Page 1

Sustainability Report 2010

Thinking Ahead – Moving Forward


Table of Contents

02

About This Report

04

1 Foreword

06

2 Company

08

2.1 General Company Presentation 2.1.1 About Hellmann 2.1.2 Products 2.1.3 Organization Structure 2.1.4 Leading Principles 2.1.5 Awards

09 09 10 10 11 12

2.2

13

Corporate DNA

3 Economic Sustainability

14

3.1

15

Continuous Improvement Process (CIP)

4 Ecological Sustainability

16

4.1 Environmental Policy

17

4.2 Environmental Management System According to ISO 14001:2005 4.2.1 Organization of the Environmental Management System 4.2.2 Environmental Aims 4.2.3 Environmental Considerations

19 20 20 20

4.3 Environmental Performance Evaluation 4.3.1 Fleet 4.3.2 Regional and Intercity Traffic

22 22 23


4.3.3 Rail Solutions 4.3.4 Cargo Handling and Loading Methods 4.3.5 Business Trips 4.3.6 Procurement 4.3.7 Facilities 4.3.8 Water and Waste Water 4.3.9 Resource and Waste Management 4.3.10 Nature-Oriented Outdoor Facilities 4.3.11 Emissions Development 4.3.12 Compensation Measures for the Reduction of CO2 Emissions

24 25 26 27 27 28 29 29 30 31

5

32

Social Sustainability

5.1 Personnel Management 5.1.1 Ratio of Women in Leading Positions 5.1.2 Scope of Corporate Social Contributions 5.1.3 Social Counseling 5.1.4 Career, Family, and Specific Measures 5.1.5 Health Protection

33 34 35 35 36 36

5. 2 Personnel Development 5.2.1 Principles of our Cooperation 5.2.2 Our Way of Communicating 5.2.3 Alignment with the Corporate DNA 5.2.3.1 “First, People First” 5.2.3.2 „Making It Work Better, Everyday“ 5.2.3.3 Talent Management

39 39 39 40 40 41 42

5.3 Corporate Social Responsibility – School Sponsorships 5.3.1 Insect Hotel for the “Naschwald” in Pye 5.3.2 Rain, Rain, Rain...

45 45 46

5.4. Corporate Social Responsibility – Cooperation with Universities and Institutions 47 5.4.1 Project “Energy Efficiency in Low-Carbon Industrial Parks” with the University of Oldenburg 47 5.5 Corporate Social Responsibility 5.5.1 Christmas Drive for the “Children’s House at Alten Dreisch” in Bielefeld 5.5.2 Aid for the Earthquake Victims in Chile

48 48 49

6

50

HPM Expands Environmental Management

7 GRI-Index

52

03


About This Report

04


The 2010 Sustainability Report, informs you about the implementation of our Corporate DNA as a model for sustainability at Hellmann Worldwide Logistics. This release is based on the guidelines of the “Global Reporting Initiative.” Currently, the results presented relate only to the German offices of our company. We also intend to include information about our locations in Miami, Lichfield, and Hong Kong, in the near future, as these sites have also been ISO 14001 certified. The report deals with the overall concept of sustainability, specifically in the areas of environmental and social responsibility. We have published a separate annual report dealing with economic sustainability, which includes all Hellmann locations worldwide. In the environmental section, we primarily take a look at the environmentally relevant issues for Hellmann, with a focus on the impact of energy and land usage, particularly in regard to transport-related emissions. The section also covers activities and methods with which we can contribute to improving the current environmental situation. Our social policy highlights our social responsibility towards our employees, particularly the aspects where we foster talents, expand our staff’s skills and knowledge, and seek to develop and implement measures to address demographic change. Only when we invest in our employees will we be able to permanently secure the future of our family business as well as to maintain our company’s success and its position as one of the top employers in our industry.

introduced according to a new performance model, with which it is possible to give more precise information on corporate emissions. This data was administered centrally and was retrieved from local data sources. This report is intended to inform interested groups, state bodies, and non-governmental organizations, as well as employees, clients, and suppliers. The 2010 Sustainability Report is available in German and English. In the interest of readability, the gender-specific employee titles have been dispensed with, and only the male forms will be used. However, both men and women are being referred to throughout. You are all more than welcome to join in on open and critical dialog with us regarding our activities in implementing sustainability measures. The next report for 2011 will appear in 2012. The paper used for this brochure is PEFC certified. PEFC documents and supports sustainable forest management, among other projects. The printer ink and varnishes used in this report are predominantly made from renewable resources and are biodegradable. This booklet was produced using resourcesaving and carbon neutral methods, compensating for all CO2 emitted in the process.

The delineation of subjects also encompasses the results of our continuous dialog with a selected group of stakeholders. In Chapter 4.3, Environmental Performance Evaluation, the environmental performance figures are

05


1 Foreword

06


2010 was an important year for Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, as we were able not only to maintain our position during the worldwide economic crisis, but also strengthen the foundation of our company through internal restructuring to support the future growth of our family business.

we now ship 400 containers per day via rail, we can make a special contribution to climate protection. We are convinced that with these measures, we will be able to fulfill our responsibility as a sustainable and environmentally responsible freight-forwarding company.

The principle,“think globally, act locally” has long defined our company’s operational activities, and in accordance with our Corporate DNA, forms our guiding principle for sustainable and environmental development. We are well aware that we thus assume a great responsibility towards our customers, the environment, and our employees, but we are also convinced that we can take on this responsibility through our continuous and economic success. We strive continuously to contribute to the improvement of the environment through our involvement in additional projects and collaborations. Therefore, we associate ourselves with those people and businesses that implement sustainable and environmentally sound processes and procedures not just because of state regulations, but rather due to their own convictions and sense of responsibility towards sustainability and the environment, and are willing to develop these aspects for the company. For us, sustainability means that we work to make a contribution to the conservation of natural resources wherever possible. Or in other words: We are prepared to take specific measures in our operational areas to prevent or reduce any resulting environmental pollution. In addition to these measures, we have formulated environmental objectives for all environmentally relevant areas; these objectives are significant for all Hellmann offices and are reviewed periodically.

We are confident that with the priority measures we implemented in 2010, to improve logistics, reduce transport emissions, further develop the successful use of Rail Solutions, and promote corporate environmental communication, we have once again contributed to the eventual realization of sustainable business practices. The demands of sustainable development and sustainable business will determine our actions in the future. We invite you to provide us with constructive criticism.

Jost Hellmann

Klaus Hellmann

With our internal restructuring and changes, the addition of new vehicles to our fleet, and the new expansion of the “Rail Solutions” concept, with which

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2 Company

08


2.1 General Company Presentation 2.1.1 About Hellmann

business and are the reason for past achievements, the foundation for future success, and the values which make Hellmann the right choice for you today.

Founded in 1871, our company started with one man, Carl Heinrich Hellmann, using a horse-drawn cart to deliver parcels in and around the town of Osnabrueck, Northern Germany. Four generations later, Carl’s great-grandchildren, Jost and Klaus, own and run a company with 9,228 employees and an active network in 157 countries. Today, we operate a truly global organization while remembering our humble beginnings: we continue to value every customer and understand that each project requires a unique solution. This powerful combination of an individual approach within an international framework ensures that we deliver top-quality customized logistics solutions, every time. We constantly strive to improve our service range in order to better satisfy our customers. Whether this manifests itself in the implementation of cuttingedge technology, an increase in the number of services we provide, or through the expansion of our network of branches and warehouses, we are always working to develop better, more efficient ways to do business.

Facts and Figures 2010 ƒƒ 9,228 Hellmann employees worldwide ƒƒ 2.65 billion EUR turnover ƒƒ 14 mio. shipments per year ƒƒ 55,733 daily shipments ƒƒ 211 Hellmann-offices in 48 countries ƒƒ Network: 16,500 employees in 443 offices in 157 countries

This dynamic mind-set is reflected in our motto “Thinking Ahead – Moving Forward” and demonstrates a tradition of innovation which is intrinsic to every part of the Hellmann company. Our adaptability has been and continues to be possible because of the quality of our people. We actively seek to hire capable and committed employees, and to create a working environment in which they can fully realize their potential while delivering results which guarantee our success and your satisfaction. Our transition from a one-man company to one of the world’s leading logistics providers is a result of all these factors. They are the cornerstones of our

09


2.1.2 Products Even a slight edge over the competition can make a great difference in today’s fiercely competitive market. This is why we offer our customers a comprehensive range of products and services, with which they, in turn, can maximize their business potential. We connect our global network of offices and warehouses with more than 5,000 trucks as well as cooperating with 50 shipping companies and 55 airlines. Our state-of-the-art IT and communications system ensures efficiency and transparency. ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

Air Freight Contract Logistics Custom Clearance e-Commerce Road Freight Sea Freight Sea-Air

Specialized tasks in the automotive, fashion, electronics, perishable logistics, and hospital logistics branches are

10

controlled by our modern IT systems. We have built strong partnerships within our global network and have cooperation agreements with 55 leading international airlines and 50 shipping companies. The employment of more than 5,000 trucks offers our customers reliable service and secure transportation of their goods. 2.1.3

Organizational Structure

As a family-run company, we are proud that the owners are still directly active at the top of our corporate management.


2.1.4

Leading Principles

The following leading sustainability principles form the basis for each location’s individual program: Leading Economic Principles Operative service provision ƒƒ Continuous improvement of processes (CIP) (“Making It Work Better, Everyday”) Quality ƒƒ Adherence to run-time commitment ƒƒ Achieving a placement within the System Alliance quality ranking < 15th place ƒƒ Continuous reduction of proportion of damage Customer satisfaction ƒƒ Increasing customer satisfaction / customer enthusiasm (”All About The Customers, Always“) Leading Ecological Principles Storage, transport and handling ƒƒ Improvement and new development of environmentally friendly logistics concepts ƒƒ Avoiding leakage of hazardous substances in order to protect employees and the environment Procurement (Administration) ƒƒ Centrally controlled purchasing, which respects environmental safety and conserving resources Procurement (conveying, handling and packaging methods) ƒƒ Innovative and environmentally friendly use of conveying, handling and packaging plants Fleet ƒƒ Reduction of pollution by Hellmann vehicles Repair shop / carwash ƒƒ Reduction in pollution by Hellmann repair shops Disposal (hazardous and nonhazardous waste) ƒƒ Reduction in pollution caused by waste Filling station ƒƒ Reduction in pollution caused by use of the filling station

Use of energy ƒƒ Reduction of energy requirement and the CO2 released Outdoor facilities ƒƒ Improvement of the appearance of the company and improvement of the microclimate through the planting of green areas Facility management, building and rebuilding measures ƒƒ Planning and implementation of environmentally friendly and environment saving building and rebuilding measures Leading Social Principles Place in the labour market ƒƒ Commitment to schools and third level institutions ƒƒ Achieving the status ”Employer of Choice“ Employee satisfaction ƒƒ Increasing employee satisfaction (”First, People First“) Employee education and training ƒƒ Encouragement and further development of our employees ƒƒ Increasing consciousness for sustainability in daily work Social responsibility ƒƒ Publicity work ƒƒ Improvement of the company image as a sustainable, responsible company Non consideration-bound aims Reporting ƒƒ Creation of an annual sustainability report

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2.1.5

Awards

Islands of Green in the Midst of Urban Areas: the Lower Saxony Environmental Competition Green facades and roofs, 2,000 shrubs, and 150 trees frame the company courtyard at Hellmann in Osnabrueck, helping to refute the image of a bleak and desolate forwarding center. The laying out of green areas on the company premises does not only serve to improve the company’s appearance, it is, above all, functional. Therefore, we chose not to design a confined business garden, but rather planted hedges, trees, and shrubs throughout the premises. The numerous plants serve to reduce the CO2 released by the company and bind respirable dust. For this concept, Hellmann was awarded the

12

special 2010 ecology prize “Greening Concept of Industrial Facilities” by the panel of the Lower Saxony Bingo Environmental Foundation. However, the concept of environmental protection is not the only reason for the complex plantation of the company premises; it is a well-known fact that the work atmosphere is much improved by greener work surroundings, and thus also contributes to our employees’ well-being. The extensive landscaping on the site also offers ideal habitats for animals: more than 30 types of birds, including goldfinches and redpolls, make their homes on the premises of Elbestrasse, along with the largest colony of sparrows in the city.


2.2

Corporate DNA

The fact that we are a family-run company is a great part of what makes us special, and we are very proud of this distinguishing factor. We are committed to all aspects of family throughout the entire company. We encourage all company members worldwide to build strong networks based on integration, understanding, and mutual cooperation. The owners are directly involved in the running of the company, as they will continue to be in the future. Every decision is weighed against criteria which are much further reaching than short-term results. We are securing the long-term development of Hellmann, so that the company may also represent an opportunity for future generations. First, People First Our people are the basis of our success. They directly affect the customers’ satisfaction and loyalty – and we understand that! Therefore, we create an attractive, stimulating, and challenging environment at Hellmann that supports and retains our employees. All About The Customers, Always We are constantly looking for ways to enhance our ability to add value to our services so that we can surpass our customers’ needs and expectations. We take great pride in being a customercentric organization, making sure that we have our customers in mind with every task we perform.

Making It Work Better, Everyday Through business processes and high quality standards, we continually increase our organizational agility and operational efficiency. We look for every opportunity to minimize costs through improved productivity and excellent vendor relations, in order not only to add to our bottom line, but also enhance our value proposition for our customers. Innovation And Entrepreneurship We foster creativity, innovation, and entrepreneurship in all areas and create an environment where it is acceptable to take risks. We encourage our people to think outside of the box and relentlessly promote service customization to adapt to the continually changing needs of our customers. Live Sustainability We are serious about providing services based on the principles of economic, ecological, and social sustainability to create new opportunities for future generations. Through these principles of sustainable development, we ensure the future of our familyowned business. You And Me Every day, “You And Me” take on new goals and challenges. “You And Me” stands for our commitment to one another, enlightening us in times when we really need each other’s support, inspiring us to lend a hand to others when necessary, and motivating us to work together. “You And Me”, relationships that last generations!

13


3 Economic Sustainability

14


3.1

Continuous Improvement Process (CIP)

The Continuous Improvement Process (CIP) forms the foundation of our economic activities, above all to ensure the quality of our services and attain stable customer loyalty and satisfaction. In addition, it generally applies to optimizing costs in order to provide a very strong economic basis for our logistics services. The CIP should not only improve the logistics processes, but rather must also increase employee motivation and satisfaction, which is also linked to optimizing customer relationships. Thus, it is a further objective of CIP to have open communication and discussions about the target agreements

in order to achieve common goals. Every single employee is not just a part of the value chain for the company and for customers, but also bears a high degree of shared responsibility for the target agreements of CIP. In order to optimally position CIP in the company, the Model Logistics Center was opened to give employees the opportunity to practice the concept of CIP.

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4 Ecological Sustainability

16


4.1 Environmental Policy Commitment to environmental protection and establishing the accompanying “responsibility for the future” as an independent company aim is a basic prerequisite for responsible company management today, apart from securing jobs and increasing productivity. In observing this responsibility, the management of Hellmann Worldwide Logistics chose to accord especially high attention to corporate environment protection, and to make provision for the tasks resulting from this decision within the corporate concept. The environmental policy of the company, which is expressed in the environmental guidelines, is based on the following operational axioms:

aningful innovations are constantly aspired to and implemented by way of continuous research and development. Avoiding and reducing waste is an absolute priority over recycling and dumping. The use of environmentally friendly and environment saving products and methods are both task and duty with respect to making an active, voluntary contribution to corporate environment protection. Our management commits itself to making the necessary tools available to ensure that specific measures in corporate environment protection are implemented and can be realized. It is a further aim to involve all employees in taking personal responsibility for the environment protection measures and to further educate them through internal and external training courses.

Action principle It is our objective to aspire to comprehensive and innovative means of environment protection, whereby the principle of continuous improvement in corporate environmental protection is given highest priority. The basis for this decision is the belief that environmental protection and profitability are not mutually exclusive, but are interdependent and coplement each other. We are committed to offering a service, which respects environment laws and regulations, whereby legal stipulations are viewed as minimum requirements. If necessary, customer expectations as well as miscellaneous other requirements, beyond the legal minimum, will be fulfilled. In observing environmental considerations, it is our concern to avoid any pollution arising from our various activities in advance, as far as possible. We at very least ensure that unavoidable pollution is reduced to an absolute minimum. Ecologically me-

The introduction and further development of corporate environmental protection require intensive and comprehensive communication between management, the executive board, the employees and the public. The executive board, the management, the Quality and Environment Protection Department as well as the ”Environment Protection“ groups are therefore keen on a dialog with all employees and interested public members. This occurs through making public any planned measures or measures already undertaken as well as through public events. External service providers and suppliers are specifically informed about our environment management ystem. An environment management system is being implemented, with which the corporate principle may be implemented as environmental policy, in order to realize the axioms anchored in the environment guidelines.

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The environment protection system was incorporated into the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quality management due to the special significance of the tasks and measures at hand, within the field of corporate environment protection, and the meaning of environment protection for the entire company. The conception and introduction of an environment protection system according to DIN ISO 14001 ensures that environmental considerations will be respected throughout all corporate areas. General questions from public interest groups are answered online or through the press departments in the various countries.

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4.2 Environmental Management according to ISO 14001:2005

System

The greater the guarantee of cooperation and dedication of all involved in the system, the more success the environmental management system will have. This is true for the management as well as for the Head of the Quality and Environmental Department, Environment Officers, members of the environmental workgroups and of course all other employees. The implementation of our environmental policy is carried out in the respective branches by way of integrated management systems, which are based on internationally recognized standards, especially on the standards: ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ ƒƒ

ISO 9001:2008 ISO 14001:2005 VDA 6 Part 2 HACCP-Codex Alimentarius

These standards contribute to adjusting and implementing the various requirements within the areas of quality, environment, work safety and health, whereby the cooperation of the following responsible personnel is necessary in individual cases. Head of Quality and Environmental Management

Environmental Protection Workgroups Workgroups have been brought into being in all Hellmann branches. These groups determine the branchspecific environmental objectives, together with the local management, and oversee their implementation. Involvement of all Employees The implementation of the management systems can only be a success if all employees are involved in the system, and are prepared to work responsibly on this task. This requires regular communication, requirement-based training and a corporate suggestion body, which accepts, evaluates and, where appropriate, implements incoming suggestions. The effectiveness of the management systems is regularly evaluated through internal audits, the results of which are communicated to the executive board. A strong tendency towards measurability of the sustainability performance also facilitates the evalua-tion of the management system through the executive board. The management systems are checked by an external certification body annually, in order to evaluate the system itself and also the responsibility of the highest management levels.

In cooperation with the Waste Officer within the company, the Head of Quality and Environmental Management steers and monitors all management systems according to international standards and reports directly to the managing partners. All documentation is IT-supported. An external advisor for environmental questions is available, where necessary, to the management, the Head of Quality and Environmental Management as well as to the workgroups within the individual branches.

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4.2.1 Organization of the Environmental Management System The following environmental management account gives an overview of the company-specific structures, tasks and responsibilities. 4.2.2 Environmental Aims

for avoiding pollution are taken in advance, thanks to continuous improvement processes. For this, all environmentally relevant company processes are recorded, questioned, and evaluated according to their potential to pollute air, water, soil, or cause noise pollution. This gave rise to the following environmentally relevant services or work processes, as the case may be, which warrant special monitoring:

4.2.3 Environmental Considerations

ƒƒ Storage, transport and handling ƒƒ Procurement (conveying, handling and packaging methods) ƒƒ Fleet ƒƒ Repair shop ƒƒ Disposal ƒƒ Filling station ƒƒ Use of energy ƒƒ Outdoor facilities ƒƒ Facilities, building and rebuilding measures

Hellmann actively carries out environmental protection and is committed to avoiding pollution and to conserving natural resources. Suitable measures

The impact of work processes and services in the areas of air, water, soil, and noise is of special consideration.

The environmental objectives of the individual branches and locations are based on the leading principles, demonstrated in chapter 2.6. Detailed environmental objectives and programs, individually adjusted to the respective business situation and infrastructure are developed and implemented by the ”environment“ workgroups in agreement with the location managers.

Management    

Define goals and strategy Layout of a comprehensive documentation Increase awareness via communication & education ISO 14001 certification   

Production    

Alternative traffic concepts (Rail) Optimal utilization of traffic Continuous improvement processes Digitalization of workflows (paperless company)

Requirements for Functional area

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 

 

Digitalization of workflows – paperless company Adherence to regulatory & other requirements Vermeidung von Dienstreisen

Reduction of energy consumption / Conservation of ressources Greenhouse gas reduction Handling of waste (avoidance, separation, recycling, removal)

Infrastructure 

Use of renewable energies Rooftop cultivation Highly energy efficient equipment

Procurement 

Procurement of eco-friendly products and materials

Sales  

Raise client awareness for „green“ logistics Develop and market „green“ logistic products

Fleet   

Fleet management system Drivers‘ training Fleet modernization


Air Consideration

(Waste) Water

Soil

Noise

Resources

Normal Incident / Normal Incident / Normal Incident / Normal Incident / Normal Incident / Operation Accident Operation Accident Operation Accident Operation Accident Operation Accident

Storage, transport and handling

+

Procurement (Administration)

Procurement (conveying, handling and packaging methods)

Fleet

+

+/++ – +/++ – +/++

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+/++ – +/++ – +/++

+/++ +/++

Repair shop

– +/++

+

+/++ – +/++

+

+

+

+

Disposal

– +/++

+

+/++ – +/++

+

+

Filling station

+

+/++

+

+/++ – +/++ –

Use of energy

– +/++ +/++

Outdoor facilities

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

Facilities, building and rebuilding measurements

+

+

+/++ +/++

– no impact + low impact ++ high impact (Source: environmental management system)

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Fleet consumption trucks 4.3 Environmental Performance Evaluation 4.3.1 Fleet Our goal in assessing the fleet is to use concrete objectives and target agreements to reduce transportrelated emissions to a minimum. With the use of modern telematics systems, we receive detailed evaluations and analyses of our fuel consumption. This information is incorporated into our fleet management system and determines performance-based measures, such as training in a particularly fuel-efficient and low-emission driving technique. Through the target reduction and restructuring of our fleet, we have now achieved our quota of over 85 % Euro V vehicles. It is possible to further reduce emissions arising from transport by using the newest vehicle types – such as the MAN TGX, optimizing driving resistance, using lubricants from renewable raw materials, and using smooth-running tires. The implementation of double-deck loading, for lightweight and bulky items, also helps decrease the volume of individual transports. Due to unforeseen circumstances, our 2010 consumption per 100 kilometers was back in the region of the 2008 values. However, it is our goal to implement appropriate measures for the fleet to improve these values. The statistics also include all shunting vehicles, which negatively influence the average consumption for the entire fleet. With the introduction of the new “Total Fleet System” concept by Bridgestone, we have found an optimal solution for our truck tires, which not only saves costs, but also makes a substantial contribution towards reducing emissions. An analysis of the test series revealed that on average, we require 3%

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lessDriving fuel than before. performance [km]

Average consumption [l/100 km] Total

2008

2009

2010

11,554,168 10,934,079 10,533,521 34.16

32.06

34.26

3,947,093 3,505,094 3,608,560

* Due to a ruling by the Swedish government, the export of BT from Sweden was closed

Fleet development trucks

2008

2009

2010

Euro I

0

0

0

Euro II

0

1

0

Euro III

28

5

4

Euro IV

22

13

11

Euro V

58

66

62

Total

108

85

77

Fleet CO2 emissions

2008

2009

2010

Diesel TTW (t CO2)*

10,657

9,464

9,743

Diesel WTW) (t CO2)**

11,447

10,165

10,465

* Conversion factor TTW (Tank to Wheel): kg CO2/liter diesel (source: ISO 16258 [Draft]): 2.7 ** Conversion factor WTW (Well to Wheel): kg CO2/liter diesel (source: ISO 16258 [Draft]): 2.9


4.3.2 Regional and Intercity Traffic It is our particular aspiration not only to build longterm relationships with our customers, but also our suppliers. This especially includes the subcontractors who are responsible for pre-carriage, main-carriage and post-carriage. We place great value on mutual trust and long-term partnerships in choosing our subcontractors. Furthermore, we integrate these firms as much as possible into our corporate environmental management system; by providing our subcontractors with training and information on the handling of dangerous goods, we place them on equal footing with our employees.

from year to year, and thus it is possible to conclude that an emissions reduction has been achieved.

Fleet truck subcontractors

2008

2009

2010

not rated

5

8

8

Euro I

4

2

0

Euro II

88

51

17

Euro III

319

293

247

Euro IV

174

191

256

Euro V

80

98

152

Total

670

643

680

However, there is difficulty in determining the exact emissions of the subcontractorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; vehicles, as we have no access to their accurate emission-related data, such as the amount of fuel and oil expended. On the other hand, we can very accurately depict the composition of the subcontractor fleet. We are able to discern that the subcontractor fleet has improved

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4.3.3 Rail Solutions The shipment of goods via rail continues to be one of our especially sustainable and low-emissions methods of transport. Hellmann has had its own train systems since 2004, which connect the Northern German locations in Hamburg, Bremen, Hanover, and Osnabrueck with the economic centers in the south.

the following comparison between CO2 emissions produced by 232 trailer-trucks and 464 Swap units which can be transported via Rail Solutions. The comparison is based on figures generated by the EcoTransIT calculation tool, which calculates and compares the emissions of the trains and the trucks. The resulting comparative figures are shown in the table below. In calculating the figures, we adopted the average parameters of the EcoTransIT calculation model, although the degree of utilization and empty-run percentage is often far better. In order to obtain more detailed figures, we will be conducting a project in June 2011 with students at the University of Heilbronn. Of course, this is only one of the special features and advantages that arise from the use of Rail Solutions. A further advantage is to relieve the highways of the extra burden of 232 trucks which could hypothetically be transported via rail: Each truck is an average of 18.75 meters long and requires a minimum safety distance of 50 meters. Thus, a total road usage length of 68.75 meters can be calculated for each truck. With 232 trucks occupying a total of 15.95 kilometers of road space, this solution would relieve the highways of a substantial amount of road traffic.

Apart from the groupage units for the south, we also load swap-bodies from Osnabrueck and Lehrte for a major client in the automobile industry, who consciously chose this environmentally friendly mode of transport. Late loading times and early allocation times mean that this train system, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rail Solutionsâ&#x20AC;?, leads the way in loading transports from the road to the rail. We were able to consolidate our Rail Solutions activities in the year 2010, so that we now transport over 400 units daily via environmentally friendly rail. To further illustrate the situation, we have provided

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Rail Solutions over truck transportation

CO2emission

232 Trucks daily = 464 Bridge 134.48 t Rail daily = 464 Bridge

32.74 t

Daily

101.74 t

Working days

CO2emission total (t)

250

33,620 t

250

8,185 t

annually 25,435 t


4.3.4 Cargo Handling and Loading Methods More efficient handling and conveying methods, along with sophisticated and IT-supported concepts, are required in order to meet our customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; growing demands, and especially to reduce the handling times in loading consignments. In 2009, we decommissioned the underfloor conveyors in Osnabrueck and Lehrte, near Hanover, as part of the continuous development and improvement of our handling processes, and replaced them with more flexible and efficient electric forklifts. After a year of testing, we can now declare the concept successful from both an environmental and economic perspective. We also completed the replacement process of exchanging all gas forklifts with more modern electric lifts.

Handling and loading methods

2008

2009

2010

Forklift (diesel)

6

6

7

Forklift (electr.)

91

121

136

Forklift (gas)

62

57

35

Stacker (semi-electr.)

33

35

21

Reach truck

22

24

25

Forked pallet truck electro

91

85

64

Total

305

328

288

CO2-emissions handling and loading methods

2008

2009

2010

Consumption propane gas (kg)

429,015 406,287 286,045

3

841,206

796,641 560,873

26,676

2,252

1,793

CO2-emission propane gas (t CO2) 2

1,602

1,517

1,068

CO2-emission diesel TTW (t CO2)

1

72.0

6.1

4.8

CO2-emission diesel WTW (t CO2)

1

77.4

6.5

5.2

1,674

1,523

1,073

Consumption propane gas (l) Consumption diesel (l)

CO2-emission total (t CO2)

Conversion factor: 1 diesel TTW: 2,7 kg CO2/l, diesel WTW: 2,9 kg CO2/l 2 Propane gas 1,904 kg CO2/l 3 Density Propane gas 0,51 kg/l

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4.3.5 Business Trips It is an undeniable fact that successful and long-term customer relationships strongly depend on personal contact with customers and suppliers. Especially in times of crisis, as we have so recently experienced, it is necessary to maintain and strengthen contact with customers. Our own travel center regularly creates a compilation of business trips which provides us with an overview of the number and distance of the respective trips. Although the emissions appraisal can only be based on average values, it certainly allows us to identify trends; for example, a shift in transport activities is clearly recognizable through this evaluation. Company Cars We record the number of vehicles and the respective fuel consumption of our company cars, which are deducted according to our company car policy. Nowadays, it goes without saying that all of our company cars are low-emission vehicles. Rail Travel Whenever possible, business travel is planned via train. Ecologically speaking, rail travel is much more environmentally friendly when compared to a single person driving a company car. Flights Flights are avoided as much as possible, as aircrafts have the highest individual environmental burden of any mode of transport.

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Business Trips

2008

2009

2010

Rail (km)

647.486 528.430 499.225

National air travel (km)

914.140 373.310 774.122

European air travel (km)

1.645.934 697.017

International air travel (km)

4.422.022 1.750.307 4.285.783

Total (km)

7.629.582 3.349.064 6.659.231

Passenger car diesel (l)

658.438 630.622 525.224

Passenger car petrol (l)

63.352

54.494

67.137

Total (l)

721.790

685.116

592.361

2008

2009

2010

64.7

52.8

49.9

265

108

224

362

153

242

CO2-emission business travel Rail (t CO2)

1

National air travel (t CO2) 1 European air travel (t CO2)

1

International air travel (t CO2)

1

1.100.101

663

263

643

2

1,778

1,703

1,418

Passenger car diesel WTW (t CO2) 2

Passenger car diesel TTW (t CO2)

1,909

1,829

1,523

Passenger car petrol TTW (t CO2)

2

152

131

161

Passenger car petrol WTW (t CO2)

2

177

153

188

5,195

2,558

2,870

Total (t CO2) WTW

Conversion factor: 1 Rail: 0,10 kg CO2/km, Flights national: 0,29 kg CO2/km, European air travel: 0,22 kg CO2/km, National air travel: 0,15 kg CO2/km 2 diesel TTW: 2,7 kg CO2/l, diesel WTW: 2,9 kg CO2/l, Passenger car petrol TTW: 2,4 kg CO2/l, Passenger car petrol WTW: 2,8 kg CO2/l


4.3.6 Procurement Environmentally-oriented materials procurement is central to our environmental management system. Essentially, it is not only about the most economical procurement, but is above all about conserving resources and environmentally friendly purchasing. For this reason, a procurement office was established, which pinpoints market sources for environmentally friendly and inexpensive goods and makes these available to our employees. Procurement includes all materials, objects, and machines, insofar as they are necessary for the rendering of services. The reduction of waste and the procurement of products from recycled materials, presented here as examples, are focal points in the area of office materials. 4.3.7

Facilities

The consumption of gas, heating oil, and electricity is the focus of our environmental management system, not merely due to public debate on CO2 emissions and respirable dust, but rather with regard to the cost development of the various energy sources. Thus, the conscious handling of natural resources is not only one of the greatest and most important tasks of our generation, but also a great responsibility for companies and every individual. The entire climate control system for both the heating and cooling of our headquarters in Osnabrueck (Speicher III) is provided through geothermal energy.

Energy Management In order to reduce our energy consumption, we began a Germany-wide energy management system in 2009, which has already had an influence on the development of consumption. The objective of the system is to utilize individual analysis of the respective

consumption locations in order to identify applicable measures which will allow us to achieve the highest possible level of energy efficiency. This survey is supported by EDP and is updated regularly. Of course, changes in business operations can result in fluctuations in consumption, which must be taken into consideration. Measures such as the exchange of light bulbs, the installation of automatic thermostats for heaters, and the programming of an energy saving mode for office appliances can all have an effect.

Procurement of paper

2008

2009

2010

Photocopying paper (sheet)

15,415,220 14,740,000 15,184,500

Continuous paper (sheet)

4,971,900

Envelopes (pieces) Total Energy - consumption

4,679,300 3,419,474

868,472 712,649

861,411

21,255,592 20,131,949 19,465,385 2008

2009

2010

Electricity (kWh)

11,989,758 11,881,798 12,668,366

Natural gas (kWh)

8,627,812 8,642,910 8,490,674

Heating oil (l)

267,540

211,890

241,324

Liquified gas (l)

8,529

12,630

19,273

CO2-emission

2008

2009

2010

Electricity (t CO2)

6,187

6,131

6,537

Natural gas (t CO2)

1,855

1,858

1,825

Heating oil (t CO2)

701

555

652

Liquified gas (t CO2)

14.0

20.7

30.8

Total (t CO2)

8,757

8,565

9,045

Conversion factor: Electricity = 0,516 kg CO2/ kWh Natural gas = 0,215 kg CO2/ kWh Heating oil = 2,7 kg CO2/ l Liquefied gas = 1,6 kg CO2/ l

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4.3.8 Water and Waste Water The conservative and sustainable management of water resources, as a key environmental protection measure, is not only important for our company, but also for every single individual. The waste water amounts mentioned in the table are compiled from the respective amounts of fresh water used, which is simultaneously the basis for calculating the amount of waste water. Added to this is the municipal water works’ calculation of the precipitation which flows to the sewer from the roofs and concrete surfaces. The fresh water is always sourced from local wells available for public water provision. In addition, our green roofs allow us to achieve more than 50% water retention, which then reduces the amount of waste water to be eliminated through the normal sewage system.

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Water/Waste water

2008

2009

2010

Fresh water (m³)

23,620

23,672

23,153

Waste water (m³)

23,316

23,358

22,839

Surface water* (m³) Total (m³)

305,001 334,183 333,303 351,937

381,213 379,295

*The surface water is computed from the drainage surface on which 800 liters of annual rainfall are estimated per m2.


4.3.9 Resource and Waste Management The organization, supervision, and control of the entire resource and waste management is in the hands of the corporate Waste Officer. Waste removal is carried out according to the corporate waste concept, which stipulates the prevention of excess waste, or greatest possible recycling of waste into the resource cycle. Due to the economic upturn, the volume of waste has risen slightly.

mately 8,500 m2 in Hanover/Lehrte, and 100 m2 with an additional 500 m2 planned for further greening in Hamburg. Even though the implementation of green roofs does not always receive a positive consensus from the various planning institutions and investment calculation models, we are convinced that it is the right move for our firm. In the continuation of our greening efforts, a large number of trees will be planted this year, as well as a several hundred meter long hedge.

4.3.10 Nature-Oriented Outdoor Facilities In order to make the outdoor facilities of the company environmentally friendly and nature-oriented, the Environmental Working Group at Hellmann planned various measures which were executed by specialists as well as Hellmann employees. Although the transformation is much more difficult in older buildings than in new buildings, the measures that have already been implemented have shown great success, not only as a move towards more environmentally friendly surroundings, but they also contribute to the improvement of working conditions on site. Quite a bit of the outer wall space on many of our buildings has now been taken over by climbing plants. Of particular note is the greening process of the building walls through direct and indirect activities, such as the planting of wild vines and ivy, as well as installing twining supports for various climbing plants. Shrubs and trees also adorn the marginal strips of the various buildings. As part of our Environmental Management System, we aim not only to save energy for heating and air conditioning through the planting of our roofs, but to also use these measures to slow down the rainwater evaporation process, consequently reducing summer smog. We have covered a total of approximately 7,000 m2 of roofing area with plants in Osnabrueck (IG West, Hafenstrasse and Elbestrasse), approxi-

Residual waste and resource ratio

2008

2009

2010

Residual waste ratio (%)

19.3

18.9

18.7

Resource ratio (%)

71.1

74.1

72.7

Residual waste and amount of total waste

2008

2009

2010

Total waste per employee (kg/EE)

923.9

830.1

981.9

Residual waste per employee (kg/EE)

178.5

157.0

183.1

External facilities

2008

2009

2010

Covered area (m²)

159,285

169,019

169,019

Sealed area (m²)

261,835 288,579 288,579

Green space (m²)

155,442

169,083

169,083

Green roof (m²)

16,921

16,921

18,021

Ecological paving (m²)

22,948

22,948

22,948

Wetlands (m²)

9,000

9,000

9,000

Drainage surface (m²)*

381,251

417,729

416,629

Total area (m²)

602,210 649,375 649,375

*The drainage surface is calculated from the buildings and sealed areas minus the green roofs and the ecological paving stones.

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4.3.11 Emissions Development Although the total emissions in 2010 increased by 1.743 tons, or about 8% compared to 2009, they were lower than the pre-crisis figures in 2008 by almost 2.6%. Several aspects of this increase must be considered: the increases in building emissions, which amounted to 5.6% compared to 2009, also include the power required for our new electric forklifts. However, through changes and adjustments in the warehouse, emissions could be reduced by 450 tons, or about 29% in relation to 2009. Due to the economic upturn, we experienced an increase in business travel of almost 20% compared to 2009. With the actual emissions increase of 8%, it appears as though we have not achieved any reductions, however, the total value of 2010 emissions is 12.6% lower than in 2008. The continuous improve-

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ment process as a whole is of the utmost importance.

Total CO2 emission

2008

2009

2010

Buildings (t CO2)

8,778

8,582

9,045

Vehicles truck (t CO2)

11,447

10,165

10,465

Loading equipment (t CO2)

1,674

1,523

1,073

Business travel (t CO2)

5,195

2,558

2,870

Total (t CO2)

27,094

22,828

23,453

Note: From 2007 CO increase due to site expansion and business trips (air and rail), from 2008 additional CO2 increase through the omitting of bio diesel and the introduction of business trips with company vehicles. 2


4.3.12 Compensation Measures for the Reduction of CO2 Emissions It is our professed goal to contribute as best as we can to reducing CO2 emissions arising from transportation. The first step towards achieving this aim is the optimization of transport and consignment processes, in order to keep the emissions per consignment as low as possible. As some amount of emission is unavoidable, we are constantly searching for ways to compensate for the necessary emissions. Climate (CO2) Neutral Transport – A Contribution to Environmental Protection It is now clear that global climate change is due to the steady increase in greenhouse gas emissions. Although we have already implemented various internal administrative policies to reduce CO2, significant efforts are still needed in order to achieve our goal of “climate-neutral” transports.

Climate-neutral transport is not just an individual commitment to climate protection, but also a public awareness message, one which demonstrates a responsible approach to the environment. Since December 1, 2010, Hellmann transportation for Kreidezeit Naturfarben GmbH has been CO2-neutral. With this accomplishment, Kreidezeit Naturfarben has ensured the full environmental sustainability of its products, including the supply chain, and together with Hellmann Worldwide Logistics, provides a significant contribution to climate protection. The compensation payments for climate-neutrality are supplied by the non-profit foundation “my climate,“ which has established itself as a leading partner for compensation solutions through high-quality climate protection projects since 2002. The decisive factors for “my climate“ are the compliance with UN requirements under the Kyoto Protocol, as well as the alignment as a charitable non-profit foundation.

It is our goal, in collaboration with our clients, to find a way to offset incurred emissions by saving the same amount elsewhere. It makes no difference where the compensatory measures are implemented, as the adverse environmental effects know no national borders. Climate-neutral transport means that we first analyze all CO2 emissions which we incur during the transportation of all shipments entrusted to us. In order to perform a precise analysis, the energy required by handling and administration should also be included in the calculations. By taking all relevant parameters into account, we will have a comprehensively and responsibly calculated result. The calculated amount of CO2 can be offset through the acquisition of CO2 allowances from certified climate protection projects. Our partner “myclimate“ will also issue an individual certificate in recognition of the total number of shipments we transport in a climate-neutral fashion.

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5 Social Sustainability

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5.1

Personnel Management

True to the motto of “First, People First“ in our Corporate DNA, the Executive Board decided against lay-offs in early 2009, despite the economic crisis and the resulting decline in business with a sharp drop in prices in the market. Nevertheless, in order to adjust to the decreased workload, they opted to implement reduced working hours, and through collective sacrifice, secure jobs for the benefit of the individual. In other measures, temporary contracts were not renewed, or only extended for the shortterm, and employees leaving the company were not replaced. The executives, who did not fall under the model of “short-time“ work, took voluntary pay cuts for the good of the community. The 2009 decision not to downsize was reconfirmed as the right solution in 2010. The number of orders rose by a double-digit percentage, and consequently, the amount of work in general. Because so few employees had left the company, the existing staff was able to handle the increasing order volume, which meant that we could avoid the expensive investments that arise with hiring and training new employees, especially in the first half of the year. As a result of gaining new customers at nearly all German Hellmann locations, the workforce has increased after the slight decline in 2009, and is back to the levels of 2008 with a total of 3,552 employees. In particular, the increased demand for staff in 2010 could be filled through the taking on of almost all trainees as full-time employees. This confirmed our retention of typical trainee numbers during the economic crisis as sustainable human resources planning. The part-time employment of mothers on maternity leave or their return after the parental leave was also able to cover a portion of the increased staffing requirements. As an added benefit, the proportion of women at Hellmann increased overall, particularly in part-time employment.

In the future, we will continue to remain true to the motto “First, People First” by supporting our colleagues and working to do our best to retain jobs, even in times of economic hardship. Sustainable investment in our employees is a matter of course for a service company such as ours. A positive picture emerges when reviewing the turnover of employees in Germany. It should be noted, that in comparison to 2009, staff has increased by 4.73%, and only few employees have left the company (3,381 EE in 2009 compared to 3,552 EE in 2010).

Employees in Germany

2008

2009

2010

Technical staff

945

930

1,026

Commercial staff

1,622

1,584

1,637

Trainees

305

308

303

Capacity based

675

559

586

Total

3,547

3,381

3,552

2008

2009

2010

Women full-time

482

463

487

Part-time staff total

895

786

819

Women part-time

349

350

571

Foreign staff

254

214

239

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5.1.1 Ratio of Women in Leading Positions Recent years have seen a major increase in the number of women in leadership positions at Hellmann, and in 2009, women filled 16.02% of the top posts. There are currently 267 managers in Germany, of which 35 are women. As a result of restructuring and parental leave policies, we currently have women in 13.1% of all leadership positions, which is still a very

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good quotient in the logistics field. With the current efforts to improve conditions for mothers to return to work, the rate will surely increase. Contact with the mothers is maintained during maternity leave and, when necessary and practical, a faster return is made possible, such as with part-time positions (see graph Employee Numbers).


5.1.2 Scope of Corporate Social Contributions Corporate contributions for social purposes are (many and) varied and can not be dealt with in detail here. Apart from Christmas pay, company retirement provisions as well as graded anniversary bonuses, there is a number of other supports such as an attendance bonus for all employees as well as a holiday fund. This fund offers employees a special interest rate on the amount paid in. 5.1.3 Social Counseling The introduction of independent social counselors in Hamburg, Osnabrueck, and Bielefeld proved successful in 2010. Two specially trained advisors are available for our employees, and they also train managers in dealing with employee issues. They have already conducted numerous counseling sessions with staff, managers, and function-owners, the contents of which are not only related to professional issues and problems, but also include issues from employees‘ private lives, such as partnerships, legal separation, education, debt, caring for relatives, and more. The counselors also handled requests for assistance with psychological and psychosomatic problems, particularly anxiety, depression, exhaustion, and burnout tendencies. In addition, intermittent lectures such as, “Assistance in the Care of Relatives,“ “How Do I Manage it All? - Dealing with Stress,“ and “Occupational Social Work - What is It?“ were offered, and were well-received by many employees. There are plans in the works to offer stress management seminars for all staff, as well as training in health-oriented leadership for managers.

Sickness rate

2009

2010

Industrial staff

5.11 %*

5.82 %

Commercial staff

3.04 %*

2.72 %

Total

3.81 %

4.01 %

* according to Loga

Trainees

industrial. commercial

Total

Maintal

7

1

8

Bielefeld

6

3

9

Bremen

18

14

32

Crivitz

2

1

3

Duesseldorf

12

12

ELC Munich

1

4

5

Hamburg

29

8

37

Hanover

1

1

Kelsterbach

4

4

Krostitz

2

2

Lehrte

16

14

30

Munich

3

3

Neunkirchen

3

3

Nuremberg

3

3

Osnabrueck

73

43

116

Osterweddingen

2

1

3

Polch

5

6

11

Ruesselsheim

2

2

Stuttgart

4

4

Wittlich

7

6

13

PCO

2

2

Total

200

103

303

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5.1.4 Career, Family, and Specific Measures The award of the “Beruf und Familie” (Career and Family) certificate led to further measures in 2010 to sustainably encourage the combining of career and family, such as active health management, more flexible work times, information events during maternity / paternity leave, and the improvement of workplace conditions. 4th Annual Autumn Breakfast As part of the program “Career and Family”, the now traditional “Autumn Breakfast” was held for the 4th time. This event offers expectant mothers and employees on parental leave the opportunity to exchange tips and stories on the joys and frustrations of parenting, as well as the chance to learn what is new at Hellmann, especially in terms of the compatibility of family and career. Daycare was organized for the older children (one year and up), while the youngest spent the event with Mom / Dad or sleeping calmly in their strollers. Anja Staschinski (HR Osnabrueck), who reported last year on the efforts of Hellmann towards building a company nursery in collaboration with other Osnabrueck firms, provided the participants this year with a project update. The project “Krippe – Die kleinen Friedensreiter” (Nursery – the Little Riders for Peace) was nearing

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completion, but unforeseen complications once again delayed the launch of the nursery. However, it is likely that the project will be realized in the near future. Further topics at the Autumn Breakfast were the introduction of the Model Logistics Center (MLC) and the CIP concept at Hellmann, which are becoming increasingly important subjects for all Hellmann staff. The Autumn Breakfast has become a regular event, and the participants enjoy it so much that Hellmann continues to host the event. It helps to facilitate contact between the Hellmann employees on maternity / paternity leave and their colleagues, as well as the company. 5.1.5 Health Protection The health management system at Hellmann has grown in importance in recent years. There are health circles in all of the larger branches, which work together with the personnel departments on subjects pertaining to all aspects of employees’ physical well-being. Several information sessions were also offered, which discussed the topics of, “Dealing with Stress – How Do I Manage it All?” and “Coping with Stress at Work and the Fundamentals of Health-Oriented Management“ (in collaboration with the HR department). The events were conducted as workshops for the 200 participating employees, or about 12% of the total workforce in Germany.


Healthy and Relaxed at Work… Headquarters in Osnabrueck hosted a two-day health event in 2010 under the slogan “Healthy and Relaxed at Work”. BKK Firmus, a German health insurance company, partnered with Hellmann to offer their expertise for the event. Our employees had the opportunity to be examined head to toe, and to participate in discussions with expert personnel on the topic of occupational health. Each employee also had the option to undergo a voluntary health check-up, which measured health indicators such as blood pressure, blood glucose, and cholesterol levels. A large number of employees happily took advantage of the opportunity. One especially popular display was the CardioScan, offered by the Bahama Sports gym. With a cardio function analysis, cardiovascular diseases can be detected early, and it can also provide a calculation of stress levels of the heart, using various indicators. The event also answered questions about eye health; an experienced orthoptist was on hand to provide helpful tips about how to prevent tired and strained eyes in the course

of daily work. Employees also attended a workshop which taught various eye relaxation techniques, as well as methods of acupressure and muscle training, all of which can be easily performed at work. In addition, the orthoptist visited individual employees at their workplace to provide tips about an ergonomic environment for working at a computer, such as correct posture. The workshop on muscle relaxation, offered by our social counselor Inga Mählmann, was a great addition to the program, and instructed participants on how to relax the muscles through the Jacobson method. During the workshop, participants learned how to relax their whole bodies by consciously tensing and relaxing specific muscle groups. This enhances total well-being and offers an escape from everyday stress. Overall, the special health services offered at the 2010 health day were a smashing success, and helped to improve on-site working conditions as a whole.

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Proper Methods of Lifting and Carrying In recent years, the Hamburg office and the University of Hamburg â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Department of Human Movement and Exercise Sciences have worked together to successfully implement a project for the improvement of back safety while carrying and lifting items in the warehouse. This year, the spinal health of the commercial staff was the focal point. The event offered employees the opportunity to have the condition of their backs assessed. Using a measurement instrument known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Medi-Mouseâ&#x20AC;?, an image of the spine was scanned in different postures, which measured the shape of the spine, flexibility, and posture. The results were transmitted to a software program, which could then provide information about the individual characteristics of the spine. A muscle function test (Janda) was performed to obtain further information about the muscles that pertain to posture and the spine. For this purpose, the strength of individual muscles (back, hip flexors and extensors, abdominal, and shoulder) are measured through specific exercises, and are then rated by muscular performance. Afterwards, all measurement results are summarized for the participants, providing an individual analysis of the back muscles and spine functionality. Suggestions provided in the evaluation of test results give each individual the opportunity to quickly take action to improve any shortcomings. The anonymously compiled results of the spinal measurements clearly illustrate that the issue of spinal health in the workplace is of great importance. Simple, yet effective exercises and the proper design of the workspace can quickly help make great improvements. The Hamburg office is now in discussion with the staff of the University of Hamburg about further measures that can be taken.

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5. 2

Personnel Development

5.2.1 Principles of Our Cooperation Every single member of the large Hellmann F.A.M.I.L.Y. contributes to ensuring the sustainable and long-term success of our company through his or her individual performance. In return for their personal dedication, Hellmann commits itself to providing our employees with challenging, fulfilling tasks and working conditions, performance-related personal (career) development, as well as appropriate remuneration. Of course, we also provide our employees with the support, guidance, and leadership they require in order to maximize their potential. All of our employees are committed to using the principles of our Corporate DNA as the basis for all of their professional decisions and activities. 5.2.2 Our Way of Communicating

Communication, whether written or spoken, crucially shapes the development of a corporate brand. Thus, all employees are ambassadors for our company through their deeds and actions. Therefore, it is necessary that all staff members present a positive image of Hellmann, and that each employee incorporates what Hellmann represents into their everyday professional lives. In todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business world, information is primarily communicated via email and telephone, or through presentations in internal and external meetings. At Hellmann, we continuously look for ways to communicate reliably and to improve our communication process. The way we communicate is essential to how the company is perceived in the market. It is our goal not only to maintain open communication with each other, but also with our customers, suppliers, and business partners, based upon agreed guidelines and behavioral patterns.

The most effective way to live our Corporate DNA and to fulfill our brand promise is to first understand the philosophies to which our firm is dedicated, and then to communicate and act accordingly in everything that we say and do.

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5.2.3 Alignment with the Corporate DNA 5.2.3.1 “First, People First“ Personnel development at Hellmann is based on the principles of the Hellmann Corporate DNA, which is deeply embedded into the corporate culture. personnel development plays an especially important role in the corporate motto of “First, People First.” Through the systematic and goal-oriented diversification of employees’ qualifications and skills, personnel development contributes to their satisfaction, loyalty to the company, and productivity. In addition, personnel development hopes to impress and delight the existing and potential customers of Hellmann with the steadily increasing qualifications standards of Hellmann employees. Personnel development at Hellmann means lifelong learning on a yearly basis, with the following aspects at the core of developmental measures:

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First, a personal skill assessment is conducted during the yearly performance reviews. Personnel development is grounded in function-based competency models for commercial and industrial workers, truck drivers, and specifically for the sales representatives and commercial and industrial executives. Personal Development Plan: A profile of the individual’s strengths and weaknesses is created from the yearly performance review, which is derived from the comparison of the requirement profile with the respective functional development goals. These goals are included in the goal agreements for each current calendar year.


5.2.3.2 „Making It Work Better, Everyday“ The Model Logistics Center (MLC) enables Continuous Improvement Processes (CIP) In March 2010, the new Model Logistics Center was opened on-site at Hellmann Osnabrueck. The MLC offers a two-day training course for the Continuous Improvement Process (CIP), an important compulsive training process for all employees in Germany. Continuous Improvement Processes (CIP) are essential for business development, and must be repeatedly demonstrated and internalized. CIP in the logistics industry is characterized by a variety of interlocking and interacting operational and IT-based processes, whose optimized interplay creates corresponding added value for the customer and the company. CIP relies on the creativity of each employee to recognize and eliminate wasteful and unnecessary activities in the workplace. With the assistance of Porsche Consulting, Hellmann launched and implemented CIP projects in the handling warehouses of its three largest branches. We also used this opportunity to train our own CIP Managers, and since mid-2010, Hellmann CIP has operated without external support.

The goal of the training is that participants improve the logistical processes so much during the various phases of the simulation, that after the last round, the defined processes have been optimized and the principles of CIP have been fulfilled. By the end of 2010, 500 employees had been trained in the MLC. By the end of 2011, 1,200 employees will have undergone training. With every new employee who experiences the twoday training in the Model Logistics Center, we are able to implement various improvements to the company even faster and more effectively, which also benefits our customers.

CIP projects

Hamburg Osnabrueck

Lehrte

Workshops

7

20

16

Coachings

4

6

Moderation

20

Users

40

113

85

The implementation of the CIP concept is part of a training course in the Model Logistic Center, which was developed by a four-member task force in collaboration with Porsche Consulting. The training is for Hellmann staff at all levels and age groups. At the heart of this training is a four-level simulation, which gives participants the chance to experience the principles of the CIP. The employees actively learn about the different types of wasteful processes, such as unsynchronized processes or wait and search times. It is the task of each participant to minimize and eliminate wasteful processes, and they should see a gradual decrease during each round.

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5.2.3.3 Talent Management „Everything is possible – you just have to be motivated and do your best!“ Every year, the new trainees are welcomed to Hellmann with this slogan. With this, we aim to inform new employees from the very beginning about the opportunity to create their own development plan and developmental perspective through their initiative within the Hellmann F.A.M.I.L.Y., once they have completed their training. Important drivers for personal development are personal initiative and the assumption of responsibility, as well as the willingness to embrace change. Before the end of the training period, Hellmann has a “discussion about the future“ with each trainee, in which the individual‘s personal goals are aligned with the opportunities and needs of the company. The Personal Development Plan (PDP) is continuously developed, supplemented, and adapted, and forms the foundation for on-the-job personnel development.

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A talent management program for prospective managers in the commercial sector is held nearly every year, and is aimed at employees who have completed their vocational training, or who have a degree and several years of professional experience at Hellmann. Hellmann Talent… ...comprises top performers at all levels of the organization, who also have the potential to assume tasks and positions with greater responsibility, to which they contribute their creativity and actively drive change. These talented employees show a high level of commitment, initiative, self-reflection, and self-confidence. They stand out from the rest with their willingness and ability to learn, enthusiastic and motivating personalities, and their clear commitment to our values and Corporate DNA. The program is conducted through several seminars and a six-month practical phase, and provides all the basic tools to prepare the “talents“ for their new role as a manager. In addition, experienced managers


are also available as mentors to provide advice and support during the development of the employees. At the moment, our mentor pool consists of 46 executives, with 27 currently acting as mentors supporting a trainee. The following graph illustrates the progression of talent development.

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Application Process Anyone wishing to apply for participation in the program must fulfill the defined criteria. The qualified applicant then receives an application package, which requires a cover letter detailing their present professional ambitions and outlining their future desired position, as well as a letter of recommendation from their current manager. This is followed by an interview with the Personnel Development staff in order to personally apply for the program. Evaluation at the Assessment Center is the final step in the application process. If the applicant successfully navigates this challenge, he will be granted a place in the management training program. The ninemonth training consists of various modules with seminars in the areas of people- and process-oriented

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management. Afterwards, the six-month practical training period begins, in which the, â&#x20AC;&#x153;talentâ&#x20AC;&#x153; works independently on a project or topic. The mentor plays a very important role during this phase, providing the mentee with advice and support. The individual project results are then presented and evaluated at the official closing ceremony of each program year.


5.3

Corporate Social Responsibility – School Sponsorships

For over eight years, we have maintained close cooperation and collaboration with various schools in the Osnabrueck region. The objective of this cooperation is to give students the opportunity to have contact with a commercial enterprise and to provide insight into the business world, in addition to what the students learn in school. The implementation of educational measures is first and foremost based on the needs of the schools‘ curricula. However, there is also spontaneous involvement on the part of the students, who have the opportunity to participate in special environmental projects with Hellmann. The projects are always conducted in close cooperation with the teachers of participating schools. 5.3.1 Insect Hotel for the “Naschwald” With the 2010 addition of the so-called „insect hotel,“ the 8th grade students of class H2 continued their expansion of the project which began three years ago. With help from Hellmann, the Thomas Morus School was able to establish a “Naschwald“ in 2007, which is a small grove filled with berry bushes and fruit-bearing trees. To facilitate more in-depth project understanding, the creation of the Naschwald is further explained here. After an intensive preparation and planning phase, the Naschwald was finally realized through the assistance of numerous volunteers and contributors. This innovative environmental project is located in the Pye district of Osnabrueck. The Naschwald plants, which include over 100 large trees and around 1,500 shrubs, were largely financed by the Hellmann Environmental Fund. What makes this project so special is that the care and management of the Naschwald relates to numerous subjects, and provides interdisciplinary acti-

vities which can be implemented as part of a “green classroom“. Any maintenance work, including the harvesting and use of the fruit, is undertaken each year by the Thomas Morus School 8th graders. All of the fruit harvesting and processing is done by the Home Economics class, which they then use to make fruit juice and preserves. The home-made products are then sold at the Thomas Morus Thanksgiving Market as well as in the Home Economics classes. All proceeds are either used for further investment in the Naschwald or other social projects. With the establishment and sustainable utilization concept of the Naschwald, a “green oasis“ was constructed in an unused industrial area in a form which, according to our research, had not previously existed.

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5.3.2 Rain, Rain, Rain... Berge Primary and Secondary School Students at the State Garden Show in Bad Essen The three school groups from our partner school in Berge were almost unrecognizable as they huddled under their umbrellas and raincoats at the State Garden Show in Bad Essen. The students were there to participate in an environmental training program at the invitation of Hellmann Worldwide Logistics. The classes were greeted by Professor Gerhard Lohmeier, the creator and overall coordinator of the environmental project at the State Garden Show. He led the school groups to Brine Park and Castle Ippenburg, where specially designed “environmental islands“ provided the opportunity to experience and perform environmental activities. Separating salt from the briny water was a special attraction for the children, especially as Bad Essen has the briniest salt water in the world. The tests performed by the students revealed that 120 ml of brine contains about 27 grams of salt. Not even the

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Dead Sea has such a high level of salinity! Due to the heavy rain, it was not possible for the children to conduct the experiments in the “salt marsh“, a specially designed area in Brine Park. Instead, the students stayed warm and dry in the “Flower Hall“, where they could conduct the experiments at the former community swimming pool. At Castle Ippenburg, the exploration environment moved deep into the “Glacial Valley of the Water Landscape,“ where several artists displayed their artwork. All of these works of art have water-related themes, and at times, displayed an even deeper connection to human behavior. Overall, the visit to Brine Park and the “environmental islands“ at the State Garden Show provided the students with many new insights and experiences which they would not have encountered during the normal school day.


5.4. Corporate Social Responsibility – Cooperation with Universities and Institutions

Project “Resource Efficiency” with the Wuppertal Institute for Environment, Climate, and Energy

5.4.1 Project “Energy Efficiency in Low-Carbon Industrial Parks” with the University of Oldenburg

We also have quite a long history of collaboration with the Wuppertal Institute for Environment, Climate, and Energy, and we are currently participating in a “Resource Efficiency” project, which we hope will provide new information on reducing energy, material, and water consumption. The project initiators are convinced of the project‘s importance: “Resource efficiency will become the focus of societal attention, economic processes, and scientific research, with one simple goal: make more from less. Only with this goal in mind will we be able to avoid irrevocable damage to our natural resources. The appropriate implementation of policies will depend upon the industry, branch, product, or production stage. For example, firms could implement technological improvements, use a better product design, develop concepts for the reduction of waste, or take resource efficiency into account during the selection of raw materials.”

For years, we have worked in close cooperation with numerous universities and colleges. We benefit from better access to new information and research, but our cooperation also provides students with the chance to gain an overview of a modern and efficient company. Since 2010, we have worked together with the University of Oldenburg on the topic “Energy Efficiency in Low-Carbon Industrial Parks“. With this particularly interesting project, we hope to gain valuable information that can be used for potential new locations of distribution facilities. We have also been working with the University of Oldenburg on a project called “IT for Green: Energy and Resource Management with BUIS 2.0”, also dubbed the Innovation Network Ertemis, which aims to find a new way to publish sustainability reports.

The implementation of any project findings will certainly result in positive and environmentally relevant changes for our company.

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5.5

Corporate Social Responsibility

The company has a long-standing tradition of involvement in the social sector. We often provide spontaneous relief efforts for those in need, especially in cases of floods or earthquakes. Our endeavors are often supported and supplemented by volunteer projects implemented by our employees. A few examples of these social efforts are presented below. 5.5.1 Christmas Drive for the “Children’s House at Alten Dreisch” in Bielefeld With their holiday charity efforts, our colleagues in Bielefeld reminded us all of the true Christmas spirit. Through her daughter‘s daycare group, one of our Hellmann employees learned about a special Christmas Drive, which was being organized by the “Children‘s House at Alten Dreisch“ in Bielefeld, operated by the Society for Social Work (GfS). The children were asked to consider their possessions and to decide whether they had a toy or other item which they would like to give to someone less fortunate.

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The collected donations were then to be given to the GfS panel in Bielefeld. Inspired by the idea of making the holidays a little brighter for those in need, our colleague promoted the Christmas Drive within all Hellmann Germany branches. The response was overwhelming. After the flood of donations had been organized by Natalie Hentrich, Nicole Main, and their fellow colleagues, they had received a total of over 80 packages. The generosity of our employees meant that they could deliver four Euro pallets full of donations to the Bielefeld panel. Combined with the 30 packages from the Children‘s House, the efforts of our colleagues surely provided many families with very happy holidays. The spirit of Christmas lives on. With this, and other volunteer activities implemented by our employees each year, our colleagues provide an exemplary model for social responsibility.


5.5.2 Aid for the Earthquake Victims in Chile Our colleagues abroad also provide aid and support

for those in need, such as the victims of the Chile earthquake. We received the following report from our office in Lima:

The Chile earthquake, which occurred off the coast of the Maule Region of Chile on February 27, 2010 at 3:34 AM, rated a magnitude of 8.8 on the Richter Scale and lasted 180 seconds. It was strongly felt in 80% of the country. The earthquake triggered a tsunami, which devastated several coastal towns in southcentral Chile and crippled the port of Talcahuano. According to the press, tsunami warnings were issued in 53 countries. The earthquake was so powerful that it moved the city of Concepción 3.04 m and the capital city of Santiago 24 cm to the west. By Sunday night, we had already received the good news that all of our staff and families had survived. In the following days, our emergency team followed the disaster plan and ensured that all installations and systems were operational, as well as established temporary offices and operations where necessary. On the humanitarian side we kept regular contact with our staff in Concepción as well as our customers throughout the region and organized aid shipments to whoever was in need. We shipped goods such as: water, rice, noodles, canned food of all kind, chocolate, batteries and flashlights, just to name a few. After all, that´s what we do for living: Logistics! Even though life goes on, this natural disaster has left many scars and footprints and no doubt will be remembered and also visible in many years to come. We restarted to provide logistics to many customers, who are rebuilding and repairing their installations, stocks and plants. However, many companies are still regrouping, assessing damages and working with the insurance adjusters as well as Government offices in order to restart their business. A rebound of business is expected sometime early in 2011. We have received an outpour of wishes and requests about our well-being and we have received several generous donations to aid the personal losses. The total sum of all donations was matched by Hellmann Chile as well as by the Hellmann Regional Latam office and even though we were unable to cover all un-covered personal damages by 100%, the donations made a real great impact. On behalf of the entire Hellmann Chile team and especially the individuals, who physically received your personal support – once again thanks a million! It is great to actually see the walk of the talk and to truly experience F.A.M.I.L.Y!

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6 HPM Expands Environ- mental Management

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The increasing scarcity of natural resources, an everthinning ozone layer, and the global occurrence of violent natural disasters has brought worldwide attention to the topic of sustainability, both in political and social circles. This is reflected in the daily activities of Hellmann Process Management (HPM), along with the three main elements of sustainability: environmental, economic, and social responsibility. As an environmental service provider, the central focus is on bridging the gap in the product cycle to make our services fully sustainable and recyclable, in order to make a lasting contribution to climate protection and conserving resources. Environmental management is not only about providing a service to the customers, but also raising the awareness of the employees. The goal is to actively involve all HPM staff in credibly conveying an enduring sense of responsibility to fellow colleagues, both internally and externally, which will help motivate employees to assume ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGER duties, both at work and at home. With this connection in mind, an Environmental Management System (EMS) was set up and has already been established in most areas. An environmental team is composed of representatives from all departments, and is entrusted with the task of sustainably expanding on the progress already made with the EMS. The team also strives to meet the current international ISO 14001 standards, so that the EMS will be able to begin its next steps as an officially certified operation in 2011. HPM also had a successful year in terms of sustainability in the area of services. In collaboration with our long-standing customers, such as Bosch, Philips, and Hilti, we were able to recycle important secondary raw materials back into the material life cycle. HPM has also launched new projects in collaboration with some of our partners: for example, the international parcel and express service DPD was able to establish a Germany-wide waste management system, which provided both economic and environmental savings,

under HPM’s leadership. This new waste management system reduced the waste disposal costs of all DPD depots by more than 35%. Increased automation of the in-house process and logistic chains has improved the waste management processes even further. Through the reduction of material-flow waste in the secondary raw materials division and the resulting increase in recycling, DPD has reduced emissions to the environment by more than 550 tons of CO2 per year. In this respect, DPD employees were steadily integrated into the process optimization and made aware of environmentally-conscious behavior, as their support and cooperation is crucial for the successful establishment of a long-term sustainability concept. This economic and ecological optimization was acclaimed in Paris with the „La Poste Quality Award 2010“ in the category of Project Management. Plans are now in the works for the further development and establishment of the HPM-service throughout Europe. For HPM, environmental management means creating and providing fundamentally safe, economic, and individual solutions on issues such as WEEE/ ElektroG, BattG, VerpackV, RoHS, REACh, material flow management, and facility waste management. HPM supports its clients throughout the organizational, financial, and legal implementation of their product stewardship. Individual specialists are onhand to provide their expertise for the responsible and sustainable implementation of environmental regulations and government guidelines, special waste management requests, or the optimization of material flows.

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7 GRI-Index

1

Strategy and Analysis

1.1 1.2

Declaration from highest responsible position Most important effects / risks / opportunities

1 4.2.3 / 1

2 Organization Profile 2.1 Name of organization 2.2 Brands, products and services 2.3 Organizational structure 2.4 Organization headquarters 2.5 Business countries 2.6 Ownership structure 2.7 Markets 2.8 Company size 2.9 Changes in size, structure or ownership 2.10 Prizes (Awards)

2.1, www.hellmann.net 2.1.2 2.1.3 2.1, www.hellmann.net www.hellmann.net 2.1, www.hellmann.net 2.1.2 2.1.1 See business report 2.1.5

3 Report Parameters 3.1 Report time frame “About this report“ 3.2 Publication of the last report “About this report“ 3.3 Report cycle “About this report“ 3.4 Contacts See back page 3.5 Process in determining report content “About this report“ 3.6 Report boundaries “About this report“ 3.7 Restrictions in scope of report “About this report“ 3.8 Joint ventures, subsidiaries and outsourcing 6. 3.9 Data collection “About this report“ 3.10 New portrayal of information from old reports “About this report“ 3.11 Changes in the scope, the report boundaries or measuring methods “About this report“ 3.12 GRI-index 7. 3.13 Confirmation by external third party Omitted 4 Governance, Duties and Dedication 4.1 Leadership structure of organization 2.1.3, www.hellmann.net 4.2 Information regarding whether the chairperson is also the manager 2.1.1 4.3 Independent members of the highest leadership body Has been omitted due to company being family-run 4.4 Mechanisms for recommendations from shareholders and employees, for Executive Board Part of the CIP philosophy, see 3.1 4.5 Connecting Executive Board remuneration to the company performance No specification 4.6 Mechanisms for avoiding conflicts of interest in the Executive Board No specification 4.7 Qualification of the Executive Board members in sustainability questions No specification 4.8 Overall concepts, behavior code and principles 2.1.4 / 4.1 4.9 Executive Board procedure for monitoring sustainability performance 4.2

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4.10 Procedure for evaluating sustainability performance of the Executive Board 4.2 4.11 Prevention principle No specification 4.12 External agreements, principles or Initiatives No specification 4.13 Memberships No specification 4.14 Stakeholder groups No specification 4.15 Choosing the stakeholder groups No specification 4.16 Involvement of stakeholders No specification 4.17 Questions and reservations of stakeholders No specification 5 Economic Performance Indicators EC1 Immediately created and distributed economic value See separately published business report. EC2 Financial consequences of climate change No prognosis is presently possible regarding the consequences of climate change. Climatic influences have been recognized for a long time as having great consequences for the transport industry. Snow and ice can also have as grave consequences as floods or drouth. EC3 Scope of corporate social contributions 5.1.2 EC4 Important financial contributions from public bodies No specification EC5 Starting salaries in relation to local minimum wage No quantitative statement can be made. However, adherence to tarif regulations is taken for granted. EC6 Location-relevant choice of supplier 4.3.2 EC7 Location-relevant choice of employees 5.1 EC8 Infrastructure investment and services for the general good 5.5 ff EC9 Indirect economic consequences No specification 6 Ecological Performance Indicators EN1 Materials used Reference to fuel consumption in 4.3.1 EN2 Recycling material 4.3.6 / 4.3.9 EN3 Direct primary energy consumption 4.3.7 (Primary energy consumption only natural gas) EN4 Indirect primary energy consumption 4.3.4 / 4.3.5 / 4.3.6 / 4.3.7 EN5 Energy conservation Energy management and building measures Speicher III, 4.3.7 EN6 Initiatives for energy efficiency and renewable energies 4.3.1 / 4.3.7 EN7 Initiatives for reducing indirect energy consumption Energy management, 4.3.7 EN8 Total water usage 4.3.8 EN9 Consequences of water usage 4.3.8 EN10 Recovered and reused water No specification EN11 Sites in or near the border to protected areas None of our locations is located in a sensitive preservation area, which could be negatively influenced by our activities. EN12 EN12 Consequences on biodiversity No direct consequences, compare 5.3.1 EN13 Protected or recovered natural living spaces 4.3.10 EN14 Strategies for protecting biodiversity No specification EN15 Endangered species No specification EN16 Greenhouse gas emissions 4.3.1 / 4.3.3 / 4.3.4 / 4.3.5 / 4.3.7 Summary in 4.3.11 EN17 Other greenhouse gas emissions No specification EN18 Initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 4.3.1 / 4.3.3 / 4.3.4 / 4.3.5 / 4.3.7 Summary in 4.3.10 EN19 Emissions of ozone-reducing susbstances We refrain from the use of ozone damaging substances. EN20 Nox, Sox and other air emissions EN17 EN21 Waste water discharge 4.3.8 EN22 Waste according to type and disposal method 4.3.9

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EN23 Basic disposal Compare EN16, EN21, EN20 EN24 Hazardous waste according to Basel Convention No waste disposal has been carried out according to the Basel Convention in 2010. EN25 Consequences of waste water on biodiversity No waste water, which could negatively influence biodiversity, was discharged into protected areas in 2009. EN26 Initiatives for minimizing environmental effects Compare leading principles of sustainability under 2.1.4 EN27 Packaging material Does not apply EN28 Sanctions arising from environment breaches No specification EN29 Consequences of transport As the transport of goods is the core activity of this company, the full report functions as a statement on this aspect of the GRI. EN30 Environmental spending No specification 7

Social Performance Indicators: Work Practices and Human Employment (Management Approach)

LA1 Total staff according to type of employment, employment contract and region 5.1 ff LA2 Employee fluctuation Compare development in 5.1 LA3 Company benefits, which are granted only to employees with full contracts 5. 1.2 / 5.1.3 LA4 Percentage of employees under collective agreement Excepting the executive board and employees in leadership positions, all employees are part of collective agreements in terms of wage level contracts LA5 Notice period(s) for basic company changes Hellmann employees are always informed in a timely manner regarding changes to the conditions of their employment. Such information is communicated via notices, personal letters, and the environmentally friendly use of e-mail. LA6 Percentage of total staff represented in Safety Committee 100% of our employees are represented by accident prevention and insurance organizations LA7 Injuries, occupational illness, sick-leave and of work related deaths V Reference to sick-leave level, compare 5.1.3 LA8 Consulting and training on serious diseases 5.1.3 / 5.1.5 LA9 Work and safety agreements with unions All workplaces and activities conform to the relevant legal requirements LA10 Average annual number of hours per employee and employee category, in which the employee was given training or further training Trainings are not included LA11 Programs for lifelong learning 5.2 ff LA12 Employees, who receive regular evaluation and development plans 5.2.3.3 LA13 Composition of the leading organs and breakdown of employees itemized according to age, sex, ethnicity and other indicators for diversity No specification LA14 Relationship of basic wage for men to womens` basic wage, according to employee category No specification 8

Social Performance Indicators: Human Rights (Management Approach)

HR1 Percentage and total number of fundamental investment agreements, which contain human rights clauses or are being or have been 100%, as report boundaries laie within the German investigated according to human rights considerations. organization. HR2 Percentage of suppliers and sub-contractors, who are or have been Regular audits of our sub-contractors are carried out, investigated under human rights questions, and measures taken with regard to illegal employment. HR3 Training of human right No specification HR4 Total number of incidents regarding discriminationand resulting measures No specification HR5 Freedom of association and collective negotiations Freedom of association is a matter of course, which the workers councils, youth and apprenticeship representations prove. HR6 Child labor Not relevant in Germany HR7 Forced or compulsory labor Not relevant in Germany HR8 Percentage of security personnel, which has been trained in the regulations and procedure relating to human rights questions Not relevant in Germany

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HR9 Total number of incidents, in which the rights of natives have been infringed upon, and resulting measures Not relevant in Germany 9

Social Performance Indicators: Society (Management Approach)

SO1 The effects of business activities on society Compare environmental considerations 4.2.3 SO2 Analysis for risks related to corruption As an instrument of voluntary self-monitoring, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;internal Auditâ&#x20AC;&#x153; makes random checks of our worldwide business units. SO3 Training for anti-corruption policies & procedures This point is documented in our employee handbook, which is available in various languages and is distributed to all emplyees SO4 Measures taken in reaction to corruption cases No specification SO5 Political positions and lobbying No specification SO6 Total value of contributions to parties, politicians and organizations All manner of contributions toward political influence are connected therewith, listed according to country against our Code of Business Conduct SO7 Number and resulting measures of law suits that were filed due to anti-competitive agreements, caterlizations and monopolizations No specification SO8 Significant fines and number of non-monetary penalties due to breach of legal regulations No specification 10

Social Performance Indicators: Product Responsibility (Management Approach)

PR1 Consequences on health along the production life-cycle Does not apply PR2 Breach of health standards No specification PR3 Product information Does not apply PR4 Breach of standards for labelling product information Does not apply PR5 Customer satisfaction The satisfaction of our customers is assessed regularly within the framework of the ISO 9001, so that we may orient ourselves specifically on their statements. Many workshops with our customers also took place in several branches in 2009. In these workshops, our strengths and weaknesses were demonstrated honestly and through dialog, we were able to create and implement measures for continuous improvement. PR6 Marketing standards Marketing measures, which were carried out by Hellmann Worldwide Logistics are subject to the prevailing preception of convention and decency. We see ourselves as having the moral obligation to act socially and fairly. We pay great attention to honest, understandable and sustainable communication in our advertising. PR7 Violation of marketing standards No specification PR8 Violation of client data protection No specification

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Impress Editor: Hellmann Worldwide Logistics GmbH & Co. KG ElbestraĂ&#x;e 1 49090 Osnabrueck www.hellmann.net Further information: Tobias JĂźchter Quality & Environmental Management Tel. 0541 605-6410 Fax 0541 605-456410 E-Mail: tobias.juechter@de.hellmann.net Prof. Dr. Gerhard Lohmeier Environmental Counselor

Kirsten Willenborg Head of Marketing/PR

Sustainability Report 2010  

Hellmann Worldwide Logistics Sustainability Report 2010

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