on one tank of fuel. For information on how Blue-TEC works, visit www.mbusa.com/mercedes/#/greenBluetec.

For The Birds Cleaning Their Feeders Is Neighborly Get out your birdie broom and start sweeping — it seems that your feathered friends like a little spring cleaning, too! Researchers and bird lovers alike agree it’s best to wash down your bird feeders once a month, year round. Hummingbird feeders should be cleaned every four days. According to Annie Bond, executive editor of Care2’s Healthy and Green Living content and the author of a number of books, including Home Enlightenment, fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus, which causes respiratory infections in birds, can grow on the feeders. If your backyard is a birdie buffet, dotted with feeders, make it easier on yourself by cleaning them on a rotating schedule. Bond recommends you use a tub big enough to hold your feeder(s), a scrub brush, outdoor hose, gloves, scent-free liquid soap or detergent, and distilled white vinegar. When it’s time to scrub, simply place your feeder in the tub outdoors, and fill it with warm water and a squirt of soap. Wearing gloves, scrub the parts of the feeder you can access, and rinse thoroughly with a hose. Empty the tub and fill it with clean water and 4 cups of vinegar. Let the feeder soak for one hour, and then rinse thoroughly.


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Clean Up Your Kitchen Make It An Environmental Haven

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f the kitchen is the heart of the home, then it’s a great place to start when you want to show a little love for the Earth. Chef Paul F. Magnant, the dean of culinary at Stratford University, says greening your kitchen is a good way to make small changes that have a big impact over time. His tips are all things you can do without a huge commitment of time or money. Start with what you bring into the kitchen. Buy locally produced food whenever possible, so that fuel isn’t wasted trucking it to you. (To meet some of the women who bring locally produced foods closer to your home, see our Farmers Market feature on page 46 of this month’s TCW.) Skip the disposables. Whether for a picnic or a party, opt for utensils, dishes, and cookware that can be reused. Invest in a set of cloth napkins, and cut old sheets, tow-

els, or clothing into smaller pieces to use, instead of paper towels, as cleaning rags. Make it easy. Stick a wicker basket in your kitchen to contain all of the items designated for recycling. At the end of the day, or when the basket is full, take it to the larger bins to be sorted. Drink tap water. Instead of buying bottled water, invest in a water filtration device for your kitchen. You’ll end up saving a lot of money and will avoid adding to the ever-increasing number of plastic bottles that are choking our landfills. Clean green. You’ll save money by using natural cleaning supplies, and you’ll keep unnecessary chemicals out of the environment, as well. (For tips on green cleaning, check out Health Matters on page 78 of this month’s TCW.)

Catch a rising star.. When it’s time to buy new appliances, look for the Energy Star endorsement as you shop. Energy Star is a government-backed initiative that ensures you are buying an energy-efficient product. Also, remember that bigger isn’t always better, especially if you don’t need the extra oomph a larger appliance might promise. Smaller appliances will shave money off your bill each year. >

Design your unforgettable moments with PANDORA’s charms, rings, necklaces, and earrings in sterling silver and 14K gold. Prices starting at $25

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Deluxe And Delightful Gifting With A Conscience

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f you think giving green means giving without luxury and style, the women who created Organica Deluxe might surprise you. Their line of beautiful and eco-friendly gifts is garnering lots of national attention, and the entrepreneurial duo behind the concept, Jane Hunter and Wendy James, got their start right here in Charlotte! The online boutique features gorgeously green gifts and products exquisitely packaged in a responsible manner and promoting a sustainable economy. Organica Deluxe gift boxes contain eco-friendly products, including organic food and wine, Veriflora flowers, organic spa delights from France, and organic baby items. The boxes range from $35 to $410, and the site makes it easy for eco-savvy shoppers to find the perfect gift, categorizing by occasion, price, recipient, and item.

Organica Deluxe utilizes the unusual practice of single-box delivery for most of its gift packages, serving to reduce paper consumption by more than 50 percent and eliminating thousands of pounds of additional landfill waste every year. The bright aqua boxes contain tissue wrapping paper made from 75-percent post-consumer recycled paper and completely biodegradable cornstarch peanuts. Organica Deluxe also purchases carbon credits to help offset the transportation of each gift sent.

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Appointment Hours: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday - Friday Wenhui Li, L. Ac 4525 Cameron Valley Pkwy. Suite 1600 Charlotte, NC 28211 704-512-6293

SouthPark Acupuncture Carolinas HealthCare System


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Mind The Store Sorting And Storing A To Z

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onna Smallin wants to get you organized … and just in time for spring. Her book, The One-Minute Organizer: A to Z Storage Solutions (available at bookstores), is the perfect reading material to get you into a spring cleaning frame of mind!

One quick quiz question, from page 181 in the book, to get you started: Where should you store items you never use? a. Basement b. Attic c. Garage d. Shed e. Off-site storage

Answer: Trick question. If you never use it, why are you storing it?

Look Good And Do Good Looking for a way to be eco-friendly, inspire positivity, and make a difference? Sporting messages such as “Laugh Often,” “Practice Kindness,” and “Choose Happiness,” Tees For Change offers a straightforward approach to a kinder, gentler world. This woman-owned business uses low-impact dyes in its line of message tees; it also carries a line of eco-friendly apparel for women, babies, and men. Here, T-shirts fuse contemporary design with super-soft bamboo and organic cotton fabrics. Tees For Change has also partnered with Trees for the Future to plant a tree for every tee the company sells! The message T-shirts retail for $24 to $46. They are available online at www.teesforchange.com, and at nearly 200 retailers, including Whole Foods. TCW

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE



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 C i t y

Q u e e n H A P P E N I N G S

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A Collection Of Art Annual Show Makes A Return

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he Charlotte Art Collective, formerly known as Artists at the Pavilion, will be holding its annual juried show and sale Sat., May 2, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at a new location — the MacLean Fellowship Hall, on the campus of Avondale Presbyterian Church, at 2821 Park Road. The Collective is a grassroots group of 20 local professional artists who work in nine different mediums, including paint, jewelry,

collage, ceramics, sculpture, fiber art, beadwork, and garden art. There’s even a chocolatier, offering chocolates as works of art! Laura Duis’ Best Friends, pictured here, is just one example of available art.

WantToGo? For information,visit www.charlotteartcollective.com/aboutus.aspx,or e-mail Patti Bryan at pjbryan@bellsouth.net.

Learning To Love The Outdoors Reedy Creek Nature Center Invites You Along

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rom gazing at the moon to tiptoeing through the wildflowers, Reedy Creek Nature Center and Preserve is offering an exciting lineup of environmental education programs in April. All programs will be held at the nature center, located at 2900 Rocky River Road, and nearby nature preserves and greenways. Participants must be able to hike two to three miles on uneven terrain. Full Moon Hike Guided by the light of a full moon, explore the preserve, and search for nocturnal animals. Thu., April 9, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Free.

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Breakfast With The Birds Join a naturalist for a continental breakfast while learning the basics of birding, followed by a hike in the preserve to test your new skills. Sat., April 18, from 9 to 11 a.m. $5. Wildflower Wander Search for spring wildflowers in the beautiful RibbonWalk Nature Preserve, and learn, with the help of a naturalist, to identify various wildflower species. Sat., April 18, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Free.

International Rhythms Dances Of India Dazzles

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nternationally acclaimed performers, Dr. Maha Gingrich and group, will introduce the rhythms of international dance styles at Dances of India Sat., April 18, at 4 p.m., in Dale F. Halton Theater at Central Piedmont Community College. Experience traditional Indian classical and folk dances — and expand your horizons — all through a love of dance.

WantToGo? WantToGo? For information, or to register, call 704/336-7600.

For ticket information, call CPCC’s box office at 704/330-6534, or visit tix.cpcc.edu.


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A Colorful View

Jazz With An Italian Flair

Charlotte Is Changing Places

Trumpeter Chris Botti Comes To Charlotte

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iscover what makes us one community — and one world — at Changing Places: From Black And White To Technicolor, a new exhibit that runs through Feb. 28, 2010, at Levine Museum of the New South. The free exhibit provides an opportunity for viewers to explore longtime and new traditions as it pushes society to look beyond stereotypes.Enjoy music,storytelling,dance workshops,crafts,and food from different cultures,plus the chance to share your story in a video-talkback booth.The event is appropriate for all ages,and is open from 10 a.m.to 5 p.m.daily,with activities taking place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

WantToGo? For information, visit www.museumofthenewsouth.org, or call 704/333-1887.

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njoy a suite of songs inspired by the romance of Italy, created and performed by Grammy-winning trumpet player Chris Botti, on April 30, at Belk Theater. Botti, whose work has been heralded by music critics as inventive and engaging, has worked with musicians such as Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, Sting, and film composer John Barry. He is considered a virtual genre-ofone in the realm of contemporary jazz while also capturing the attention of the pop music world.>

WantToGo? For information, visit www.blumenthalcenter.org, or call 704/372-1000.

Where History Has A Home

r visit Call eobsite to w r e u o ut morr find ou ou abo tMaking s Women y Serie Histor

Collections Museum • Living History Tours

1774 Hezekiah Alexander Homesite 3500 Shamrock Drive • Charlotte NC 28215 P 704.568.1774 • www.charlottemuseum.org

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QueenCityJewels

Clean, Green, And Fun Eco-Friendly Festival Celebrates Earth Day

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t’s our planet — celebrate its beauty and learn how to play, live, and save green at the Charlotte Clean and Green Festival April 17 and 18, at Central Piedmont Community College. The second annual Festival is a collaboration between the U.S. Green Building Council Charlotte Region Chapter, the Sierra Club, CPCC, the City of Charlotte, and Mecklenburg County. This year, the event partners with Earth Day Charlotte, as well, adding more family and kid activities to the mix and broadening the appeal of the event to the community. The Festival includes workshops on how to save energy and money, and how to do a green remodel or design a green home from the ground up. It also offers a look into the environmental and health benefits of local, sustainable food. On Friday, workshops help builders and

other professionals learn about green building. On Saturday, Festival-goers can enjoy more than 30 “going green” sessions, with free workshops and presentations, plus a display of vendors and exhibits showcasing products, services, and ideas. There will be a Hands-On Green exhibit of green building technology, a local and organic food pavilion and garden displays, and live music. The newly renovated Elizabeth Avenue will be closed to traffic and serves as the hub for vendors and sponsors. (Note: Per CPCC policy, dogs, except for service animals, are not allowed.)

WantToGo? For information,visit www.charlottecleanandgreen.com.

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Spring Into Success Conference Encourages Smart Business Practices

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he Cabarrus Region and Lake Norman Chapter of eWomenNetwork is hosting a Spring Into SMART Success conference Fri., April 3. The group’s first full-day conference program includes keynote speakers, breakout panel discussions, networking, and a vendor showcase. Topics will be relevant to owners of small and start-up companies, and to women in all businesses who are looking to succeed. The program is open to the public. TV personality and national speaker Kim Jacobs will serve as

emcee. Friday’s keynote speaker is Terri Bennett, CEO of Terri Bennett Enterprises LLC, and former meteorologist at WCNC-TV and WSOCTV. Bennett’s message encourages a resolve to remain focused and positive during challenging times. Expert panels will tackle financial and marketing issues. Event hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Embassy Suites Concord Convention Center, with an After GLOW event running from 5 to 6 p.m. Cost is $155, and includes all event activities, plus breakfast and lunch.

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Heavenly Views Center Of The Earth Gallery’s Garden Exhibit

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ust in time for spring, the Center of the Earth Gallery invites art lovers to visit the Garden of Earthly Delights, an exhibit featuring the landscape art of Nancy Scheinman, Dawn Rentz, and Scott Hill. Each artist’s work, though uniquely different, beckons viewers into a world of fantasy, where forgotten stories and lore come to life through rich depictions of scenery.The exhibit, held at 3204 N. Davidson St., runs through May 2.

HEAR THE WHOLE PICTURE.

Conflicts are taking place all over the world with consequences felt right here at home. During these turbulent times tune in for the most comprehensive coverage of the war-and-terrorism issues

WantToGo?

that affect us all. Visit WFAE.org.

For information, visit www.centeroftheearth.com, or call 704/375-5756.

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O n W O M E N

M A K I N G

Job Changes/Promotions Cheryl Richards was named dean of Central Piedmont Community College’s Cato Campus and Professional Careers Division.

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Amy Sosa was appointed account executive at FASTSIGNS South Tryon, a top-10-worldwide franchise of FASTSIGNS International Inc.

Today’s Charlotte Woman has named Fern Howerin associate publisher and Gail Williams advertising sales director.

S T O R I E S

Mary Jerz has opened Seamless Expressions, a full-service design studio and workroom specializing in custom window treatments, at 5803 Sharon Road, Unit E.

Awards And Installations Muzak LLC has appointed Shauna Collins head of sponsorship and events for the Muzak Heart & Soul Foundation, where she will oversee annual initiatives including Noise!, Battle of the Bands, and Music Matters.

Crystal Health Care Services has hired Felicia Bookert as office manager.

Tiffany Randolph was named general manager of the Kennedy Academic Learning Centers.

Lake Norman Regional Medical Center has promoted Becky Dunlap, RN, to chief nursing officer, a position previously held by Pamela Rudisill, who was promoted to HMAvice president of nursing/patient safety.

Kimberlee Hughes was promoted to general manager of Donald Haack Diamonds & Fine Gems Inc.

Deborah L. Fletcher has joined Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP as a Charlotte-based partner in its Bankruptcy and Creditors’ Rights Practice.

Lynn Grayson has joined Walker Marketing Inc. as a senior public relations account manager.

New Business/Changes Mary Lynn Shorac has opened The Greatest Gift Egg Donation Agency, a matching service for egg donors and potential parents wishing to have a child via egg donation and IVF, at 4000 Manor House Drive.

Greyne Custom Wood Co., a hardwood floor manufacturer, has relocated from Baltimore to Charlotte, at 8520 Crown Crescent Court.

Barbara Pinson, a former morning anchor at WBTVNews 3, has founded and opened Media Versed, a media coaching business for the professional sports and business world.

Mary Miller, president of Stage Mothers,The Home Staging Experts, has opened a home staging service at 4500 Cameron Valley Parkway, Suite 230.

The National Employment Counseling Association has awarded the Practitioner Award to Astrid Chirinos, founder of Diverso Global Strategies.

Chia-Li (Jolly) Chien is one of 68 financial planners selected from among 2,200 around the country to join the Select Member Group of Lincoln Financial Advisors Corp./Sagemark Consulting, as part of Sagemark’s Private Wealth Services Group Program.

Kianga Coleman, executive assistant to Hinrichs Flanagan Financial’s general manager Timothy C. Flanagan Jr., was presented the Hinrichs Flanagan Financial 2008 Staff Award.

Sandi O. Thorman, CPA, a partner at Greer & Walker LLP, was appointed to serve as a member of PFK North American Network’s Women Into Leadership Task Force for 2009. SEND YOUR NEWS TO:

On The Move editor@todayscharlottewoman.com

Today’s Charlotte Woman 5200 PARK ROAD, SUITE 111, CHARLOTTE, NC 28209

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WorkNotes

Tax Tips For Job Seekers BY PATSY PATSY SCHOBER SCHOBER BY

A

s more Americans are facing unemployment, looking for ways to keep more money in their wallets is increasingly important. If you are seeking a job, taking eligible tax deductions can help buffer your bottom line. If you’ve been unemployed for less than one year and you’ve acquired significant job-search expenses (out-of-pocket travel to interviews), these costs may be classified as miscellaneous itemized deductions. Deductible expenses include those not reimbursed while you were employed, or educational courses or certification related to your work.

Get A Move On Qualified moving expenses may be deductible if one of the following applies: Your move is within one year of starting work in the new location; your new job is located at least 50 miles farther from your previous home than your old job was from that home; or you are a full-time employee for at least 39 weeks of the 12-month period starting when you arrive at the new location. Only expenses that are not reimbursed by your employer are deductible.

Take Your Lumps Alump-sum severance package can be a quick boost to retirement savings, but it brings tax implications. If the lump sum makes your

annual income higher than it was last year, some deductions you normally claim may be reduced. Companies that provide lump-sum severances are generally required to withhold 25 percent to cover federal income tax. Social Security and Medicare taxes apply as well. Some states also require that state income taxes be withheld. However, the mandatory withholding might not be enough to cover what you’ll owe at tax time. Making estimated payments and increasing the amount withheld could help in the long run. If your former employer will agree to it, severance may be paid over several “regular” pay periods, which provides you with salary continuance and a more “regular” tax picture for the year.

When It’s Time To Roll Over Be sure to heed deadlines for rolling retirement funds into an IRA or other account. It’s best to have the trustee of the current plan transfer the funds directly to the trustee of the plan where the funds will be held. If a distribution is made to you, you will have 60 days to roll over the funds. To avoid paying tax and penalties, make sure you roll over the exact amount of the full distribution. Consult a tax or financial advisor for more detailed information on tax deductions. TCW Note:Patsy Schober is an H&R Block tax professional in Charlotte. For information, call 704/522-9600. A P R I L

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BROUGHT TO YOU BY ...

Banking On The

Environment O N

T H E

R O A D

T O

G R E E N E R

P A S T U R E S

At a time when “going green” can be seen as good politics, good business, or just plain good for the planet, consumers often look to large corporations and trusted brands to lead the way. For Bank of America, environmental initiatives are taking many forms geared to corporate clients and retail customers alike. An active consideration for the environment can be seen in how the bank looks at lending, investments, new products and services, as well as internal operations.

Investing In Growth With the resources, experience, and capabilities to match investments to the unique needs of each client, Bank of America is able to focus strategic investments in businesses and technologies that directly address climate change. Such businesses might include those developing low-carbon technologies and alternative energy. Bank of America has invested, for example, in companies that can capture solar, wind, and wave energy, and then convert it into electric power. The bank is also creatively using investments to help preserve forests, which are, of course, central to the fight against global climate change.

Leaving A Smaller Banking Footprint The move toward paperless, online banking is a convenient and beneficial step for both the banking consumer and the environment! As of January 2009, Bank of America customers had saved more than 12,000 tons of paper using paperless forms of payment and account management: monitoring account activity online; using online bill pay instead of writing checks; and receiving monthly paperless statements as an alternative to paper statements. That’s a lot of

trees saved, meaning a smaller carbon footprint for every banking customer who participates in online banking.

Offering A Green Card Bank of America has partnered with Brighter Planet™ to offer a credit card that helps customers invest in the development of clean, renewable energy projects. The Brighter Planet™ Visa® credit card enables customers to earn one EarthSmart™ point for every $1 spent in purchases. The points earned with the credit card are automatically redeemed each month to support renewable energy projects, educating consumers and allowing them to contribute toward an environmentally sustainable future. Each 1,000 points earned is projected to offset an estimated 1 ton of carbon dioxide. Eliminating 1 ton of carbon dioxide has the same impact on global climate change as taking an average car off the road for two months. Since the card’s launch in November 2007, cardholders have offset more than 41,200 tons of carbon dioxide.

that aggressively target reducing its greenhouse gas emissions, cutting consumption and waste, and making notable strides toward LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certifications from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC®) in multiple buildings. One approach to emissions reductions is the development of environmentally responsible real estate that employs advanced, stateof-the-art workplace designs. To that end, Bank of America has committed $1.4 billion to achieve LEED® certification from the USGBC® in all new construction of banking centers and office facilities. Environmentally advanced facilities not only have a positive effect on the planet; they also positively impact associate productivity and morale. Since 2000, Bank of America has reduced paper usage per associate by 40 percent, and has set a firm goal to voluntarily reduce its company-wide greenhouse gas emissions 9 percent by the end of 2009. To find out more about Bank of America’s greening initiative, log on to www.bankofamerica.com/environment. For information about the rates, fees, other

Using An Internal Approach Taking a leadership role in its own effort to reduce its carbon footprint, Bank of America has launched internal programs

costs and benefits associated with the use of The Brighter Planet™ Visa® credit card, visit http://www.brighterplanet.com/. The Brighter Planet credit card is issued and administered by FIA Card Services, N.A. EarthSmart is a trademark of FIA Card Services, N.A.Visa is a registered trademark of Visa International Service Association, and is used by the issuer pursuant to license from Visa U.S.A. Inc.

Bank of America, N.A. Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender © 2009 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Profile

PHOTO BY KAI LINN

Author Jodi Helmer wants to make it easier for all of us to make small, impactful changes for the environment.

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Green Embracing The Many Shades Of

Jodi Helmer Spells Out 365 Tiny Ways To Make A Big Difference BY KARSEN PRICE

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et the cruise control on your car. Order draft beer instead of bottled. Put tennis balls in your dryer. Switch to powdered laundry detergent. Skip an oil change. What do all of these seemingly random actions have in common? Each is an easy way to exert a positive impact on the world’s ecology, and each can be found

in Jodi Helmer’s new book, The Green Year: 365 small things you can do to make a big difference. Helmer is a Toronto native who lived in Portland, Ore., for seven years before moving to Charlotte on an adventuresome whim. She didn’t simply write a book about a topic she knew or cared nothing about; she is the real deal when it comes to environmental conscientiousness. She walks the walk and talks the talk, all in various hues of green. She lives with environmentally friendly principles … and she’s found 365 effortless ways you can learn to do the same.

In addition to being the author of two Earth-savvy books (The Complete Idiot’s Guide To Green Careers comes out later this spring), Helmer is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in national magazines such as Shape, Women’s Health, Plenty, and Yoga Journal.

A Daily Read, A Daily Deed The Green Year is part eco-informative guidebook, part motivational calendar. For each day of the year, there is a page detailing one manageable thing you can do to make a difference that, collectively, can be felt around the world. The book, released in late 2008, was created specifically to co-exist with today’s busy lifestyle. Its simple but effective format proves you can be environmentally conscious without making huge waves in the way you live your life. It offers bite-sized nuggets of information,

just right for today’s go-go-go attitude, with each page featuring a compelling circle in the corner, where you can give yourself an attagirl checkmark after you complete the daily task — done! In addition to a tip a day, The Green Year is filled with easy-to-digest stats explaining how every recommended action helps improve the Earth. At the bottom of each page is space where you can jot down an alternative idea, just in case Helmer’s suggestion is out of your comfort zone.

It Is Easy Being Green Beth Miller, a Charlotte dental hygienist who refers to herself as “the greenest person I know,” is a veritable fanatic when it comes to recycling. Believing that everyone is capable of taking small measures toward creating a healthier planet, Miller was ecstatic to hear that a local > A P R I L

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Profile important. “It isn’t difficult,” she says. “I try to lead by example, and continue to remind people that if they just take the time, they will have such a huge impact on the world.” Helmer agrees that going green doesn’t have to be at odds with present-day society’s on-the-go, gotta-get-it-now, BlackBerry world. The key is finding what works for you.

Culture Shock In The Queen City Helmer did substantial research in Portland — one of the country’s most eco-conscious cities — before deciding to relocate to Charlotte’s University City area. “In all of my research, Charlotte kept making the list of one of the best places to live in the United States,” she says. However, Helmer’s first few weeks in North Carolina were difficult ones. She had only a computer and a small collection of clothing when she arrived in town in March 2007, six weeks before her belongings caught up

Take It Month By Month THE

GREEN YEAR AT A

GLANCE

January (13): Turn your computer off at the end July (14): Get the junk out of your trunk. An extra of the day — and help save a ton of carbon diox- 100 pounds in your car can reduce fuel efficiency by up to 2 percent. ide emissions. February (16): Download your favorite music online, August (30): Choose a cast-iron pan over one to eliminate the manufacturing of a CD, its plastic with a nonstick coating, which contains chemicals case, the paper liner notes, and the plastic wrapping. that are harmful to the environment and people. March (16): Buy your dog a leash made of canvas or hemp. Replacing all nylon pet leashes in the United States would prevent the release of greenhouse gases equal to the amount produced by 250,000 households per year.

September (10): Scrape (don’t rinse) dirty dishes before putting them in the dishwasher. October (9): Switch to powdered laundry detergent. Liquid laundry detergent is almost 80 percent water!

November (21): Use your PDA or cell phone to April (19): Donate newspapers to local animal text short messages. Texting uses 30 percent less shelters to use as bedding. energy than e-mailing does. May (5): Fill small bowls with beer, and place at December (13): Buy a cut Christmas tree. Nearly soil level to get rid of slugs in your yard. all sold Christmas trees are grown on tree farms, June (23): Wash your car at a commercial carwash, meaning their stock is replenished yearly and and save anywhere from 40 to 100 gallons of water. forests aren’t depleted. And they are recyclable! Excerpted with permission. Jodi Helmer. Alpha Books, 2008.

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author had written a book that encourages others to put their best green foot forward. In addition to keeping four recycling bins in her house (for paper, cans, glass, and plastic), Miller turns her thermostat down at night, and she donates to Goodwill everything that she no longer uses. She has been known to sift through the trash at work and at her daughter’s sports facility to help keep errant recyclables from winding up in the trash heap. “I spend a lot of time at the softball field with my daughter,” Miller says. “I often take a bag with me and round up plastic to take home and recycle, whether it is on the ground, in the dugouts, or in the garbage cans. You wouldn’t believe the recyclable products that just get thrown away!” Miller acknowledges it frustrates her to hear others complain that recycling is too hard, or that living a green lifestyle isn’t

J O D I H E L M E R , W I T H H E R P U P, M I L O , T R I E S T O L I V E A N E C O - F R I E N D LY L I F E .

with her. There was no public transportation within walking distance of her new home. And, she was soon greeted with the unwelcome news that her area didn’t have a recycling mandate in place for local businesses. “I found a nearby coffee shop that had free Wi-Fi, and I camped out there for a few weeks,” she says. “I bought Diet Coke after Diet Coke and worked on the computer. At the end of one of those days, I had seven plastic bottles lined up around my table. I asked the owner of the shop, ‘Do you recycle?’ ” Helmer was shocked to find that the answer was “no.” “When I used to walk into the grocery store,” she continues, “I made quite a stir with my canvas tote bags.” She recalls how the store’s bag boys would put one item in her tote, and then pile the rest into plastic bags. “I had to tell them, ‘It will all fit in there.’ ” Eco-friendly shopping bags are popping up in the hands of more and more consumers, and Charlotte works to make strides with its public transportation system, expanding it and finding ways to make it run more efficiently and effectively. Charlotteans continue to look for how they, as individuals, can make a difference in promoting a healthier environment.

Do What You Can While many people want to be environmentally responsible, going green can be a bit intimidating at first. And sometimes the ideas presented seem just silly. Helmer is refresh-


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ingly candid about her approach to caring for the Earth and admits that even she can’t currently incorporate all of her book’s suggestions into everyday life. For instance, The Green Year encourages those who don’t have access to a yard to create an in-home earthworm compost pile in a large plastic bin. “I have three dogs,” Helmer says, “and I rescue dogs, as well. I can’t have an earthworm farm in my condo!” Instead, she focuses her efforts in a different direction until the day she can buy her dream farm and create a compost pile out back for her vegetable peelings and coffee grounds. Another idea, the “don’t flush your toilet after every use” tip, very nearly didn’t make it into the book. Helmer admits that while she may be a green-iac, she is also a realist who understands that what may be perfectly reasonable to one person may, in fact, be completely disgusting to the next. “I asked several friends and acquaintances if they would seriously consider not flushing every time,” she says. “I knew also that some people would think that was a totally unsanitary suggestion.” Although the toilet tip ultimately did wind up in print, Helmer encourages her readers to target the small steps they feel comfortable taking, and let go of the rest. The Green Year is really all about education, Helmer explains, adding, “I’ve had a lot of people come up to me at book signings, and as they flip through the book, they say, ‘I had no idea this could make a difference!’ And that is a great feeling, knowing I’ve taught someone something. Now, that person can go home and say, ‘In 10 seconds of my life, I can do this. I can unplug my coffeemaker or toaster in the morning. I can stop rinsing my dishes before I put them in the dishwasher.’ My hope is that people will look at the little things in the book and say, ‘Wow, I can do this!’ “It’s not about installing solar panels, and spending tens of thousands of dollars,” she continues. “It’s not about going out and buying a hybrid car. If you can do those things, fantastic! But if not, here are little things everyone can do.” TCW

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The 2008 Charlotte BusinessWoman of the Year, Jennifer Appleby, is president and CEO of marketing firm Wray Ward.

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Jennifer

Appleby The 2008 Charlotte BusinessWoman Of The Year BY COREY STEWART

W

hen you enter the offices of Charlotte creative marketing communications firm Wray Ward, the first thing you notice in the reception area is a mural. It is big and

bold, full of vibrant colors, and spans 22 feet of wall space. Composed of photo-

graphs enhanced with paint, the mural depicts the firm’s employees in motion: wear-

ing silly hats, posing like supermodels, captured in mid-conversation, cheering, and embracing.“This,” says a beaming Jennifer Appleby, gesturing widely, “is my family.”

Appleby, president and chief creative officer of Wray Ward, is the winner of the 2008 BusinessWoman of the Year award, sponsored by Queens University of Charlotte’s McColl School of Business. On March 11, 2009, she became the 23rd local woman to win this recognition, having exemplified what award organizers call “the three C’s: competence, character, and commitment to the community.” “Jennifer Appleby is known for her professional dynamism, dedication to the community, and ability to bring people together for a common cause,” says Pamela Davies, president of Queens University. “We are proud to honor her leadership and outstanding character with this award.”

We Are Family Appleby and her team at Wray Ward are no strangers to awards. They’ve won so many industry accolades that there isn’t ample room to display them all, despite the spaciousness of the company’s new offices. Yet, Appleby says, being recognized as BusinessWoman of the Year signifies much more to her than just another plaque for the shelves. She finds this award par-

ticularly meaningful. “It was a tough year,” she reflects. “There was turmoil in the economy, and that affected everyone. But beyond that, it was an extremely difficult time because I lost two women who were incredibly inspirational to me.” One of the devastating losses was a young woman, a wife and mother, who worked at the agency. The other was Appleby’s own mother. “You can never prepare for those kinds of losses,” Appleby says. “But it’s those tough times that define who you are, as a person and as a leader. We got through it. We pulled together, like any family.” The employees of Wray Ward are, indeed, as devoted to one another as family. They are boisterous and loving, and they enjoy a closeness and camaraderie that is unusual in a business setting. Their offices are full of natural light, energizing colors, and meeting spaces with glass walls that move, making collaboration practically unavoidable. Appleby’s leadership is underpinned by the idea that there are no clear demarcations in a creative environment. “Our clients, now more than ever, need creative solutions to help differentiate > A P R I L

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Profile

PHOTO BY AUGUSTO PHOTOGRAPHY

WITH AN OFFICE SPACE DESIGNED WITH CREATIVE COLLABORATION IN MIND, JENNIFER APPLEBY AND HER STAFF STRIVE TO OFFER CLIENTS SOMETHING DIFFERENT.

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and build their businesses and their brands,” she explains. “So we definitely encourage, and value, creative thinking from every service area of our business.” When Appleby was offered the chance to take the helm at Wray Ward, she agreed to the promotion only if she could assume a dual role as president and chief creative officer. “My job,” she says, “is to lead the agency, but also to inspire. We have an incredible management team in place. They are all phenomenal, and experts in their areas.” She affectionately describes Greg Campana — her business partner, executive vice president, and director of client services — as “not only the nicest person you will ever meet, but also the perfect yin to my yang for running this business.” Under their leadership, Wray Ward has grown steadily, but Appleby says she never wants the company to get to the point


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“ ” Jennifer Appleby is known for her professional

dynamism, dedication to the community, and ability to bring people together for a common cause.

— PAMELA DAVIES

where she doesn’t personally know everyone who works there. “We’ve grown in a controlled way, and have been able to attract great clients while still retaining the special culture of the firm,” she says. “We don’t want to ever lose the passion for what we do.”

The Art Of A City Appleby’s passion extends to a love for the arts, and prompts her involvement in numerous cultural organizations across The Queen City, including chairing the Arts & Science Council at a crucial time of reinvention. During her tenure, ASC, once viewed solely as a corporate fundraiser for the cultural community, underwent a major marketing initiative as it redefined its brand identity and launched CharlotteCultureGuide.com, an online events calendar. “I cannot imagine a city, or a life, without the art, science, history, and heritage offerings we enjoy in Charlotte,” Appleby says. “So my work with ASC has been a labor of love, because it is also something that I believe is critical to our community, especially during these challenging times. Cultural events, exhibits, and activities have the unique power to entertain us, to amaze us, and to create dialogue and understanding. ASC and CharlotteCultureGuide.com connect us to these opportunities for enrichment.” One of Appleby’s proudest

achievements of late is being part of the Charlotte Center City Partners team that brought the First Night celebration back to uptown this year. Appleby says, “The timing was right to bring back a truly family-friendly event. It was rewarding and inspiring to watch thousands of diverse citizens come together to celebrate New Year’s Eve through the arts.” Ensuring that our city remains a great place to do business is good for creative endeavors, too, and to that end, Appleby is involved with the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce. “Culture is the soul of any city,” she says, “but at the same time, we have to make sure that Charlotte is a business-friendly city, especially for small businesses, and womenowned enterprises.” Appleby credits the women who came before her as having laid the groundwork for the current rising tide of female leaders in The Queen City. She cites the Women’s Impact Fund, an organization that draws on the collective experience, expertise, and funding from its members to support philanthropy, as one example of the leadership of women in Charlotte. “We have an extraordinary network of women in Charlotte who support each other, as colleagues and mentors,” she says. “There are such great opportunities to learn here, and to be part of this tremendous, vibrant, community of women.” >

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Profile

Q&A WITH JENNIFER APPLEBY

TCW : You’re the president and chief creative officer now, but what was your first job? J.A: A waitress at Steak ‘n Shake! And I still love a good steakburger, let me tell you. PHOTO BY ANDREAS SEIBOLD, WRAY WARD

TCW : What is your favorite thing to do in your limited free time? J.A: Fish! Seriously. The only place I can relax is on the dock with a fishing pole in my hand. If my partner would let me, I’d have my 22-inch, prize largemouth bass mounted on the wall in my office.

TCW : When you were little, what did you want to be when you grew up? J.A: A mom.

J E N N I F E R A P P L E B Y D E S C R I B E S T H E T E A M A T W R AY W A R D A S “ F A M I LY. ”

TCW : What lessons do you think you’re imparting to your daughters? J.A: That they can count on me to be there for the important times. That girls can do, and be, whatever they want. And that it’s important to give back, to volunteer, to teach Sunday School, and to be a part of the community.

TCW : If you weren’t at Wray Ward, what would you be doing? J.A: I’d love to someday be an art teacher.

TCW : Is there anything you wish you’d learned earlier? J.A: To enjoy every minute, and stop wishing away the years. Life is short, enjoy the journey!

Welcome To Charlotte Appleby came to Charlotte after receiving her undergraduate degree from The Pennsylvania State University. Her father, an IBM executive, was working here, and chairing the United Way’s annual fundraising campaign. He encouraged Appleby to volunteer at the organization while she looked for a job in her field. “It was a wonderful introduction to the area,” she remembers. “I met great people, loved the work, and was thrilled to find such 38

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We have an incredible management team in place. They are all phenomenal, and experts in their areas.

— JENNIFER APPLEBY

a giving, caring community.” As a non-native, Appleby is especially a fan of Charlotte’s open-armed welcome to those from elsewhere. She laughs at the stereotype of Southern cities, where a clearly delineated family history and the proper pedigree are the keys to opening doors. “Charlotte is a city that allows you to get drawn in very quickly, to whatever extent you want to be engaged,” she says. “You can make a huge difference here, in a very hands-on, decision-making way. Charlotte’s isn’t a culture available only to the elite — it’s for everyone.” With a successful creative marketing communications firm to run, a husband and two daughters, and a number of community commitments, how does the 2008 BusinessWoman of the Year manage to do everything asked of her? “I have wonderful partners, both at home and at the office,” she says. “Their round-the-

clock, 100-percent support lets me do what I do, and without them the house of cards would quickly fall.” While Appleby’s father had to travel extensively for work, her husband, Wayne, is a stay-at-home dad. “My husband sacrificed his career to stay home with our girls, and as a result, my daughters have an unbelievable relationship with their dad and are great kids, in large part because of him,” she says. “I am so fortunate to be surrounded by really amazing people.” Juggling a thriving business with civic duties, soccer matches, basketball games, and dance rehearsals doesn’t leave much time for reflection, but Appleby is determined to make the most of every day. “If I’ve learned anything this year, it’s that life is so short,” she says. “It moves quickly, and we owe it to ourselves to enjoy every moment.” TCW


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BY DEBRA MOFFITT LESLIE • PHOTOS BY SCOTT STILES

T

he recent buzz about the threatened

crops and are essential for food.”

state of the honeybee is no small matter

Many people have heard of colony

when it comes to the balance of the

collapse disorder, a serious condition in

Earth’s ecosystem. Given that a third of our

which worker bees disappear, leading to

food supply relies on bees for pollination,

the destruction of entire hives. The syn-

the health of this tiny winged one is vital

drome primarily affects large-scale com-

to the health of our planet.

mercial beekeepers who transport tens of

“If you don’t have pollinators, you don’t have agriculture,” explains Charlotte

thousands of hives around the country by truck to pollinate crops on demand.

beekeeper Libby Mack.With no bees, she

Mack remarks that, without hobby-

declares, many of the fruits and vegeta-

ists-beekeepers like herself, the feral

bles we love would not grow. These

bee populations might have been deci-

include buckwheat, almonds, apples, cher-

mated. She has not experienced colony

ries, most berries, melons, cucumbers,

collapse during her six years of bee-

watermelons, and many more.“There are

keeping, but says she still must pay

other pollinators,” she says, “but honey-

careful attention to protecting her hives

bees pollinate the largest number of

from mites and diseases. >

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PHOTO SUPPLIED BY LIBBY MACK

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— especially to people who claim they don’t like honey. When weather conditions permit, Mack often shows up with observation hives to introduce curious customers to her bees. This native Michigander arrived in The Queen City 16 years ago. Mack, who moved from the Chicago suburbs and project management at Andersen Consulting (now Accenture) to managing several colonies of bees near uptown, considers women and beekeeping a natural fit. “Women are very attuned to bees,” she says. “We pay more attention to the hive; move more slowly (which is a big advantage); and we smell better.” It seems the creatures are very sensitive to pheromones and prefer those of female handlers. Not to mention that women typically use cosmetic products with attractive scents. In the apian social structure, just a few males, or drones, live in each hive, strictly for reproduction, and are kicked out in the fall. The rest of the colony contains only female workers devoted to their queen. For this reason they have become intriguing symbols of the feminine spirit in books like The Secret Life of Bees, by Sue Monk Kidd. “They're fascinating,” says Mack, who loves to take her lunch outdoors and sit about 6 feet from her beehives so she can watch the industrious insects come and go. She says they pose no threats and go about their own business, too occupied with pollinating flowers and trees to pay any attention to her. She compares her quiet pastime to the soothing experience of watching a river. She also finds the fuzzy, golden-backed creatures photogenic and has taken spectacular close-up shots of them.

The Sting’s Not The Thing Honeybees are active when temperatures reach 55 degrees, says local beekeeper Libby Mack. Here, they are sipping water in Mack’s Myers Park backyard.

Uptown Girls While honeybees have lately been making the evening news as an indicator of our environmental standing, they’re not usually associated with city life. However, urban bees may not be so uncommon. According to Mack, “People keep bees on rooftops in Chicago, Manhattan, and even on the roof of the Paris Opera House!” She, herself, maintains hives 42

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in a space of about 100 square feet in her Myers Park backyard — and says her neighbors love the sweet results. Other Charlotteans may be familiar with Mack and her delectable liquid gold from the Charlotte Tailgate Farmers Market, where she and her husband, Gerry, sell their product, educate consumers about the multiple joys of hosting hives, and frequently provide tastings

According to Mack, who keeps the Italian and Russian varieties of Apis mellifera , known for their docile nature and plush, golden coats, many people fear honeybees. “With a lot of people I meet,” she says, “the first thing they tell me is, ‘I was stung by a bee.’ But it probably wasn’t a honeybee. It was more likely a yellowjacket. We have lots of those in Charlotte. Honeybees take the bad rap for all of them.” While yellowjackets are aggressive and will sting many times, honeybees are quite domesticated, totally devoted to their colony, and very single-minded. “A honeybee will only sting if she is defending her colony,”>


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Smoke acts as a relaxant for the bees, making collection of the honey easier for Libby Mack.

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Where Are

The Bees?

LOOKING FOR POLLEN IN N.C. Here is a quick look at Piedmont-area plants, shrubs, and trees that honeybees fly to throughout the month of April and beyond. Apr 3 - Sep 1 • Sumac Bush Apr 4 - Jul 15 • Alsike Clover Apr 10 - Apr 30 • Blackberry Bush Honeybees in Charlotte have no shortage of flowers to pollinate, including camellias, red maples, and tulip poplars — all plants that are growing in Mack’s yard.

Apr 10 - May 5 • Crimson Clover Apr 14 - Jul 25 • White Clover Apr 25 - May 24 • Tulip Poplar Tree

Mack explains. “At home she will sting to protect the hive even though a single sting means she will die. Away from home she has no interest in stinging anything at all.” Mack says everyone who starts out in beekeeping is wary of getting stung at first, but in most cases it hurts for about a minute and then fades. Some highly allergic people, however, can go into shock. For their safety, she always has on hand an EpiPen® epinephrine injector to counteract an allergic reaction to a sting. “Only a few people react to a sting,” she says. “The rest of us just find it somewhat annoying.”

Like A Bee To Honey Initially, beekeeping was Mack’s husband’s idea, and they decided to pursue it together after she left the corporate world in

2001. One day, she saw an ad in the paper for a class organized by the Mecklenburg County Beekeepers Association, where she now helps teach classes. Mack says she was attracted to beekeeping because it is totally different from consulting. Her husband, a commercial power plant developer, enjoys woodworking and helps to build frames and boxes for the hives. “It was good to find a hobby that we can do together,” she says. “When we were in corporate America we were often flying off in different directions. This is close to home and is ecologically sound.” Before setting up her hives, Mack talked to the neighbors and their children. While some of the adults seemed reluctant, the kids reacted with enthusiasm. They had learned about hon-

Apr 26 - May 10 • Black Gum Tree Apr 27 - May 7 • Black Locust Tree Apr 28 - Jun 13 • Vetch Vicia Apr 30 - May 15 • Holly Ilex Bush Apr 30 - May 15 • Raspberry Rubus Source: North Carolina Beekeepers annual calendar, www.meckbees.org.

eybees at school and found the idea “cool.” Her first 3,000 bees arrived, along with their queen, in a shoebox-sized package. “The first year was a little rocky,” she admits, as she displays a photo of herself in what she calls her “moon suit” — the traditional beekeeper’s hat, veil, and protective outerwear.

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she suggests bathing a container of the sugared syrup in hot tap water, to return the honey to liquid form. With her firm belief that bees teach good lessons, Mack encourages everyone to learn more about her fuzzy friends, noting, “They are very productive, hardworking, and never stop. They’re devoted to each other and to their queen, and somehow they always know the right thing to do. They have extremely strong instincts, and they are amazingly cooperative. “A single honeybee cannot live away from the hive for more than a few hours,” Mack continues. “And she’s totally devoted to the success of the colony even when it means sacrificing her own well-being. For example, if a bee is sick, she will die outside of her hive to save her sisters from having to dispose of her body. They are selfless even unto death.” TCW

Many things have to go right in order for beekeepers to have a good harvest of honey. Rainfall, temperatures, quantities of flowers — everything must come together perfectly for a bumper crop. Last year met all the requirements, and Mack toiled in her kitchen after three separate comb collection periods, performing the hot and sticky task of uncapping cells of beeswax to draw out the gooey goodness. While most of the initial yield went to neighbors and friends as gifts, subsequent batches are still being sold on Saturdays at the Tailgate Market, under the Mack’s Very Local Honey label. Mack says she eats honey nearly every day and recommends it drizzled on almost anything — berries, oatmeal, yogurt — and even uses it to glaze meats and vegetables. But, she cautions, don’t expect the same taste experience from one jar to the next. The colors and flavors of honey For a few sweet reads and more fun vary from harvest to harvest, based facts on honeybees, visit our Web site at on which flowers the bees pollinate. www.todayscharlottewoman.com. In the Myers Park area, they find camellias, red maples, tulip poplars, and whatever else is in bloom during any particular time. Mack’s 2008 spring honey is very clear and light golden, with a taste reminiscent of tupelo honey, while the later harvest provided a darker batch. To preserve the natural nutrients and enzymes, she doesn’t heat the honey, although she does filter it. Because natural honey tends to crystallize more quickly than store-bought kinds,

ToLearnMore The Mecklenburg County Beekeepers Association offers extensive information and training on bees.The group consists of about 150 hobbyists, each typically caring for just a few hives.A few members have several dozen hives, and at least one is a commercial honey producer with thousands of hives. The Association meets monthly on the third Thursday of each month at the Marion Diehl Recreation Center, 2219 Tyvola Road, behind the Tyvola Senior Center. Visitors are welcome. Log on to www.meckbees.org for information.

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To Market,

To Market BY LEE RHODES

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h, tomatoes. Juicy, refreshing, vine-ripened veggie-fruits bursting with flavor … or are they? Consider the supermarket tomato. Many of them are picked, packed, and shipped as far as 1,500 miles away, to where they’ll be unpacked and shelved — often languishing on those shelves for up to a couple of weeks — before making it into your grocery cart.

Now, consider the farmers market tomato. Mary Roberts and her husband, Ray, of Windcrest Farm, specialize

in heirloom and old-time-variety tomatoes,many of which you’ll never see on a supermarket shelf.“They were developed for flavor,not for shipping,”Roberts explains.“We also do five or six kinds of lettuce.We do a cucumber called ‘lemon.’ It’s fun because people will come into the booth and say,‘My grandmother used to grow those.’ We specialize in those kinds of things.” Following in the footsteps of others who years ago blazed a trail to re-establish a link between local farmers and consumers,Roberts initially began selling her vegetables,flowers,and herbs at the Charlotte Regional Farmers Market on Yorkmont Road.These days she’s doing business at the Matthews Community Farmers Market,which is more convenient to the Union County farm she’s owned for over 30 years. Acknowledging that she is one who has “always dug in the dirt,” Roberts left her corporate career several years ago for what she sees as a tremendous opportunity.“There is more demand [for local foods] than supply,”she says.“Every day there’s another food scare.People want to know where their food is coming from.”Today,Windcrest Farm is one of three certified organic farms in Union County, and is home to one of the few certified organic greenhouses in North Carolina. >

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Home Grown

mercial agriculture don’t have that. They never meet the end users of their products.”

that benefits the cattle, the environment, and the consumers. The beef goes to a USDA facility before being taken to the market.

PHOTOS BY ALICIA TOWLER

The burgeoning awareness of the local food movement has certainly served to bring out the crowds. Roberts’ customers are a Where’s The Beef? health-conscious, well-informed lot, and many Baucom’s husband, Milton, was born into This Little Piggy Went … return to the market faithfully, week after farming and has long been involved in the Pastured pork is another meat product week. There are also first-time market-goers, industry. Relying on the combination of his available at the Charlotte Regional Farmers Marmany times with their young children or agricultural expertise and her business acu- ket. Grateful Growers’ Parsons worked as a corout-of-town guests in tow. men, the couple launched their business in porate and private dining chef for years until, “I’ve watched the Yorkmont market grow 2004, in an effort to provide an alternative to continually daunted by the caliber of food and become a fun, family-centered market,” traditional beef. “coming through the back door,” as she puts it, says Cassie Parsons of Grateful Growers Farm Although Baucom grew up eschewing red she stepped out of the profession and into in Lincoln County. “It’s incredibly special to see meat, she now raves about the wonderful fla- organic gardening, which eventually prompted families coming back an interest in producing week after week and protein. Today, the corbringing their kids. nerstone of her farm is There is a beautiful synthe Tamworth hog, ergy that is happening at which is raised in open that particular market.” pastures and is free of First-timers who are added hormones, synjust experiencing that thetic chemicals, and synergy typically have feed additives. questions about the fare. “Our product is outRoberts’ advice? “Know rageously good. The your farmers,” she says. taste and texture is like “Talk to them. Have a nothing else,” says Parconversation. That’s sons, who thinks of her really the most imporfarm as a melding of tant thing.” craftsmanship agriculThese days, more ture and culinary artistry. often than not, many of “Craftsmanship those farmers are agriculture involves women. Baucom’s Best being mindful about owner Harriett Baucom how the animals are Women are, many times, leading the way in the popularity and success of producing and selling locally grown food. Area farmers, like (clockwise from upper left) Harriett Baucom, of Baucom’s Best; Mary explains: “There are so raised,” she explains. Roberts, of Windcrest Farm; Michele Lamb, of Bosky Acres; and Cassie Parsons, of Grateful Growers, are many women repre“We have little padtestament to the strength of family-owned farms represented at farmers markets across the region. senting agriculture now, docks that we use to which is pretty remarkmicro-graze the aniable. You have to be able to interact with cus- vor of the pastured beef she and her husband mals. They are never on the same spot more tomers, and that seems to be a female trait. raise. “Grass-fed beef can have the reputation than six months.” When I look around from my table at the farm- of being a little tough and grainy, but that’s in The wide variety within Grateful Growers’ ers market, I see mostly women.” the way people produce it,” she says. “You can product line stems from Parsons’ penchant for Like all local farmers, these women are con- avoid that graininess, but it takes more work culinary artistry. Describing a few of her cerned with sustainable food systems, envi- and money. And that’s what we do. Our beef offerings, she says, “Customers can get proronmental stewardship, raising produce and is all dry-aged so it’s juicy and tender.” sciutto-style ham that’s been hung for 14 animals in a conscientious manner, and getting A visit to the Baucom’s Best booth at the months and has no nitrates, and is just as good to know their customers. In fact, at the Char- Charlotte Regional market provides cus- as the Parma from Italy. We do a guanciale, lotte Regional Farmers Market, Baucom has tomers with the opportunity to purchase which is really fun for spicing up greens; we found interacting with her buyers to be one of grass-fed beef from cows the Baucoms have also do both mild and hot breakfast sausages, the great joys of the job. “We have wonderful, cared for personally on their Union County a bratwurst, and a beautiful paprika bacon that very loyal customers,” she says. “We get to farm. The animals are raised humanely in is to die for. And there are baby back ribs and know them as friends. They tell us how much open pastures, and there are no feedlots, hor- spareribs. All the good things you could find they appreciate our products. Farmers in com- mone implants, or antibiotics — an approach at a butcher shop, you can find at our table.” 48

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A Web Of Food Options CONTACT INFORMATION FOR LOCAL GROWERS

Windcrest Farm www.windcrestorganics.com, 704/764-7746 Baucom’s Best www.baucomsbest.com, 704/254-0742 Grateful Growers Farm www.ggfarm.com, 828/234-5182 Bosky Acres www.boskyacres.com

Michele Lamb of Bosky Acres, also in Union County, is enjoying similar success at her table. Lamb studied textiles in school and worked as a fiber artist for years before her love of alpacas prompted her interest in Nubian dairy goats. She and her husband, Matt, purchased their first pair of goats in 2001, and began selling their Farmstead Goat Milk Soap at local farmers markets. When customers began clamoring for cheese made from goats’ milk, the couple put together a business plan and obtained their dairy license. They now have 20 goats, with plans to expand the herd and add feta and an aged artisanal cheese to Bosky Acres’ line of products. Customer response has been tremendous. “We have had remarkable feedback,” says Lamb. “The cheese is special because it’s made in small batches, by hand, with milk from goats that are very well cared for. At the farmers market (the Charlotte Regional and Matthews Community markets, among others), it’s as fresh as you can get it.” Like her fellow vendors, Lamb enjoys getting to know her customers, most of whom want relationships with the people who produce their food. She sums it up this way: “People feel strongly about buying local. It’s not just a political ideal; it’s an ongoing community experience. Everyone seems so busy and isolated these days. But the farmers market is a great place to come hang out and bring your kids and see people every week. And food is what’s behind it.” TCW

PHOTOS BY ALICIA TOWLER

Cream Of The Crop


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ON COURSE WITH THE

PHOTO COURTESY OF QUAIL HOLLOW CHAMPIONSHIP

Quail Hollow Championship

BY MONIQUE BROWN MCKENZIE 50

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THE QUEST TO GREEN THE GREENS

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lthough most serious golfers are not thinking of the environment when they hear the word green (grass, maybe; Masters jacket, definitely), participants in — and fans of — the Quail Hollow Championship (formerly the Wachovia Championship) will benefit from organizers’ efforts to produce a more environmentally friendly golf tournament as the 2009 event tees off April 27, at Quail Hollow Club in south Charlotte.

Game On When Charlotte’s PGA TOUR franchise (which offers a blue jacket to its winner) was first unveiled on the pristine links of Quail Hollow seven years ago, organizers quickly realized the spring tournament was generating a lot of garbage — and they didn’t quite know what to do with it all. Patrons noticed the high volume of trash, too, and on feedback surveys, they suggested recycling. However, efficiently recycling the trash output of 200,000 participants, volunteers, and spectators is no easy task. To address the need for putting a recycling system in place, the event’s organizers reached out to its vendors for assistance, and were soon connected with the Anheuser-Busch Recycling Corporation, one of the world’s largest recyclers of aluminum beverage containers. “Two years ago, Anheuser-Busch made a donation by buying 150 bins for the Wachovia Championship for the recycling of aluminum and plastic beverage containers,” says Rob Thoele, senior region manager for AnheuserBusch Recycling. “Wachovia was committed to recycling, and we wanted to be a part of that endeavor.” The recycling company also supplied the bags for those bins, as well as guidance on how the Championship could implement an effective recycling agenda. In addition, AnheuserBusch introduced tournament organizers to local companies that could assist with the recycling efforts. “We couldn’t have done it alone,” says Tony Schuster, operations director for the

Championship. “In order to set up a recycling program for an event this size, you need to have a couple of partners.” Those partners include more than a few ecology-minded helpers from the surrounding community. Throughout the course of the event, volunteers from South Mecklenburg High School’s Activities Association collect the filled recycling bags and replace them with new ones daily. At night, the group sorts the bags and places the contents into bigger recycling containers. Ahired hauler then trucks the trash to the city dump, and takes the recyclables to a local recycling outfit.

Green Growth When the recycling program began three years ago, it consisted of installing a few bins throughout the grounds of Quail Hollow. At the time, there was no way to sort the bins. With more hands on deck, however, the program has achieved stellar results. “In 2007, we recycled 1 ton of fiber, which includes paper and cardboard, and 2.5 tons of plastic and aluminum,” says Schuster. “But last year, the organization’s recycling efforts exploded, resulting in 3.5 tons of fiber and 14 tons of plastic and aluminum.” The 2009 Quail Hollow Championship organizers have proactively stepped up their green efforts to ensure that nearly every aspect of the tournament is ecologically responsible. They have added 120 recycling stations, bringing the grand total to 390. Last year, the shrink-adjusted weight of recycled plastic and aluminum containers gathered from recy-

cling stations reached 28,154 pounds. Tournament organizers hope that the amount of this year’s recycled materials will far exceed what was collected in 2008. Recycling is only one part of the Championship’s green initiative. The event donates more than 20 trees to the Quail Hollow course, and many tournament-related items, such as maps, spectator information sheets, brochures, parking passes, and other handouts, are printed on recycled paper. Quail Hollow Championship golf hats made from recycled milk cartons are produced by AHEAD Inc., an outfitter specializing in custom golf garments and headwear. Efforts to help feed the hungry with surplus food generated during the weeklong tournament are also in place for 2009. In 2008, almost 15,000 pounds of food was donated to Second Harvest Food Bank of Metrolina. As the Quail Hollow Championship continues its greening of the greens, organizers say there is still plenty of room for improvement. And more eco-friendly plans and ideas are in the works, including the possibility of implementing cost-effective alternative power sources for the tournament’s energy requirements. In the meantime, tournament organizers will continue to maintain and upgrade the programs that are already in place. “Our goal is to have a 1-to-1 ratio when it comes to trash and recycling retainers,” Schuster says. “We find that people are willing to recycle as long as you make the option available to them. We’re trying to fine-tune the process to ensure we’re doing the best job possible.” TCW

ToLearnMore The Quail Hollow Championship will be held April 27 through May 3, at Quail Hollow Club. For information, visit www.quailhollowchampionship.com, or call 704/554-8101.

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Rainy-Day Ready

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L E T A S M I L E B E U N D E R YO U R U M B R E L L A BY MICHELLE YOUNG HUBACHER • PHOTOS BY ARMANDO BELLMAS

Raindrops keep falling on your head — but when you have an umbrella worthy of Mary Poppins’ envy, who cares? These may not lift

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you off the ground, but they’ll certainly lift your spirits on a dreary day.

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Target Target, $12.99

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The Cover-Up:A Brief History Of The Umbrella

The Chinese are credited with making the umbrella rainready by waterproofing what had been used,apparently for hundreds of years,as a sunshield,as well as to denote a position of high birth or power. Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics depict kings being shielded from the African sun by attendants holding large umbrellas. Eventually, the concept reached Europe, and by 1800,

the sunny parasol and its rainy-day cousin had achieved separate identities. While the desire to preserve ladies’ porcelain-white skin during the subsequent Victorian Era made the parasol an iconic image of style and wealth, the umbrella evolved as a more utilitarian tool.The parasol was lightweight and elegant, available in a range of styles, material, and colors. The umbrella, on the other

hand, was cumbersome and bulky, and very few were considered suitable for persons of refinement. Well,times have changed.Today’s umbrellas come in as many patterns and styles as you can imagine.The purpose is always the same — to keep the raindrops off your head. Source: A History of the Umbrella by T.S. Crawford. A P R I L

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Fashion

“Octavia”Trouser Jean. Fidelity Jeans, denimaffair boutique

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F I N D I N G

T H E

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PA I R

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BY TRACY B. MCGINNIS

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e’ve all had those days doing awkward plies in front of the dressing-room mirror, trying to zip ourselves into what we hope will be our favorite (and perfect-fitting!) pair of jeans. Style-watchers estimate that most of us stretch and stuff into a dozen dungaree disappointments before finding a good — or even acceptable — fit. Relaxed office dress codes and denim-clad celebrities have helped jeans insinuate themselves everywhere from country clubs to places of worship. But if the thought of buying jeans makes you long for yoga pants and tunic blouses, you’re not alone. With an ever-growing list of denim products promising to show off your best assets, finding the right wash and waist size, without putting a large dent in your wallet, can be challenging.

Try, Try Again (And Again And Again) Paige McManus is the owner of denimaffair boutique in south Charlotte’s Blakeney shopping center, which specializes in a mix of wellknown and emerging denim brands, such as 1921, AG, Anlo, Anoname, Denim of Virtue, Hello! Skinnyjeans, iT!, James Jeans, Lucky, Fidelity Jeans, and Moto. Ajeans connoisseur of sorts, McManus says buying the right pair is no different from finding the perfect bathing suit — a tricky task, but not mission impossible.

McManus is adept at helping women (and men) navigate their way through what can sometimes be a less-than-pleasant experience. She left Capitol Hill, where she worked as a staff director at the U.S. House of Representatives, to open her Charlotte shop. But, she found, the politics of getting someone into a great pair of jeans can be just as complicated. “Customers will say, ‘It fits here, but doesn’t fit here,’ ” she explains. She and her team at denimaffair make it their goal to help each customer find and fit just the right ones. Angela Wells, of Paul Simon for Women, agrees. “Buying jeans can be a daunting task,” she says. “It is our job to listen to our customers’ wishes, but at the same time make suggestions according to individual body types, such as short-waisted versus long-waisted; curvy-cut versus boy-cut.” Wells and the Paul Simon staff work with customers to find the ideal pair of jeans among the higher-end denim products the store carries, which include David Kahn, Cambio, and Vanilia. When you buy jeans, McManus advises, get a pair that feels a little tight in the store. “Snug in store, baggy at the end of the day,” she cautions. She also says you should never dry denim, and she recommends laundering your jeans only every third time you wear them. “The stretch fibers break down more with each wash,” she explains. >

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Fashion “Scoop” Straight-leg Jean; “Koy”Tab-pocket Trouser Jean; “Skip”Trouser Jean; “Honeysuckle”Wide-leg Jean. Fidelity Jeans, denimaffair boutique

Blues, Shoes, and Tips You Can Use

“Brenda” Flared-leg jean in a distressed wash. Cambio, Paul Simon for Women

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If you love a pair of jeans in the store, McManus says it makes sense to buy two pairs and hem one to wear with flats. “Keep the other for heels,” she suggests. She does, however, stress the importance of using the original hem, noting, “Attaching the original hem gives a better look and makes it less obvious that the jeans have been taken up.” Kami Gray, TV and film wardrobe stylist, and the author of The Denim Diet: Sixteen Simple Habits to Get You Into Your Dream Pair of Jeans, notes that jeans should not be too short; in fact, the hem should almost reach the floor. She also suggests wearing heels for a taller, slimmer silhouette. “Someone 5’6” and 145 pounds looks 5’10” and the same exact weight when wearing a pair of 4-inch boots or heels,” she says. “Make sure your jeans have back pockets; pocket-free jeans don’t look good on any body type,” continues Gray, who has worked with several A-list celebrities. “And if you have a muffin-top [a bit of excess fat around the midriff], get a larger size, or choose a different brand or style. Remember, too, that jeans that come up too high on the waist create the appearance of a long behind.” Wells maintains that the perfect pair of jeans has replaced ordinary black pants as a fashion staple. “A great pair of ‘dressy’ jeans is a must-have in your wardrobe,” she asserts. “On a casual Friday, jeans paired with a chic, sporty jacket will take you from the office out for a night on the town. A good, all-over dark wash is a great look, especially for evening.” A higher heel on your shoe can help make denim look more professional and go from office to evening. Alow-heeled pump W O M A N

“Ginger” High-rise Wide-leg Jean. 7 for all mankind, Neiman Marcus

or stylish boot works well with jeans in a professional (but still casual) setting. You can dress up jeans for the weekend by pairing them with stilettos, peep-toes, or shoes with detail. If you can buy only one denim item this season, you may want to consider the white trouser jean. “Partner a fabulous pair of white jeans with a fun printed top and a wedge, and you’re ready to go,” Wells says.


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Denim-ology Shopping for the right fit is not for the faint of heart. Take a deep breath and read through this list of jean fits available at the time-honored jean source, Gap: Long & Lean, Curvy, LowRise Boot-Cut, Mid-Rise Boot-Cut, Essential, Straight, Trouser, Skinny, Cropped, Capri. “With the countless selection of styles, ranging from boot-cut to relaxed fit to is-thereany-room-left-to-breathe, I was never able to find a pair that fit my body,” says Claire Jason, vice president and creative director for Atlanta-based PZI Jeans. “We all have our jeans that make us feel skinny or sexy; or a favorite pair of jeans that we just can’t live without. For me, I turn around first. If they don’t look good from behind, I’m on to the next pair. I want shape!” To satisfy the need for shape, PZI Jeans, which launched in 2002, offers its premium denim and related-apparel brand “to fit the woman with a streamlined waist, fuller hips, and curvy bottom.” The good news is, when shopping for jeans, it’s no longer just about whether you can squeeze into a size 8 or a size 10. The bad news is, it’s no longer just about whether you can squeeze into a size 8 or a size 10! Other questions abound. How low is a low rise? What’s the point of a boot cut when you don’t own a boot? How do you know if skinny is for you? (Hint: Unless you’re 15 years old, it’s probably not.) If you brave the pile of denim and end up actually selecting a pair, this is how the tag on one style of jeans may read: Sits just below the waist. Slightly relaxed through the hip and thigh. Flared leg opening. Zip fly, five-pocket styling, deep hem. Back right patch pocket.

Blue Clues Educate yourself on the terminology used to describe the fit and features of today’s blue jeans. Here’s a start: Mid-Rise: “Mid-rise jeans hide a multitude of sins,” says McManus. “If you have kids and find yourself bending down all day, then this fit — where the back is higher than the front — gives you great coverage.” Noting that this is her most popular fit, she recommends that women consider this cut over a natural waist, which sits higher than mid-rise. That, she insists, “is not flattering on anyone.”> A P R I L

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Fashion Skinny Jeans: This fit is good if you have a long, lean body style. McManus suggests tucking these jeans into a pair of boots, and wearing a larger top or a belt to balance the look. To slim it down even more, consider a dark wash.

“Body” Tapered-leg Jean with a slimmer profile. Cambio, Paul Simon for Women

Flattering Fits: Straight-leg jeans work well for women who aren’t hippy, but if you are looking to make your thighs appear slimmer, consider a boot cut or a flared-leg jean. Atrouser-like cut and a wider leg create a polished look. Flared jeans also help thin and elongate your legs, and don’t hug your thighs. Dark Denim: “Clean, dark jeans with no distressing are great for a more formal look, and will trim you up,” McManus says. Consider pairing strappy shoes with dark denim for an evening look. Pockets: Pockets with flaps help fill out your back end, while larger pockets can minimize your, ahem, assets. Small pockets will only make your rear appear larger. TCW

“Pascale”Trouser White Jean. Anlo, denimaffair boutique

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Attention: Smile-Conscious Charlotteans

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Beauty

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Tom’s Of Maine CucumberGrapefruit Deodorant Stick, Grocery Stores and Drugstores

Pacifica Hawaiian Ruby Guava Natural Soap, EarthFare

Elizabeth Arden’s Green Tea Travel Kit, Department Stores


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AtHome

In going green, the Watkinses have not sacrificed style and charm in the renovation of their Lake Wylie home.

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Pinkie Watkins and her husband,Vince, are committed to an ecofriendly remodel of their lakeside farmhouse.

Behind The Beams Green Building Principles, Inside Out BY MEAGHAN CLARK • PHOTOS BY SCOTT STILES

P

inkie Watkins and her husband, Vince, care about the environment. Not just their own environment, which includes a current home renovation on Lake Wylie, but the bigger picture, as well. That’s why they have decided to make their construction as “green” as possible.

From their sustainable roofing system to energy-efficient low-E windows, the Watkinses, with help from John Morgan and Adam Kaloz of Charlotte’s Urban Building Group, are putting Mother Nature first. Their “green build” project will incorporate sustainable products, reclaimed materials, and Energy Star guidelines.

Going Green Takes Some Green The cost of doing a green build can be prohibitive for many homeowners. It’s also what often scares away builders, project managers, and tradesmen. However, Morgan and Kaloz say that trepidation is usually based on a lack of understanding and knowledge of going green, noting that consumers can actually make changes that will end up saving them money. The Watkinses have a keen

understanding of such costs, and have made it their objective to do as much as they possibly can. “We are going as green as our wallets will allow,” says Pinkie Watkins. The family of four is adding a larger structure to the property and connecting it to the existing home via a breezeway. Every opportunity to repurpose materials is being considered; every chance to save costs and save the farm is on the agenda, as well. The Watkinses know they are limited in going completely green, but are doing as much as they can, when they can, with plans for more green functionality down the road. Although their budget can’t accommodate solar panels on their entire home right now, the couple will start with two panels on their garden shed and add more later on. > A P R I L

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AtHome With larger-than-normal overhangs, Dow SIS-Board insulated sheathing, and energy-tight windows, the home is a model for energy efficiency.

Back in 2007, when they purchased the former organic farm, the Watkinses bought with the knowledge that they would be expanding the little house to include room for their family. They were insistent that they would not drastically change the footprint of the land: They would not raze the current home; nor would they sacrifice any trees or landscaping. It was a tall order, but one they wholeheartedly felt was necessary. “We think it doesn’t pay environmentally to tear down a structure, even though it may cost less monetarily. In the end, our children will pay for it, and that just isn’t worth it,” says Watkins. The need to provide a clean, healthy, sustainable environment is what drove her and her husband to seek out a building company and design team that held the same principles. “We had initially picked out another architect,” she continues, “but his plans were too big and too modern, and he just didn’t get us.” Urban Building Group did.

The Gospel Of Green The ultimate goal for the Watkins family is to create a beautiful new structure that meshes with the existing structure, pays homage to the history of the land, and remains environmentally responsible. They also want to do all they can to avoid dumping more materials into landfills, which means repurposing as much as possible. Urban Building Group has worked with the Watkinses to meet those goals. “Sustainability is key,” Morgan says. The president of UBG is passionate about his work — this project in particular — and does his best to spread the gospel of green. Fortunately for Morgan and Kaloz, talking to the Watkinses about sustainability is like preaching to the choir. “The most important factor in a successful venture is to have comprehensiveness,” Kaloz says. The native New Yorker explains that this concept applies, not just with the building process itself, but with the clients, as well. “You must have the homeowners on board,” he emphasizes. He concurs with Morgan that working with the Watkinses has been an > 64

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Call today for a free in-home consultation! 704.598.1558

6735 Reames Rd. • Suite 600 • Charlotte • www.granitetransformations.com • charlotte@granitetransformations.com


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AtHome

Vince (right) and Pinkie Watkins have worked closely with the builder to preserve the original footprint of their farm home. No trees were uprooted or cut down in the remodeling and rebuilding process.

absolute pleasure. “If the clients are educated and knowledgeable, it allows us to be more comprehensive in our approach.” And these clients are educated. They don’t just talk it; they live it and work it. Watkins’ husband is a flooring sales representative and specializes in eco-friendly materials, such as cork and bamboo. The home will feature both of these types of flooring, in addition to reclaimed wood. It’s just one example of the many details that are beneficial to the family’s health — and the environment — that the eco-con66

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scious couple are including in their home.

Re-Purposefully Green For Watkins, repurposing materials and being mindful of waste is simply a state of mind. “I hate to throw anything away,” she says. But sometimes her need to assimilate the old into her home goes beyond the merely practical. Sometimes, it is downright sentimental. “We are using an old handrail from my granddad’s house, that he built and carved himself, in our new home,” she says. Many

fond memories of times spent with her relatives will be relived every time she walks up or down those stairs. “It will be a conversation piece for me,” she adds. Morgan and Kaloz agree that the commitment from the Watkinses to do the best they can is completely commendable. “There is a middle ground,” Morgan says. UBG is aware that its clients have a budget to follow, and are continually looking for — and finding — ways to be cost-effective and eco-friendly. Re-using materials in creative ways, such as taking the


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The home features fiber cement siding and trim, bamboo and cork flooring, and a rainwater collection system hooked into the gutters.

old concrete driveway and incorporating it into the structure of the existing wall on the property line next to the water (rip wrap), is a prime example of sustainability at its best. The UBG team encourages all homeowners to take as many steps as they can toward sustainability. Green builds have greater longevity, which ends up saving homeowners money. It is a point that is lost on many builders, but one that UBG stresses in every project it has taken on. “Building green is just a better way to build,” Morgan insists. Although they realize that homeowners are often fearful of expensive renovations, Morgan and Kaloz say many families are

most likely already using ecofriendly materials or methodologies without even knowing it. The two UBG principals also have a myriad of tips to improve the quality of the home and the quality of life for homeowners, and to keep Mother Nature happy, too. “Seal the envelope,” is one of Morgan’s favorite sayings. He refers to sealing air gaps in a home by caulking holes around the exterior. Putting a vapor barrier in a crawl space is another top priority for Morgan and Kaloz. “Use common sense,” says Kaloz, who suggests homeowners consider the slope of their properties and remember that water always trickles down. > A P R I L

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The original home has been incorporated into the layout of the redesign.

It’s a concept that is not lost on Pinkie and Vince Watkins. They have plenty of common sense, and plenty of desire to take good care of the Earth. They also want to pay tribute to the original function of the land on which they live. Peach trees remain intact and flowers bloom everywhere. Though the property is no longer a working farm, its owners prize the fruits it brings forth, and frequently share them with friends and visitors. Even Kaloz admits to occasionally picking peaches from the trees when he’s working on site! TCW For information on the health benefits of building green, visit our Web site at www.todayscharlottewoman.com.

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Nuts And Bolts F E AT U R E S O F P I N K I E A N D V I N C E W AT K I N S ’ G R E E N H O M E

Masterworks

• Sustainable Roofing: A standing-seam metal roof gives longevity (2 to 3 times the lifespan of asphalt), durability, and solar reflectivity; and it can be recycled.

from the New Orleans Museum of Art

CASSATT DEGAS KANDINSKY MATISSE MIRÓ MONET O’KEEFFE PICASSO POLLOCK RENOIR RODIN TIEPOLO AND MORE

• Solar Panels • Insulation: Icynene® spray foam insulation will achieve up to a 50-percent energy savings. Small gaps or channels in fiberglass insulation can drastically bring R values down, but spray foam insulation fills all gaps. The product is water blown and does not contain HFC’s; it is class-1 fire retardant without the use of PBDE’s; and it will qualify for LEED credits, as well as up to 120 points for NAHB National Green Building Standards.

March 14 - June 21, 2009 Mint Museum of Art 2730 Randolph Road, Charlotte, NC 704/337-2000, mintmuseum.org Organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art XSFIRI½XMXW/EXVMRE6IGSZIV]*YRH EDGAR DEGAS. French, 1834-1917. Dancer in Green, circa 1878. Pastel on paper. New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of Charles C. Henderson in memory of Nancy S. Henderson. The Mint Museum is funded, in part, with operating support by the Arts & Science Council.

• Dow STYROFOAM SIS™ Board: A structural insulated sheathing, composed of 80-percent post-consumer recycled content, is used in place of typical plywood and housewrap,adding an additional 3 to the R value of the home while reducing condensation in the wall cavities. • Conditioned, Sealed Crawl Space • Reclaimed Brick Veneer • Fiber Cement Siding and Trim:The addition of fiber cement siding,with its durability,longevity, and lower maintenance requirements, adds to the sustainability of the home and does not negatively affect the environment.

I NTRODUCING AURA S TONE AN ENVIRONMENTALLY “GREEN” ARCHITECTURAL FINISH

• Low-E Windows: The use of low-emissivitycoated glass, filled with argon gas between the layers, drastically reduces the loss of hot or cool air from the home and helps to maintain internal climate control. • Rainwater Capture:The home is equipped with half-round gutters tied into rain barrels as a free source of water for landscape irrigation on the property. • High-Efficiency HVAC • Tankless Gas Water Heater:The installation of a tankless system allows for an endless supply of hot water, less wasted space, and a much smaller carbon footprint. • Low-Flow Shower Heads and Faucets

The stunning beauty and organic appeal of AuraStone finishes are simply breathtaking. You can duplicate colors created by nature. Realistic finishes like granite, marble, stone and even wood can be achieved.This product is unparalleled in durability, versatility and workability. Installs over existing counter tops, vanity tops, desk tops, furniture, walls, floors and more. Learn how the AuraStone finishing system is simply the most eco-friendly and user-friendly product available. We have workshops forming now for the Do-It-Yourselfers, Contractors and Faux finishers. Call us at 704.323.0919

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Diversions

BY MICHELLE YOUNG HUBACHER

The Nature Of Art CIEL GALLERY INSTALLS STICKS AND STONES

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rom across the continent, artists who work with natural and found materials are exhibiting their designs this month at Ciel Gallery and Studio in Charlotte’s historic South End. Creations ranging from mosaics to interpretations of nests and couture “gowns” of soft grasses and reeds will bring to fruition Sticks and Stones, a nature-inspired, juried exhibit

produced by Ciel owner Pamela Goode. “Most artists are drawn to nature in its purest form,” Goode says. “I wanted to explore what different people are doing with stones, sticks, grasses, and all kinds of natural elements.”

The Sticks and Stones exhibit was born of Goode’s fascination with nests and their construction — simple, yet incredibly intricate, with no two forming exactly the same structure. Created in nature with found objects, nests are some of the best works of our feathered friends, and the perfect representation of the animal kingdom’s ability to generate beauty as a byproduct of utilitarianism. Several participating artists have produced sculptural renderings that challenge and turn on its head the idea of a safe haven, using their skills to illustrate our inability to acknowledge man’s destructive role in nature. “As humans, we are continually constructing and manipulating the natural world — often with poor results,” says Amber Zavada, a Virginia artist whose “nest” is entered in the exhibit. “My structures deal with ill-conceived intentions of protection: fragile nests and towers that offer little security.” Special features of the show will include a “cocooning” installation of the exterior gallery space, as well as classes in nest-building, mosaic, and collage. Afollow-up class in stone mosaic-building, with Canadian artist Sophie Drouin, will be held this fall.

From Earth To Earth Exhibiting artist Susan Springer Anderson of New York contributes to the exhibit’s theme of using found objects with her couture “torsos,” a collection of chicken-wire sculptures that are Left: Susan Springer Anderson, Coming Into Being/ Coming Undone II. Insets from top: Kate Strickland, Synapse 2; Pam Goode, The Stone Unturned; Kris Kessey, Sticks and Stones and Wishing Bones.

artfully arrayed in ornamental grasses, natural fibers, sticks, grapevine, leaves, and even hydrangeas. “Coming into Being/Coming Undone II” is a floor-length gown as ethereal as it is powerful. “Backyard Beauty” is a shorter form that typifies Anderson’s own description of the torsos: “What lies guarded just beneath the surface is now out in the open. The materials used for each piece are familiar in their presence, and yet evocative in their new context.” Context is what Goode hopes viewers of Sticks and Stones will consider when they see the varied works on display at her Camden Road gallery. “I’m inspired when I go out in the world and see things in a different setting than I had considered before,” she says. “That experience changes me. It changes my perception of events and relationships, and influences what I might do with my day.” Her goal, Goode adds, is for people to recognize a bit of their own lives in works of art, and consequently to perceive life in a whole new way. “Ciel,” she explains, “is French for ‘sky,’ as in, ‘The sky’s the limit.’ Creatively and developmentally, that’s a pretty good mantra.” Kate Strickland, whose work appears in Sticks and Stones, combines materials such as paper, thread, beeswax, metal, and natural objects into her sculptural collages. This Canadian artist credits the environment and her surroundings where she grew up, in Northern Ontario, with her approach. “My aesthetics are informed by the rugged pre-Cambrian landscape of the Canadian Shield and the sedimentary fossil-rich outcrops of Manitoulin Island,” she says. Her “Remnant Reliquaries” > A P R I L

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Diversions

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are microcosms that resemble fossilized bits of the natural world. Zavada’s collages, photographs, drawings, paintings, and prints typify her connection to the natural world. But it is her metal sculptures that tie her to ancient artists who created works of bronze and other metals that have lasted centuries — and taught us about the cultures that came before us. For example, in a technique called “lost-wax bronze casting,” a form is created in wax; then covered in liquid clay that is fired to create a hard cast. During the process, the wax melts and is “lost,” leaving a cavity of the hardened clay, into which molten metal is poured. The metal is cooled, the clay is knocked away, and the sculpture is done. Although the lost-wax process has been refined, it is essentially the same as it was in 2,000 B.C.

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The power of nature to move both an artist and an art aficionado is part of what has motivated Goode in her direction of the Sticks and Stones exhibit, as well as in her mosaic work. Her love of mosaic and the desire to create a studio where mosaic designers can share their creations is at the heart of her Ciel Gallery endeavor. “Mosaic art has been around for at least 2,000 years, but materials and styles change daily.” Goode explains. “One aspect that


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Count Them In ARTISTS EXHIBITING AT CIEL GALLERY AND STUDIO Twenty artists will display works in the juried exhibit, Sticks and Stones, which will award $750 to the Best in Show. Exhibitors: Lynn Adamo, Mosaic: Stones,Twigs, Moss Tina and Juan Alberni, Sculpture: Palm Fronds Susan Springer Anderson, Sculpture:Wire, Grass, Jute,Vine Jeannette Brossart, Mosaic: Mixed Media Annie Burke-Thomas, Mosaic: Mixed Media Sophie Drouin, Mosaic: Marble, Desert Rose, Oyster Shell, Ostrich Egg Virginia Gardner, Mosaic: Gemstones,Turquoise, Copper, Pottery Pamela Goode, Mosaic: Seashells, Stones, Gemstones, Quartz Crystals, Copper Virginia Gardner, Earth One

hasn’t changed: Artists still cut each fragment by hand to create dynamic, fluctuating images, and the power is palpable. Though the medium is different, a mosaicist cutting marble with a traditional hammer and hardie [a chisel-like tool] has a lot more in common with a wood sculptor or paper caster than you might think. We’re taking the raw materials provided by nature and giving them new life, a new context. For me, it’s exciting to be able to provide exposure to artists working in ways that aren’t always recognized.”

In Sticks and Stones, Goode’s own mosaics are displayed alongside the work of several other mosaic artists, including Virginia Gardner, of Charlottesville, Va. Gardner uses gemstones, minerals, and pottery to create her mosaics, often drawing inspiration from her love of the garden to express her passion for color and texture. “I enjoy combining diverse materials in ways that stimulate thoughts or emotions,” she says. “Over the past couple of years, I’ve begun consciously incorporating natural symbols in much of my work. I might use crystals that carry certain attributes or

Gretchen Kauffman, Mosaic: Seeds,Wood, Stones Kris Kessey, Sculpture: Clay, Sticks, Stones, Cast Glass Ken Knowlton, Mosaic: Seashells Eleanor Parr-DiLeo, Mosaic: Stones,Wood, Seashells, Seeds Lisa M. Penny, Fabric Art: Cotton,Wood, Silk, Cinnamon Rachel Sager, Mosaic: Salvaged American Chestnut, Glass Dotti Stone, Mosaic: Pebbles Kate Strickland, Sculpture: Cast Paper, Pods, Thorns, Beeswax Brooks Tower, Mosaic: Granite, Marble, Onyx Deborah Carlson Wight, Mosaic:Wood, Pods, Seeds Rebecca Ruige Xu, Engravings: Landscape Images Amber Zavada, Sculpture: Reeds, Rattan, Pods

shapes and colors representative of specific concepts and ideals.” For Goode, inspiring the public to look at nature a little differently is key to the installation of Sticks and Stones. “My goal in art,” she says, “is the same as my goal in life: to quietly push the boundaries of what we assume to be the norm.” TCW

WantToGo? Sticks and Stones runs through May 1 at Ciel Gallery and Studio, 1519 Camden Road. For information call 704/577-1254,or visit www.cielcharlottte.com.

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MeetOurAdvertisers

Remember how good home tastes?

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harlotte’s Dr. Scott Young believes “Everyone should have a Young smile.” Dr. Young and his staff offer the most up-to-date dental care and procedures, as well as the comfort and hospitality that keep clients coming back year after year. “People may come to our office for the first time for the most advanced dental care, but they stay because of our ‘personalized quality and care.’ Our patients are like our family, and we enjoy Dr. Scott Yo ung and h caring for them,” Dr. is patient a “Young sm staff strive to give every ile.” Young says. He has found that, in addition to routine dental care, sometimes patients need emo- He also offers several diftional support. “Sometimes you ferent options for tooth whitenneed more than a filling,” he says. ing, including the newest Kor Dr. Young and his staff pride Whitening Deep Bleaching™ systhemselves on being open to each tem (www.korwhitening.com), patient’s particular needs, and which Dr. Young calls “the most they offer a personalized approach effective technique ever,” and custom-fit mouth guards for to every client. Dr. Young specializes in cos- patients to take home and use metic dentistry, using natural- while they sleep (resulting in litlooking all-porcelain crowns, tle to no sensitivity). While undergoing treatment, veneers, and implants to change the color, shape, or position of each patient can enjoy a massage teeth. He and his staff treat from a specially equipped chair patients of all ages and offer a full or watch a movie on the overrange of dental services, from head television mounted in each routine cleanings to extensive room. Same-day emergency smile makeovers, to give patients appointments are always available. TCW the smiles of their dreams.

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ToLearnMore Dr. Scott Young’s office is located at 7810 Pineville-Matthews Road, Suite 2. Hours are Mon. through Thu., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Most dental insurance is accepted, and interest-free financing plans are available.Call 704/541-5900,or visit www.youngsmile.com.


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MeetOurAdvertisers

Be An Ageless Wonder With Help From Posang Nature BY MELINDA JOHNSTON

More Than Just Skin Deep Sharon Heineman, Posang Nature’s licensed medical aesthetician, is an expert in skincare and treatments, and can teach you how to protect and care for your skin, using such products as Glimpse, a topical skincare nutrient made using natural or “green” chemistry. Posang Nature also offers the Pico Perfector, a device that painlessly rejuvenates the skin with a biological massage. The Pico Perfector is designed to treat all three levels of tissue: the skin surface, to diminish acne scarring, hyperpigmentation, and age spots; the subdermal

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ging is inevitable, but Dr. Poveena Posang and her staff at Posang Nature can help you take proactive steps to prevent disease, stay in shape, and “extend your younger years.” A family practitioner and anti-aging medicine specialist, Dr. Posang offers a complete arsenal of anti-aging strategies, including bio-identical hormones and natural products, as well as a skincare line and several new devices that can improve your complexion and help manage your weight. According to Dr. Posang, hormonal imbalance is not just a problem for menopausal women. “Hormonal imbalances are affecting even young men and women now,” she explains. “An imbalance can cause lots of problems, including weight gain, depression, low energy, low immunity, low sex drive, and much more.” It’s important that male and female hormone levels be tested and adjusted to fall within a normal range. “We specialize in bringing your hormonal and essential nutrient levels back to your youthful level,” Dr. Posang continues. “We use only natural bio-identical hormones, botanicals, high-grade vitamins, and natural nutrients.” Dr. Posang also treats chronically ill patients who want to supplement their medical treatments through the use of wellness strategies.

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connective tissue, to promote collagen and elastin production; and the underlying muscle layer, which is responsible for a tighter, more refined appearance. “This amazing technology is a painless, nonsurgical way to help erase wrinkles and fine lines in a matter of minutes,” Dr. Posang says. “An important point of difference from laser treatments is that the Pico Perfector strengthens the muscles of the face, which form the substructure that is crucial for the youthful appearance of the face and jaw line.” To help reshape stubborn areas, Posang Nature employs a painless therapeutic tool called the Ion Magnum. “It helps build muscle, boosts stamina and core strength, and helps speed up your metabolism,” Dr. Posang says. “This same device is being used by professional athletes to improve their performance.” TCW

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BY MELINDA JOHNSTON

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n spite of the smiles, hugs, and genuine excitement of discovering yet another friend or family member is expecting a child, it may be difficult to hide your personal disappointment that you aren’t on the receiving end of the well wishes. If you have not been able to get pregnant, Advanced Reproductive Concepts in Huntersville can help. For over 20 years, the husband-and-wife team of reproductive endocrinologist Mark Jutras and Mary Todd Jutras, Mary Todd MSN, REIN (certification in Jutras and her husba Jutras, he lp couple nd, Dr. Ma Reproductive Endocrinology s achieve rk parentho od. and Infertility Nursing), has helped countless couples who were personalized service in a calm struggling to conceive. Mary Todd Jutras says that and controlled environment. Plus, Advanced Reproductive Concepts we can set our own rules and offers a higher level of attention prices. There is no corporation or than other centers do. The clinic anyone else telling us what our treats all forms of male and female prices should be.” For young couples who have infertility, including tubal anastomosis (reversal of tubal ligation). tried to conceive for 12 months or However, Advanced Repro- more without success, Jutras ductive Concepts’ specialty is IVF, advises an evaluation. Couples in a procedure in which eggs are har- their mid-30s and up, she says, vested, fertilized in the lab, and should come in even earlier. “We have a lot of experience then implanted as embryos into the womb. The center offers one of and a long history of high success the highest IVF success rates rates,” Jutras adds. “And we (check out the statistics by visiting make it as easy for our patients as www.sart.org) at, according to possible. One patient recently Jutras, the lowest cost in the area. said, ‘If I had known it was this “Because we are privately easy, I would have done this a owned,” she says, “we can offer long time ago!’ ” TCW

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N OW A C C E P T I N G N E W PAT I E N T S

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Presbyterian Urogynecology is dedicated to providing women with quality, personalized care in a friendly, professional setting. Whether you suffer from incontinence, overactive bladder, uterine or vaginal prolapse, pelvic pain or another pelvic floor disorder, William Porter, MD, and our highly trained staff diagnose and treat your problem using advanced surgical and non surgical techniques. We understand that these issues can cause pain, embarrassment and affect your quality of life. We are here to help. A small practice setting allows us to know our patients by name, know your history and care for you like family.

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HealthMatters

The Green Clean Scene NATURAL RECIPES FOR HOUSEHOLD PRODUCTS

Spring BY JOANNA ZIKOS

Into Cleaning The All-Natural Way

K

aryn Siegel-Maier avoids the cleaning

Queen Of Clean

aisle of her local supermarket like the

Siegel-Maier has some clever solutions. In her latest book, the second edition of The Naturally Clean Home: 150 Super-Easy Herbal Formulas for Green Cleaning, she extols the virtues of baking soda, white vinegar, natural soaps, and essential oils and herbs that many believe contain germ-fighting properties. With simple recipes using inexpensive ingredients, The Naturally Clean Home instructs readers on how to make cost-effective grime busters that will leave our world smelling of citrus, peppermint, or geranium, while minimizing damage to the planet. “I wrote the book because I recognized a real need for ordinary people to be able to take back control over their personal environment,” explains Siegel-Maier. “At the time the first edition came out (in 1999), there weren’t

plague. She doesn’t use commercially made products to clean her

home, wash clothes, or manage garden pests.

“The smell of most commercial products is enough to produce a headache for me,” says Siegel-Maier, an author and freelance writer based in upstate New York. “They also irritate my sensitive skin. One incident that I particularly recall was suffering an allergic reaction to laundry detergent residue left on my clothing.” Siegel-Maier is not alone. As millions of Americans become more eco-conscious, we’re looking for cleaning alternatives that pollute our environment less, are not hazardous to our health, and take fewer dollars out of our wallets. 78

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Easy-Does-lt Toilet Bowl Cleaner 1/2 cup baking soda 1/4 cup white vinegar 10 drops tea tree essential oil Combine all ingredients. Just add to the bowl, swipe with a brush, and you’re done. Natural Laundry Soap 2-1/4 cups liquid castile soap 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar 1 tablespoon glycerin 3/4 cup water 10-15 drops essential oil of your choice Combine all ingredients in a plastic container that can be closed for storage.To use, shake once or twice before adding to the wash: 1/4 cup per average load; 1/2 cup for a large or heavily soiled load. Herbal Degreaser For Kitchen Surfaces 2 cups water 1/4 cup oil-based soap (Murphy’s is good) 10 drops rosemary, lavender, or citrus essential oil Combine all ingredients in a plastic spray bottle. Shake well before each use. Spray generously on surface and wipe with a damp cloth or sponge.Wipe dry with a clean cloth. Controlling Kitchen Pests Wipe out your kitchen cabinets with a damp sponge and 6 to 8 drops of peppermint or citronella essential oil.Then place 3 to 5 drops of the oil on windowsills, around doorway cracks, and in the corners of the cabinet under your kitchen sink.


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a lot of titles dedicated to the topic of natural cleaning, and what few there were seemed to be concerned more with what chemicals to avoid than how to make your own effective cleaners without using toxic substances. “For the second edition,” she continues, “I learned that listening to my readers has rewards. For instance, the first edition didn’t offer any formulas for automatic dishwashers and steam carpet cleaners — two things I’ve received a lot of requests for in recent years. They are included in the second edition, and I can’t wait for the feedback!” New recipes include Rosemary-Geranium Floor Wipes (for electrostatic mops), Thyme to Make Your Own Carpet Steamer, Weekend Warrior Wicker Wash, Telephone Dirty Talk Tamer (to clean the phone), and Lavender Lift Automatic Dishwasher Soap.

Eco-Smart Shopping Ingredients in Siegel-Maier’s concoctions are biodegradable and easy to find in local supermarkets. Items like Borax — a combination of water, oxygen, sodium, and boron sold in powder form — bring back memories of our grandmothers’ cleaning products. A well-known brand, 20 Mule Team, is still made by the Dial Corporation and is available at most grocery stores. (You will have to venture into the cleaning aisle for this, but try to stay focused!) Castile soap (Dr. Bonner’s brand can be found in natural food stores), is a vegetable-based soap made with coconut oil or

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olive oil, both renewable resources. Siegel-Maier uses it in several recipes, including her laundry and dishwashing liquids, as an alternative to the typical commercial preparations made from petroleum distillate, which she labels “a toxic pollutant.” Drops of essential oils, with scents ranging from rich cedar and sinus-clearing eucalyptus to perky mints, sweet orange, and ever-popular lavender, are important components of Siegel-Maier’s recipes. The citrus oils, such as lemon and lime, not only smell wonderful, but are natural degreasers with anti-microbial properties. Tea tree oil, believed to have anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties, is also included in many of the recipes. Oils can be purchased at area supermarkets and natural food stores. Other ingredients, such as vinegar and baking soda, are not only cheap and readily available, but you probably already have them right there in your cupboard! “The cleaning alternatives in my book demonstrate a commitment to preserving the environment and guarding the safety of children and pets,” says SiegelMaier, who, along with her family, has tested every recipe in The Naturally Clean Home. “I receive quite a bit of e-mail and feedback from people who say their lives have been changed by switching to natural cleaning. While I can’t take credit for any epiphany, it’s nice to know I’ve provided some inspiration for people to make positive changes toward living in harmony with nature.” TCW

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HealthFlash WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TO STAY FIT AND WELL

COMPILED BY JENNIFER BRADFORD-EPSTEIN

Diet Debate Common Sense Wins Again

I

f you want to lose weight, it doesn’t seem to matter what type of diet plan you choose. What matters — hold on to your chocolate bar — is that you simply eat less. A study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine compared a variety of diet regimens that emphasize varying degrees of fat, protein, and carbohydrates, and found that any eating plan that causes you to consume fewer calories will help you lose weight. “On average, no one diet was better than another,” says study author Dr. Frank Sacks, a professor of cardiovascular disease prevention at the Harvard School of Public Health. If you want to lose weight, he says, the bottom line is to “eat a heart-healthy diet and be very careful about how much you eat.” OK, so you’re cutting caloric intake, but how do you stay sated? “When you’re looking for foods that are going to keep you fuller for longer, look for ones high in fiber, healthy fats, and protein, as well as foods with a high water content,” says Dr. Barbara Rolls, professor of nutrition at The Pennsylvania State University and author of The Volumetrics Eating Plan.

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10 Slimming Foods Apples This portable fruit is the perfect snack, with a high water content and both kinds of weight-busting fiber.

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Before And After Cosmetic Surgery Getting The End Result You Want

O

ne of the biggest concerns people have when considering plastic surgery is the fear of not really knowing what they will look like after the procedure. But a new technology called the Vectra 3D Imaging System is setting out to change the way people view plastic surgery. The system, designed by Canfield Scientific Inc., uses special cameras to take a 360degree photo of a patient’s body. When the photo is downloaded to the Vectra 3D Sculptor Tool software, the patient and doctor can see multiple views of the body, simulated outcomes, and even side-by-side before and after pictures — all before surgery is performed. Here in Charlotte, doctors at The Refine

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Institute, which is the first cosmetic surgery practice in the Carolinas to use the Vectra 3D Imaging System, say that because Vectra patients are far more involved in the process, they can make more informed decisions, so they

can ultimately make more choices for themselves. “The additional knowledge gained from the Vectra means that our patients not only have a much better understanding of their options, but they have a realistic idea of the end result,” says The Refine Institute’s Dr. Andrew Gear. Additionally, Dr. Gear says the Vectra 3D Breast Sculptor Tool benefits surgeons, because many women do not have symmetrical breasts before surgery. This means that two different-sized implants might be necessary to create a cosmetically pleasing outcome. The Vectra software provides exact measurements and calculates the variance, leaving the guesswork behind and ensuring a more satisfactory result for the patient.


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Food For Thought The Fast Temptation Of Your Brain

N

ew research on the brain suggests that women unconsciously have a tougher time resisting their favorite foods than men do. Dr. Gene-Jack Wang, the study’s author, speculated that women might have more trouble saying no to food because their bodies sometimes have to eat for two.

“Maybe evolution leads them to this because of their important mission to have a baby,” says Wang, a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and professor of psychiatry at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. According to Wang, the new study aimed to understand why some people don’t stop eating when they are full. This wasn’t a big problem throughout history, because people rarely had a chance to eat more than they needed. But modern society, he says, has changed that, especially during the past 30 to 40 years, as obesity has become much more common in the United States. Men and women were asked to fast for 20 hours; they were then presented with their favorite foods — which they were not allowed to eat. Finally, the study participants were told to try to inhibit their desire to eat the food. Simultaneous brain scans found that both men and women succeeded in making themselves feel less hungry by suppressing their desire to eat the food, but the women’s brains still acted as if they were hungry. In other words, the women may have thought they were less hungry, but their brains didn’t seem to be entirely on board.

Pops Not Tops Pass On The Sodas In recent years, diabetes, obesity, and kidney disease have been increasing, right along with consumption of high-fructose corn syrup, the sweetener used in most sodas. Women who drink two or more cans of soda per day are nearly twice as likely to show early signs of kidney disease, although an elevated risk was not found for men. In the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which included urine samples and a questionnaire about dietary habits, researchers from Loyola University Health System examined data from a representative sample of 9,358 U.S. adults.

Women who reported drinking two or more sodas in the previous 24 hours were 1.86 times more likely to have albuminuria, an excess amount of a protein called albumin in the urine. Among women who drink two or more cans of soda per day,17 percent have this early marker of kidney disease,although it remains unclear why.What is clear,however,is that soda provides an increase in sugar that cannot be good for your body’s systems.According to the National Kidney Foundation,about 26 million American adults have chronic kidney disease,which can lead to high blood pressure, anemia, nerve damage, weak bones, and cardiovascular disease.

Winner Take All … The Estrogen? Research has shown that fluctuations in testosterone levels are reflected in what society often sees as a man’s desire for dominance. But, until recently, some researchers doubted whether women had a similar biologically anchored need. Estrogen, it turns out, is a close hormonal relative to testosterone and is also very behaviorally potent. According to psychology professor Oliver Schultheiss, director of the University of Michigan’s Human Motivation and Affective Neuroscience Lab, which studies the behavioral aspects of motivation, estrogen appears to play a big role in a woman’s motivation to attain higher power. Estrogen levels were measured in women who participated in a one-on-one dominance contest. While participants had markedly higher estrogen levels than non-participants, winners of the contest who had a strong need for power showed even further increases in the hormone. Notably, this increase could still be detected one day after the contest was over. In contrast, power-motivated losers showed a post-contest decrease in estrogen levels. “Our findings,”Schultheiss reports,“perfectly parallel what we have observed for power motivation and testosterone in men.” TCW


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Mondays Every Monday Lake Norman Toastmasters, Suite 206 above Lake Norman Chamber of Commerce, 19900 W. Catawba, Cornelius, ext. 28, 6:30-8 p.m. Call Loria Cass, 704/560-8881; www.lakenormantoastmasters.com. Six-O Toastmasters, St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, 3200 Park Rd., 7 p.m.; 704/451-8502; www.monday6o.org. Women’s Cancer Group, Presbyterian Buddy Kemp Caring House, 242 Colonial Ave., 6:30-8 p.m.; 704/384-5223. Visit www.presbyterian.org/buddykemp for other support group info.

First & Third Monday Of Each Month Independence Toastmasters Club,Dowd YMCA, 7th floor, 400 E. Morehead St., 7:07 a.m., charlottetoast.freetoasthost.org.

Second Monday Of Each Month Executive Women International, 5:30 p.m. reception; 6 p.m. dinner, members only. Call Sara Evans, 704/731-4397. International Association Of Administrative Professionals, Charlotte Chapter, Hilton Executive Park off Tyvola & I-77, 6 p.m. Call Leigh Ann Nafus, 704/243-4786. Junior Woman’s Club Of Charlotte, The Mint Museum, 2730 Randolph Rd. 7 p.m., www.charlottejuniors.com. Mint Hill Women’s Club, call Dixie Helms, 704/545-3806; vicepresident@minthillwc.com; www.minthillwc.com.

Third Monday Of Each Month International House Book Club, International House, 7 p.m., 704/333-8099.

Last Monday Of Each Month Latin American Women’s Association, The Mint Museum, 2730 Randolph Rd. 6:30 p.m., 704/552-1003.

O F

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Holistic Health Network, Presbyterian Hospital, Hawthorne Lane (Bobcat Room), 6:45 p.m. Meets Sept.June. Open to all. Call Belle Radenbaugh, 704/542-7040; www.ncholisticnetwork.com. Lake Norman Women’s Connection, Atlanta Bread Company, Huntersville, 10 a.m. Call Janet, 704/281-8496, or Lindy, 704/892-9060. National Association Of Women Business OwnersCharlotte, locations and format vary. $30-$60. 704/3673454; www.nawbocharlotte.org. Women In Electronics, Holiday Inn University Executive Park, 6 p.m. dinner; 7 p.m. meeting, $15; www.womeninelectronics.org.

Second Tuesday Every Other Month Women’s Initiative Network, Charlotte Chapter. Call Pat Baldridge, 704/541-0277; www.womensinet.com.

Second Tuesday Of Each Month American Association Of Medical Assistants, Charlotte Chapter, Pritchett Hall, Kings College, 6 p.m. Visitors welcome. RSVP to pjh2ncaama@aol.com; www.aama-ntl.org Carolina Breast Friends, Myers Park United Methodist Church, Room 109, 7 p.m.; www.carolinabreastfriends.org. Charlotte Woman’s Club, 1001 E. Morehead St., $10, 704/333-1980. Clemson Women’s Alumni Council, Charlotte Metro Area Chapter, locations vary, drinks 6:30 p.m., dinner/activity 7 p.m. Call Anne Roberts, 704/236-0255; AnneVRoberts@alumni.clemson.edu; www.clemsonclub.net. Crohn’s And Colitis Foundation Of America, St. Gabriel’s Catholic Church, 3016 Providence Rd., 7:30 p.m. Call Andy, 704/907-9374 or 704/717-3300.

Ovarian Cancer Support Group, Presbyterian Buddy Kemp Caring House, 242 Colonial Ave., 10-11:30 a.m., 704/384-5223.

International Association Of Administrative Professionals, Metrolina Chapter, 3210 CPCC W. Campus Dr. Call Davandra Reed, 704/605-5817.

Tu e s d ay s

Project Linus, Candlewyck Baptist Church, 7200 Providence Rd., 6:30-9 p.m.

Every Tuesday BizNetwork.org, SouthPark, locations vary, 7:30 a.m. Call Kathryn Mosely, 704/676-5850, ext. 101. Charlotte Concert Band, Dana Auditorium, Queens University, 7:30 p.m., 704/553-8062; www.charlotteconcertband.org. Queen City Toastmasters Club, Cisco building, 1900 South Blvd., 6 p.m. dinner; 6:30 p.m. meeting, 704/366-3519.

First Tuesday Of Each Month Artists’ Forum, Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Rd., 7:30-9 p.m. Charlotte Association Of Insurance Women, Myers Park Country Club, 2415 Roswell Ave., 5:30 p.m. dinner/speaker, $25. Call Dot Williams, 704/333-6694.

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The Heart Link Network-Mooresville, dinner, 7 p.m.; www.28115.theheartlinknetwork.com for info. Watercolor Artists Of Charlotte, Sardis Swim Club, 7400 Thermal Rd., 10 a..m-1 p.m. $5. Call Sandy, 704/578-7077.

Second & Fourth Tuesday Of Each Month VFW Ladies Auxiliary 2031, 7:30 p.m. Call Naomi Sigmon, 704/384-9662.

Third Tuesday Of Each Month Delhom Service League, Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Rd., 10 a.m.; b.holland@mindspring.com. Dirt Divas Mountain Biking Club, Blonde Lounge (below Jason’s Deli), 1600 E. Woodlawn Rd., 7:30 p.m.; www.dirtdivas.net.

M E E T I N G S

Institute Of Management Accountants, Holiday Inn Woodlawn, CPE/dinner meetings, 1-5 p.m.; dinner, 6 p.m., 704/717-9165; www.ima-charlotte.org. Lake Norman Women’s Connection, NorthStone Country Club, 10 -11:30 a.m., $13. Call Lisa, 704/953-6693. Mecklenburg Evening Republican Women’s Club, Captain Steve’s Seafood, 8517 Monroe Rd., dinner, 6 p.m.; program, 7 p.m.; free. E-mail Iris, cltfolks@bellsouth.net; www.meckgop.com. National Association Of Women Business Owners North, Acropolis Café, 20659 Catawba Ave., 8-9:30 a.m., $6 members, $10 visitors. Call 704/987-3828, or e-mail sales@advancedbatteries.net. National Association Of Women Business Owners South, The PRStore Ballantyne, 13855 Conlan Circle, 89:30 a.m., $10 members, $15 visitors. Call 704/525-5539; e-mail info@bhs-cpa.com. National Association Of Women In Construction, Hilton Executive Park, 5624 Westpark Dr., 5:30 p.m. network; 6 p.m. dinner/meeting; $22. Contact dsifers@environamics-inc.com.

Fourth Tuesday Of Each Month American Business Women’s Association, Hornet’s Nest Chapter, Olive Garden, 4336 Independence Blvd. 6 p.m. dinner (order from menu). Call Johnnie Simpson, 704/545-4198. Friends Of Beverly, Pewter Rose, South Blvd., 6 p.m. RSVP by e-mail to Beverly@friendsofbeverly.com. Pilot Club Of Charlotte, Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6 p.m. dinner/meeting. Call Jean Funderburk, 704/846-3526.

We d n e s d ay s Every Wednesday Business Network International, SouthPark Producers Chapter, Zebra Restaurant, 4521 Sharon Rd. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Call Chris Bennett, 704/502-7947. Bosom Buddies, Presbyterian Buddy Kemp Caring House, 242 Colonial Ave., 10-11:30 a.m., 704/384-5223. Visit www.presbyterian.org/buddykemp for other support group info. Toastmasters, Sunrise Speakers Chapter, Conference Rooms C & D, Presbyterian Hospital Matthews, 7 a.m. Call Wayne Caulder, 704/846-7846.

First Wednesday Of Each Month Doorways, International House, 10 a.m., 704/333-8099. North Mecklenburg Woman’s Club, NorthStone Country Club, 10:30 a.m. Call Dawn Bradford, 704/875-1402. Young Republicans Club, South End Brewery, 7 p.m., contact scottallocco@hotmail.com; www.meckyr.com.


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Second Wednesday Of Each Month American Business Women’s Association, Charlotte Charter Chapter, Crown Plaza Hotel-Charlotte, 201 S. McDowell St., dinner, $23. Call Clarice, 609/351-0373; www.abwacharlottecharter.org. Charlotte Women’s Connection 1, Raintree Country Club, 10:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., lunch/entertainment, $14. Call Janice, 704/847-2669; charwomenconn1@aol.com. Daughters Of The American Revolution, Piedmont Patriots chapter. Call Mary Joy, 704/334-6035. Democratic Women Of Mecklenburg County, locations vary, 6:30 p.m. Call Dr. Ann Mabe Newman, R.N., 704/517-7008; http://democraticwomenofmecklenburgcounty.org/. eWomenNetwork, Byron’s South End, networking, 11 a.m.; lunch/program 11:30 a.m-1:30 p.m.; members, $35; guests, $45. Call Mel Miller, 704/650-5439.

Second & Fourth Wednesday Of Each Month Legal Clinics, Mecklenburg Women’s Commission, free seminars; 704/336-3210, 704/336-3414.

Third Wednesday Of Each Month Association Of Fundraising Professionals, locations vary, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Call 704/331-8518; www.afp-charlotte.org. eWomenNetwork, Lake Norman, Birkdale Golf Club, networking, lunch/program, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; members, $35; guests, $45. Call Lori Dvorak, 704/9478476. Friends Of Beverly, Borders Bookstore, Morrocroft Shopping Center, 6 p.m. RSVP to Beverly@friendsofbeverly.com.

Lake Norman Republican Women’s Club, Jeffrey’s, Mooresville, 7 p.m.; call Debbie Lambert, 704/660-3140. National Association Of African Americans In Human Resources, Charlotte Chamber, 6:30 p.m., no meeting Jan. or July; 704/307-2598; naaahr-charlotte.org.

Fourth Thursday Of Each Month

United Daughters Of The Confederacy, Chapter 1840, General James H. Lane ; call Gail Sifford, 704/366-4737.

Credit Professionals International, Ole Smokehouse Restaurant, 1513 Montford Drive, 6:30 p.m., $15. Call Diane Radcliff, 704/841-9573.

United Daughters Of The Confederacy, Chapter 220, Stonewall Jackson; call Suellen Del`ahunty, 704/708-9866.

First & Third Thursday Of Each Month

New Friends Of Carolina Women’s Group, monthly luncheon, 11:30 a.m., 1-866/213-9183.

SHARE: Supporting HSV/HPV awareness, resources , Sensovi Institute, 2125 Southend Dr., 6:30-8 p.m. Call 704/377-2022.

Every Friday

Second Thursday Of Each Month Charlotte Newcomers Club, 10:30 a.m., 704/543-8330.

Charlotte Art League, 1517 Camden Rd., walk-ins welcome, 8-10:30 a.m., $10. Call 704/376-2787; www.CharlotteArtLeague.org.

Professional Association Of Healthcare Office Managers, lunch $10, guests free. Call Sandy Glaspell, 704/795-7010. University City Women’s Group, Oasis Shrine Temple, 10 a.m. Call Jean Kern, 704/594-6884.

American Business Women’s Association, University Chapter, 11:30. RSVP Jane Norman, 704/552-8492; www.abwauniversitychapter.org.

Business Network International, Ballantyne , 7:30 a.m., call Tammy Copeland, 704/804-1761.

First Thursday Of Each Month eWomenNetwork, Cabarrus/University Area region, Speedway Club, networking, lunch/program, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; members, $35; guests, $45. Call Lori Dvorak, 704/947-8476.

Saturdays

Daughters Of The American Revolution, Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence Chapter, 10 a.m. Call Patricia Autry, 704/366-3487.

Third Thursday Of Each Month

Every Thursday

Debtors Anonymous, St. Stephen United Methodist Church, 6800 Sardis Rd., 7:30-8:30 p.m. Call Harold, 704/362-0587.

Every Saturday

Assistance League Of Charlotte, Assistance League of Charlotte Center, 3600 S. Tryon St., 9:30 a.m. Call 704/525-5228; alcharlotte@bellsouth.net; www.charlotte.assistanceleague.org

Thursdays

Fridays

Daughters Of The American Revolution, Mecklenburg Chapter, 10 a.m. Call Miriam Smith, 704/391-0504.

Fourth Wednesday Of Each Month

Public Relations Society Of America Charlotte Chapter, Design Center for the Carolinas, Suite 110, Byron Hall, 101 W. Worthington Ave. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; members, $22; guests, $29; students, $15; www.prsacharlotte.org.

International Coach Federation, Charlotte chapter. Dowd YWCA, 400 E. Morehead St., 7th floor; 6:15-8 p.m. Call Janet Caffray, 704/372-0154; www.icfcharlotte.org.

Charlotte Networking Professionals, Ramada Inn Conference Center, 212 Woodlawn Rd., Pineville, 11:30 a.m.1 p.m. $15. Call Drew Waterbury, 704/523-6914; www.charlottenetworkingprofessionals.com

What Every Woman Should Know, financial discussion group. Smith Barney, 6101 Carnegie Blvd., 2nd floor. Noon. E-mail Nicole.E.Hudson@smithbarney.com.

Guild Of Charlotte Artists, Sept.-May, Mint Museum of Art, 2730 Randolph Rd., 7 p.m., 704/337-2000; www.guildofcharlotteartists.org.

Women In Architecture, call Nora Black, 704/536-4988.

New Friends Of Carolina, Women’s Group, New Members Welcome Coffee, 10:30 a.m. Call 1-866/213-9183.

Metropolitan Business & Professional Women, The Capital Grille, IJL Financial Center, 201 N. Tryon St.; 11:30 a.m.; members, $21; guests, $28; 866/851-9446; www.mbpw.org.

Charlotte/Mecklenburg Republican Women’s Club, Maggiano’s SouthPark, 11:30 a.m., members, $25; www.cmrwc.com for reservations, or call Dana Both, 704/621-9191.

Women In Insurance And Financial Services Carolinas, Carmel Country Club, 4735 Carmel Rd., luncheon. Call Margo, 803/322-8629, or e-mail mgoodman@parksouthgroup.com.

American Payroll Association, Charlotte Chapter, 12:302 p.m.; call Denise Bryant, 800/221-7573, ext. 6142; www.apacharlottenc.org. Cabarrus Newcomers & Friends Club, Max’s Ally in Concord, 10 a.m., optional lunch. Contact Carolyn Osborne, 704/792-9577. Carolinas’ Professional Saleswomen And Entrepreneurs, Marriott Executive Park, 5700 Westpark Drive, 11 a.m. networking, 11:30 a.m. meeting; members, $25 ; nonmembers, $30; walk-ins, $35. Call Ann Hodges, 704/7240326; www.CPSECharlotte.org.

Second & Fourth Saturday Of Each Month Saturday Morning Toastmasters, SouthPark Suites Hotel, 6300 Morrison Blvd., 8 a.m. Call Morris Lawing, 704/366-0846.

Third Saturday Of Each Month American Association Of University Women, Trinity Presbyterian Church, 3115 Providence Rd., 10 a.m., 704/596-3482. No summer meetings.

Fourth Saturday Of Each Month Dining For Women, Charlotte Chapter. World Alliance for Families and Children, 4835 S. Tryon St. Contact Saba K. Washington, jesapro@hotmail.com. The Girl Friends Inc., locations vary, noon, members only. Call Victoria Carter, 704/258-3420. The National Association Of Negro Business And Professional Women’s Clubs Inc., Charlotte Club., Pleasant Hill Baptist Church, 517 Baldwin Ave., 3 p.m., members only. Call Dr. Carlether Burwell, 704/455-7205, or visit www.nanbpwc.org.

Sundays First Sunday Of Each Month

Charlotte Artists Society, Queens Gallery, 1212 The Plaza, 7 p.m., guests welcome. Call Chuck Calhoun, 704/847-2111; www.charlotteartistssociety.org.

A LOTT Of Sista Love, all women welcome. Locations vary, visit www.alottofsistalove.org or e-mail communication@alottofsistalove.

Charlotte Business And Professional Women, Hotel Charlotte, Sharon Amity Rd., 6 p.m. dinner/program, 704/517-2357 or 704/545-3717.

Third Sunday Of Each Month

Charlotte Newcomers Club, locations vary, lunch, speaker, 11 a.m., 704/543-8330. Sisters Network, for black women with breast cancer, Presbyterian Buddy Kemp Caring House, 242 Colonial Ave., 6:30 p.m., 704/384-5223.

Black Political Caucus, Memorial Presbyterian Church, 2600 Beatties Ford Rd., 7 p.m.; www.bpccharlotte.com.

BeInTouch To be considered for inclusion in The Meeting Place, or to update a listing, send details to editor@todayscharlottewoman.com.

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T o m o r r o w ’ s G I R L S

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Leslie Anne McGill Prize-Winning Goat Farmer

 C h a r l o t t e W O M E N

L E A D I N G

T H E

W o m a n

WAY

Got Goats? BY KARSEN PRICE • PHOTO BY JAMES BROWN

W

hile many of her peers are heading to the mall or frenetically sending text messages, 16-year-old Leslie Anne McGill can be found on her family’s 30-acre farm,happily caring for her 40 South African Boer show goats. The goats have names like Rooster and Angel,and when Leslie opens the pasture gate, they come trotting up with friendly shakes of their heads,ever mindful of who feeds them. Currently, she has three tiny baby goats to bottle-feed,and the two-week-old infants nestle against her legs and beg shamelessly for another bottle. Leslie,a Clover High School junior, is president of her 4-H club — the “Just Kiddin’ Around Goat Club”in York County — and secretary of her school’s Future Farmers of America.She has been raising goats since she was in elementary school. The project began when her family moved to her grandparents’ homestead,just outside Clover,S.C.Leslie’s father,Les,wanted the full “farm”experience,and so,for her 6th birthday he introduced two pygmy goats — Molly and Billy Goat — to the farm. “Eventually, the barn was full of pygmy goats, and there was a name for every one of them,”Leslie says.“I thought it was the greatest thing to have goats — and still do.” Before long, it became apparent that Leslie had a way with animals.At the age of 9,she decided to take this talent to the show pen.She began showing South

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African Boer goats, which are known for their white bodies, dark-red heads, and horns on both males and females. Leslie has since garnered numerous awards. Judges determine her skill at exhibiting the goats,which includes “setting up”(achieving the proper stance with your animal), and displaying sportsmanship and mental confidence. She also enters market classes,in which her goats are judged on their structural correctness, muscle tone,volume and capacity,style and balance, and growth potential. At the York County Livestock Show in September 2008, Leslie won a First Place award in showmanship,and a Second Place award in market. She has earned many other high markings in area shows,including last fall’s South Carolina State Fair in Columbia,where she and her goats came in second in showmanship, and fifth in market. But Leslie’s love of animals is more than just a hobby; it has put her on the path of her chosen career of educating others in agriculture and animal science.Her biggest honor to date came last summer, when she was selected to attend the South Carolina Commissioner’s School for Agriculture at Clemson University. Anne McGill loves the fact that her daughter already knows what she wants to do in life,and she attests that caring for animals has made Leslie extremely responsible. Leslie just shrugs her shoulders and smiles. “Some girls like to go to the mall,”she says simply.“I like to take care of these goats.” TCW


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April 2009  

Today's Charlotte Woman April 2009 Issue

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