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Sometimes, you just need to get outside and play. BEACH VOLLEYBALL This winter, you no longer have to jump on a plane to put your feet in the sand. With indoor beach volleyball taking over Niagara courts, your winter getaway just got much closer to home. Offering multiple adult co-ed leagues and divisions, Not So Pro Niagara Sports League has become the easily accessible route for adults of every skill level looking to balance exercise with their busy lives. Having recently expanded their indoor facility to house multiple beach and court volleyball games simultaneously – while boasting another five outdoor courts for the summer months – NSP is bringing summer to you all year round. “It’s fun to kick off your shoes and enjoy the sand – not a lot of people can do that year round especially in the winter,” said John Morrison, Founder and President of Not So Pro. “As far as the sport goes, there is nothing like hitting a few volleyballs and releasing some stress with a team.” With no membership fee or commitment required, players are able to move between divisions, nights of the week and sports with ease while accommodating hectic schedules simultaneously. “If you’re busier in the summer you can leave and come back in the fall,” said Morrison. “We are very flexible to individual’s wants and needs.” Though NSP encourages players to register as a team, individuals are welcome to sign-up and play one of the multiple nights a week tailored towards single players. “With individuals, it’s usually people who come here from a different place, they’re moving from Montreal and they don’t have any friends or they have been transferred here for work, and this is their opportunity to meet people,” said Morrison. “It’s not simply about coming out and playing a game; it’s also about getting out and hanging out with some people that you may not have an opportunity to hang with during the day time cause you’re working.” With big expansions on the horizon, NSP will continue to expand on their Beach Box clubhouse and offer a licensed lounge area where teams can kick back before and after the game to watch sports and hang out. “We really want to get back to the social,” said Morrison. “We want teams to come around before the games and stick around after their games, hang out, get to know each other, watch the Superbowl and some hockey and enjoy a place where they can hangout.” Not interested in volleyball? NSP as well offers soccer, ultimate Frisbee, softball, dodgeball and basketball both seasonally and year round and is looking to expand from grass soccer to beach soccer in the near future. “Having all of these different sports and everyone under one roof makes it very exciting and gives people the opportunity to meet new people,” said Morrison. For more information and costs, visit notsopro.com.

FIELD SPORTS Sometimes, you just need to get outside and play. Grass under your feet, sun on your face, air in your lungs – it can take years off your life and bring you back to when you were a kid on the soccer field screaming and running like a mad man with your friends. Niagara Rec Sports, a coed adult sports league, offers adults the opportunity to lace up and enjoy some friendly competition post work. Whether you’re an individual looking to rekindle a love for an old high school sport and meet new people or looking to try something new with a group of friends, NRS has a sport to fill your craving. “I grew up playing soccer and as I grew up I ended up playing in various coed sports leagues; but I always thought the leagues were lacking,” said Vince Amato, founder and coordinator of NRS. “I started by offering soccer and the other sports came from people requesting them.” Today, NRS offers soccer, ultimate Frisbee, volleyball, dodgeball and softball with most available year round throughout Niagara. But more than just a sports league, NRS has become a social club targeted towards newcomers to Niagara looking to mingle and make friends with similar interests. “We have a lot of teams comprised of people who have registered individually,” said Amato. “And maybe 50 per cent of them stay together as a team going forward into future seasons. People tend to bond.” With the average age between 20 and 40, Amato says he purposely schedules games later in the evening to give the adults coming from work or those who have kids the opportunity to enroll and get active. “I really try to put the players first,” said Amato. “We schedule the games a little later, especially in the winter, to accommodate those who have to work during the day but still want to play sports in the evening. If something isn’t working and players aren’t liking what’s going on I am not afraid to make rule changes according to player feedback. It’s about having fun and being active.” Though the games are taken seriously, Amato said his league has evolved from being a competitive outlet to an outpost for fun physical activity. “It’s not about winning or losing, it’s about getting out, getting active, meeting new people and not sitting on the couch,” said Amato. “People call up and they may be new to the community or want to get their spouse involved in a sport they love – they’re all just looking for something to do and to get involved and get active regardless if they’re good or not. You’re still out and running around and being active while doing your thing.” TM For more information on costs and registering as a team or an individual, check out niagararecsports.com/.

Profile for TodayMagazine

Business - Winter 2015  

Business - Winter 2015