Issuu on Google+

AUSTRALIAN

SEPTEMBE ER 2016 $8.99 NZ $9.99 INC GST

Build Arms Like These! Mark Wahlberg’s Muscle Blueprint

Yo

Ignite Her SEX Drive p102

C M TRIE ED & TASTED

Best Chicken Meals

Olympian Training Secrets REVEALED!


An Olympic medal is the ultimate sporting dream. A lifetime of dedication can be transformed into gold in less than a heartbeat. This summer in Rio, OMEGA’s team of timekeepers will measure the fractions of a second that determine the medal hopes of the world’s best athletes, including Chad Le Clos. We will be beside every pitch, pool and track to record their achievements as they aim to fulfill their dreams.


OMEGA Boutiques SYDNEY MLC Centre Tel. 02 8080 9696 • Westfield Bondi Junction Tel. 02 9369 4300 MELBOURNE Chadstone Tel. 03 9568 0612 • 179 Collins Street Tel. 03 9652 2800 • Crown Casino Tel. 03 9682 7800


The world’s thinnest laptop The New HP Spectre Laptop Reinvent Obsession

Available at Harvey Norman, JB Hi-Fi and hp.com.au/spectre Powered by the Intel® Core™ i7 processor.


A N I N S TA N T CLASSIC I W A N T T H AT H P


In This Issue 09.16 On the Cover p24 #1 WAY TO INSTANT CALM

Chill in seconds with this ommm-free trick.

p32 OLYMPIAN TRAINING SECRETS

The strength workout that’s made Rio-bound swimmer Cameron McEvoy a record-breaker.

p57 SPIKE YOUR METABOLISM Make fat-burning a gourmet affair.

p88 BUILD ARMS LIKE WAHLBERG’S Add the moves that supersized the action hero’s guns.

p102 IGNITE HER SEX DRIVE

Hint: it starts by realising her desires are a lot more radical than you might imagine.

28 new ways to cook up your top protein source, with finger-licking results.

p121 BOOST YOUR TESTOSTERONE Take our quiz on your favourite hormone – then send your T soaring.

p140 FLAT BELLY FAST: 28-DAY PLAN

Carve a fighter’s body with this lard-stripping circuit from boxing’s most in-demand trainer.

MH COVER GUY MARK WAHLBERG PHOTOGRAPHED BY ART STREIBER

6

SEPTEMBER 2016

COVER IMAGE: STYLING BY SAMANTHA MCMILLEN/THE WALL GROUP; GROOMING BY GEORGIE EISDELL/TOM FORD/THE WALL GROUP; PRODUCTION BY EMILY ROTH/PRODUCIT. JAMES PERSE T-SHIRT, 7 FOR ALL MANKIND JEANS, ROLEX WATCH

p107 BEST CHICKEN MEALS


In This Issue 09.16 Sections

p15

p19

p32

p65

p88

p135

ASK MH

USEFUL STUFF

PERSONAL BEST

MH LIFE

FEATURES

ELITE

Muscle

Nutrition

Style

p28 MUSCLE, FIFTIES STYLE

p20 THE TUNA TIGHTROPE

p74 AHEAD OF THE CURVE

Build brawn the old-school way with inspiration from Steve “Hercules” Reeves.

Why it pays to find alternatives to the cheap-and-convenient bodybuilding staple.

Formula 1 hotshot Daniel Ricciardo reveals his style secrets for fast-paced living.

p42 LIFT LIGHTER, GET HEAVIER

p22 SPICE UP YOUR MUSCLE FUEL

p76 ATHLETIC AESTHETIC

How backing off can have you feeling your old self again – and kickstart massive gains.

Bored with your post-workout shake? A mouthwatering taco comes to your aid.

The new breed of sportswear isn’t just for the gym.

p135 TOUGHER THAN THE REST

p94 ROCK & ROLL HEALTH CLUB

p80 DON’T BE SO SENSITIVE

Sevens rugby skipper Ed Jenkins on building a body that busts tackles and turns heads.

Live fast, don’t die young. And enjoy Elvis’s bacon-and-banana sanger while you do!

Post-shave burn should be a thing of the past. Here’s all you need for a smooth experience.

Health

Sex

Fitness

p38 SHOULD YOU SKIP BREKKIE?

p20 GET YOUR HANDS DIRTY

p138 FIX YOUR FUEL CRISIS

We weigh up the pros and cons of leaving home on empty. And deliver our verdict.

The four hottest things you can do with your mitts to send her wild.

Busting that training plateau could be as simple as tweaking your diet.

p52 TALKING PROSTATE CANCER

p22 THE ART OF THE QUICKIE

p146 READY FOR ANYTHING

Expert advice on pulling off the brief, passionate encounter.

Elite obstacle racer Jarad Kohlar on priming your body for the toughest challenges.

p48 TECH WITH BENEFITS

p149 JUMPSTART YOUR GAME

How to master sex in the digital age.

Adding plyometrics is your shortcut to game-changing lifts in performance.

Give the finger to ignorance. Here’s what you need to know to keep this killer at bay.

p126 THE EPIDEMIC It’s claiming more and more men in their prime. How to stare down suicide.

8

SEPTEMBER 2016


ALL-NEW JAGUAR F-PACE

DEDICATED TO PERFORMANCE

Welcome to Jaguar as you’ve never seen it before. Now you can enjoy the dramatic drive and beauty Jaguar is renowned for, with added practicality. Inspired by F-TYPE, its powerful, muscular looks give the All-New F-PACE a head-turning road presence. And it delivers the connected steering feel and sharp, responsive handling of a sports car too, thanks to its aluminium double wishbone front and Integral Link rear suspension. A master of sporting performance and everyday practicality, F-PACE raises the game. jaguar.com.au


Ed’s Letter

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Men's Health Magazine Australia

@MensHealthAU

@MensHealthAU

POWER UP YOUR MAG!

Rise & Shine

“Science confirms that the snooze button is indeed your enemy”

Your alarm clock jolts you awake. Do you catapult yourself out of bed fully energised, whistling and raring to conquer the world (or at least annex a couple of minor continents)? Neither do I. But I’ve learnt something in this job after reading interviews with hundreds of Men’s Health cover guys. The early birds not only catch the worm, they also seem to have an unfair monopoly on success, wealth and most of the accompanying good stuff. This month’s cover star Mark Wahlberg gets up at 4.10am – a wake-up time generally reserved for postmen or breakfast TV hosts. The Rock meanwhile is so evangelical about kick-starting his day at 4am – to get “the edge” on the competition – that he recently launched his own “motivational alarm-clock”. Hugh Jackman is yet another advocate of the crack-of-dawn workout, hitting the gym six days a week at the comparatively decadent time of 5.45am. A pattern is clearly emerging here. Conspicuously, it does not involve endless lie-ins that culminate in a leisurely browse through your Facebook news feed. As if this wasn’t confronting enough for hardened night owls, now science has waded in to confirm that the snooze button is indeed your enemy. After your alarm goes, snatching a few extra minutes of kip may feel like a good idea at the time. But a US study revealed that drifting back into low-quality sleep for short periods can actually impair your memory and make it tougher to get going in the morning. Clocking your seven-plus hours of beauty sleep is, of course, still a smart move for health, performance and safety. But emerging from your slumbers at an early hour seems to be where the money is. After all, if you’re going to seize the day, you need to have a decent run-up.

ACCESS EXCLUSIVE CONTENT WITH

Take the workouts, recipes, gear and tips from Men’s Health to the next level: keep them on your phone or tablet – for free!

viewa.com

O HOW IT WORKS Wherever you see the logo, simply scan the page to access extra interactive content

1

2

Download your free app from the App Store or Google Play Scan any page with the logo for bonus Men’s Health content

O SCAN THIS PAGE TO TRY Luke Benedictus

Twitter: @LukeBenedictus Email: menshealth@pacificmags.com.au

THE WORLD’S BIGGEST URBAN ADVENTURE RACE SERIES IS BACK. FIND OUT MORE AT MHSURVIVAL.COM.AU 10

SEPTEMBER 2016

GET SOME SERIOUS HELP TO STACK ON MUSCLE AND TORCH FAT WITH MH TRANSFORM. ON SALE ONLINE AT

SUBSCRIBETODAY.COM.AU/PRODUCTS/MHTRANS

Use the free app to scan this page and explore all bonus content from this issue


dior.com

W I L D AT H E A R T


MEN'S HEALTH SUBSCRIPTION OFFER

LUKE BENEDICTUS

Editor

HALF-PRICE

BEN JHOTY

Deputy Editor DAVID ASHFORD Creative Director

JASON SCULLIN

JASON LEE

Chief Sub-Editor

Deputy Art Director

AARON SCOTT

DANIEL WILLIAMS

JAY ABADY

Senior Writer

Associate Editor

Senior Designer

ESA RUOHONEN

DANIELLE JOHNSON

BRAY STONEHAM

Pre-Media Solutions

Picture Editor

Digital Content Producer

LIAM CURTIS

CAELIA CORSE

MELINDA AYRE

Editorial Coordinator (02) 9394 2321

Grooming Director

Grooming Editor

SALE was $ 1 0 7. 8 8

54

$

now

FOR 12 ISSUES ANN-MAREE MULDERS National Group Sales Director Health Brands (02) 9394 2289 NICOLA TIMM National Business Integration Manager (02) 9394 2212 BIANCA CLUNING Deputy National Business Integration Manager (02) 9394 2251 MIKE BARTLETT QLD Senior Account Manager (07) 3368 7486

JACKIE FRANK Publisher

ROBERT NOVICK Senior Vice-President

KATHY GLAVAS Marketing Director (02) 9394 2057

KEVIN LABONGE Executive Director, Business Development and Global Licensing

COURTENAY RAMAN Marketing Manager (02) 9394 2703 HANNAH DEVEREUX Director of Corporate Communications

JOHN VILLE Editorial Director & Director Content, Rights & Photography Operations

JOHN VIRM Production Manager

LAURA ONGARO Editorial Director, Women’s Health and Men’s Health International

JESSIE TAYLOR Advertising Production

SAMANTHA QUISGARD Associate Editor

JEREMY SUTTON Group Subscriptions Manager

VERONIKA TAYLOR Deputy Editorial Director, Runner’s World

KATE LAWRIE Senior Business Analyst

GEREURD ROBERTS Commercial Director MYCHELLE VANDERBURG Group Marketing & Retail Sales Director SIMONE DALLA RIVA Regional Sales Director

OR PAY ONLY $49.99 via automatic renewal – that’s a bigger 54% SAVING for you! AUSTRALIAN NC $8 99 NZ $9 99 AUGUST 2016

KARL ROZEMEYER Content Manager BURCU ACARLAR International Business Development Coordinator

“One of t

PETER ZAVECZ Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Magazines

SAVE 50%

BUILD

BMUIG SCLE

The 8-Week Plan That MadeThis Body! MH GUY Black Sails star Tom Hopper

The Sex Robots Are Coming! Strike Out Stress p18 Perfect Protein Meals

8

ST

Fight Fat WiWintn!r & Dodge

Weight Gain

21-DAY TRICEP TAKE OUR CHALLENGE!

t ORE, ER!

r thhe 122 12 on p12

MOIRA O’NEILL Financial Analyst

DEAN PORTER Operations Director

Pacific Magazines, Media City, 8 Central Avenue, Eveleigh, NSW 2015 Phone: (02) 9394 2000 Fax: (02) 9394 2319 Subscription enquiries: 1300 668 118 Printing Hannanprint Warwick Farm, 2-8 Priddle St, Warwick Farm, NSW 2170. Distribution Gordon & Gotch. Published 12 times a year. Registered business name Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, (ABN) 16 097 410 896. All rights reserved. Title and trademark Men’s Health © Rodale Press. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or in part without prior written permission. Men’s Health is a registered trademark and the unauthorised use of this trademark is strictly prohibited.

VISIT subscribetoday.com.au/mh916h

OR CALL *

1300 668 118

and quote P69JKZZD

*Print + digital subscription bundle orders can only be completed online, not by phone. Digital edition available on iPad and iPhone. Offer available in Australia only and ends 31/10/2016. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packed with the magazine. Visit subscribetoday.com.au for full terms and conditions.


MAKERS OF THE ORIGINAL SWISS ARMY KNIFE | ESTABLISHED 1884


HELLO WEEKEND!

GO YOUR OWN WAY WITH THE DEPENDABLE ISUZU D-MAX Isuzu D-MAX drivers put up with a lot from Monday to Friday. So when the weekend comes around, nothing beats getting away from it all with the people that matter most to you. With a powerful and efficient 3.0L turbo diesel engine, 3.5 tonne braked towing capacity* and a Terrain Command 4WD system, the Isuzu D-MAX has everything you need to go your own way.

Discover the Isuzu D-MAX for yourself – visit your Isuzu UTE Dealer or isuzuute.com.au

5-star ANCAP safety rating applies to D-MAX 4x4 Crew Cab variants built from November 2013, 4x2 High-Ride Crew Cab variants built from November 2014 and all MU-X models. *3.5 tonne braked towing capacity on D-MAX 4x4 and 4x2 High Ride models when fitted with an optional genuine Isuzu UTE tow bar kit. ^5 years/130,000km whichever occurs first, for eligible customers. Excludes trays and accessories. >The Capped Price Servicing Program (“CPS Program”) applies to Eligible Vehicles with a Warranty Start Date after 1 January 2015 at Participating Isuzu UTE Dealers only. The CPS Program covers the first 6 Scheduled Services in line with the Scheduled Service Intervals. CPS Prices are subject to change. For full terms & conditions and current pricing visit isuzuute.com.au/service-plus.


Ask MH

Room spinning like a top? Your crystals might be out of whack.

LIFE QUESTIONS, ANSWERED

Q I stood up quickly and the room started spinning. BW Then I hit the floor. What happened? MAYBE IT WAS DEHYDRATION. Maybe it was that fourth martini. Maybe watching Mad Max: Fury Road on your 75-incher was just too much. No? Chances are you experienced something called benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. The key word here? Benign. That’s good. This is the condition that made golfer Jason Day hit the fairway (with his head, not his ball) during the US Open last year – but he recovered and became world No.1. It’s different to garden-variety dizziness, which generally passes in seconds after you stand quickly. It’s also different to orthostatic hypotension, a

blood pressure problem that worsens the longer you stand. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is sudden, and it’s brought on by dislodged calcium carbonate crystals in your inner ear, says Dr Carol Foster, director of the Balance Laboratory at the University of Colorado Hospital. These crystals relay motion signals to your brain, but if they migrate to the wrong place you get seriously dizzy. It can take months for the condition to clear up, but you can coerce the crystals back into place with a series of whacky poses that mimic yoga. Ask a doctor to show you how. >

SEPTEMBER 2016

15


Ask MH

LIFE QUESTIONS, ANSWERED

Q Some days I’m just too tired for the gym. Is there something else I can do? DE ABSOLUTELY. Ride a bike for 20 minutes – it’s a proven lethargy buster. In a recent University of Georgia study, low-energy but otherwise healthy people who took time out for a 20-minute exercise bike ride three days a week reported an impressive 20 per cent boost in energy over the course of six weeks. If cycling isn’t your thing, you can replicate the study’s results by choosing any exercise that increases your resting heart rate by 50 beats a minute, says exercise physiologist Dean Somerset.

Q I hear chia seeds have omega 3 fats. Can I just eat those instead of fish? CD

Q Is it just my imagination, or do elite fast bowlers have big arses? Does that help them on the field? EC-S Assolutely. That plus-size posterior is responsible for generating the huge rotational torque required to bowl 90km/h-plus deliveries. The key muscles here are the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus, which provide balance, speed and power. To build them up, advises Bret Contreras, author of Bodyweight Strength Training Anatomy, perform three classes of glute exercises: vertical (squats and lunges), horizontal (hip thrusts and back extensions) and lateral (cable hip abductions and lateral band walks). Do one of each 3-5 times a week. 16

SEPTEMBER 2016

We’d rather you didn’t – chia seeds are no substitute for seafood. Omega 3s come in three varieties: EPA, DHA and ALA. Those first two, which are plentiful in salmon and tuna, fight inflammation and help build every cell in your body. ALA is found in canola oil, walnuts and chia seeds. To use it, your body has to convert it to DHA or EPA. But the process is inefficient, and only about 10 per cent of the ALA you eat actually makes the switch, says nutritionist Alan Aragon. So to meet your DHA and EPA quota, be sure to eat 2-3 2 3 servings of fatty fish a week or supplement with fish oil.

Q My girlfriend has genital herpes. If we have safe sex, what are the odds I’ll get it? AR Very slim – if you’re smart about it. While no form of protection against genital herpes is foolproof, you can lower the odds of transmission enormously with two easy steps. First, ask if she’ll talk to her doctor about taking an antiviral medication. Research has shown that it reduces the odds of becoming symptomatic – as in, dealing with painful lesions – and it cuts the risk of transmission in half. Second, use condoms – they’ll drop your risk even more. (A touch of lubricant outside the condom will make mak things feel better for both of you.) With that combo in place, yyou can worry a lot less.

Q I’ve been waking up a lot to pee. How many nighttime trips is too many? ZK How old are you, ZK? It’s not too common for young guys to get up more than twice a night to take a slash, but up to half of men in their seventies do. Generally, it’s nothing to worry about. But in some cases, excessive nocturnal urination can signal a weak heart, diabetes or a kidney infection, says men’s health clinician Dr Jesse Mills. A simple urine test can rule those problems out. You might also have an enlarged prostate, which is annoying but usually easily treatable. To stem you nighttime flow, impose an hour-long no-drink buffer before bedtime. And if you’re used to enjoying a nightcap, get unused to it, since alcohol can act as a diuretic. Meanwhile, double down on your gym time. Maintaining a healthy body weight and limiting systemic inflammation – two benefits of exercise – may give you more bladder control.


THE NEW FRAGRANCE


. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

f l Stuff 03

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . . . .

Tons of tips, tricks and strategies for life 09/2016

DAYS TO INCREASE YOUR STRENGTH WITH LESS EFFORT

If you’ve recently gone from months spent holding down couch springs into a feverish training plan, the strain on your nervous system can cause your fitness goals to cough and splutter to a halt. That’s why good intentions too often morph into broken dreams. To get your form back without breaking your back, you need to train smart – which is to say less. While bros like to venerate masochism on the weights floor, it’s a relief to learn that new research shows less really is more. A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that doing workouts that mix strength moves (bench press, squats) with power moves (medicine ball slams, box jumps) three times a week increases your body strength by an average of 23 per cent compared with a standard iron session done twice as often. That means rest days in the bank. So, armed with a new workout plan, you won’t have to live (and die) at the squat rack to see results.

SEPTEMBER 2016

19


seful tuff

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

20

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

NUTRITION KNOW-IT-ALL Jacqueline Alwill Adv Dip Nut Med

Q I eat a lot of tuna as cheap

and easy protein. How much is too much? AS Less than you think. While the evidence isn’t clear-cut, to avoid the risk of heavy-metal toxicity (tuna is high in mercury) restrict yourself to two small tins a week. For alternatives, if you like fish and convenience, add canned salmon, mackerel or sardines to your trolley. Better still, go crazy and cook up a big batch of organic, free-range chicken at the start of the week. Non-meat sources of protein – kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, quinoa – combined in a salad are another way of hitting your quota in a balanced manner.

GET Y

Q How much notice should

A S DIRTY

I take of the health-star ratings on breakfast cereals? They seem generous for what I thought was rubbish.

Your downstairs equipment isn’t the only star in the bedroom. You have 10 tools just waiting to be used: your fingers 1/ TRACE HER BODY Pretend you’re an artist, drawing every crease of her body with your finger. “This gets her focusing on sensation,” says Marianne Brandon, author of Reclaiming Desire. Trace her lips, her soft inner thighs, the roundness of her breast. “It’s not tickling,” says Brandon. “Your fingers maintain contact with her skin, but very lightly.”

2/ UP THE EXCITEMENT During oral sex, your tongue plays a starring role, but don’t forget about your hands. “Spreading her lips with your fingers makes her feel more exposed,” says Brandon. “For most women, that level of vulnerability heightens the excitement.” Alternatively, grab her hand and squeeze it: “That’s a lovely way to stay romantically connected,” says Brandon.

3/ LET HER GUIDE YOU Watching her solo sessions can be instructive – and fun. But she may be too shy to let you observe. Your move? Ask for a hands-on education. “I train my couples to use the ‘handwriting technique’, where she takes your hand and shows you how to touch her in the way that feels best,” says sex therapist Lisa Thomas.

4/ ADD STIMULATION Important stat: only about a quarter of women consistently climax from intercourse alone. So get your hands involved. In a study in the Journal of Sex Research, 71 per cent of women who orgasmed during their last encounter said they combined manual stimulation and penetration. Your best position: spooning. “You have easy access to her genitals,” says Thomas.

I share your scepticism, DA. Most commercial breakfast cereals are a waste of cardboard. Rather than checking out stars, peruse the label on the side of the pack. If the first three ingredients are sugar, wheat and water, and there’s other stuff in there you haven’t heard of, replace the box and grab a bag of rolled oats instead. Cook a cup on the stove and top with nuts, seeds, banana, berries and a dollop of natural yoghurt. Now there’s a five-star breakfast. Jacqueline Alwill is a qualified, practising nutritionist and author of Seasons To Share: Nourishing family and friends with nutritious, seasonal wholefoods

HEALTH HACKS

Trying for a Baby? Do This for Two Weeks First If making babies is on your agenda, beware: mental stress can torpedo your sperm quality. So try a new position – a yoga position. According to geneticist Dr Rima Dada, yoga can make your sperm healthier. Men in her study who did yoga five days a week saw a significant reduction in oxidative stress after just 15 days, and DNA damage in their sperm improved after six months, increasing their odds of being virile. Bonus: you’ll both appreciate the flexibility factor.

SEPTEMBER 2016

DA

PHOTOGRAPHY: APIX SYNDICATION, JOEY WRIGHT

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .


seful tuff

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

THE GIRL NEXT DOOR Alice Treloar Q Can quickies work, or

do women always need a painstaking build-up? SC

51g

PROTEIN

GUT BUSTERS

SKIP THE SHAKE, REFUEL WITH FOOD

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Tired of recovery drinks that taste like cardboard? Build muscle with spicy prawn tacos instead Feeding your muscles has never been easier. You need just three minutes and a few ingredients.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

22

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

In a hot, oiled frying pan, cook 200-250 grams of peeled, deveined prawns with one teaspoon of smoked paprika, a dash of ground cayenne, and salt and pepper to taste.

Now warm two corn tortillas in a dry pan over medium-high heat for about 90 seconds.

Pop the prawns on the tortillas and top with avocado slices, sliced red cabbage, coriander, a glob of Greek yoghurt and a squirt of fresh lime.

Percentage of wives who want more sex. Most common time for sex: 10:24pm on Saturday. SOURCE: ILLICIT ENCOUNTERS EXTRAMARITAL DATING SITE

BURN THE MARITIME OIL You already knew omega 3s boost heart and brain health and “good” HDL cholesterol levels while reducing arthritis symptoms, but did you know that they can also help slash the kilos? A University of Guelph study found that popping 1.4g of omega 3s after dinner increases the kilojoules you burn that night by 51 per cent. But stick to fish oils: plant varieties contain alpha-linolenic acid, which your body has to break down first, reducing the omega 3s you get (and increasing the number of capsules you’ll need to swallow).

SEPTEMBER 2016

Q Is it possible to be

tacitly rebuffed by a girl but then kindle her interest by aiming my charms elsewhere? DE Tugging on her jealously strings could work, but it’s risky. Overt efforts to woo others may give her the impression she was just one gal on your roll call. Worse, she’ll see through your ploy and there ain’t no cologne strong enough to mask the smell of desperation. Chances are if your charms failed first time, watching them as a bystander won’t make a lick of difference. Bubble-wrap your ego by finding a lass who doesn’t require game-playing.

HOW TO HIT 1.4g

1000mg CAPSULES

FISH OIL

3

KRILL OIL

6

FLAXSEED OIL

18

WALNUT OIL

27

FOOD STYLING: BRETT KURZWEIL/ART DEPARTMENT

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Of course. In fact, sometimes 18 seconds of intimacy is exactly what women want (especially when the next episode of Nashville is about to start). But before you schedule a week of wham-bam interludes, remember this: ladies tend to work better with a warm-up. It’s basic biology, so blame science for slowing down your southerly adventures. Take a moment or three to hit her erogenous zones, or perhaps offer a massage, before prematurely bringing out your man muscle.


Free Shipping over $50

100 Day Free Returns

Over 700 Top Brands

Same Day Delivery for Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney *conditions apply


seful tuff

4 Ways to Shoot the Lights Out Master the short game with pro tips from a PGA coach World No.1 golfer Jason Day is known for his powerful drives and long irons. But the short game is where tournaments are won and champions made. Listen to Day’s lifelong coach and caddie, Colin Swatton.

That’s yourformulaforinstantcalm.Closeyourmouthandinhalethroughyournoseforacountoffour. Thenholdyourbreathforsevencounts.Nowexhalethroughyourmouthforeight.Repeatthiscycle three more times. Relaxed, right? You can thank integrative medicine specialistDr Andrew Weil.

MAKE LYING K F YOU Deceit isn’t usually a good career move. But sometimes it is – and can propel your career upward. Here’s your cheat sheet

THE SITUATION

YOUR LIE

THE TRUTH

You’re offered a mammoth project that you’re not really ready for.

“ I can handle that.”

You’re overwhelmed, but you’ll come to realise you have the skills. Calmly ask for specifics on timetables, staffing and expectations, which will reassure your boss – and yourself, says Patrick Lencioni, author of The Advantage.

Your company is circling the drain and you doubt it has a future.

“With your help we can turn things around!”

A leader must project optimism even when his confidence is wavering. Be the man who keeps his staff on board and productive, says Dan McCarthy, an expert on executive development at the University of New Hampshire.

A job interviewer asks you just how horrible your former boss was.

“I learned a lot from them.”

Negativity adds nothing, and nobody likes a backstabber. Recount a challenge and what you learned. Your restraint and ability to learn will earn respect, says Brian de Haaff, founder and CEO of the software company Aha!

You’re negotiating your salary at a new company.

“I need to earn $125,000 a year.”

Of course you start high. It’s just an opener. If you get it, great. If they baulk, ask how much they have budgeted for the role. It’s refreshingly direct and shows you’re confident, says Joel Comm, author of Twitter Power 3.0.

You’re feeling frustrated about your job.

“I’m very excited about my job.”

Feign interest and then find a way to get interested. A bad attitude can infect staff and demonstrates disrespect. Ask colleagues what they enjoy about the work and try to see what you’re missing, Lencioni says.

24

SEPTEMBER 2016

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Step Away from the Driving Range “Amateurs don’t practise their short game enough, Swatton says. “Jason and I use a 70-30 rule. That’s 70 per cent of our time spent on the short game and 30 per cent on the long game. If amateurs spent 70 per cent of their time on the short game, they’d see a dramatic improvement in their scores.” Pay Attention to Putting Speed The polished-marble greens of courses like Augusta National require exquisite speed control. As you practise putting, make speed paramount. “Do long putts from 10-12 metres,” Swatton says. “I see so many amateurs have three or four three-putts per round because they don’t leave themselves a short putt.” Analyse Your Round A shot-by-shot recap (painful, we know) will reveal the areas you need to work on. For Day, it was wedge play. “I presented the stats to him and we started a practice routine,” Swatton says. “He quickly improved from 130m in.” Minimise Your Moving Parts Day is top-drawer on the Tour in “scrambling” – chipping and putting. He chips with minimal wrist involvement, using the bigger slow-twitch muscles of his arms and body, Swatton says. Amateurs who rely on wrist cock tend to chunk their chip shots.

An arm-and-shoulder swing is best on chips.

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .


ADVERTISING FEATURE

BUILT FOR THE CHALLENGE

DIVE INTO ANY ADVENTURE WITH SEIKO PROSPEX. IT’S THE AUTHENTIC DIVERS’ WATCH BUILT TOUGH AND TRUSTED BY THE EXPERTS.

FEATURES

> Features PADI’s signature red and blue

> Water resistant up to 200m

> Stainless-steel case

> Screw case back > Screw-down crown


seful tuff

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

ONE MAN’S QUEST FOR . . . CALM UNDER PRESSURE Tim Wilson 2016 MH Man winner

LIFE TRICKS

TOP EAST STI

Deodorant is fine for your armpits. Here’s your attack plan for foul odours elsewhere YOUR REEKING KITCHEN Old tricks like lighting candles or boiling cinnamon sticks only mask the stench. The odour might be coming from your stove as it cooks remnants of funky leftovers – rotten crumbs and stale grease. First, strip off the appliance’s hardware – racks, knobs, drip pans – and run it through the dishwasher. Next, if you can, pull out the unit and clean the sides and underneath with a degreaser. Finish with a spray of white vinegar, says Jan Dougherty, author of The Lost Art of House Cleaning.

Percentage of millenials who’ve had sex in public. SOURCE: 2015 SKYN CONDOMS MILLENNIAL SEX SURVEY

26

SEPTEMBER 2016

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOUR FOUL BREATH Actually, chewing gum does more than just cover up the rotten smell. The gum will snatch up food bits, giving the real culprit – bacteria – nothing to feed on. And chewing produces saliva, an effective antibacterial solution, says naturopathic physician Eric Yarnell. If you’re out on a date, consider skipping dessert; sugar is like fertiliser to bacteria. If you do indulge, chase that slice of cheesecake with water and gum.

YOUR SMELLY DOG Be consistent: twice a week for 10 minutes, brush Buster with a comb and a slicker brush (square head, metal pins). This stimulates natural oils and shedding, and removes old fur along with odour-causing dirt and dander. At bath time, use room-temperature water; hot water constricts pooch pores, says dog groomer Bonnie Cowper. Follow the dilution ratio noted on the dog shampoo; over-sudsing won’t help. After a towel-dry and a hit with a hair dryer, brush him to remove loose hair from his undercoat.

ANXIETY CAN HIT you hard. Your body temperature rises, your chest tightens and muscles seize up. You feel the blood pumping through every vein and you just want to hit the eject button. This used to be me until I worked out that I was the only one piling on the pressure. Don’t get me wrong – I still feel it; I’ve just learnt how to deal with it. I was lucky enough to serve with some of the army’s calmest soldiers – men who wouldn’t blink at the sound of gunfire or the prospect of imminent combat. These guys taught me that no matter how bad the situation might seem, you’ve always got time to stop, take a breath and think about your next move. I’ll never forget a day when I had to draw on this lesson. In a gunfight in Afghanistan in 2010, a fellow section member and I got stuck in thick mud while running for cover through a field. My heart began to race, but instead of freaking out and making an error that would have left us stranded and exposed, both of us stopped and observed what was going on around us. We decided our best course of action was as simple as going back the way we came. Had we not done that, it’s more than likely we would have been shot. Can you apply this technique to less confronting scenarios in everyday life? You bet you can. At those times when you feel under the pump – a work deadline, a breakup, moving house – you need to pause and ask yourself: what is my smartest move here? STOP, THINK, DO.

The Five Best Food And Drink Apps

BrewArt Take the hassle out of homebrew. Brew 10 litres of beer in your chosen style, then control your “beerdroid” remotely with push notifications for all your microbrewery milestones.

Fit Men Cook Features hundreds of recipes made from healthy and affordable ingredients. MH’s favourite: The Hulk Smash Chicken, Asparagus and Avocado Pizza.

Vivino Choosing wine can give you a bigger headache than the resulting hangover. Vivino bypasses that stress. Take a photo of any wine label on your phone to get instant access to an online review.

Guzman y Gomez Food from our favourite Mexican isn’t just deliciso, it’s healthy and fully customisable to your dietary needs. The best bit? You’ll get a free burrito with your first purchase on the new GYG app. Arriba!

Matchbook Never forget a great restaurant again. Matchbook keeps tabs on where you’ve eaten and lets you store a list of places you’re eager to try, sending you a notification next time you’re in the area. – LC


seful tuff BULK BUSINESS

MUSCLE, FIFTIES STYLE

Steve Reeves used a bodybuilding tactic to look the part as Hercules. For massive size, his secret still works today He won both the Mr America and Mr

SETS

REPS

BARBELL BICEPS CURL

3

12

BENCH PRESS

3

10

DUMBBELL BICEPS CURL

4

10

TRICEPS PUSHDOWN

4

12

Give it a try! Start with a heavy weight. Repeat with one that’s about 15 per cent lighter. Repeat again with 15 per cent less weight. That’s one set.

QUIT FACEBOOK FEEL MORE SOCIAL Status update: stop reading status updates

Herc carved his V-shape the oldfashioned way: a crapload of reps.

People who took a Facebook break ended up feeling better than those who didn’t, a study by the Copenhagen-based Happiness Research Institute found. They also had more focus and were more satisfied socially (ie, in real life). Facebook feeds may cause envy and have become an unrealistically positive highlight reel of users’ lives. Here’s how many people in each group said they were . . . WEEKLONG FB BREAK

NO BREAK

HAPPY

88%

81%

WORRIED

41%

54%

SAD

22%

34%

ANGRY

12%

20%

ENJOYING LIFE

84%

75%

ENTHUSIASTIC

61%

49%

DEPRESSED

22%

33%

DECISIVE

64%

56%

LONELY

16%

25%

Green With Facebook Envy

in

FB USERS ENVY OTHERS’ EXPERIENCES

in

ENVY OTHERS’ HAPPINESS

in

ENVY OTHERS’ SUCCESS

28

SEPTEMBER 2016


09/16

PERSONAL

BEST AUSTRALIAN

A Beautiful Mind Cameron McEvoy, the great hope of Australia’s Olympic swim team, is proof positive that success starts in your head [ BY A ARON SCOT T

PHOTOGR APHY BY

DANIEL LINNET ]

CAMERON MCEVOY LIKES TO IMAGINE HIMSELF standing on the blocks of the 100-metre final at the Rio Olympics. He imagines the feel of his body, burnished by years of training. He imagines the sound of the crowd, the noise reverberating off the steel roof. He imagines his energy, pent-up by weeks of tapering and now straining desperately to unleash itself in the water. But at this moment, McEvoy’s perspective shifts. He doesn’t imagine himself diving into the pool, his body knifing through the water. Instead, he imagines aliens watching this spectacle from outer space. He imagines them observing these humans – these ostensibly intelligent life forms – diving into a hole in the ground filled with water and swimming back and forth in a straight line. McEvoy smiles: “I imagine they would think this was the most bizarre thing they’d ever seen. I reckon they’d be thinking: Don’t these humans have better things to do with their time? When you look at the Olympics like that, you suddenly realise it isn’t that big a deal in the universal scheme of things.” No, this 22-year-old is not your average sportsman. Sure he looks the part, with big-money sponsors like Myer, Mercedes, Telstra and Speedo scrambling to be part of “brand” McEvoy. But he doesn’t fit the A-type mould. He studies physics at Griffith University and dreams of one day working as a theoretical physicist (“If I get lucky enough

32

SEPTEMBER 2016

I could even work at NASA”). His heroes are NBA legend Kobe Bryant (“I love his above-and-beyond mentality”) and Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman (“He was the kind of guy who found everything interesting”). His ideal holiday destination is Iceland (“I reckon seeing the aurora borealis would be awesome”) and his swimming cap is adorned by the signature of a gravitational wave created when two black holes collided. Little surprise McEvoy’s squad mates call him “The Professor”. His broad smile and sunny disposition can’t hide the fact that he’s a deep thinker who’s lit upon some important truths in life. Primary among these: he knows that winning gold in Rio will not necessarily make him a better man. “What you achieve in sport is not what defines you as a person,” he contends. “And understanding that is important, because it not only takes the pressure off you, it allows you to be more confident within yourself if you don’t win.” For a fresh-faced kid chasing gold in the 50, 100 and 200m free at Rio, this is an invaluable insight – particularly given the infamous flameouts of fellow sprinters James Magnussen in London and Eamon Sullivan in Beijing. Question is: what makes McEvoy so fast? He’s so poised, so measured, so nice. Where’s the snarl, the chest beating, the stuff-silver-we-come-for-gold posturing made famous by Laurie Lawrence?


Eyes on th prize : pic l is l t

v y’s i

list.

SEPTEMBER 2016

33


WATCH, DO, LEARN McEvoy’s early days in the water were unexceptional. He was dragged along to the pool as a five-year-old when his brother Hayden, three years his senior, joined the Miami Swimming Club on the Gold Coast. For the first few months the youngster tooled about on the pool deck, whiling away the minutes till he could go home. Eventually boredom drove him into the water. He joined a junior squad, splashing around with the other kids. It was during these years, however, that a peculiarity in McEvoy’s personality began laying the foundations for his future success in the pool. As the younger brother, his squad training would finish at 5:30pm – an hour earlier than his brother’s. And it was during this hour, as he sat on the pool deck waiting to go home, that he would study the techniques of the elite swimmers in the senior lanes, men like Hackett, Thorpe and Klim. The youngster didn’t just gawk at the champions, jostling for a signature when they emerged from the pool. Instead, he analysed their strokes, noting how their bodies sat in the water, the point of entry for their arms, the angle of their wrists. He filed the information in his mind, imagining how it would feel if his body hung in the water like that, if his arm

entered the water at that point. Then, when he was next in the pool, he would replicate that feeling and see if his stroke changed for better or worse. “More often than not it changed for the worse,” he says. “But I could always pick up on that. And over a long period of time, I learned what worked and what didn’t.” It was, of course, the budding scientist applying his problem-solving mind to the issue of moving through H2O at maximum speed. It was an assiduous process of trial and error that has not only delivered McEvoy an easy stroke (his coach Richard Scarce describes him as having “a great affinity with the water”) but also a keen kinaesthetic understanding of precisely what his body is doing in the water. Describing this process, McEvoy quotes the famed physicist Niels Bohr: “An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made in a very narrow field.” “And that,” says McEvoy, “applies perfectly to my swimming. It’s problem solving – something I’ve always loved. And that helped at that young age because I was able to churn through experiences. Each time I changed my stroke it would be a different experience, so I’d put that experience in my toolbox and move on. It was all about building that toolbox so when my natural strength started to develop, I knew exactly what worked.”

CARVEASWIMMER’SBODY McEvoy’s fluid stroke allows him to glide through the water with apparent ease. A recent barrage of strength training, however, has supercharged this stroke, leading to a string of breakout swims that have established him as Australia’s premier sprint swimmer. Follow his workout to add power to your game. Do four sets of eight reps for each movement.

Chin-up

Grip a chin bar with an overhand grip, your hands slightly wider than shoulderwidth apart. From a dead hang, raise your chest to the bar, keeping your body straight. Too easy? Hook a dumbbell between your feet.

Pike

On a set of Olympic rings, hold your body weight with your arms by your side, your elbows locked. Slowly raise your legs until they’re parallel with the floor. Pause, then slowly lower back to the starting position.

Squat

With a barbell across your upper back, push your hips back and bend your knees until your thighs are parallel to the floor. Drive up, recruiting your glutes and quads. Worried about your back? Do front squats with a pair of kettlebells.

Deadlift

EACHTIMEI CHANGEDMY STROKE,I’D PUT THATEXPERIENCE IN MY TOOL BOX 34

SEPTEMBER 2016

McEvoy likes to use a trap bar for his deadlifts. Push your hips back and bend your knees to grab the bar with an overhand grip. Clench your glutes and thrust your hips forward to drive up to a standing position.

Benchpull

Lie facedown on a bench and grip a barbell with an overhand grip, your arms at full extension. Pull the bar up towards your chest. Pause at the top of the movement, then slowly lower to the starting position.


f o d n i k y l n o e h T

Fiji boring? Not on your life!!! With 333 islands to snorkel around, trek through, zipline above, paddleboard off or simply relax on, you’ll need to stay longer than you thought! If being active makes you happy then Fiji is for you – where happiness finds you.

www.fiji.travel


RACE YOURSELF McEvoy’s first taste of serious competition came at the age of 12. The family had just moved to a new house with a 12m rectangular pool in the backyard. Here, the three McEvoy children – Hayden, Cam and younger sister Brittany – would contest the “McEvoy Olympics”. The Games were the creation of Hayden, who would spend hours at the family computer compiling fake heats and finals, fictional records, and champions. He would even print out gold, silver and bronze medals that were ceremoniously distributed after each race. McEvoy, however, promptly quashes any suggestion that filial competition was the kiln that forged his competitive spirit. He had no interest in beating his older brother – his great ambition was simply to match the times Hayden was churning out. “I wasn’t sitting there going, Right, I have to beat my brother,” he says. “I just saw how much faster he was and I wanted to be up there swimming alongside him. He was an idol to me.” For a power athlete at the pointiest end of swimming’s chest-thumping events, McEvoy’s lack of cut-throat ambition is bewildering. Throughout his childhood he never once countenanced the thought of going to an Olympics. “I just never thought it could be a possibility,” he shrugs. It was only when he began besting Ian Thorpe’s underage records as a 16-year-old that he realised he had a serious talent. And the prospect of winning Olympic gold? He frowns: “The first time I thought, you know, I could win an Olympic medal was 2014. I was 19 – so it was after I’d made my first Olympics at London . . . ” It’s a laissez-faire approach that’s reflected in McEvoy’s race-day routines. Sitting in the marshalling area in the minutes before a race, he’s so calm, so composed, coach Scarce calls him “the Iceman”. While other swimmers brood beneath headphones or slap their chests red raw, McEvoy is invariably kicking back looking for someone to chat with. Before the 100m final at the 2013 World Championships in Barcelona, for example, he was so entranced by the noise of the crowd that he found himself startled when a whistle summoned him on to the blocks. He finished fourth in that race, a bare 0.17 seconds off the win. “Yeah, it was a surprise,” he says. “At that stage I had all this speed, but I still didn’t really know how to ‘race’ the 100 free. I was just doing it in a way that felt natural to me.” Over the past three years, the gradual refinement of McEvoy’s race strategy has seen his PBs plummet, a process that culminated at the National Championships in April, when he notched an historic treble, becoming the first Australian man to claim the prestigious 50, 100 and 200m freestyle titles in a single year. Again, it was a performance that left McEvoy wideeyed with shock. “I mean, I knew I was capable

36

SEPTEMBER 2016

of going that fast at some stage in my career, but I never thought it would come this soon.” And so to Rio, where there are whisperings he could bag as many as six medals. Yes, he admits to feeling a pinch of fear at the prospect of failing to win even one – especially after a close-quarters’ view of the lashing Magnussen received after failing to win gold in London. But like the good scientist he is, McEvoy conquers this fear with reason. “Looking at it rationally,” he says with careful emphasis, “if I get to the 100 final in Rio, swim a PB, but finish eighth – I’ll be over the moon.” And this, for McEvoy, is the key. This is why he swims. “That feeling of getting out of bed when you’re the fittest you’ve ever been, then you dive into the pool and swim the fastest you’ve ever swum – that feeling is indescribable,” he says, a smile stretching across his face. “It’s that striving for personal improvement that fuels me. It’s never about getting in the pool with the intention of beating everyone else. It’s all about expanding the radius of what I think I can reach.”

The Iceman cometh: no brooding isolation or chest-slapping before a race for McEvoy.

IF I GET TO THE 100M FINAL SWIM A PB BUT FINISH EIGHTH – I’LL BE OVER THE MOON


I’M SELLING

A HOME GYM KIT.

ANY TAKERS?

IS ANYONE

INTERESTED IN

CROSSFIT classES?


HEALTH

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN I

Skip Breakfast? 03

04

Done right, you’ll gain time and lose your muffin-top. But the butter knife cuts both ways, and new research serves up a smorgasbord of reasons to dig in at dawn

The idea that simply eating breakfast alone will give your metabolism a boost is bunkum: you won’t get shredded with toast. It’s the quality of the kilojoules that really counts, says PT David Kingsbury. Opt for 35 grams of protein from fare such as eggs, oats or natural yoghurt, which the University of Missouri found can limit fat storage.

01

02

Muscle glycogen levels are at their lowest when you wake, due to overnight fasting. Bang out an early AM session and recent evidence shows you’ll better tap into your fat reserves. But if weight loss isn’t a priority, skipping breakfast could be bad news. A Loughborough University study found that men who missed a morning meal didn’t perform as well in evening workouts.

Adults who neglect breakfast are more likely to smoke, drink heavily and work out less, concludes a study by the University of Helsinki. However, the link between breakfast and a lean body may be purely behavioural. People who do partake tend to have a more balanced diet overall, says dietitian Emer Delaney. Start off with something light and you’ll soon see the benefits.

HIIT It Early

Not So Sweet Research in the Journal of Nutritional Science found overweight men who skipped breakfast lost fat but had higher cholesterol compared with those eating frosted flakes. However, new studies suggest sugar has a worse effect on heart disease than cholesterol – meaning flakes could be worse than flaking.

Kick the Habit

05

Eat at Eight Eggs almost done? Tuck in at 8am. That’s when the stress hormone cortisol peaks, and a well-balanced breakfast can lower it, says Kingsbury. According to a University of Missouri study, habitual breakfast skippers also have lower stocks of the “reward” chemical dopamine, making them more likely to binge on sugary foods. Pass the salt, would you?

01

04

02

03 04

05

38

SEPTEMBER 2016

Protein First

CHO

KG


REDEFINE STRENGTH

SAM BURGESS SOUTH SYDNEY RABBITOHS, AUSTRALIA CANTERBURY,

nd COMMITTED TO THE GAME are registered trade marks of Canterbury Limited. © Canterbury Limited 2016. All rights reserved.


Smart plays will help the time you spend with your kids go swimmingly.

Raise the Kids You Want in the Time You Have THE AVERAGE MARRIED FATHER spends about seven hours a week looking after his kids, according to research from the University of Maryland. That’s a sliver of time that can quickly disappear into work emails or Game of Thrones marathons. So the last thing you need is a guilt-inducing list of to-dos designed to make your son or daughter a Tolstoy-reading prodigy at age eight. The secret to being a great father isn’t finding more time; it’s making better use of the time you have. None of these 14 ideas take longer than an hour to pull off. But each one will help you raise a winner – with time to spare.

[ BY MIK E DARLING ]

40

SEPTEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY: KATA SEDLAK/MONO.SK

14 ways to be a good dad in an hour (or less!) a day


FATHERHOOD

FATHERHOOD

1/ Muck Around Backyard wrestling matches help kids control hyperactivity. Roughhousing also gives you a chance to teach very young children that biting, kicking and other forms of physical violence aren’t okay.

2/ Own Your Lack of Cool Kids can spot a fake and would rather roll their eyes at your off-key Eddie Vedder than at your failed attempt to riff Macklemore, says psychiatrist Dr Kyle Pruett, author of Fatherneed. Steadiness and authenticity will earn their admiration over time.

3/ . . . and Your Nerdy Side Bust out the photos of your mullet and porn-tache. Being comfortable with your imperfections telegraphs confidence. When your son or daughter dishes it out, laugh it off and give it back. Good-natured banter is fine, as long as your kids still respect you.

4/ Read Like You Mean It You may be bored by your 297th reading of Goodnight Moon, but your kids aren’t – and they’ll be better off if you get into the story, suggests research from Boston University. Reading in an engaging voice appears to make a difference in promoting childrens’ literacy and language development.

5/ Don’t Move Bedtime Tucking in the kids at inconsistent times can hurt their cognitive development. In a University College London study, researchers tracked nearly 10,000 children and found a link between irregular bedtimes at age three and lower scores in maths, reading and spatial development at age seven.

6/ Sign on for Swimming Lessons The shallow end of life is brief; it gets deep really fast. No wonder a Griffith University study found that children who learned to swim at a young age were more physically and mentally advanced than their peers.

7/ Schedule Sick Days Save a few “sick” days for spontaneous fun, Pruett says. Unplugging is critical, and you both need to connect with something deeper than wi-fi. Homework can be made up and co-workers can get on with it for a day.

9/KeepLotsofBooksAround

The mere presence of books crammed on a shelf – whether or not they’re actually read – can translate to an intellectual boost, a University of Nevada study found. Having 500 or more books in the home is as great an advantage for a kid as having university-educated parents, and twice that of having a dad who’s a professional rather than an unskilled labourer.

10/ Let Them Get Dirty Laugh if they jump into a puddle with their shoes on. Applaud their mud slides. Children – boys and girls alike – love dirt. Let them do something that will require some serious hosing down afterwards. Better yet, join in. They’ll remember it as one of their greatest days ever.

11/ Break the Occasional Rule 8/ Praise Effort, Not Ability By emphasising the value of resolution over talent, you can help your children dream up strategies for improvement, and they might even end up preferring tasks that are more challenging. The next time your son or daughter does well on a school project, say “I’m proud of how hard you worked” instead of “You’re such a smart kid – I knew you’d get a good mark”.

Important distinction: a rule, not a law. Let them occasionally eat dessert for breakfast or stay up to watch the final quarter. Be consistent and fair, says Pruett, but also show some flexibility and have a bit of fun.

12/ Befriend Their Friends Ask your kids’ friends about their holiday plans, whether the band teacher favours the woodwinds and what footy team they support.

Listen closely to the intel they share – it will help you understand what your own children are up to when you’re not watching.

13/ Teach ’Em the Three Laws to Live By Being a kid is hard enough; they shouldn’t feel like they live in a police state. There are only three rules they need to thrive in a civilised society: 1) don’t stand in front of a TV when an adult is watching; 2) get a second opinion before tweeting anything; and 3) never, ever, ever beat dad at table tennis.

14/ Walk in Kindness Never scream in your own house unless there’s a fire. Don’t even hint at violence. And never kick the family pet – especially the goldfish. Repeat aloud: “Every dog is a good dog.” And mean it because it’s true.

SEPTEMBER 2016

41


MUSCLE & FITNESS

DEVIL’S ADVOCATE

Lift Lighter for Heavy Results Bro science is too often a load of hot air. Take it easy if you want to see a big hormonal hit

42

SEPTEMBER 2016

The founder of LiveFit training, James Hardy is a master-level PT with a deep understanding of how the body works. He can find your workout sweet spot.

So what options are left to gainers on a mission if going at the weights room like a jacked-up berserker is off the cards? While it may go against everything your shouty PT stands for, try slowing down. If you fear your gains will sap away, take a former MH cover star as inspiration: Jason Statham now trains very much to his limits, rather than pushing past them. He’s listening to his body instead of battering it. And he doesn’t look half bad for it, you’ll agree. He’s not the only one. One-man actionhero factory Patrick “P-Nut” Monroe has produced some of Hollywood’s best physiques. He eschews weights and doesn’t push his A-list clients to failure. His focus is on training fascia and muscle in a healthy, consistent manner, rather than hammering it into shape for get-me-ready-for-that-filmquick results. This allows your physique to develop without burning through testosterone. It’s training safe and smart. The message is clear: know your limits. However fit you think you might be, you’re not a professional – you’re a civilian. Hitting it hard then slogging in the workplace takes its toll. Testosterone regulates your health and mood, so man up and stop emasculating yourself at the squat rack. Go soft from time to time – or go home in an ambulance.

YOUR DEALS WITH THE DEVIL

Keeprollin’

Suppitup

Taketwo

High-intensity training takes its toll. Offset any harm with foam rolling, swimming and mobility drills, lest your path to fitness be cut short.

Maintain high levels of testosterone by eating lots of protein and fats along with zinc, vitamin D and magnesium supps. And take naps when possible.

Swap heavy weights for push-up variations, or work with a partner to create resistance, suggests P-Nut. Stop before you lose form.

PHOTOGRAPHY: SUN LEE

GO HARD OR GO HOME. It’s one or the other. These are the binary options laid down by fitness boneheads who see “gainz” as a direct result of effort. On a simplistic level this is true enough. Trouble is, effort in certain circles has come to mean self-flagellation rather than self-improvement. Sorry, but what happened to good old-fashioned try your best? Stepping into your Nike MetCons and throwing heavy metal around has become akin to joining a cult. Just look at #FitFam or US bone-crunching export CrossFit. Zealots punish their bodies in search of a hormone spike to build biceps like boulders. Less rock solid, though, is the longevity of these pursuits. What’s more, the hormonal quest isn’t quite as straightforward as all those Instagram muscle poster boys would have you believe. To chase a testosterone boost from exercise as if it’s a video game power-up is to misunderstand the biochemistry at play. Next time you load up the squat rack with 200 kilograms, consider this: each rep uses up testosterone. You’re spending all that your old boys produce during the day. So what? Well, your body brings a base amount of T to the party. Factors such as sleep deprivation, stress, lack of exercise or too much exercise can cause your levels to dip. When the hormone takes a severe enough tumble, your body switches to its back-up generator. This is adrenaline. You might be familiar with its effect. Ever trained in the evening and spent the first few hours of the night lying awake with your heart pumping harder than an out-of-control jackhammer? Perhaps you’ve taken on a fitness challenge only to find yourself totally sapped of energy? That’s adrenaline overload for you. This hormone exists as a jolt to the system when your body is in peril. To court it daily is like pumping yourself with poison. With this level of under-recovery you will burn out. Perhaps not today. Perhaps not this year. But eventually injuries will pervade and your immunity will suffer.

SATAN’S LITTLE HELPER


BIOGLAN LIQUID SHOTS START AND FINISH EVERY TRAINING SESSION WITH SOME OF NATURES’ MOST POWERFUL SUPERFOODS. FORMULATED TO HELP SUPPORT PERFORMANCE & RECOVERY. MACA PLUS PRE WORKOUT SHOT TO FUEL YOUR SESSION. TURMERIC PLUS POST WORKOUT SHOT FOR RECOVERY.


CONFIDENCE, Self-assurance will get you noticed – at the bar, in the boardroom and in the bedroom. Use these moves to supercharge your swagger

PHOTOGRAPHY: MARY EVANS/ APL

[ BY MARK HAM HEID ]

A CONFIDENT MAN LANDS DATES WITH AUTHORITY. An insecure man seems to whisper, “Just ignore me”. A confident man fearlessly negotiates his salary until he gets what he wants. An insecure man considers each pay cheque a minor miracle. “Confidence lets us project the assets we possess – competence, income, ambition – that people can’t see,” says evolutionary psychologist Dr Sean Murphy. These signals can be subtle and subconscious; you don’t always realise you’re sending them. But even if you don’t naturally exude alpha qualities, a growing body of research is revealing how you can trick yourself into seeming invincible. Elevate your superpower with our three-step plan.

44

SEPTEMBER 2016

1

Dress to Stand Out

Shy men play it safe, and that’s a one-way ticket to mediocrity. Defy your style regulator by taking small risks, says Dr Karen Pine, author of Mind What You Wear. As the compliments roll in (and they will), you’ll get the lift you need to express yourself in more dramatic ways.

Outclass the Competition Dress one notch above the other guys. Clothes that verge on the formal side – like a suit for a regular progress meeting – get you noticed. Attire is also associated with power, a recent California


MIND

State University study found. And since power is linked to leadership and confidence, dressing up can instill those same traits in you.

Finish With a Detail Small touches show that you know how to take care of yourself. Cufflinks are too ubiquitous to garner a second look, says celebrity stylist Jacqui Stafford, author of The Wow Factor. Add a modern touch instead, like monk-strap shoes or a sharp pocket square.

Find Your Uniform Joining clubs that are meaningful to you comes with a privilege: a shot of self-esteem. That’s the conclusion of a recent PLOS ONE study. Even if it’s just a local cycling crew, being part of a community with shared beliefs gives you a sense of belonging and purpose, both of which bolster self-worth.

AVOID TOUCHING YOUR FACE ESPECIALLY YOUR LIPS OR MOUTH WHICH SUGGESTS YOU’RE BEING DISHONEST Be the Man in Motion Gesturing shows conviction, says executive coach Bonnie Marcus, author of The Politics of Promotion. Just don’t point. That comes off as aggressive and can be seen as a sign of insecurity. Also, avoid fidgeting or touching your face, especially your lips or mouth, which suggests you’re being dishonest. On the other hand, nodding while listening signals empathy and agreement, says Hoppe.

Make Yourself at Home Give People a Whiff Wearing a scented deodorant can help boost your body image and self-assurance, a Journal of Cosmetic Science study suggests. Same goes for colognes and fragranced body sprays. “Pleasant aromas help you tune out negative self-image,” says study author Dr Jorien van Paasschen. But remember: a scent should accompany you, not precede you.

Show Your Tough Side People report better focus when they put on a white lab coat, the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology has found. We subconsciously take on characteristics we associate with our clothes. For casual situations, buy a good leather jacket or boots to emphasise the classic association of leather and toughness.

2

Make the Right Moves

Even the world’s finest clothing won’t conceal the signals your body is sending, says Eliot Hoppe, the author of Everyone’s Guide to Body Language. Use this checklist to show you’re in total control.

Assume a Positive Posture When standing or walking, keep your shoulders back and chin slightly up, says Hoppe. Face others directly, and keep your arms open and expressive. When sitting, crossing your legs with one ankle atop the opposing thigh can make you feel more powerful, say Northwestern University researchers.

Strike This Pose If you feel your poise starting to waver, assume a high-power pose: it can boost testosterone and lower stress hormone levels, a Harvard study found. Stand for a minute with your feet apart and hands on your hips. This expansive, open stance can buck you up and juice your courage. Try it now.

Trying to impress a co-worker? Just as relaxed, open body language signals confidence when you’re standing, spreading your stuff out on the table at a meeting sends the message that you feel in control. One caveat: don’t put your phone, coffee and notepad directly in front of you. Moving items inward suggests you’re setting up a barrier because you’re anxious, Hoppe says. Instead, use the table’s real estate, creating a clear open line between you and others.

Perfect Your Handshake Firmness is subjective. A good handshake is really about following the other person’s lead, Hoppe says. “People give you the same pressure they expect in return,” he explains. It’s also important to extend your hand straight out – not palm up or down, which can be interpreted as submissive or dominant, respectively.

3

Speak With Power

Specific words, and the way you say them, signal confidence. Use these cues to make your subtitles scream that you’re a winner.

Talk Yourself Up Nervous? Give yourself a pep talk. In a University of Northumbria study, male cyclists who engaged in motivational self-talk cut their 10-kilometre time by four per cent. Thinking about your strengths and speaking to yourself using positive words can make challenges seem less daunting, the study authors say. Use your name or the pronoun “you”, not the firstperson “I”. Ditching first-person pronouns strengthens the force of your self-talk, which can better help you handle stressful situations.

Trim Your Hedges Whether you’re speaking or writing, starting a statement with a disclaimer is a no-no, says linguist Dr Deborah Tannen. Examples: “Maybe you already thought of this, but . . . ” or “I know this is obvious, but . . . ” You might as well begin with “I’m totally inept, so just tune me out”. It’s fine – necessary, in fact – to add “just” or “only” in a phrase like “I’m just emailing to check in”, but avoid them in a more serious context. “It’s just an idea” invites others to dismiss your suggestion. “Here’s an idea” will instantly carry more weight.

Say You’re Sorry and Move On Shift Some Iron Exercising on a regular basis makes you feel great about your body, a University of Florida meta-analysis suggests. So use that shot of post-workout confidence to your advantage by going for a run or hitting the gym before a date. You’ll be happier with your body, and with any luck, she will too.

Some men think apologising is a sign of weakness. Others generally don’t see it that way. In fact, if you’re clearly wrong, a lack of contrition can be seen as a sign of insecurity, Tannen says. So don’t be afraid to say sorry. Make it quick, say it confidently, then – here’s the most important part – move on. Nothing looks more pathetic than a man who apologises endlessly.

4 CONFIDENCE KILLERS

DON’T LET THESE UNIVERSAL MISTAKES START TO UNDERMINE YOUR COMMAND

1// Hunching Over Your Mobile By forcing your chin down and shoulders inward, slouching over a phone can cause you to act less assertively, according to Harvard Business School research. Make sure to put your mobile away before going into a meeting.

2/ Scoping Friends on Social Media Facebook may compel you to compare yourself to others, which can drive lower self-esteem. To fight back, use the “hide” feature to distance yourself from those who bring you down – and anyone who repeatedly posts pictures of their dinner.

3/ Hanging on to Poisonous Pals Pessimists who belittle your success turn your mood sour. Defeatism may signal personal discontent, says Jay Heinrichs, author of Thank You for Arguing Ask him if everything is okay. If he opens up, great. If he keeps sniping, cut him loose.

SEPTEMBER 2016

45


NUTRITION

BREW SCIENCE From fuelling your workouts to simply easing the daily grind, coffee and green tea have long battled to claim the victor’s cup. But which shot is hotter?

COFFEE

TEA

24

5g

Average stamina boost enjoyed by coffeeng drinkers during runnin and cycling time trials, according to research att gia. the University of Georg

Amount of body fat burned by one cup of b green tea, according to research published in the journal Obesity Reviews.

VS STEEP IMPACT

Coffee’s caffeine triggers hormones such as adrenaline to deliver a short-term energy burst. Use it as a pre-workout, 30 minutes before the gym.

Tea contains the natural relaxant l-theanine and less caffeine, for a smoother effect on energy. Use it for a late-afternoon focus boost that won’t disturb your sleep.

HELPFUL FOR

Liver health

Sunburn

Sexual boost

Heart health

SWORN NEMESIS

Minerals Your flat white curbs the absorption of iron and calcium. Down it at least an hour before lunch. And don’t use it to wash down supps.

Cold-brew coffee The latest in coffee-shop trends will score you hipster cred, with an 86 per cent Google search increase since January 2015.

Diabetes

Immunity

Cancer risk

Carbohydrates Tea can’t quite flush out a bread binge, but its polyphenols help stabilise blood sugar by increasing insulin activity in fat cells.

HIPSTER POINTS

Matcha latte Matcha steals a march, up 90 per cent in the search stakes. Plus, it’s infinitely more ’grammable than a mug of boiled leaves.

THE MH VERDICT: GREEN TEA WINS! Tea is having its time. Yes, for a quick pick-me-up or pre-workout jolt, coffee will get the job done. But for proven health highs – both in terms of weight loss and disease prevention – without the caffeine comedown, green tea takes it. Your personal best is in the bags. 46

SEPTEMBER 2016

WORDS: SCARLETT WRENCH; PHOTOGRAPHY: HEARST STUDIOS

Pain relief


“I look for simple ways to support my cholesterol health”

Image is not of the person quoted.

ENLIVA® once-daily natural supplement *In healthy individuals.

or visit enliva.com.au

Always read the label. Use only as directed. ENLIVA® contains the following strains: Lactobacillus plantarum (AB-Life® formulation: CECT 7527, 7528, 7529). Each capsule contains 1.2 billion probiotics per 100mg. BGP Products Pty Ltd. trading as Mylan EPD. ABN 29 601 608 771. Ph: 1800 314 527. ENLIVA® is a registered trademark. AU-ENL-2016-29. Date Prepared: June 2016. ABB3298/MH. CHC71606-06/16


S EX U AL

H EA LI N G

Tech With Benefits Next-gen sex is at your fingertips. Learn how to stream the latest technology into your love life. Data limits do not apply

EXPERT PROFILE

NAME: Ni chi Hodg son JOB: Auth or, acti vist and ex-d ominatri x, Hodgson helps yo u connect with new hot spots an d log on to better fo replay.

Q: Fitness trackers and wearables are everywhere at the moment, but do any of them work with horizontal workouts? A: Let’s start with what is already at your disposal. Take the fitness tracker on your wrist, for example. Anything that encourages both you and her to exercise is only going to increase your sexual PB. Your partner’s beating heart makes her more likely to experience a stronger orgasm post-workout too, according to a study in the Journal of Sexual and Relationship Therapy. If you’re the sort of power-fitness couple who already sweat, juice and foam roll together, you’re ready for the next level. The OhMiBod Bluemotion Mobile Driven Vibrator monitors your heart rate and syncs it with the vibrator, giving her fuller vibrations as your BPM goes up. Call it a HIIT session if you must, but this is the couples’ workout that counts.

IF YOU ALREADY SWEAT, JUICE AND FOAM ROLL TOGETHER, YOU’RE READY FOR THE NEXT LEVEL 48

SEPTEMBER 2016


SEX

Q: I think internet porn has made me immune to arousal. How can I get my fix a different way?

Q: What’s the best way of using music in the bedroom, without dusting off a Barry White album?

A: Start by closing your laptop. Porn can be a healthy part of modern sex, but many find they spend more time sifting through clip after clip than experiencing the more natural (and a lot more gradual) sexual response cycle of arousal, plateau and orgasm. It doesn’t mean going cold turkey though. The growing popularity of podcasts has been embraced by legendary porn star Mary Carey, blonde dominatrix Aiden Starr, and a host of others, all of whom have their own shows available live or to download on vividradio.com. If you’d prefer to hear some top-tier sex advice, go for Nyomi Banxxx’s sex Q&A phone-in on chocolateradio.net. It’s a subtle and rewarding way to tune into your arousal. Noise-cancelling headphones may be a worthy investment.

A: The Walrus of Love enjoyed a lucrative career for good reason, and it’s not simply a case of setting the mood – the songs themselves trigger a pleasure hit of dopamine, reports Canada’s McGill University. But don’t confuse sultry for sexy. There’s nothing like Jason Derulo’s Wiggle to turn your partner off the idea of sex; women require a positive emotional connection to be aroused, according to the Journal of Sexual Medicine. A Spotify study determined that The XX’s Intro is the perfect song to make love to, but I’d suggest more lyrical tracks. Frank Ocean or Banks offer a contemporary remix of the otherworldly instrumentals and sultry vocals that made Big Barry such a hit. As an aside, revealing any musical talents you might possess counts as foreplay. A study by the University of Southern Brittany proved women are attracted to men’s musical ability. If that sounds a bit mainstream for your taste, turn it up to 11 with a synced-up sex toy like the Bedroom Kandi, a double stimulator that throbs in time with your playlists. She won’t get enough of this one, babe.

Q: I’m in a long-distance relationship and phone sex just about gets us through the week. How can we crank it up a notch?

Q: I’d like to be able to sext without getting myself into a world of trouble. Any advice? A: The standard dick pic is old news, and while dirty words are a reliable lubricant when delivered in person, you need to be more forward-thinking with your sexting to stand out from the crowd. Viber and even WhatsApp are good options for voice clips, but Snapchat is still the best way to get visual in a secure way, with the obvious downside being that you can’t save any replies to enjoy at a later date (unless you’re a filthy screengrabber). If you’re in need of a partner to begin messaging, opt for MeowChat. This lovechild of WhatsApp and Tinder lets you instantmessage contacts and hook up with new people all in one place. Consider it an online bar, if you will. Happy sexting.

A: Distance can be a powerful aphrodisiac, and having an ocean between you is actually a sure-fire way to strengthen your relationship, a study from Canada’s Queen’s University found – you value communication as a way to build up intimacy. Hence phone sex, though even that has its logistical limits. For something more tactile, you don’t have to wait until next weekend: Tron-like technology can bring you together. The Kiiroo is a mind-blowing virtual-reality system designed for relationships just like yours. Classed as a “teledildonic” experience, you put the sleeve on your penis while she plays with the sensation-sensitive dildo. It’s popular with co-habiting partners after the thrill of separation play too. If time zones are against you, try the latest version of the Fleshlight, which offers pure, personal pleasure but now connects to what you’re watching online for a more bespoke way of treating yourself.

SEPTEMBER 2016

49


MUSCLE + FITNESS

THE

BEXERCEISSEYTOU’RE NOT DOING

the Big Ba

The best exercise you were doing just got a lot better, courtesy of some stretch resistance. Try the ke ettlebelll swing with power ow wer band to expand your gains gain ns s IF YOU WERE FORCED to limit yourself to d make a pretty just one exercise, we could bell swing. A ironclad case for the ketttleb full-body move that in particular targets your all-important core and a d oft-neglected ojou ules and forges glutes, it also smelts kilo at more m could you new muscle fibres. Wha e ba and, since want? Well, a resistance you asked. “A band will ma m ximise ove the effectiveness of this mo because it demands ex tra force from your glutes on the upswing,” explains PT Al o Jackson. “Your core also he has to work harder on th eco oil.” downswing due to the re We think it’s a smart, on, inexpensive progressio especially if your kettlebell a selection is limited. Try it as the last move in a mini--circuit: 30 seconds each of chin-ups, nal) and push-ups (band option swings (band compulsoryy). nd aim a for Rest for 60 seconds an en ring in 3-5 rounds in total. The the changes. “Just don’t start out too close to the mirror,,” warns Jackson.

SET T UP Loop p the resistance band throu ugh the kettlebell, leaving enough space to grip tthe handle solidly. Secu ure it under your feet, then slightly widen your stancce to add tension.

POP U UP Hinge at your hips and pussh your glutes back to swing the kettle ebell between you ur slightly b bent legs; squeeze e your glutes to thrust forward. Remember: it’s a swin ng, not a squat.

03

WHAT YOU’LL GAIN SPRING-LOADED SEAT OF STRENGTH ATHLETIC POWER

50

SEPTEMBER 2016

AN ORE-SOM ME SIX-PACK K

DROP IT Maintain a neutral back – not rounded – as you swing the kettlebell back between your legs and bend at the hips. Start slowly with a light band. Then burn some rubber. PHOTOGRAPHY: PHILP HAYNES

STOP IT

At the top of the swing, double-check your core is engaged and brace yourself for the fall. Don’t eyeball the kettlebell: your head and shoulders will follow and your form will drop.


% 15 -.% ,  $$ 

,

#

$ % &



 

  ! $49 This specially formulated shave balm is loaded with ingredients that willl skin           areas and reduce unwanted rednesss. unger and more vibrant skin.

Delivering a superior glide that creates a close shave and softer skin. Shaving is a very harsh operation. It removes hair from the face whilst taking a few layers of skin, this shave gel is designed to both sooth and repair the damage caused by the razor.

!   !  "        




We Need to Talk About Prostate Cancer Man’s biggest cancer foe rarely comes up in conversation. But less coyness could help catch a killer [ BY MIK E SHALLCROSS ]

52

SEPTEMBER 2016

THE DIGITS ON PROSTATE CANCER

1 in 5

Number of men likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer by age 85

3300

Number of Australian men who lose their lives to the disease every year Chance of surviving at least five years

92% Source: Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

ADDITIONAL REPORTING: BEN JHOTY; PHOTOGRAPHY: ANDREW JOHN SIMPSON

WHERE IS THE PROSTATE? Seven out of 10 of us don’t know. Even I’m hazy about its location and I’m writing this story. For the record, the walnut-shaped gland sits just below your bladder, north of what a colleague used to charmingly refer to as his “grundle”. Ideally located for its function of nourishing your sperm; less well suited to polite conversation. Yet cancers don’t come more common. There’s no need to trot out the stats because there’s a good chance it will already have touched someone in your own circle. Mine? I can cite a casual acquaintance, a music journalist cut down in his fifties; and a hero, my favourite writer, JG Ballard, who breezily revealed his terminal prognosis on the final page of his autobiography. A lifetime of describing dystopias was ended by one that grew in his own body. Most painful was a beloved uncle, a haematologist, who spent much of his professional life battling childhood leukaemias. Months into what should have been a long retirement, his supposed arthritis turned out to be prostate cancer that had metastasised. He died six months later. I still have a letter from him, thanking me for a largely symbolic bottle of port I sent him after radiotherapy. Unable to mention the cancer by name, he refers to “an unpleasant condition”. It still inspires a profound loathing in me for this wretched disease. If it’s any consolation, we’re in good company. Dogs and lions are the only other animals known to develop the cancer.


HEALTH

I DON’T RELISH THE THOUGHT OF PLAYING SOCK PUPPETS WITH MY UROLOGIST EITHER BUT PERHAPS WE NEED TO TAKE A GUTSY LEAF OUT OF THE FAIRER SEX’S BOOK HERE AS THEY ENDURE ALL MANNER OF MEDICALISED PRODDING “It’s a huge problem,” says Associate Professor Anthony Lowe, CEO of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia (PCFA). “There are more men dying of prostate cancer in Australia each year than women die of breast cancer. Men just don’t appreciate that they need to take it as seriously as women take breast cancer.” It’s so common, in fact, that most men over 80 have some signs of the disease, which means that if you make it this far, you’re more likely to die with the cancer than because of it. That’s why health professionals prefer to talk about prostate cancers. The violence with which they attack the body runs the full spectrum from a kitten that needs its claws clipped to a sorely pissed-off Bengal tiger. The trick is telling one from the other. While genetic advances are making this easier, a doctor still needs a timely diagnosis to halt the angry variety in its tracks. First of all, a bit of good news: if you have no family history you don’t need to get tested until you’re 50, Lowe says. A family history ups your odds by degrees, he adds. “If your father or brother was diagnosed under 65 then you should be tested from 45. If a father and two brothers have it then you should be tested from 40.” Test? As in the pointy one? Relax. The test we’re talking about, at least in the first instance, is a PSA (prostate specific antigen) blood test, which measures levels of a protein that can be a marker of the disease. While perhaps not as infamous as the digital rectal exam (DRE) it’s just as controversial. Under new guidelines released by the PCFA earlier this year, your doctor needs to inform you that the harm associated with a PSA test may outweigh the benefits. That’s because around 20-40 per cent of cancers detected as a result of PSA tests would never have bothered

the men in whom they were detected had they not been tested, Lowe says. Prostate cancer treatment can have side effects that include urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and bowel problems. The test is certainly a far from perfect indicator. Critics believe PSAs produce undue stress and anxiety, as a high score can often have an innocent explanation – keen cyclists often have high PSAs, possibly due to the gland’s location. Be that as it may, if you’re worried you might be at risk, you’re best to err on the side of caution. If your PSA is elevated you will be referred to a urologist who will do another PSA and then, and there’s no way to sugarcoat this, may need to stick a finger up your bum. Now, I don’t relish the thought of playing sock puppets with my urologist either, but perhaps we need to take a gutsy leaf out of the fairer sex’s book here, as they endure all manner of medicalised prodding. Women are screened for cervical cancer from their mid-twenties onwards. And I should point out that I do know a man who claims he found his DRE quite pleasant . . . The truth is, while uncomfortable, it’s over in 30 seconds. If your urologist is still concerned, he’ll do a biopsy and that’s what will ultimately diagnose the cancer. If you’re staring to despair, then allow me an ill-timed idiom: there’s light at the end of the tunnel. Death rates have fallen by 30 per cent in the past 20 years, according to the Cancer Council. Perhaps we will always have to live with prostate cancer, but live is the operative word. Genetic advances and better awareness could be the difference between it being a trial of old age, and something that ensures we never get there. But the difference between the dog that lies down with us and the wolf that tears us apart is a fine one. Best be on your guard.

LEGENDS LEND A HAND The annual EJ Whitten Legends game will take place at Etihad Stadium on Friday September 2. Now in its 21st year, the game aims to raise funds for prostate cancer research in the name of champion Footscray and Victorian footballer Ted Whitten, who died of the disease in 1995. Broadcast live on channel 7, this year’s telecast will see AFL commentator Brian Taylor front up for both a prostate exam and colonoscopy. For more information check out ejwhittenfoundation.com.au. Also in September is the PCFA’s Big Aussie Barbie campaign, encouraging blokes to hold barbecues to raise funds for and awareness of the disease. Check out bigaussiebarbie com.au

SEPTEMBER 2016

53


THE CURE FOR MAN BOOBS Gynaecomastia is both embarrassing and common. But it is treatable. Your flat-chest plan is here [ BY LOU SCHULER ]

WITH HIS SHAVED HEAD, lean torso and broad shoulders, trainer Kevin Larrabee looks like a lot of fitness professionals. When he’s in the weights room, the 30-year-old fits right in with the crowd. But back in his teens, Larrabee stood out for the wrong reasons. First, he was overweight at 95 kilograms. Second, he had man boobs. “I just thought I had the chest of a fat kid,” says Larrabee. So aged 15, he decided to lose the excess baggage. He cut out junk food and embraced a healthier, lower-kilojoule diet. He also exercised “a ridiculous amount”. In three months he dropped to 79 kilos. But he still had those womanly breasts. What Larrabee didn’t know was that his condition, gynaecomastia – known colloquially as man boobs, mannary glands or, if you’re especially unkind, chesticles – was caused by breast tissue, an artefact of the hormonal big bang that hits all boys at puberty. He also didn’t know that 50 per cent of his peers had developed gynaecomastia as well, but that in most of them it later receded to unnoticeable levels. “I knew it wasn’t right, but there wasn’t anything I could do about it other than try to lose more weight,” he remembers. “I was as far as I could get with the knowledge I had.” Your body is not always a perfect regulator of your hormones, says Dr Adrian Lo, a plastic surgeon

54

SEPTEMBER 2016

who specialises in gynaecomastia. In fact, haywire hormones are what cause the formation of excess tissue in the first place: your testicles produce both oestrogen and testosterone, but in early puberty you may not have enough free testosterone (the hormone that builds muscle) to counteract the oestrogen. That imbalance allows glandular tissue to form. “In puberty, many boys have ‘breast buds’,” Lo explains. “Usually that tissue shrinks to nothing as they grow out of puberty.” For a few, however, it remains. And men can grow breasts in other ways; in fact, as many as 60 per cent develop them at some point in their lives. Some are guys with pubescent gynaecomastia that never went away, while others develop man boobs because of medications (see “The Breast Medicines”, right). Then there are the men carrying excess body fat that enlarges their breast tissue, creating the dreaded condition. A guy with a bosom born of chest fat has a condition known as pseudogynaecomastia. This is the type often seen in overweight men, whose man boobs can resemble anything from the perky proto-breasts of your first girlfriend to droopy sacks of tissue. Working out or losing weight may help those disappear.

THEBREASTMEDICINES Up to 25 per cent of gynaecomastia cases are caused by drugs like these, according to the journal American Family Physician Anabolic steroids Antidepressants Paroxetine (brand names: Aropax, Extine), fluoxetine (Prozac) Antipsychotics Risperidone (Risperdal) Cholesterol drugs Atorvastatin (Lipitor) Hair-loss treatments Finasteride (Propecia), minoxidil (Regaine) Heartburn remedies Cimetidine (Tagamet) Ulcer drugs Ranitidine (Zantac) ACE inhibitors


WEIGHT LOSS

FLATTEN YOUR FRONT THIS FOUR-STEP PLAN MAY HELP YOU DOWNSIZE YOUR MAN BOOBS With true gynaecomastia, as Larrabee learned, no amount of exercise or diet vigilance will help. “Once you have it, you have it,” Lo says. “The only way to take care of it is surgery.” He performs four or five of those procedures a week. “The men I see are usually pretty fit. But most men with gynaecomastia qualify for surgery even if they’re not an ideal weight.” A sliver of breast tissue less than four centimetres wide can be enough to make the areola soft and puffy. Then the man needs to decide whether it bothers him enough to do something about it. Larrabee was bothered. All through his teens, he would try to cover up his chest with creatively layered T-shirts. Earnings from his part-time jobs were spent on spot-reducing creams and sprays. “I wasted hundreds of dollars on that stuff,” he says. In the gym, he built his workouts around chest exercises. He avoided any situation where he might be expected to take off his shirt. But despite his best efforts, people noticed. Finally, Larrabee googled “fat chest” and learned that surgery was his only option. He went under the knife. The first time he saw his new chest was an emotional moment. He compares the experience to looking in the mirror and seeing a different face staring back. “It was unbelievable,” he says. “I had a flat chest! I couldn’t wait for summer.”

1/ Trim Some ’Joules

3/ Ease Up on the Partying

Eating less can help you lose manboob fat, but don’t go overboard. A very-low-kilojoule diet is bad for many reasons; for one thing, starvation wreaks havoc on your hormones. That may actually increase your risk of gynaecomastia when you start eating again. “Cut 1000-2000kJ a day. Eat plenty of protein, fruits and vegetables,” says nutrition adviser Dr Mike Roussell.

Both marijuana and alcohol have been linked to gynaecomastia, due to the testosterone-lowering effect of heavy use. But it all comes down to the genetic luck of the draw. “Everyone’s sensitivity level is different,” Lo says. “Some people can smoke pot forever and not get gynaecomastia. Others smoke one joint and their breasts will swell up and get tender.”

2/ Straighten Your Posture

4/ Bench Press it Away

Rounded shoulders make a soft chest look even softer. Rehab specialist Dean Somerset recommends the exercise-band pull-apart to draw your shoulders back into their natural posture. Hold a band straight out in front of you with your arms shoulderwidth apart. Pull your arms out to your sides while lifting your sternum and pulling your shoulderblades down and together. Do 3-4 sets of 10-12 reps every day – especially after sitting.

The fat in pseudogynaecomastia tends to accumulate on the whole breast. (Actual gynaecomastia is just behind the nipple.) Sculpting your pecs can cut chest flab. So do dumbbell bench presses two days a week. “Don’t even count the reps; just think about making your chest as full as possible,” advises trainer Ethan Benda. Do five sets, using a weight you can lift about 20 times. Extra credit: follow with three sets of cable flys, keeping the reps controlled. Finish with three sets of heavy barbell bench presses, using a weight you can lift four times.

THE BEST CHEST MOVE If you’re trying to shrink breast fat and sculpt your pecs, make the dumbbell bench press your go-to move. Lie on a bench holding a pair of dumbbells with your arms straight above your chest, palms facing forward. Lower the dumbbells to the sides of your chest, pause, then drive them back up. That’s one rep.

1

2

SEPTEMBER 2016

55


AVAILABLE AT


NUTRITION

Haute Fat Burning The most effective fat-burning foods aren’t always a culinary match made in heaven. But with the right knowledge, losing weight can be a gourmet affair

SEPTEMBER 2016

57


YOU R FAT-SPI K I NG K ITC H E N STAPLES

THE DESIRE TO SHED your winter padding can lead you down a dark path paved with cardboard “health” foods, which both fail to set your tastebuds on fire and drain your bank account. Allow chef Florence Knight, author of A Cook And Her Cupboard, to show you the light. We compiled 10 of the best weight-loss foods readily available at your local supermarket (there’s no first harvest, cold-pressed cocon nut oil here) and tasked her with h using her culinary skill to tu urn these seemingly discordant ingredients into two coursess of mouth-watering, weightcutting cuisine. You’ll want to add these to your recipe rotation immediately.

58

SEPTEMBER 2016

01/ arramundi Ba

06 6/ Walnuts W

It ha as one of the lowe est saturated fat co ontents of all anima al protein source es and it tastes damned good to oo. Hook yourselff up.

Th hese nuts deliver an n antioxidant hit an nd control your ap ppetite, so you’ll pa ass on the office bisscuit jar.

02/ Brown Rice

07 7/ Orrange

Burning slower than its albino cousin, it’s easily absorbed by your digestive system and its fibre makess for a great, er, m cleanser. A vacuum for belly fat.

Vitamin C and die de, etary fibre asid one orange will lea ave you sated for a trifling 270 kilo ne ojoules. Dig on outt of the fruit bow wl ASAP.

03 3/ Organic oney Ho

0 08/ Spanish S Onion O

This balances blo ood sugar to red duce cravings, and gives you ap pre-run en ndurance hit.

W double the With a antioxidants of its p paler counterpart, this bulb offers a d dose of low-GI fuel to light up yyour our fat burning burning.

04/ Egg

09/ Carrots

Make nature’s multivit a staple. Its high protein content programss your metabolism for the rest of the day’s efforts.

This low-carb, high-fibre root veg is a useful pre-workout snack, and comess crammed with vitamin K to keep bones strong.

05 5/ Grrapefruit

1 Oats O

This tart fruit is pa acked with vitamin B5, which h converts fat into energy and clearrs the e excess carb loa ad so it won’t sit above your belt.

They’re not just fo or breakfast. A Add these complex carbs to o your dinner to keep you full for a lot longer.


NUTRITION

THE BELLY-FAT SINKER WALNUT BAKED BARRA WITH ORANGE-INFUSED RICE

63g PROTEIN

2g SATURATED FAT

2500kJ

45 MINUTES

THE SWEET TRIMMING

Prep your rice Knight’s way. “Blast it under the cold tap, then submerge it in 10 centimetres of cold water for up to 30 minutes. That’s how restaurants get that incredibly fluffy texture,” she says. Pre-heat the oven to 200°C. Pour the oats, walnuts, orange zest and salt into a food processor. Pulse the machine on and off – you want the walnuts crushed, not dust. Whisk together the egg and milk; pour into a bowl. Then grab your protein and dip it along the factory line: first in the flour, then the egg wash, finishing with the walnut and oat mix. Stick it in the fridge for 20 minutes. Drain your rice. Now add a generous pinch of salt and the rice to a large pan of boiling water. Cover tightly and turn the heat down to the lowest setting. Cook for 28 minutes, remove from heat, and stand for eight minutes. Get back on fish duty. “Heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over a low-to-medium heat. Lightly cook for two minutes on both sides, until golden,” says Knight. Finish it off in the oven for three minutes. Almost there. Soak the onion in cold water for three minutes, to mellow its flavour. Finally, mix the orange, carrot and onion with the rice in a bowl. Plate up the rice with the fish and sprinkle the rosemary on top for a high-performance meal with no fatty consequences.

INGREDIENTS (serves 4) For the fish • 4 x 150g skinless barramundi fillets • 100g rolled oats • 50g walnuts • Zest of an orange • 1 egg, beaten • 100ml milk • 2 tbsp plain flour • 1 tsp olive oil For the rice • 450g brown rice • 2 oranges, peeled and segmented • 3 carrots, peeled and grated • 1 Spanish onion, peeled and finely sliced • 2 sprigs fresh rosemary

MAKE AT HOME USE THE FREE VIEWA APP TO ADD THESE RECIPES TO YOUR PHONE

BAKED GRAPEFRUIT WITH WALNUTS This dessert hits the spot without any repercussions for your waistline. Introduce a handful of walnuts to the grapefruits for a mouth-watering shower of antioxidants that infiltrates the very centre of your fat supplies. “Heat your oven to 200°C. Halve the grapefruits, run a knife around the circumference and slice the centre into segments,” says Knight. Prep, done. Place the grapefruits cut-side up on a baking sheet. Pour a layer of honey over each and put them in the oven for 10 minutes. Toast the walnuts for three minutes and sprinkle them on top of the grapefruits. Adding nuts is what makes this dish filling, while only bumping up the kilojoule count by 50 a plate. Devour at leisure, burn fat with pleasure.

INGREDIENTS (serves 4) • 2 large pink grapefruits • 1 tbsp organic honey • Handful walnuts

0.6g SATURATED FAT

4.5g FIBRE

880kJ 15 MINUTES SEPTEMBER 2016

59


Bone of contention: Shoulder injuries can take months to heal. Don’t be a victim

Shore Up Your Shoulders Many lifters end up with sore shoulders. Here’s how to end the pain if you have it, and avoid it in the future [ BY LOU SCHULER ]

SHOULDER INJURIES DON’T discriminate. They account for up to 36 per cent of all major weights room injuries (that is, the ones severe enough to require medical attention), and they target big and small guys equally. Dr Morey Kolber was one of those casualties. “I separated one shoulder and partially tore the rotator cuff on the other one when I was lifting in high school,” he says. Kolber needed three months of physical therapy to get his shoulder back into working order. His physio’s advice moving forward was simple: use lighter weights. But even though Kolber followed that wisdom carefully, within a couple of years he had seriously injured his shoulder once more.

60

SEPTEMBER 2016

You may never be carted out of the gym with a blown shoulder the way Kolber was. But if you’re an average guy with a natural inclination to test your max bench or see just how much weight you can shunt overhead, chances are you have experienced shoulder pain at some point in your life. That pain is a sign you’re doing something wrong, and larger problems could be looming. If the joint finally fails, with it goes the ability to do everyday tasks and activities you love. Everything from typing on a keyboard to sleeping through the night can become painful and challenging – in fact, more than 80 per cent of people with shoulder pain report trouble sleeping. You can also say goodbye to your

favourite pastimes, like swinging a racquet, throwing a ball or casting a line off a boat. So take action and read on for four ways to protect this crucial joint. STOP DOING THESE EXERCISES

Part of Kolber’s problem was that he received bad advice from both his physio and his training partners. “The things I was told were good for my shoulders, I now realise were not,” he says. Currently Kolber teaches at Nova Southeastern University in the US, and he began studying shoulder pain in lifters in 2004. Almost immediately he found a strong link between shoulder pain and moves done with arms in the “high five” position, like the behind-the-neck


MUSCLE + FITNESS

pulldown and shoulder press – body-building staples. “These were exercises I did day in and day out,” he says. Rather than strengthening his shoulders, the moves were making the joints unstable by stretching the tissues tasked with protecting them. Next, he looked at what happens to those unstable joints. Impingement is something that occurs when your rotator cuff – the four muscles that hold your ball-and-socket shoulder joint together – is pinched within the tight space where it’s attached. The condition, caused by inflammation, can lead to chronic pain. Lifters who did upright rows and lateral raises with their elbows above their shoulders were most likely to have impingement. Sore-shouldered lifters typically blame the bench press. It might be a perpetrator, but Kolber found proving that connection impossible. “Some 95 per cent of people I study do the bench press,” he says. “Determining whether it’s a culprit is hard when everyone does it.” Your best bet is to correct your form to minimise your risk (see below). FOCUS ON YOUR FORM

The most surprising result of Kolber’s 12 years of research turned age-old advice on its head: the weight of the load actually doesn’t seem to matter. “People with good form who lift heavy don’t have a higher injury risk,” he says. “They’re told, ‘If it hurts, use less weight and do more reps’.

DOING LOTS OF REPS WITH BAD FORM ON ANY SHOULDER EXERCISE IS A TERRIBLE IDEA But it’s not the weight. It’s muscle imbalance and poor movement patterns that cause damage.” In fact, Kolber says, doing a lot of reps with bad form on any shoulder exercise is a terrible idea, no matter how light the weights are. It’s far better to do fewer reps with heavier weights while maintaining perfect form – that is, unless you’re doing those “high five” exercises. Then you’re in strife no matter how good your form is. STRENGTHEN YOUR TRAPS

Kolber discovered two big differences between lifters with shoulder pain and those without: the pain-free lifters were more likely to do externalrotation strengthening exercises. These moves target your external rotators, small muscles at the back of your shoulders that help stabilise your shoulder joint, balancing your deltoids and reducing your risk of impingement. Also, in their upper back, their lower trapezius muscles were stronger relative to their upper traps. Your lower traps are easy to strengthen: just consciously pull your shoulderblades down

and together. That alone increases lower-trap activation by 13 per cent, Kolber says. Do that before each rep on lat pulldowns and pull-up variations and they’ll be better able to protect your shoulders. DON’T SLEEP ON YOUR SORE SIDE

Your sleeping position has a big impact on how quickly you recover and may even affect your future injury risk, says Kolber. If you do have pain or an injury, try to avoid sleeping on the hurt side with your head resting on your arm. That can cut bloodflow to your injury, which in turn slows down the repair process. But even if you don’t have pain, cutting off bloodflow to one shoulder every single night can make the joint more prone to injury. Kolber’s recommendation: if you’re feeling pain, sleep on the unaffected side with your arms out in front of you or hugging a pillow. This position facilitates bloodflow. Pain-free? Sleep in that same position but alternate sides nightly.

THE SHOULDER-SAVING BENCH PRESS

PHOTOGRAPHY: BEN GOLDSTEIN; GROOMING: ADAM RAYMOND

Talk to a lifter with shoulder discomfort and he’ll likely blame the barbell bench press. With four simple changes to your form, you’ll spare your shoulders and push your lifts into PB territory, says trainer Eric Cressey.

3 / NARROW YOUR GRIP A wider grip limits your range of motion but also leaves your shoulders in a more vulnerable position. Narrow your grip so it’s exactly at shoulder width, Cressey says. As you remove the bar, don’t lose your shoulder positioning.

1 / ENGAGE YOUR LEGS The bench press is a total body exercise, Cressey says. The more work you do with your lower body, the less strain your shoulders will endure. Spread your feet wide when you set up, and drive your feet down into the floor. Start each rep by pushing through your feet to help move the bar off your chest.

2 / HUG THE BENCH Before you even touch the bar, pull your shoulderblades together and down, as if you’re “hugging” the bench with your shoulders. Keep your shoulders in this position throughout the exercise in order to provide yourself with a stable base and a powerful platform to press from.

4 / PULL BEFORE YOU PUSH Letting the bar drop to your chest and bounce off your sternum is a surefire way to get hurt. Instead, pull the bar to your chest by flexing your upper-back muscles. That raises your chest higher and limits your range of motion, says Cressey. Then push yourself away from the bar, driving your upper back into the bench.

SEPTEMBER 2016

61


NEW COM PETIT ION

– Brought to you by –

HAVE YOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES? The competition you’ve been waiting for is here! Men’s Health is looking for a trainer with a proven record in achieving eye-popping physical transformations and the expertise and charisma to motivate anyone to get fit. Enter now and you could win a fitness coaching diploma at Sage Institute of Fitness worth over $18,500*, a $1000 workout wardrobe from THE ICONIC SPORT and be a contributor to Men’s Health, plus you’ll catapult yourself to the top of the fitness industry! You can never stop learning in any career you are in. 62

SEPTEMBER 2016


MH COMPETITION

HERE’S HOW TO ENTER Head to menshealth.com.au and click on the Next Top Trainer tab. Fill out the entry form and upload a one-minute video explaining why you should be our Next Top Trainer, together with a pic of yourself and, if possible, a recent client case study. Our expert judging panel (below) will select the top five entrants, who will be flown to Sydney for a photo shoot and an interview. Voting will be hosted at menshealth.com.au with the top five profiled in our January 2017 issue and the final winner unveiled in the February issue.

WHAT YOU CAN WIN!

The winner will receive a scholarship for a Diploma of Fitness Coaching (10067NAT) at Sage Institute of Fitness (RTO ID 110070) worth over $18,500*, a $1000 workout wardrobe and ambassador role at THE ICONIC SPORT, and be a contributor to Men’s Health. The winner will also star in Men’s Health training videos, along with possible partnering opportunities with competition sponsors. Visit menshealth.com.au for full terms and conditions. *Value may vary, please see full terms and conditions

OU

+

TJUDGING PANEL

COMMANDO STEVE



+



QUALIFIED FITNESS COACH

+

CHIEF BRABON



+



ORIGINAL BOOTCAMP

+

RICK BURKE



+



HEAD OF SPORT, THE ICONIC

+

LUKE BENEDICTUS



+



MH EDITOR

– Our proud sponsors – Full T&Cs: menshealth.com.au. Entrants must be 18+ and have a Certificate III & IV in Fitness. Competition open between 04/08/16 00:01 AEST and 09/10/16 11:59 AEDT. Finalists judged at Promoter’s premises 11/10/16 11:00 AEDT. Public Voting open: 07/11/16 00:01 AEDT to 16/12/16 00:01 AEDT. Major Winner determined at Promoter’s premises 16/12/16 11:00 AEDT. Major Winner notified by phone 05/01/17 and announced in Men’s Health on 09/01/17. Total prize value: $19,500 + MoneyCan’t-Buy. Promoter: Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, 8 Central Ave, Eveleigh, NSW 2015 (ABN 16 097 410 896).

SEPTEMBER 2016

63


LIM

IT

ED

E

T DI

IO

N INSPI R ING STOR IES TH AT SH APED OUR NATION

TR ALIA’ AUS SPORTING S

INSPIR ING STOR IES TH AT SH A PED OUR NATION

SPORTING

ISSUE 1

APED TH AT SH

ON OU R NATI

I A’ AUSTR AL S

INSPIR IN

G STOR IES

ION

HEROES Australia – no nation on Earth loves so many sports, nor loves them so much.

ISSUE 2

1960s & 70s INSPIR ING STOR IES TH AT SH APED OUR NATION

AUSTR ALIA’S

ECTOR’ COLL &

ISSUE 3

Aussies love their sporting heroes, and these four bookazines have got them all, from Don Bradman to Joey Johns, Dawn Fraser to Sally Pearson, and everyone in between.

1980s & 90s

S G STOR IE INSPIR IN

Sporting success, the idea of a tiny population of rugged individuals taking on the world in any field of endeavour featuring a ball, an engine or just the human body, is a concept embedded in our national DNA.

A PED TH AT SH

ION OU R N AT

A

Brought to you by &

ISSUE 4

FOLLOW THE JOUR NEY IN ISSUE 4 EDITION ECTOR’s COLL you Brought to &

ISSUE 4 ON SALE 1ST AUGUST

by

O


Adventure

MH Life MAKE IT COUNT

PHOTOGRAPHY: GARY SALTER

Outer Limits Sir Ranulph Fiennes has trekked his way from Antarctica to the North Pole. He had a heart attack and then ran seven marathons – in seven days. He turned 65 and summited Everest. Discover what pushes him > BY

GEOF F NORM A N

SEPTEMBER 2016

65


Adventure

uch of Sir Ranulph Fiennes’ life has been spent getting to the top. Not the top of the corporate ladder, but literally the top of the world – the North Pole – and the bottom as well, as in the South Pole. He succeeded at both, and had plenty of other extreme adventures along the way. The founding editor of Guinness World Records has called him the world’s greatest living explorer. The cost of all these exploits? A considerable amount of money and half of each finger on one hand.

M

The Case of the Missing Digits “During a solo expedition to the North Pole, I lost my sled through the ice and had to reach down into the water to retrieve it. As a result, the fingers and thumb on that hand were badly frostbitten. When I returned home, the doctors told me that amputation of two inches or so was necessary.”

An Unendurable Wait For medical reasons the amputations couldn’t be performed right away. Fiennes would have to wait, perhaps five months, while the skin near the dead tissue healed enough to make what they called a patch. “It was agony, just touching a thing by mistake. I grew tired of waiting around, so I did it myself.” (See “DIY Amputation”, right)

The Dangers of a Wet Boot Fiennes’ first bout with frostbite was as a young officer in the British Army’s elite Special Air Service (SAS). “I had been wading in an icy river, and my feet stayed too long in the wet boots. My right foot turned black and I had a skin graft. But the whole graft came off two or three years later, when I was in the bath.”

Adventure in His Blood His father, Lt. Col. Sir Ranulph Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes, who commanded the Royal Scots Greys, was killed in action in World War II. The younger Fiennes was educated at Eton and holds a peerage title, Third Baronet of Banbury; his ancestors include Charlemagne and various kings. His third cousin 66

SEPTEMBER 2016

is Voldemort (that is, the actor Ralph Fiennes). The military suited him – the SAS is at the very top of British soldiering.

Exploits in Arabia Fiennes was born too late for all the 19th-century British colonial action, but like a character out of an adventure novel, he ended up on the Arabian peninsula – between Yemen, Saudi Arabia and the Strait of Hormuz – serving the Sultan of Oman. The Sultan was embroiled in a tough shadow war against communist guerrillas. Fiennes commanded a reconnaissance platoon and saw plenty of action in the Dhofar Rebellion. He was decorated for his bravery and chronicled the experience in a book, Where Soldiers Fear to Tread. Later he returned to Oman on an expedition to locate the fabled lost city of Ubar – known as “Iram of the Pillars” in the Koran and “Atlantis of the Sands” elsewhere. This once-mighty fortress had disappeared beneath the soft desert sand. He and his late wife found what was believed to have been this city; he wrote a book about that too.

As it turned out, climbing Everest’s 8848 metres wasn’t a problem. “There was never that long emptiness immediately below,” Fiennes says. “When you looked off, what you saw were white shoulders.” It took him three attempts. The third time proved lucky, and he was only 65 years old. And yes, he’s written a book about that too. He also climbed the Eiger, the legendary Swiss peak with a 539m vertical surface of rock and ice. “It took us three days to make it up the north face, and when it was done, I determined that from here out I would leave the vertical stuff behind,” Fiennes says. “These days, when it is time to clean the leaves and debris from the gutters on the house, I hold the ladder and my wife climbs up to do the job.”

solution is breathable clothing, and you have to be able to quickly put on something warm on top when you stop. Cold and hot, cold and hot. They come together very quickly.”

The Mind Plays Tricks People ask Fiennes if he’s ever had experiences that might be called supernatural. “Nothing like that for me. My late wife, on one trip, thought she heard footsteps and had the sense that she was being followed. Of course, there was nobody out there to do any following.”

Deep Thoughts Out There? “No. It’s a bit late to be wondering why you are out there. And you are awfully busy.”

Does He Miss It? Going to Cold Extremes The polar regions are endless, flat and white. The trick is to think cinematically to “divert the mind. You imagine that you’re escaping from a Siberian gulag. You chant to yourself ‘escape, escape’. . . imagining you’re being chased. And you must keep going to stay ahead of the pursuit.”

A Climber Afraid of Heights

When Sweat Freezes

For a man who’s been driven to conquer great heights, Fiennes has never had the best relationship with them. “I suffer from what I think of as vertigo,” he says. “Put quite simply, I am afraid of heights.” But the SAS made him a paratrooper, and he learned how to step out of a plane in midair. His instructors taught him to never look down and to keep his eyes open when he exited the airplane.

“When [physician and fellow adventurer] Mike Stroud and I did the first unsupported crossing of Antarctica in the Nineties, we were pulling 220 kilograms on a sled. It was often 50 degrees below zero centigrade, but the two of us were sweating trying to pull these things. Almost as soon as we stopped, the sweat would freeze and then we were in danger from hypothermia. The

“When I’m at home I have never wanted to be back at the poles.”

The Tiniest Obstacle “On one crossing there was a problem with a kidney stone. I knew right off what the problem was, but I thought if I drank enough water and took enough painkillers, I would be able to carry on. But eventually I ran out of painkillers. Then it was too painful to keep walking. So I used the rescue beacon to alert the ski plane, and it came and got me.” He wrote a book about that too, of course.

His Cardiac Pause . . . One thing to know about being an adventurer-explorer is that the unknown is always right around the corner. Things like the heart attack that Fiennes suffered, in

>


SIR RANULPH FIENNES

Age 72 Home West Midlands, England Occupation Adventurer, author

The Sixties At 17, Fiennes left Eton College before graduating and joined the army. He trained as an SAS paratrooper, commanded counterinsurgency forces in Oman and led the first hovercraft expedition up the Nile.

The Seventies and Eighties After expeditions to Greenland and other exotic locales, Fiennes and fellow explorer Charlie Burton became the first people to cross the North and South Poles in one trip.

PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN PARNELL/EYEVINE/AUSTRALSCOPE

“WhenI’mathome Ihavenever wantedtobe back at the poles’’

DIY AMPUTATION: “I DID IT CAREFULLY” 1 2

“I took the Black & Decker vice from my tool shed.” With the micro saw blade, “I cut off the dead finger and thumb ends of my left hand”. 3 “I did it slowly and carefully. When it bled or was painful, I moved the saw away from the living flesh to the damaged flesh.” 4 “I had to saw through bone, but it was dead and quite shrivelled.” 5 He says he saved himself thousands in medical bills by doing it himself. EPILOGUE “I kept the mummified fingers. You hate to part with something that has been a part of you for some 6 ars. But I have no idea now where they are. Part of the tter, I suppose. Or thrown out.”

The Nineties Fiennes set a world record in 1990 for “unsupported northerly polar travel”, found the purported lost city of Ubar in the Arabian Desert, and completed (with Mike Stroud) the first unsupported crossing of Antarctica.

The 2000s He lost part of his fingers to frostbite on a North Pole tour. Four months after a heart attack and bypass surgery, he completed seven marathons in seven consecutive days. At age 65, he climbed Everest.

The Future He won’t say what’s next, but it’ll be good; his autobiography is called Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know.


Adventure

. . . and the Reason Why “I’ve always believed that it was the diet on those polar expeditions that led to my heart attack. We ate quite a lot of chocolate and butter,” says Fiennes. “Doctor Stroud planned it so that what we consumed was largely fat. That was the most efficient way of getting the calories.” Stroud, who’s done a study on starvation and its effect on the human body, calculated that they would need 5500 calories (22,990 kilojoules) a day, but the weight of that much food would have slowed their progress to the point that they would have eaten all the provisions before they reached the destination. “So he cut it back by 300 calories (1250kJ) to 5200 (21,740kJ). That was the bare minimum.” Fiennes began the Antarctica crossing weighing 98kg but lost an enormous amount of weight – and not in a healthy way. “By the time we reached the South Pole, the halfway point, I was looking skeletal.”

then, of course, he forgot to pack the heart monitor. “But just the same . . . I knew.”

Truly Scary Disasters “When I was young, I smoked. Gauloises. Ten a day. Then I quit. But I still got cancer. Not of the lungs, however. I had cancer of the prostate. Which led to six hours of surgery. That got rid of it . . . for now. Then there are the other things. Alzheimer’s. Dementia. Much worse than an emergency on the ice. And nothing you can do.”

What’s Left to Explore? “There are only two poles, of course, and there is a constant race to break records. Everest has been done. Many times. There is a lot left to explore in the oceans and space. The barrier is the cost. You can do Everest, but you can’t get into the space race. But there are climbs. Those dreadful 6000-foot (1800m) cliffs where someone can still do a first ascent. Crossing Antarctica during the polar winter between the two equinoxes is something that has not yet been done. Someone will do it. Perhaps using vehicles or whatever, and that will be a record. After that, someone will do it on skis. Eventually, it will be solo, or female, or over-70 . . . and so forth.”

His Bypass Recovery Plan “You wait four or five months and then get back to it.” For Fiennes, that meant doing seven marathons in seven consecutive days, beginning in South America in Patagonia and ending with the New York City Marathon.

How Crazy Is That? “It might appear that this was foolishness on my part,” Fiennes says with British understatement. “A way of denying the reality of the heart attack, if you will. But it wasn’t, actually. I had been doing these things that were greater tests of endurance before the heart attack, and I had permission from the surgeon to do this as long as I monitored my heart rate and made sure it did not get above 130 beats per minute.” But 68

SEPTEMBER 2016

The Why of it All “Sometime in the Eighties, Prince Charles, who has always been a supporter and benefactor, suggested using the expeditions as a way of raising funds for charities.” In 2011, Fiennes was named the top celebrity fundraiser in the United Kingdom, having generated over £2.5 million for Marie Curie, a charity that supports people suffering from terminal illnesses.

What’s Next? Fiennes will soon let us know what his next adventure will be. What we can know for sure: there’ll be a record to be set, it’ll involve expensive travel to a very hot or very cold part of the world, and probably he’ll write a book about it.

BYPASS COMEBACK, EXTREME EDITION

After his heart attack, Fiennes ran seven consecutive marathons in the Land Rover 7x7x7 as a fundraiser for, appropriately, the British Heart Foundation. 7 MARATHONS, 7 DAYS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Oct. 27, 2003: Patagonia Oct. 28: Falkland Islands Oct. 29: Sydney Oct. 30: Singapore Oct. 31: London Nov. 1: Cairo Nov. 2: New York City. Finishing time in the New York City Marathon: 5 hours, 25 minutes

TWO RULES OF POLAR TRAVEL

Rule 1 Travel light. “There isn’t much room left on the sled after you’ve packed the food and the absolute necessities,” Fiennes says. “So you leave a lot behind. No toothbrush – too much weight and space. Mike Stroud was ruthless, and I am a man of faith. I made a little inspirational note that read, ‘With God all things are possible’. He vetoed that and it got left behind.”

Rule 2 Go to the loo fast. Okay, it’s 50 below, but you have to go. “People always ask about that. ‘How do you do it?’ The answer is . . . quickly.”

PHOTOGRAPHY: IAN PARNELL/EYEVINE/AUSTRALSCOPE

June 2003, in the most banal of settings: sitting in an airplane, waiting for takeoff. He never saw it coming. “I went forward with a bang and that was it,” he says. “Out for three days. They did a double bypass.”

‘‘I suffer from what I think of as vertigo. Put quite simply, I am afraid of heights’’


NEW FOR SUBSCRIBERS

Renew your subscription and gain access to the new MyVIP Rewards site. Enjoy thousands of rewards with up to 50% off BIG BRANDS. Save on health, wellbeing, groceries, entertainment, retail, dining, travel and household helpers.

Live life large on us when you renew your subscription to Men’s Health.

4 WAYS TO RENEW 1. See your latest reminder in your letterbox or inbox. 2. Jump online and visit subscribetoday.com.au/mh/renewme 3. Turn to the subscriptions page for this issue’s offer. 4. Call our friendly customer service team on 1300 668 118 and quote “renew me”. Need your subscriber number? Check the front of the address sheet that came with your magazine.


Discover The Whitsundays

Sure, you could kick back and soak up some rays on the dazzling sweep of Whitehaven Beach. Or you could put this long stretch of pristine sand to better use BY

A A RON SCO T T

AS AUSTRALIANS, WE’RE SO spoilt for choice when it comes to beaches that it’s easy to become jaded. We tend to grow blasé about powdery sand, darting schools of fish and gracefully arching palm trees. We have a habit of clapping eyes on some delectable sweep of sun-drenched sand and sniffing: “Mmm, not bad. But not quite as good as . . . ” And yet even by these exacting standards, Whitehaven Beach – which clings to the eastern shore of Whitsunday Island – is something else. A bay of seawater so turquoise it looks like a Disneyland concoction, a ribbon of sand so white it positively glows in the mid-morning sun, a jagged backdrop of jungly mountains unsullied by a single mark of human existence. I approached the beach

70

SEPTEMBER 2016

from the sea, onboard the Hamilton Island ferry, and as the boat cleared the southern tip of Whitsunday Island and Whitehaven hoved into view, an awed silence settled over the crowded deck. I swear you could hear the clicks as jaws fell open. All of which explains why I decided to run the 10-kilometre Great Whitehaven Beach Run in bare feet. The scene was so glorious, the sand so fine, the water so clear, I wanted to feel connected to it all. I wanted to feel the powder between my toes, the water lapping at my ankles. I wanted the primal joy of running as nature intended, my feet skittering over the gently cambered sand. But it was a mistake. And what’s more, I’d been warned . . .

TACTICAL BLUNDER The evening prior, I’d bumped into race ambassador and four-time Olympian Steve Moneghetti as he sat down for dinner. An affable bloke who still snaps out over 100 kilometres of running a week, I’d asked him if he could give me some tips for tomorrow’s race. “Well, I’ll definitely be running in shoes,” he offered, before launching into an impassioned monologue about how runners need to listen to their own bodies and understand what works for them come race day. So it was that, the following morning, I impulsively unlaced my runners and skipped to the start line in bare feet. As we counted down the seconds to the starter’s gun, I noted that there was only one other runner in bare feet – and he was a slightly unhinged-looking youngster who’d neglected to wear a shirt, instead pinning his race bib to the back of his shorts.


Trouble in paradise: the author hobbles across the finish line.

WHERE

f

p

pp

h

y

HAMILTON ISLAND

p BRISBANE

STAY Hamilton Island’s Reef View Resort towers over the sands of Catseye Beach, offering spacious rooms with splendid views of neighbouring Whitsunday Island. Local tip: beware the rapacious cockatoos that throng the balconies at sunset. Feed them at your peril.

EAT

Nonetheless, as the gun fired I was washed in a warm wave of endorphins that left me grinning with barely constrained euphoria, my feet pattering over the sand as the pack of runners stretched out to a long thread, the sun on our shoulders, the southerly pushing at our backs. Then, at the 3km marker, I noticed an ominous tingling in the balls of my feet. At the 4km marker the tingling had morphed into burning. At the 5km turnaround point, it felt as if I was running on red-hot coals.

BLOOD ON THE SAND Oh, the regret as I slogged back into the southerly! The air was still sweet, the sun still glorious, the beach still unutterably beautiful – but I saw none of it as I shuffled away in my own private pain-cave, counting down the steps to that blissful moment when I could sit down, soak my

legs in the soothing waters, then jab a needle into the bubo-like swellings consuming my feet. The kilometre markers that had zipped by with wondrous speed at the start of the race now inched past with torturous slowness as I scuffed along, wincing with every stride, my eyes locked on my mutinous feet. Then I finished. And things were suddenly all right. Because I was sitting on sand so white you’d think you could bake bread with it, my legs immersed in water just cold enough to bring a prickle to the back of my neck while tiny black-andwhite-striped clownfish darted around my feet, no doubt marvelling at the size and scope of the blisters before them. Should you run Whitehaven? Yes! A hundred times, yes! Just take my advice – hell, take Steve Moneghetti’s advice – and wear shoes.

Drawing inspiration from South East Asian street food, Coca Chu pumps out seriously tasty share plates. The twicecooked pork ribs defy my powers of description. Oh, and don’t forget to check out their cocktail menu.

RUN The Great Whitehaven Beach Run (June 18, 2017), which includes five-, 10- and 21km races, is the second event in the Hamilton Island Endurance Series, which also includes the Hilly Marathon (April 30, 2017), the Hamilton Island Triathlon (November 12, 2016) and the Whitehaven Beach Ocean Swim (November 13, 2016). Visit hamiltonisland.com.au for more information.

RELAX The sunbaked beaches and knife-edge mountains of the Whitsundays may be spectacular to behold, but they can be brutal on hard-working limbs. If a nasty case of DOMS is threatening to derail your holiday, pay a call at Spa Wumurdaylin. Trust me, you won’t regret it.

SEPTEMBER 2016

71


Watches

Omega Seamaster Diver “RIO 2016” $5875 Made to commemorate the Games, the watch’s black ceramic bezel and coloured lacquered numerals reproduce the five colours of the Olympic rings.

72

SEPTEMBER 2016

e Olympics, the merest on of a second can make the erence between a podium finish end of a lifelong dream. Whether track, the pool or the velodrome, nt timing is critical. the official Olympics timekeeper, this ponsibility falls to Omega. Luckily, they’ve some practice. Their involvement with the Games stretches b back to 1932 when three of ked up at the Los Angeles their watchmakerrs rock Olympics with a ssuitcasse full of mechanical changed a bit since stopwatches. “Th hings have h the brand’s then,” admits Step phen Urquhart, U recently retired presideent. m will number 450 In Rio, Omega’ss team onals armed with time-keeping pro ofessio easure up to onetechnology that ccan me such accuracy millionth of a seco ond. Achieving A isn’t the Swiss braand’s only o challenge. In the course of overseeeing 277 Olympics – both has wrestled with summer and wintter – Omega O the variable logisttics off an encylopedia of sporting events. “The bobsleigh h is one of the hardest because the timing is so difficultt to capture,” Urquhart n is tricky, too, because says. “But the marrathon ent.” it’s such a sprawling eve Handling such diverse events has led Omega hnological breakthroughs. to develop severaal tech From improved starting blocks for runners that ne false-starts to the electronically dettermin nd touch-pad sensors in photo-finish camera an the pool, the bran nd’s list of inventions is lengthy. What then does U Urquhaart consider to be Omega’s most significaant innovation? “It’s on’t make mistakes.” simple, p ” he says. y ““We do

PHOTOGRAPHY: EDWARD URRUTIA

TTheo official timekeeper of the Olympics knows that every llisecond matters


ONLY

$45 PER EDIT*

SUBSCRIBE NOW AT BEAUTYCREW.COM.AU/PARCEL


Style

AHEAD OF THE CURVE Formula 1 ace Daniel Ricciardo divulges his style secrets for living life in the fast lane

I’m always travelling. I took 98 flights last year

I don’t have a specific style role model. But Steve McQueen was a pretty cool cat in his day. He had that “don’t-reallycare” quality about him. Whatever he wore, he always looked effortless. Sometimes I can get style ideas from music too. G-Eazy, the Oakland rapper, always looks sharp in buttoned-up shirts, baseball jackets, that sort of thing. It’s a very American look – like a cross between Johnny Cash and James Dean. When it comes to essentials, you always need a plain black and a plain white T-shirt. They work with everything, they’re versatile and you can dress them up or down. Calibre does a good crew-neck one.

I’ve been wearing Dior Sauvage fragrance a lot lately and really like it. As I’m always on the go, I like something that keeps me feeling fresh and masculine.

I’m always travelling. I took 98 flights last year. If it’s long-haul then I always wear compression socks – 2XU do a good pair. They help to minimise fatigue and guard against deep-vein thrombosis.

Everyone in motor racing seems to love watches. I think it’s because of the mechanical nature of watches annd cars – they share a lot of similarities. Right now I’m wearing a TAG Heuer Carerra 01 Chronograph on a rubber strap. It’s casual, sporty and not too fragile, so I wear it a lot at the traack. But I’ve got a few pieces in my watch w box – a Rolex, a Patek Philippe, aan IWC. Like I say, I love watches.

74

SEPTEMBER 2016

I prefer shopping online for the convenience. Plus it can help take my mind off a big race. mrporter.com offers a broad range and variety.


The crystal-clear waters of Whitehaven Beach will really test                 !    "#   $       %$#  &     '  %$ () %*  +     ^^^OHTPS[VUPZSHUKJVTH\

Sunday 13 November, 2016

GREAT WHITEHAVEN BEACH RUN 12 November 2016

30 April 2017

18 June 2017


ATHLETIC AESTHETIC Sportswear isn’t just for the gym. High-tech fabrics meet hard-knock durability for gear that’ll go the distance at work or play PHOTOGR A PH Y GROOMING

76

TOMASZ MACHNIK

PAUL BEDGGOOD

SEPTEMBER 2016

S T Y L ING

MODEL

MAIA LIAKOS

JONATHAN @ WINK

Topman denim jacket $139.95

Calvin Klein hoodie $169.95

Kit and Ace pants $198

Nike Air Huarache Run Ultra sneakers $200


FIT FOR PURPOSE

As a self-proclaimed “fitness superwatch”, the Fitbit Surge lives up to its billing, with constant heart-rate tracking, GPS and a battery that lasts for days. As a style accessory on this bold orange strap, it also delivers the goods. ▪

Lacoste windbreaker $329

Superdry top $139.95

Dita sunglasses $475

Fitbit Surge $399.95

>

SEPTEMBER 2016

77


VESTED INTEREST

Offering warmth minus the bulk, the puffer vest is the true mark of winter. Let your biceps rejoice and be free. ▪

H&M puffer vest $49.95

Lululemon tank $65

Nike shorts $90

Pared Eyewear sunglasses $260

Polo Ralph Lauren backpack $269

78

SEPTEMBER 2016


COOL RUNNING

The new breed of trackpants offer style as well as comfort. Pick a pair with a slim, tailored construction and opt for formal materials like wool and thick cotton. ► Lacoste sweat top $229 ► Superdry vest $179.95 ► The Academy Brand trackpants $69.95

TIGHTY WHITEY

A crisp, white polo isn’t just for the tennis. Just remember: baggy and long is out; slim is in. The shirt should hit just below the hips and be streamlined against your body. ◄ ◄ ◄ ◄

Tommy Hilfiger jacket $299 Tommy Hilfiger polo from The Iconic $99.95 Lululemon sweatpants $119 Saucony Originals sneakers $150

SEPTEMBER 2016

79


Grooming

DON’T BE SO SENSITIVE IS YOUR DAILY SHAVE SCORCHING YOUR FACE? HERE’S HOW TO BEAT RAZOR BURN FOR GOOD By

Caelia Corse

1 Gillette Fusion Hydra Gel Pure & Sensitive $6.99

3

1

Has no dye or grance so as to e uce skin irritation, plus contains “glide” technology for smooth shaving.

4

2 Bulldog Sensitive Moisturiser $12.95

2

Finish up massaging soothing, absorbing it leaves or greasy

by in this fastcream – no shine feel.

3 Dermalogica Close Shave Oil $35

5

This lightweight oil provides visibility for shaping edges and deposits a protective barrier on skin for an easy glide.

6 4

ck Leopard Skin thing After S have Balm $49 Instantly dials down post-shave stings with soothing horse chestnut extract.

5 Schick Hydro 5 Razor $12.99

7

The gel reservoir near the blades reduces razor friction and lubricates skin with each stroke.

It’s a burning issue: the International Journal of Cosmetic Science reports that two-thirds of men suffer irritation after shaving, with the neck area particularly vulnerable to redness and razor bumps. Here’s how to soothe your skin and get your smoothest shave ever.

80

SEPTEMBER 2016

DO YOUR PREP “Rinse your face with warm water to clean and soften hairs,” says dermatologist Dr Natasha Cook. Softer facial hair means you can use a lighter touch with your razor. Shaving postshower is ideal. And choose a shaving product with glycerin. “It moisturises, softens and protects the skin barrier,” says Cook.

DON’T BLIND SHAVEE Singing, sex, winning g imaginary arguments – all suitable shower activities. But avoid shaving there; instead use a mirror to guide you. “Always shave in the same direction of hair growth,” says Cook. Shaving against growth pulls skin in the opposite direction to the root of the hair, increasing skin tension and irritation.

KEEP IT CLEAN Rinse your razor after each stroke, says Kristian Jones, head barber at Sydney’s QT Hotel. Rinsing ensures skin is not exposed to any bacteria gathered in the previous stroke. Once done, rinse with cool water, then moisturise, says Cook. “Remember, you’ve taken skin off microscopically so it needs a layer of protection immediately.”

HAVE A BREAK Give your razor the weekend off. Taking a break from shaving will rehabilitate sensitive skin. “Every time you shave, you remove a layer of skin, so a rest is always recommended,” says Jones. “These days it’s increasingly acceptable to have a day or two of growth, even in the corporate world.”

Uses natural foaming agents like coconut to cleanse and unplug pores gently, plus glycerine to protect your skin barrier. 7 Tom Ford For Men Neroli Portofino Conditioning Beard Oil $76 Delivers texture, lustre and a classic aroma for a post-trim beard polish.

PHOTOGRAPHY: EDWARD URRUTIA

6 Klim Face Wash + Scrub $12.95


? R O V I V R U S #AREYOUA

BAN R U T S E G IG B ’S D L R O W E H T K... C A B IS S IE R E S E C A R E R U ADVENT DNEY OLYMPIC PARK Saturday 10th December MHSurvivalAus

2016, SY

@MH_SURVIVAL

U .A M O .C L A V I V R U S H M


Motoring

IN THE DRIVER’S SEAT: TOBY PRICE

Turn Left at the Cactus On two wheels or four, this Aussie daredevil is a hard man to beat

“HE’S NOT HUMAN. He can’t be.” This is a typical comment from Toby Price’s competitors in the recent Finke Desert Race, a brutal battle between man, machine and dirt tracks held each year over 452 kilometres outside Alice Springs. Price had previously won the Finke four times on a dirt bike, usually by huge margins, and was obviously getting bored, so this year he decided to attempt the seemingly impossible, entering in a giant off-road truck as well. This meant completing a brutal course (many entrants piss blood afterwards, and generally only half of them finish) in the truck, then jumping in a chopper back to the start line to immediately go again on his bike. Incredibly, he won the twowheeled contest (easily) and finished second in the trucks, despite it being his first serious offroad effort on four wheels. The secret, according to his competitors, is that he has absolutely no fear, and thus drives like a man who feels immortal. Sure enough, Price confirms that’s how he felt after rolling his truck in his first practice session before the Finke. “I lost track of how many times it rolled. It was a decent crash, so I was pretty pumped to get out of it

and feel all right. I didn’t even break a fingernail,” he says. “After that, I realised how safe I was, that I wasn’t going to get hurt, and I thought I might as well have a real crack.” Price is also the reigning bike champion – and the first Australian winner ever – of the world’s toughest dirt-bike race, the Dakar Rally, which sees racers cross more than 9000km of desert from Bolivia to Argentina for 14 days straight in plus-40°C temperatures. To say he has to be fit for his sport is as much of an understatement as suggesting he must be “slightly” bonkers. Price’s training regimen includes mountain biking, cross-country running and gym sessions focusing on his arms, shoulders and legs. “I tend to do a lot of core workouts, but in terms of unconventional stuff, I love to ride my stand-up jet ski, which helps with balance and core strength,” he explains. The fact that it’s a highspeed and potentially risky hobby no doubt appeals to him as well. Hot stuff: Price guns it through Chile in the 2015 Dakar Rally.

82

SEPTEMBER 2016


EDITED BY STEPHEN CORBY

Should you be rushing out to buy a Tesla?

$114,100

HITS . . . AND A MISS

The Boxster Boxster’s iconic bangs and crackles of old now come via the flick of a dial.

Cash price of an entrylevel Tesla S 60 in NSW (see tesla.com/en_au for prices in your state) $67,200 Cost in the US

The new Porsche Boxtser is a delight to behold and a thrill to drive. But what happened to that iconic roar? DAVID BECKHAM’S VOICE WAS, for

OFF-ROAD TRAINING Hitting the desert on a dirtbike is brutal on your back. You’ll also be constantly moving from a seated to a standing position and riding on the balls of your feet, which strains your calves. Here’s how to prepare. Running stairs builds stamina and strong calves. Run three sets of 50 steps or more twice a week to build endurance in your calves. Keep your knees high and take short steps. Back extensions strengthen your glutes, hamstrings and lower back. Get into position on a backextension station, fold your arms across your chest, then bend at the waist, lowering your torso until it’s perpendicular to the floor. Hold for a second, then return. Do three sets of 10 reps.

Abdominal exercises tighten your gut and stabilise your torso. Crunches put less strain on your back than sit-ups, while isolating the upper and lower abdominal muscles. Do three sets of 30 reps.

a long time, seen as proof that God had a sense of humour. The sound of Porky Pig after a heavy night out issuing from the mouth of a sporting superstar and male model was also evidence of a slightly cruel bent. Porsche – a car company as close to godliness as the rules of engineering allow – has always made cars that sound more like Scarlett Johansson (particularly in the movie Her, where disembodied sexiness is so powerful): throaty, strident, warm, reassuring and just generally wonderful. It comes as something of a shock, then, to drive the company’s beautiful new 718 Boxster and discover that its famous engine howl has been replaced with something closer to a cross between an amplified raspberry-blowing contest and a Subaru WRX (the infamous choice of ram-raiders and lovers of doof-doof music). There are occasional echoes of the induction bark and throttle bellow of old, but in general it’s like listening to a favourite AC/DC song, only to discover that Axl Rose is doing the singing. It’s not bad – it’s just not Porsche. The reason for the change is a shift from the much-beloved, naturally aspirated six-cylinder engines the company is revered for to a choice of two turbocharged four-cylinder units (just like a WRX). This epochal shift is driven by the worldwide trend for car companies to go into a mad flap about reducing C02 emissions while increasing fuel economy, by downsizing every engine in sight. In an effort to disguise its voice-box transplant, Porsche has

made efforts to “augment” the sound of the new Boxster, which means that if you flick the nifty little dial attached to the steering wheel to “Sport” it will make lots of impressive bangs and crackles every time you get off the throttle, some of which sound like fireworks are being dropped into tin cans right under your seat. This cool mood switch also offers a brilliant “push to pass” button, offering you Maximum Everything for 20 seconds (there’s even a cool little graphic on the screen counting down how much crazy time you have left). The grunt this button unleashes really is impressive, because the clever Germans at Porsche have managed to extract more power and torque from these smaller engines (a 2L with 220kW in the base model; a 257kW 2.5L in the Boxster S) than from the old six cylinders. Not surprisingly, this means they’re also faster – the S going from zero to 100km/h in 4.2 seconds, the base model taking a slightly more leisurely 4.7. The 718 model – which boasts that 80 per cent of its parts are new – is definitely the sexiest looking Boxster ever, with a pert new rear end, as well as the quickest. And it’s still an absolute joy to drive, with exquisite steering and handling. That kind of fun ain’t cheap, of course, with the base manual-gearbox Boxster starting at $113,100 (MLP) and the top-of-theline flappy-paddle Boxster S topping out at $148,390. Getting people who own the old one, with its beautiful Johanssonesque voice, to upgrade, however, might be a challenge.

Number of Teslas sold in the US in 2015

600 Estimated number of Teslas on Australian roads

661 Number of Tesla Supercharging stations across the globe

8

Number of Supercharging stations in Australia . . . all of them between Port Macquarie and Melbourne

2018 Likely year that Tesla’s sedan-size Model 3 will arrive on Australian shores

MH Verdict: NOT YET SEPTEMBER 2016

83


POP-UP STORE

SOCKS, SHAVING KITS, PERSONALISED POWER DRILLS . . . FATHER’S DAY GIFTS ARE INVARIABLY DUTIFUL BUT DULL. IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE THAT WAY. USE THESE IDEAS IF YOU’RE BUYING FOR YOUR OLD MAN – OR JUST LEAVE THIS PAGE STRATEGICALLY OPEN TO GIVE YOUR KIDS SOME TACTFUL “INSPIRATION”

A Laphroaig Triple Wood Single Malt

C

Whisky made on the Scottish island of Islay is big on flavour and characterised by its smoky or peaty taste. Do not mix with cola. $119.99

B

D

B Suunto Ambit3 Vertical Multisport GPS

F

The ideal wingman for any keen hiker. As well as monitoring your speed and distance, this watch charts your changing altitude during your next uphill assault. $629

E

C Leatherman Signal A true jack-of-all-trades, this 19-piece multi-tool is a DIY godsend that includes everything from wirecutters to a hammer and pliers. $285

H A I

D Montblanc Meisterstück Passport Holder Boost your chances of a businessclass upgrade by presenting your travel docs in this full-grain cowhide passport holder. $270

E Montblanc Meisterstück Solitaire Blue Hour LeGrand

I

Whether you’re signing autographs for your loyal fans or sealing milliondollar deals, putting pen to paper feels infinitely more civilised if you’re doing it with this blue lacquered ballpoint with platinum-coated fittings. $1350

F Maui Jim Mavericks with Blue Hawaii lenses They may look like a fashion statement, but these sunglasses are strictly built for purpose. The mirrored lenses eliminate glare while boosting colour and clarity. $369

G. The MARCS WALTON SATCHEL ideal smart-casual substitute for a traditional briefcase. The detachable shoulder strap means you can even take it on your bike. $349

Hops have got hip with the craft-beer revolution. This guide will help you or your dad navigate your porters from your pales and your stouts from your saisons. $29.99

I Sauvage Shower Gel Dior’s new roster of Sauvage products includes a shower gel, antiperspirant and aftershave balm. The subtler way to incorporate scent and upgrade shower time. $61

84

SEPTEMBER 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY: RICHARD MORTIMER

H The Great Australian Beer Guide


GROOMING AND STYLE MASTERCLASS WITH

Step up your casual style game with a sport luxe look that’s cool and relaxed. Think sporty accessories, a bomber jacket and a sleek pair of runners. A clean-shaven face helps keep things sophisticated.

“ADOPT THIS CAREFREE LOOK TO KEEP YOUR STYLE AS FRESH AND SMOOTH AS YOUR FACE.” Bray Stoneham Men’s Health

PROTECT YOUR SKIN FROM IRRITATION AND REDNESS AND PUT YOUR BEST FACE FORWARD WITH CONFIDENCE


BUY THE BOOKS USETHE VIEWA APP TO BUY AUSTRALIA’S SPORTING HEROES ONLINE

EVERYONE’S BUDDY

The AFL is blessed with a multitude of stars. True superstars, though, with athletic prowess and a profile that sees them genuinely transcend their code are far more rare. But Lance “Buddy” Franklin is clearly one By

S A M A N T H A L A NE

BUDDY. A moniker from childhood that became an Australian household name. Although he consciously introduces himself as Lance, from the moment he joined the AFL’s elite ranks in 2004, Buddy was how he was always going to be known. Footy aside, there were things about the Franklin package even then – the twinkling of piercing blue eyes, how he carried himself, his choice of dress compared to a bunch of trackydack-clad fellow draftees. A telltale sign that Hawthorn knew the rare commodity it had on its hands was the manner in which Franklin’s first senior coach, Alastair Clarkson, tried to limit the Buddy buzz. For some time Clarkson spoke with almost painful restraint about a player who went on to lead the Hawks’ goal-kicking in six consecutive seasons, lead the competition goal count twice, win four All Australian gongs, two premierships and a club best and fairest in one of those flag years. Star? No. Superstar? Hell yes. Hawthorn could hardly be blamed for at least attempting to keep the lid on this uniquely gifted footballer and young man as he made his way through a life that was never going to be ordinary. 86

SEPTEMBER 2016

Franklin didn’t merely lift in packed football stadiums, burning off opponents with a trademark arching of his back, conjuring miraculous goals and propelling his 199-centimetre frame with eye-watering athleticism. After growing up on an isolated wheat farm in rural Western Australia, where he honed ball skills by drilling a footy into the wall of a tin shearing shed, he moved to the big smoke of Melbourne and began to lead a merry dance off-field. For a period, Hawthorn actually engaged a quasi-minder to keep an eye on him. Inevitably, the legend of Franklin – and some myth – flourished. Franklin won his first premiership with Hawthorn in 2008, was the best player in the Hawks’ losing Grand Final side in 2012, and in 2013 collected a second flag. It was no secret Franklin’s 18-possession, six-mark, one-goal performance in the last AFL match of season 2013 – which took his match tally to 182 and goal count to 580 – might be his last wearing the brown and gold. He remained unsigned the entire season and Hawthorn made obvious adjustments on field that suggested the club was preparing for life without him.

As Franklin’s taste for life in Sydney became more widely known, flashing lights pointed to the AFL’s newest club, Greater Western Sydney. Giants bosses believed they were on the cusp of landing a dream catch. Ten days after the 2013 Grand Final, however, one of the biggest recruiting coups in the history of Australian Rules footy dropped: Franklin was indeed going to Sydney, but joining the Swans. He signed the richest deal in the code’s history to date: nine years for more than $10 million. Swans chairman Andrew Pridham, an investment banker of international repute, knows a good commercial deal when he sees one. Three years into Franklin’s Sydney life, Pridham is at pains to say club recruiters led the unprecedented marquee player’s signing, not the club’s marketeers. But on critical metrics like membership, television ratings and home game attendances, Franklin’s arrival has correlated with a boom. Is it sheer coincidence that Sydney’s membership figure was 36,358 in 2013 – the season before Franklin joined – but recently exceeded 50,000 for the first time? Doubtful. “A bit like Adam Goodes, Lance’s aura


MH PROMOTION

“Franklinsignedthe richestdealinthe code’shistorytodate: nineyearsformore than$10million” transcends what happens on the field,” Pridham says. Franklin hasn’t won two Brownlow Medals, been the anti-racism campaigner and advocate for Indigenous affairs, or Australian of the Year that Goodes has. Yet comparable column inches have been devoted to his sporting gifts, life and times. Never more than since his engagement to model and paparazzi favourite Jesinta Campbell. Winning his third Coleman medal for league-leading goal kicker, a fifth All Australian and equal second place in the 2014

Stats of a Hero

102 GOALS IN THE 2008 SEASON

For more legends on the field, court and pitch, check out our four-part Australia’s Sporting Heroes bookazine series. Available from leading retailers and online at austsportingheroes.com.au

Brownlow medal were dazzling decorations for his debut year in red and white. Franklin’s second season with the Swans, however, ended prematurely and in circumstances no one could have predicted. On the eve of the 2015 finals series he withdrew and did not return. The reason for the sidelining was not an injured knee or ankle, but his mental health. He retreated and committed to intense professional help. To warm welcome and some relief, Franklin returned in round one this year, and before the milestone, in a Channel 7 interview, described

6

his decision to go public with his private challenges as the best he has ever made. Instantly kicking on, Franklin booted four goals in each of his first four outings. In light of his recently shared tribulations, there is fresh perspective on his triumphs now. Private challenges may have altered the life of this very well-known face. Unchanged is the Buddy effect. Whenever, wherever Franklin takes the field, eyeballs are transfixed and jaws inevitably drop. He accelerates, soars, glides and a mesmerised audience is transported with him.

TIMES HAWTHORN’S LEADING GOAL KICKER: 2007-2012

THREE COLEMAN MEDALS: 2008

2011

2014

SEPTEMBER 2016

87


The Mark Wahlberg ethos: you get one shot; don’t waste it.

88

SEPTEMBER 2016


MH GUY

Wahlberg’s

Winning

Ways

He’s one of the most successful actors on the planet. But that’s not enough. Which is why he’s up each day at 4am BY

DAVID HOCHMAN ART STREIBER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

SEPTEMBER 2016

89


A word of warning if you happen to encounter Mark Wahlberg with a football in his hands: duck. HE’S AN OSCAR-NOMINATED actor and producer, and an entrepreneur – and he also has a serious throwing arm. And on this brilliant blue-sky day in Los Angeles, he’s launching missiles at a couple of guys from his crew at a park near his house. If the image of a movie star horsing around with his pals sounds like a scene from Entourage, remember that Wahlberg’s real-life posse was the inspiration for the series, which he produced. It’s clear that his inner circle is still loyal. His new West Coast assistant, Jonathan, is winded from chasing down Hail Marys, and now Armando, a man in his mid-fifties who’s Wahlberg’s longtime caddie, is about 90

SEPTEMBER 2016

five metres from the boss, catching chestthumping spirals. Armando looks away for a split second and – thwack! – is smacked in the face as his glasses go flying. Everybody laughs, especially Armando, but you can tell it hurts. “What the hell happened?” Wahlberg says with his Boston lilt. At 45, in jeans and a snug blue T-shirt, he hasn’t lost the swagger or the chiselled physique that first made him famous. “You’re usually all hands, buddy.” Armando shakes it off as Wahlberg tells the boys to go long. They start running. Armando, bless his resilient heart, pivots left to make the reception. Wahlberg can’t stop grinning. “Way to stay alive out there, my man!” he says. “You’re a superstar.”

That’s pretty much how it is with Wahlberg. Go huge or, well, suck it up and try all over again. The one-time street tough from Dorchester, Massachusetts, has pushed through hard knocks and career ups and downs to become a global industry all of his own. Wahlberg’s movies alone have grossed more than US$2.5 billion at the box office, largely because of his versatility. He can do gritty drama in a film like The Departed, frat-boy comedy in the Ted movies, and all-out action in Transformers. Deepwater Horizon, about the deadly 2010 oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, opens in Australia on October 6, and Wahlberg will appear in Patriots Day, based on the Boston


MH GUY

“It gets harder the older you get,” says the father of four.

WATCH THE TRAILER USE THE VIEWA APP TO SEE WAHLBERG IN DEEPWATER HORIZON

Marathon bombing, which is due for release here early in 2017. Transformers: The Last Knight is due out in the middle of next year. And Wahlberg makes these massive projects feel almost like side gigs. There’s the Wahlburgers hamburger chain, the sports drink company Aquahydrate, and a line of supplements. Plus, he’s making inroads in apparel and real estate. “Time management” is for office drones in khakis. What Wahlberg achieves in any given 24 hours is a different beast altogether. When asked for the formula for his success, Wahlberg shrugs and folds his sizable arms. “I just want to be good at what I do,” he says, “so I constantly figure out how to do that.”

Success on this scale doesn’t require a master plan. It requires an attitude. And an alarm that goes off at 4:10am.

“I’M A BIG BELIEVER in getting ownership of your life,” Wahlberg says. He’s sitting in the shade thumbing through text messages as he talks. It’s only noon, but he’s been up since before dawn. He did a workout with kettlebells, dumbbells, bands and a skipping rope before attacking the golf course with a round of “hit and run” – basically a six-anda-half kilometre run punctuated by booming tee shots. “It’s like everything else Mark does,” says Armando, who carries the clubs on these

near-daily assaults. “Don’t dick around. Go to the ball, hit it, go to the next one, hit it, get on the green. Got it?” Wahlberg’s trainer, Brian Nguyen, calls him “one of the most dedicated, strictly regimented athletes I know. He’s a creature of habit and doesn’t like to change routine once it’s set.” Cue the shoulder shrug. “There’s more than enough time in a day as long as you’re not burning the candle at both ends,” Wahlberg says. “As long as I’m not going out and getting crazy, I’m good. I get eight hours of sleep.” His default mode is being in transition – at this point from 95 kilograms, the weight he carried for Deepwater Horizon, to a lean 80 for the

>

SEPTEMBER 2016

91


Transformers movie. But you get the sense that he pushes like this all the time. Whether it’s fitness, films or fooling around, the Wahlberg ethos is: you get one shot; don’t waste it. “It gets harder the older you get,” he says. “That’s why staying in shape and maintaining it is always easier than going from one extreme to the other, heavy to getting in shape to stopping training and getting heavy again.” Motivation? When he says it’s not just about the money, you somehow believe him. And this part sounds absolutely sincere: “I’ve got plenty of motivation. I always want to be at my best. I don’t want to show up anything but prepared and the way they expect me to show up.” This Wahlberg learned from a life of transitions, from teenage criminal to rapper to model to actor to producer to entrepreneur. New gig? The one thing you can control is preparation. The constants, which work for any man on any career path, are these: work hard, find mentors, ask questions, show up prepared. And stay loyal to your crew. Now a cluster of school kids on a field trip notices the one famous face in the park, and the “Oh. My. Gawwwwds!” go viral. At this stage in his career, Wahlberg sets off giddiness with kids, teens, millennials, Xers, grandmas, even the ice-cream man. He pulls on a Boston Red Sox cap and pops in a blue earbud to try to staunch the attention. But it’s useless, so he starts jogging.

FOR DEEPWATER HORIZON, a film about the workers on that ill-fated oil platform, Wahlberg attended “drilling school” to learn the job. He then insisted that the man he portrays in the movie, former Transocean chief electronics technician Mike Williams, be at his elbow as an on-set consultant to ensure authenticity and accuracy. The research was typical for the all-in Wahlberg. “It was good to talk to a lot of the survivors and certainly to the families of the guys who didn’t get off the rig,” he says. The gushing oil dominated the news for weeks, but that was nothing compared to the loss of human life, says Wahlberg. “We wanted to focus on that.” Wahlberg’s desire to learn forms a through-line for his career – although it didn’t kick in until almost too late. He was a drug-selling punk teenager in a working-class neighbourhood south of Boston when he pleaded guilty to assaulting two Vietnamese men, one with a wooden stick, the other with his fists. Wahlberg served 45 days at Boston’s Deer Island House of Correction. “People always ask, ‘What would you say to the 15- or 16-year-old Mark Wahlberg?’” he says in a voice that’s softer than you might expect. “I say, ‘Why would I bother? He wouldn’t listen. He thought he knew it all.’” His jail cell lesson (aside from the value of doing umpteen sit-ups a day) was that being a screw-up is a choice. “I knew the only way I 92

SEPTEMBER 2016

“I don’t pretend to know what I’m talking about. If there’s something I don’t understand, I’m the first one to say, ‘Explain that to me until I do understand it’.” could be successful was by working hard and doing the right thing,” he says. “When I was in trouble, I got to a point where I said, ‘I don’t want to do this anymore’, so you look around at your options.” Wahlberg looked to his next-older sibling (there were nine in all), Donnie, who’s now an actor on Blue Bloods but was then busting moves with a cadre of white-boy pop singers in cargo pants called New Kids on the Block. With fresh jailhouse abs and rap sheet cred, Marky Mark was born. He and the Funky Bunch toured with Donnie’s group, and by early 1992 the group’s first album, Music for the People, was a platinum-selling behemoth. Another lesson loomed. The New York Times dismissed the pelvis-thrusting Wahlberg as “a few steps shy of a Chippendales dancer”. That only drove him to work harder.

“Honestly, it was good being underestimated and not taken seriously because the expectations were so low,” he says. “You think, ‘Imagine what they’ll say when I put out a quality product’.” A certain resolve, evident today, began to form.

LOOKING AT THE ICONIC Calvin Klein ads now, “you see the hard effort”, Wahlberg says, as if he has to say it. Those early Nineties black-and-white skivvy shots by Herb Ritts show a rising star with a six-pack going on 12 and what Wahlberg describes as “this belief that if it could be done, then I could do it”. By this point he knew what he didn’t know. Admitting ignorance is hard for some, but try it sometime. “I’m not afraid to ask questions,” he says. “I don’t pretend to know what I’m


MH GUY

talking about. If there’s something I don’t understand, I’m the first one to say, ‘Explain that to me until I do understand it’. Like learning the beverage business, learning the restaurant business.” Early on, some of those questions went to his parish priest, Father Flavin, who saved him from his own worst impulses. (He still attends Mass weekly.) When he segued from music and modelling to movies, he was sure to surround himself, he says, “with the smartest, most talented, most successful people who would have anything to do with me”, including co-stars Danny DeVito and Penny Marshall (on his first film, Renaissance Man) and Leonardo DiCaprio (on his second, The Basketball Diaries). Ironically, the 1997 movie that set Wahlberg apart is one he probably wouldn’t make today: Boogie Nights, in which he played the generously proportioned porn star Dirk Diggler. The giant penis prosthetic that Dirk Diggler flashes makes Wahlberg uncomfortable now. “You do things when you’re younger that when you become a father make you go, ‘Well, I’m going to have to explain it to the kids’,” he says. Wahlberg and his wife, Rhea, have two girls and two boys ranging from six to 12 years old. They don’t watch Dad’s grown-up movies (“We don’t give them access to computers and YouTube and Google and all that shit,” he says), and parenthood makes Wahlberg think twice (well, okay, four times) about his projects. Wahlberg was an A-list marquee star by 2004, having appeared in such blockbusters as The Perfect Storm, Planet of the Apes and Three Kings. The money was spectacular, but he regretted some movie choices. He decided that he needed to “create projects I would want to watch myself”. That’s when Entourage happened.

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN acting and producing is the difference between “waiting around for miracles to happen and putting your ass in the driver’s seat”, Wahlberg says. In Hollywood – or in any business where unseen honchos make decisions affecting your life – the ultimate power move is taking the reins yourself. The story goes that Wahlberg’s longtime friend and assistant Eric Weinstein, a former drug addict he met on the set of The Basketball Diaries, hatched the idea to document the actor and his buddies goofing off behind the scenes. Wahlberg thought a funny, fictionalised version could work better – Eric became E; Mark turned into Vinnie Chase – and signed on to executive produce. He took other producer credits on the Oscar-nominated The Fighter and the HBO hits In Treatment and Boardwalk Empire, among others. The weight of responsibility has an oddly freeing side benefit: no regrets. “My thing is to make sure I don’t cut any corners and that I’m constantly working as hard as I can and giving myself the best chance to succeed at

ARM YOURSELF

To build Mark Wahlberg’s guns for the upcoming Transformers sequel, trainer Brian Nguyen added this finisher to his workouts. Do this circuit three times a week. Completing all three exercises is one round. Do two or three, resting for two minutes between rounds.

Step-up with Single-Arm Curl and Press Put your left foot on a box, a dumbbell in your right hand. Step up onto the bench. As you do, curl the weight and raise your right knee; press the weight overhead. Reverse the move. That’s one rep. Do all your reps and repeat on your other side. Reps: 8 each side

Instability Push-up Assume a push-up position with your hands on a foam roller, stability ball or medicine ball. Keeping your body straight, lower your chest until it nearly touches the roller or ball; pause, and push back up quickly as you can. Reps: as many as possible

Cable Triceps Pushdown Grab the rope or V attachment of the high pulley of a cable station and stand facing the stack with your elbows bent 90º. Without moving your upper arms, pull down until your arms are straight. Reverse the move. That’s one rep. Reps: 6-8

everything that I do.” He puts down his phone and smiles a little. “Then if things don’t work out, I don’t have to feel bad.” Admit it: nine out of 10 of your mates (and maybe you too) would love to be Vinnie on Entourage or Mark Wahlberg in real life. And maybe you’d take the millions and retire to a tropical beach. But listening to Wahlberg, you’d think he was just getting started. Forbes estimates his most recent annual salary at US$32 million, but that doesn’t include the burger joints, the beverage and supplement businesses, the growing real estate holdings, and more. There’s always more. The attitude is evident at his predawn workouts, five days a week, Nguyen says. After some foam-rolling, movement prep and Zen body awareness, “he dials it up and only knows intense. For the next 30 minutes he goes into beast mode, relying little on rest and heavily on complex movements and load.” Then there’s dad mode. Predictably, Wahlberg says he’s terrible with holidays: “I get a little stir-crazy.” He doesn’t like spending on things he won’t use. A splurge for him is outfitting the family’s Toyota Sienna people carrier with rims, DirecTV and tinted windows. He’s no Jay Z, in other words, though he definitely admires the guy. He holds up his phone and scrolls: the only music visible is Jay Z & Kanye’s Watch the Throne, 2Pac’s Greatest Hits and Adele’s 21, “which I listen to more than any of them”. He’s inspired by Paul Newman. “What he did on the philanthropy side with Newman’s Own is exactly what I’d like to do with our businesses,” he says in a quiet moment. The Mark Wahlberg Youth Foundation distributes millions annually to inner-city youth services and enrichment programs that inspire teens to stay in school. He’s also an active supporter of Boys & Girls Clubs of America. In April, Wahlberg made a surprise visit to Boston’s Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, whose running team raised $500,000 for the facility that treated 32 survivors of the Boston Marathon bombing. “Entertaining people is one thing,” he says, “but if you build in a charity component and make it thrive, you can do right by people for generation after generation.” The gawking kids are circling again, and Wahlberg glances back for his squad. It’s time to resume real life. A typical day includes helping Rhea get the kids up and off to school, then a day of phone calls and work, then home for a never-miss family dinner. After that, put the kids to bed. “They know Daddy’s going to read for a little while, memorising a script.” On this day there are adjustments: one son is sick, and there’s a sports banquet at school. Tomorrow, “I’ve got to get up at 4:15 to train and do it all over again”. Wahlberg, a flash of mischief on his face, nods to Armando. “Hey, where’s that football?” he asks, and his guys just shake their heads. “I’ll try to hit the tree next time, I swear.” SEPTEMBER 2016

93


TO LIVE FAST AND DIE YOUNG IS THE ULTIMATE PARTY ANIMAL’S EPIGRAM. BUT WHILE WE’RE FULLY SIGNED UP TO THE FIRST BIT, WE’RE FAR LESS ENAMOURED WITH THE IDEA OF AN EARLY SEND-OFF. THIS IS THE HEDONIST’S GUIDE TO GETTING AWAY WITH IT. FOR THOSE ABOUT TO DETOX, WE SALUTE YOU > W O R D S B Y T O M WA R D

94

SEPTEMBER 2016

P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y J O B E L AW R E N S O N & D A N M AT T H E W S

ILLUSTRATIONS BY BEN MOUNSEY


HEALTH

Learn how to clean up your act and give burnout the finger.

SEPTEMBER 2016

95


LIVE AID Rock god moves don’t come easy. PT and fitness author Tim Walker shares three exercises that’ll make your stage antics look more “dynamic thrash” than “epic fail”

ONSTAGE THE GUITAR SMASH

BACKSTAGE THE SLEDGEHAMMER SWING

A perennial favourite of virtuoso guitarists from Pete Townshend to Kurt Cobain, a memorable axe slam requires a powerful core, strong triceps and a lenient insurance policy. Fortunately, the correct execution can be honed through sledgehammer swings in the gym. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, hands close to the end of the handle, and swing 15 times diagonally from the right, then 15 from the left. Do four sets, resting for 30 seconds in-between.

ACKSTAGE BACKSTAGE THE BOX JUMP

The most dangerous part of a stage dive is not landing in the crowd but missing it altogether, a’ la Iggy Pop. The key is explosive energy, and a plyometric exercise like the two-footed box jump will help you develop maximum spring with minimal impact. Stand in front of a box of manageable height, then bend your knees and curl your arms back, keeping your torso straight. Perform three sets of 10 jumps, concentrating on moving forward not upward. Throw your arms forward for added momentum.

ONSTAGE THE TV TOSS

BACKSTAGE THE DEADLIFT

When kicking back after a three-hour set, it’s only natural to want to throw your television out of the window. Mastering the deadlift, which helps build strength in the lower and upper body, will make child’s play of hell-raising. First take an overhand grip on a barbell – knees bent, back straight – then squeeze your glutes as you stand up, pushing your hips forward to bring the bar to waist height. Do three sets of four reps to help avoid injury and embarrassment.

96

SEPTEMBER 2016

Fine-tune your health to avoid an early encore.

FOOD STYLIST: JACK SARGESON; ADDITIONAL REPORTING: JACK HART, SAM ROWE

ONSTAGE THE STAGE DIVE


HEALTH

A LEPPARD CHANGES ITS SPOTS After years of hoovering up every intoxicant put in front of him, Def Leppard guitarist Phil Collen hit the weights and started rewinding the clock “As anyone that’s ever sold zillions of records knows, drugs are everywhere. I indulged in alcohol, acid, heroin and cocaine. I was afraid of needles, so I snorted everything. But there comes a point where you eventually realise how hideous that is to your body. “Getting clean gave me two extra hours a day, so I took up jogging, martial arts, boxing and weightlifting. At one point I was lifting 160 kilograms – which is pretty good considering I’m a 71kg vegan – until a tendon slipped off my hand and I had to lower the weights. “Like anyone, I focus on different areas on different days. On Thursdays I like to train chest and triceps, which will be incline dumbbell press drop sets with about 22kg or 27kg dumbbells and some flat-bench press stuff. “When we’re gearing up to go on tour I’ll add in some cardio. That could be anything from a Muay Thai routine to boxing drills. I’ll try to do 25-60 minutes each day. I’ll also do HIIT. Often, I’ll do shoulders for two minutes, then kick the bag furiously for one minute. “I don’t think I’m missing out on anything by being a vegan – I have way more energy than my meat-eating counterparts. If I do need more protein, I avoid the kilojoule-laden powders with added sugar and go for vegan brands instead. “Food-wise I have a George Foreman grill on the tour bus, and I’ll make salad with kale, carrots, cabbage and lots of greens. Instead of dressing I’ll have apple-cider vinegar and a little amino acid, which tastes like soy sauce. Then I’ll chuck in a vegan burger, with avocados, to get some good fats. “I still get a high on stage, but a natural high will always beat a synthetic one.”

ROCKSTAR MUNCHIES #1

ELVIS’S PEANUT BUTTER, BANANA AND BACON SANDWICH The King was renowned for his monarchical appetite, in particular a fondness for these sweet and salty sandwiches, lovingly fried in butter. Toothsome though we’re sure they were, it’s tempting to suspect that such a habit may have indirectly contributed to his death in the lavatory, aged 42 and weighing 120kg. But if you’re feeling all shook up and need some gustatory succour to quash the blues, nutritionist Hayley Pedrick has crafted a more wholesome version that will return you to slender. INGREDIENTS

METHOD

• 3 TBSP ORGANIC RAW WALNUT BUTTER • 1 SLICE RYE & SUNFLOWER SEED BREAD • 1 SHAKE CINNAMON POWDER • 2 RASHERS LEAN BACON • 1 BANANA • 1 TBSP EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL (WE LIKE COBRAM ESTATE)

1/ Bacon has been getting a bad rep of late, but that’s the least of your worries here. Limit your intake to two grilled slices per sandwich and you’ll be fine. Key to redeeming this snack is swapping the peanut butter for organic raw walnut butter. It’s low in sugar and high in iron, giving you the energy to rock around the clock. 2/ Spread the walnut butter over your slices of seeded bread and sprinkle with cinnamon powder. Along with the slow-release carbs, this nutritional angel dust will help balance blood-sugar levels and suppress appetite. 3/ Add the sliced banana and grilled bacon, then fry your sandwich in extra-virgin olive oil. Coconut oil has its merits, but this is still your best fat for frying due to high levels of monosaturated fats (great for energy and resistant to oxidisation) and relatively low levels of saturates, helping you avoid the Heartburn Hotel.

>

A little less sat fat and a little more walnut butter please.

SEPTEMBER 2016

97


Play like a rock star, recover like an all-star.

AN ANATOMY OF EXCESS A lifetime of indulgence can take its toll on every part of the body, as this litany of notorious rock’n’roll casualties grimly illustrates. But equipped with our hedonist’s first aid kit, you can avoid blood on the tracks

CROWD SURF AND TURF OUT TINNITUS An exploding drum kit left The Who’s Pete Townshend with this serious aural complaint, but most cases tend to be less rock’n’roll, with 63 per cent of sufferers found to be lacking in vitamin B12. The good news is that methlcobalamin – a bioavailable form of B12 – is particularly adept at repairing nerve health, reducing the effects. The even happier news is that lobster boasts 23 per cent of your RDI – so you’re better calling room service than trashing your hotel room. SOURCE: AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY

98

SEPTEMBER 2016

SOUND CHECK YOUR BLOOD-SUGAR LEVELS Easing up on the booze isn’t perhaps the most rock’n’roll way to combat type 2 diabetes, but it could have helped drummer Mick Fleetwood avoid his own diagnosis. For a more proactive, preventive approach, hit the bikes. Spinning activates three of the body’s largest muscles – the quads, hamstrings and glutes – meaning you’ll continue to torch kilojoules long after exercising. Plus, high-intensity exercises have been shown to steady blood-glucose levels for up to three days post-workout. SOURCE: JOSLIN DIABETES CENTRE

SAFEGUARD YOUR IRON MAN Black Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi battled – and beat – lymphoma aged 64. The causes are myriad, but spending thousands of hours with an electric guitar hanging by the family jewels isn’t great for groinal wellbeing. Domestic gods aren’t off the hook either: resting a laptop on your lap has been found to cause similar problems, so cut it out. Skintight leather trousers are also out of the question – whether you’re trying to avoid cancer or not. SOURCE: UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL BASEL


HEALTH

ROCKSTAR MUNCHIES #2

JACK WHITE’S HOMEMADE GUACAMOLE With his alabaster pallor and rock eccentricities, the former White Stripes frontman might seem an unlikely champion of nutritional health. But the leaking of his backstage rider requirements revealed that the axeman knows his onions – or more accurately, avocados. Having specified a bowl of fresh, homemade guacamole, White went on to explain with surgical precision how this should be made. Here, nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert assesses the spoils. INGREDIENTS • 8 ORGANIC HAAS AVOCADOS • 8 VINE-RIPENED TOMATOES • ½ YELLOW ONION • 1 BUNCH CORIANDER • 4 SERRANO CHILLIES, DE-VEINED • ½ LIME

METHOD 01 Halve the avocados, removing the stones for later. Cut the tomatoes and chillies into rough chunks, then finely chop the coriander and onion. The avocados’ high vitamin E content, paired with the vitamin C-rich tomatoes, boost collagen production, helping to rehydrate skin. Avocado’s abundant potassium levels (higher than bananas) also contribute to a speedy recovery after a session on the sauce. 02 Mix all ingredients in a large bowl, leaving large chunks of avocado. As well as helping the body absorb antioxidants, the glutathione in avocados teams up with sulphur compounds in the onions to scrub the liver and flush waste from the body. Meanwhile, the antibiotic, antiviral and anti-inflammatory flavonoid quercetin (plentiful in both onion and coriander) combats infection.

Avoid a cardio crash like a garage e rock reviva alist.

LIVER LITTLE LONGER WITH TWO LIVENERS Cancer of the liver proved fatal for David Bowie, but the fight continues. And the biggest secret weapon is already an essential component of your hangover ritual, with coffee drinkers reducing their risk of hepatocellular carcinoma – the most common form of liver cancer – by up to 50 per cent. Your flat white’s polyphenols are to thank, along with its ability to increase the flow of toxin-flushing bile. You needn’t turn yourself into a jittery wreck either: two cups a day should do the trick.

03 Add salt and pepper to taste, then the avocado stones and lime juice to prevent t idi ti C d premature oxidisation. Cover and refrigerate before serving within the hour. The B vitamins, iron and zinc in avocados will keep pre-show energy levels high, while the chillies’ endorphin-releasing capsaicin stimulates the brain for on-point guitar shredding stamina.

>

SQUASH INSOMNIA IN ITS TRACKS In hindsight, it’s clear that Michael Jackson, a pathological insomniac (among other conditions), should have reached for pumpkin seeds instead of clinical anaesthetics to salve his lack of shut-eye. Packed with 206 per cent of your RDI of sleepboosting amino acid tryptophan, all they’re missing is a carb to transport the good stuff to the brain. May we direct you to our rehashed rye and sunflower seed Elvis sandwich? SOURCE: UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL CENTRE

SOURCE: CLINICAL GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY

SEPTEMBER 2016

99


NUTRIBULLETSTOTHEHEAD

Rock stars don’t do juice bars, but smart ones know that vodka for brunch ain’t so clever either. That’s why we designed three bespoke cocktails with the Juice Doctor and Erik Lorincz, head bartender at London’s Savoy hotel, for a night filled with swagger that’s consequence-free come morning

GREEN ARNOLD PALMER INGREDIENTS • 50ML GREY GOOSE VODKA • 10 SPINACH LEAVES • 30ML LEMON JUICE • 2.5CM GINGER, GRATED • 15ML AGAVE NECTAR • 1 TBSP MATCHA TEA

100

METHOD 01 Mix everything with a hand blender, then add ice and shake hard. The chlorophyll in the spinach will bind leftover toxins, preparing them for elimination, while the agave sugar restores blood sugar to normal levels. 02 Strain the mixture over ice into a rocks glass, dusting the glass with matcha powder to garnish. Epigallocatechin gallate is what you’re after here – an antioxidant that supports the liver after you’ve put it through the gauntlet.

SEPTEMBER 2016

DONT MISS A BEAT INGREDIENTS • 45ML OCHO TEQUILA REPOSADO • ¼ BEETROOT, COOKED • 60ML CLOUDY APPLE JUICE • 30ML COCONUT WATER • 30ML LIME JUICE • 2.5CM GINGER, GRATED • 15ML AGAVE NECTAR

METHOD 01 Whiz all ingredients with ice in a hand blender. Don’t be afraid of the beet: it contains massive amounts of nitrates, which work to increase bloodflow to the liver, helping it “pre-toxify”. Transfer to a shaker and give it some. 02 Strain the mixture over ice in a highball glass, then garnish half the rim with salt. If needed, top up with more lime and some coconut water: it helps to pre-empt the inevitable electrolyte drain post-drinking.


HEALTH

TRAIN FAST, DIE OLD Smashing it for 20 years before retiring to a penitent life of lentils, yoga and abstinence might be the template, but we just think it’s bad planning. Do this bespoke vivification circuit after a session (taking a 30-second breather between each move) to undo the damage On the liquid diet? There’s much more than whisky in these jars.

01

02

BODY-WEIGHT WINDMILL 5 rounds of 60 seconds

BURPEE PUSH-UP CLIMBERS 5 rounds of 60 seconds

With feet slightly wider than hip-width, hold your left hand straight up and reach your right towards your right foot. Your arms should form a straight line. Now engage your core and reverse the move back to the starting position. Alternate to the other side and repeat back and forth for the full minute. THE BENEFIT As well as “sweating out the toxins”, repetitive, large muscle movements increase heart rate, promoting the flow of oxygen to the organs working hardest to self-cleanse, namely your liver. Take a 30-second breather after each round and stay hydrated to speed up the process.

Start by getting into the push-up position, shrugging off the urge to sleep it off. Now do two push-ups before bringing your knees up to your chest one at a time for a count of six reps. Finally, jump up so that your feet leave the ground. It’s a lot to handle, so go at a steady pace for the minute, then rest for 30 seconds before going again. THE BENEFIT HIIT supercharges your metabolism, handy when you consider that hung-over workouts tend to burn carbs, rather than fat. It will take care of some of that late-night pizza, essentially.

03

04

FIRE BALL INGREDIENTS • 50ML CHIVAS REGAL 12 YEARS OLD • 30ML LEMON JUICE • 15ML SUGAR SYRUP • 2.5CM GINGER • PINCH TUMERIC • ½ FRESH EGG WHITE • 3 DROPS ANGOSTURA BITTERS METHOD 01 Crush the ginger in a shaker, add all the ingredients except for the bitters, and shake hard. Ginger is crucial because of the compound curcumin, which soothes inflammation, limiting your soreness the next day. 02 Fine strain into a martini glass and garnish with the bitters. The lemons are key: they help redress the body’s pH balance, plus their citric acid combines with the ethyl alcohol to neutralise most of the booze’s harmful effects before it hits your bloodstream.

STAR-JUMP JOGGERS 5 rounds of 60 seconds

LOW SQUAT TO SHOULDER LDER PRESS 5 rounds of 60 seconds

If this feels like you’re whirling like a dervish then you’re doing it right. Kick things off by jogging on the spot at 70 per cent effort for 30 seconds. Switch to star jumps for the remainder of the minute, making sure you’re getting your arms well above your head on each one. Keep whirling, then rest for half a minute. THE BENEFIT: Alcohol is a depressant that slows brain activity. Vigorous cardio releases endorphins, norepinephrine and adrenaline, all of which not only make you feel better but also help to numb the pain of that sixth cocktail.

Your final penance before a clean physical and mental conscience. Take a 12kg dumbbell in each hand and squat down so your forearms are parallel with your shins. Power yourself into a standing position, driving through the legs and extending your hips to force the dumbbells up and overhead. THE BENEFIT A heavy session slows the metabolism, but this final move will keep your kilojoule burn going for hours afterward. Which technically means it’ll still be working this evening, should you be tempted to go out again.

SEPTEMBER 2016 101


Porn star Mandy May is thinking about sex (as usual) and it turns out that she’s not the only one. The modern woman’s perspective on sex may just be more radical than you think . . . and that’s only the bits suitable for print ILLUSTRATIONS BY

102

WERN

SEPTEMBER 2016


SEX

My girlfriends screamed when I told them I hadn’t had sex in months. It was a pterodactyl-pitched screech of pain, pity and a by-proxy predatory hunger that silenced diners at other tables in the restaurant, made the waiter hurry over with a fresh bottle of wine, echoed over hills and valleys, and somewhere, kilometres away, made a lone man grope at his junk for reassurance without exactly understanding why. I shushed them. Of course, if the definition of having a sex life is engaging in semi-regular penis-in-vagina intercourse – along with the scattering of dinner dates and “Where is this going?” conversations that seem part and parcel of a consistent carnal routine – I’m screwed. Or not. Indeed, I’d be close to flatlining and the handwringing and pitiful clucks might have been appropriate. But the year is 2016 and surely no one thinks about sex in such biological, hardand-fast terms anymore? (Not that I have anything against hard and fast, mind you.) SEPTEMBER 2016 103


T AKE THE WOMAN I’VE BEEN sleeping with for the past four months – and I use the word “sleeping” incredibly broadly because she frequently wakes me up at 4am, or sometimes 5am if I’m lucky, with gentle kisses whose motive is always betrayed by the more insistent grinding of her hips. Our moans and whimpers escalate with the sound of early morning songbirds, before sunrise brings a sweaty, satisfied slip back into slumber. Or there’s my friend-with-benefits who every few weeks will invite me over to watch TV, yet more often than not I’ll leave his place hours later with a peck on the cheek, his taste still in my mouth, my underwear bunched up in my handbag and hickeys in secret places, with everything but the TV having been turned on. And of course there’s the man on the other side of the planet – the one who first let me answer to his demands with “Yes, sir” and now lets me call him “Daddy” – who I’ve never shared bodily fluids with, but with whom I exchange such graphic and detailed sexts that I frequently shudder to orgasm in the quiet moments between chores, social engagements and time zones, one hand wrapped around my smartphone and the other jammed down my panties. As I’ve counted the months on my fingers without a

penis in my vagina, I’ve learnt more about sex than I would’ve thought possible. Our bedroom narratives are changing along with our relationship ones – and just as we’re realising the only options for intimacy don’t have to involve diamond rings and white picket fences, so we’re learning the only act of intimacy is not just what the dictionary defines as sex. The first part of understanding these new narratives is recognising the one-dimensional nature of what’s left behind. In a story where women are “good girls” (ie, passive, demure, more emotionally driven than men and less libidinous) and those who are not are broken, deviant – sluts – there’s little room in the plot for our needs to converge, for that coming together of all the factors necessary for a climax. But in case my friends’ genuine concern at the intimation of a dry spell or my Sapphic sweetheart’s nocturnal nudges aren’t evidence enough, let me spell out one of the greatest misconceptions about women: that we don’t like or desire sex as much as men. Bullshit! A male friend laughed when we were discussing this. “Anecdotal evidence,” he said. “It’s way more. Women are a bunch of remorseless orgasm machines.” And it’s not just anecdotal either: books like Cacilda Jethá and Christopher Ryan’s Sex at Dawn (2010) and Daniel Bergner’s What Do Women Want? Adventures in the Science of Female Desire (2013) argue that conventional wisdom concerning human sexuality – particularly female sexuality – couldn’t be further from the truth. “Science Proves That Women Want Sex Just As Much As Men Do”, “The Truth About Female Desire: It’s Base, Animalistic And Ravenous”, “Turns Out Women Have Really, Really Strong Sex Drives. Can Men Handle It?” These headlines are hardly breaking news anymore, and while dudes in lab coats might still be debating the matter, I know for a fact that I’m only a “good girl” when being bad has earned me a spanking. So if we are indeed “remorseless orgasm machines” (I kinda love this description

because it removes that perceived emotionality that makes most women roll their eyes and cringe) – what oils our gears? What gets our engines purring? If we’re that into it, why isn’t everyone getting laid way more often? THERE WAS A COOL STUDY back in the early 2000s by psychologist Meredith Chivers, now director of the Sexuality and Gender Lab at Canada’s Queen’s University, that looked at the differences in the ways in which men and women get turned on. The things that turned hetero dudes on were pretty predictable: put a naked woman on screen and their arousal levels soared. Only naked men and suddenly not so much. And the things that turned women on? Everything. Well, almost. When shown a selection of porn clips – including sex between men and women, women and women, and men and men, as well as clips of a muscle-bound naked man walking along a beach and a pair of bonobo chimpanzees mating – what was measured in almost every case across women both straight and lesbian was increased vaginal wetness and bloodflow, bar the scene of the limp-dicked Chippendale going for a languid stroll. There are two noteworthy impressions here: we’re not aroused by the sight of a flaccid penis, no matter how many other muscles it’s attached to; and even so, the scope of sexual stimuli that women respond to, regardless of our sexual preferences, is far beyond that of men and beyond what we are even consciously aware of. The takeaway of that second point is particularly important: women are not “built” to attach sex to emotion, and it’s not only in response to romance that we get a warm tingling between our thighs. We don’t need to fall in love with you to want to bang your brains out on a fierce and primal level. But if it’s not love and emotional intimacy we’re looking for in sexual partners, and it’s not necessarily the visceral pleasure of an erect dick sliding into us, what is it? The confusing part is that it’s not, not those. Not always. We’re not just “remorseless orgasm


SEX

PHOTOGRAPHY: TRUNK ARCHIVE, CORBIS

machines” and sex is not simply a mea to an end – certainly not just one end anyw . It’s not an equation where one thing must surel lead to another or some sort of trade e ange of “I’ll lick yours if you lick mine”. Thi s what I love about my lovers, I told my cated girlfriends. The other diners continued with their conversations, the waiter no long hovered so close that I felt the need to ay his therapy bills, crickets chirped under th stars and that lone man somewhere kilomet away scratched his balls in idle content nt. EACH PERSON that I’ve not-been-havi g-s with-if-you-want-to-get-technical-abo -it is fulfilling a need or desire of their ow by fulfilling one of mine, and there’s some profoundly gratifying about that. Natur y my friends agreed. (“I love when a dud ju friggin’ worships my pussy, like it’s som sort of honour I’ve bestowed upon him. Once a guy said, ‘Oh my God, your puss is beautiful’, and then was basically super stoked to eat it. It stands out as one of m hottest moments ever.”) It all points to the fact that like stimu ation, satisfaction is not a simple formula: it’s a extensive experience that can expand fa beyond the spaces between our legs, and d that’s something worth exploring and – importantly – worth communicating, wh it’s with a one-night-stand or a long-term lover. It’s the man who spends hours with h his tongue between my legs not because expects me to return the favour but beca e this, he tells me, is where he could “die happy”. It’s the smile we exchange when I get up to rinse the mascara off my cheeks fix my hair so that the doorman downstai doesn’t think that I’ve been crying. It’s th woman who will sleepily open her eyes a pull me closer in the dark when I nuzzle i her neck, whisper her name and run my h s over her bed-warmed breasts and tummy hips and ohhh . . . And the distant dude w in carefully chosen words can get me pan ng without so much as touching me. And if you needed any more incentive to share your turnons, as my friend then succinctly put it: “I love being with guys who appreciate me. My sense of humour, my personality, my body – being effusive in your appreciation for me doesn’t make you a wuss, it makes me want to fuck you senseless.” There’s a new frankness in the ways we talk about sex, whether with our friends, our lovers or even our potential conquests. We’re emboldened by instant messaging, dating apps and the ubiquity of sex in mainstream media. The message that we can have everything is constantly being reinforced; “settle for nothing less”. But there’s a difference between knowing and communicating what’s good for you and gets you turned on, and being attached to a particular outcome. One thing has struck me about almost every dysfunctional relationship I’ve ever been involved in (and this includes even the most

Ravenous sex being or not, sex n carries the weight of social itioning and

casual no-strings encounters, because you are nothing if not relating on some level even as you’re fumbling with zips and buttons, reaching for condoms and mentally reminding yourself not to call out the wrong name) and that is the disparity between what we expect and the sometimes very different reality. Ravenous sexual beings we might be, it’s easy to forget that even though most of us now laugh at the notion of holding out until marriage or anything quite so oldfashioned, sex still carries the weight of social conditioning, our upbringings, our previous histories and our future hopes. As we attempt to steer our sexual narratives on courses more conscious, trying to sort real desire from what we think we ought to desire, we are often exploring uncharted territory – be it emotionally or just physically. We’re hungry to discover what pushes our buttons; sometimes it’s cautiously, slowly, and sometimes it’s with a reckless mash of the remote control. RECENTLY A GUY I’d been flirting with longdistance for some time sent me a message on WhatsApp. “So do you feel like actually having

sex at some stage?” My answer was a nebulous but honest “I don’t know”. I don’t know, and that’s okay. We get into all kinds of shit by thinking we understand exactly how our minds connect to our genitals and not just that, but thinking we can predict it. We’re remorseless orgasm machines, but the catch is that the users’ manual is getting torn up and redrafted with each erotic epiphany, usually discovered not through science, books or articles such as this one, but through that glorious trial and error of getting naked with someone. What I feel fairly confident about in my assessment of my own and other women’s current perspectives on sex is that we’re learning by doing and that most of us need little more than for ourselves and others to be whatever kinds of freaks we want to be. We’re all still figuring ourselves out and, you know what, it’s pretty damn exciting. Rather than instructing you on exactly how to touch me, I want sex to be about seeking out all the different and wondrous ways in which I can be touched – the surprise discoveries of the things that make you groan. Let’s just fuck, and think about it in the epistemological wet spot.

SEPTEMBER 2016 105


ADVERTISING FEATURE

ULTIMATE GIFTS

Our guide to the best gifts for this Father’s Day

OUR NATION-SHAPING HEROES

Aussies love their sporting heroes, and these four bookazines have got them all, from Don Bradman to Joey Johns and everyone in between. Available in supermarkets, newsagents and online at austsportingheroes.com.au

LUMINOX IS YOUR No.1

In World War II, if diving gear wasn’t on the ANU list, fighting men didn’t use it. The ANU list provided the frogmen of the past and the Navy SEALs of today with a sense of security that their gear would work when needed. It’s with this same intent that Luminox name these newly developed watches the ANU series. If you have an essential mission then use authorised essential gear, ANU by Luminox.

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE

Perfect for the adventurer, Dolphin Eveready has introduced its latest product innovation and brightest-ever torch with the launch of the new Dolphin LED Lantern. The Dolphin LED lantern features new technology, ergonomic design and four powerful LEDs offering 200 lumens of light output, meaning it shines twice as bright as the previous model.

GO GLOBAL WITH SEIKO

From Seiko’s Prospex adventure sport collection, the World Time Solar Chronograph SSC487P is a timepiece for the traveller. Featuring 25-city world-time function and dualtime display, the stainless-steel, sapphire-crystal watch also boasts a chronograph capable of measuring up to 24 hours in one-fifth-of-asecond increments. RRP $950 seiko.com.au

BUILT TO SURVIVE

Powerful, robust and sporty, the Victorinox Swiss Army I.N.O.X. Professional Diver adapts to any environment – natural or urban, it can take the pressure. Shockproof and anti-magnetic, resistant to water, high pressure, vibrations and extreme variations in temperature, it can face any challenge. RRP $950 lionbrandsaustralia.com.au

PREP STARTS HERE

Deep Heat Pro Sports Prep Massage Lotion and Deep Heat Pro Sports Recovery Massage Oil represent an elite new product line aimed at muscular preparation, prevention and recovery. An integral part of every warm-up & warmdown routine – both mental and physical.

STYLE AND COMFORT

The Commuter Short from Kit and Ace is made from a technical fabrication designed for movement and travel. The fabric has been preshrunk, provides four-way stretch, and is both machine washable and moisture-wicking. The tailored design features flat seams and a hidden cellphone pocket. RRP $180.00

BE FIRST IN LINE

Upgrade your Guzman y Gomez experience with the GYG App. Skip the queue, view your recent order, access exclusive offers and features, and customise your meal using GYG’s new app. Download it NOW via the App Store or Google Play!


NUTRITION

28

New Ways To Cook This Bird IT’S YOUR GO-TO PROTEIN. BUT YOU CAN DO BETTER THAN A FACTORY-FARMED FOWL. TURN THE PAGE FOR CHICKEN THAT WILL DRIVE YOUR TASTE BUDS WILD! BY

MICHAEL RUHLMAN MISHA GR AVENOR

PHOTOGR APHY BY

SEPTEMBER 2016 107


ll too often, cooks are left underwhelmed by chicken. It’s bland. It’s expected. It’s less than inspiring. But you can avoid all that. Remember that the dark-meat parts (legs, thighs, wings) are rich in fat. You need to cook them longer to tenderise them. The white breast meat is naturally tender, so it cooks faster. Yet it’s so lean that you have to add fat and flavour. All chicken, though, can satisfy any craving – Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Italian. These easy meals take you there.

START COOKING USE THE VIEWA APP TO ADD THE RECIPES THAT FOLLOW TO YOUR PHONE

THE STATS

KILOJOULES

BREAST SKINLESS, 110G ROASTED

THIGH SKINLESS, 110G ROASTED

782

840

PROTEIN GRAMS

35

27

FAT GRAMS

4

9

108

SEPTEMBER 2016

THE WHOLE RECIPE

Rain a crust of rock salt onto an organic chicken, then roast it in a baking tray at 230°C until the cavity’s juices run clear; 60-90 minutes. Let it rest, covered with tinfoil, for 15 minutes, then tuck in. Yeah, it’s really that simple.


NUTRITION

ROAST THE ULTIMATE CHICKEN You don’t have to get all fancy with roast chicken, but a few extra steps will pay off in flavour. Truss the bird or jam a halved lemon into the cavity to promote even cooking. Or deploy these sidekicks.

Garlic and Herbs

Jamaican Jerk Paste

Halfway through roasting, add some thyme sprigs and a few lightly smashed garlic cloves to the roasting pan. Baste the chicken often with its fat. Or you could use fresh oregano and add lemon slices.

Before roasting, coat the bird with storebought jerk paste. It has onions, thyme, nutmeg and searinghot Scotch bonnet chillies. Serve with black beans and brown rice.

Chimichurri

Honey Mustard

Mix one cup chopped herbs (parsley, chives, mint, coriander) with a minced garlic clove, two minced anchovies, one tablespoon lemon juice, one tablespoon chopped capers, salt, pepper and olive oil until it’s spoonable.

Mix two parts each of orange juice, honey and Dijon mustard to one part soy sauce. Apply to the chicken about five minutes before it’s done, and/or serve the sauce as a topping, like the chimichurri.

BARBECUE IT!

Sear the chicken, breast-side down, over direct heat for about 10 minutes. Flip and move it to indirect heat. Close the lid and cook until the breast reaches 65-68°C; 60-75 minutes.

> SEPTEMBER 2016 109


PICK THE CARCASS TO THE BONE Roast chicken makes incredible chicken salad. One secret is magic mayonnaise: soak minced shallots in lemon or fresh lime juice for 10 minutes, then stir in diced celery and a dollop of mayo. Add chicken and:

SAVOUR THE GLORIOUS, CRISPY SKIN The chicken’s skin is quite possibly the tastiest part of the entire bird. Once the fat is rendered out, the remaining connective tissue and protein crisps and turns golden brown. One bite will silence any scepticism you may have.

110

SEPTEMBER 2016

• Chopped tarragon and sliced red grapes • Jerk paste and fresh lime juice • Curry powder and cayenne, to taste (serve with pappadums) • Curry as above, but with more stuff to make it heartier: chickpeas, chopped apricots, chopped olives, coriander and harissa • Soy sauce, fish sauce, chilli oil, toasted sesame oil, sliced spring onions and chopped peanuts

Cook

Enjoy

Quit Feeling Guilty

First, save up the skin from several chickens – it freezes well and making one big batch is easier. Place the skin on a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and add salt and pepper. Cover with another sheet of greaseproof paper and then stack another baking tray on top of that. Roast the skin at 175ºC till browned and crispy; 20-30 minutes.

Think of these chips two ways. First, they make a great protein snack. While the crisped skin is still warm, dust it with smoked paprika or chilli powder. Second, you can crumble the chips and add to green beans or salads. Oh, and keep any fat – you can use it to sauté potatoes (or cook more chicken).

Wait, won’t this stuff give you a big fat heart attack? The skin may be high in saturated fat, but this kind of fat isn’t the heart slayer that scientists once thought it was. Plus, the skin from half a chicken has about 1200kJ and 11g of protein. By contrast, that 50g bag of Doritos has 1085kJ for a mere 4.5g of protein.


NUTRITIOM

BEHOLD BEAUTIFUL BREASTS Overcooking boneless, skinless breasts is easy. So pound the meat to a thickness of half a centimetre and start cooking. The breast is done when the flesh feels resistant, not squishy, to the touch. Try these prep ideas.

Schnitzel

Dredge a pounded breast in flour, then egg wash, then panko breadcrumbs. Pan-fry and serve in a sandwich or with a heaped side of sauerkraut plus grainy mustard.

Chicken and Guacamole

Sauté or grill a pounded breast. Season it with salt and pepper and serve on a bed of homemade guacamole.

Garlic Lemon Herb

Cook a pounded, seasoned breast in an oiled griddle pan over medium-high heat till done; 3-4 minutes per side. Top with minced garlic, thyme and lemon zest.

Tomato Basil

Sauté or grill a pounded breast and serve atop tomato slices salted and sprinkled with finely minced garlic 10 minutes before serving. Garnish with fresh basil leaves.

PAN PREP

Adding breaded chicken to a pan with too-cool oil will yield greasy breasts, not crispy ones. A simple test: when you see the heated oil shimmer or ripple slightly, the meat hits the pan.

> SEPTEMBER 2016 111


BECOME A THIGH MASTER Moroccan Curry

Thai Coconut Soup

Saltimbocca

Shop for boneless, skinless thighs. You’ll cut down on cooking time without sacrificing succulence. Unless otherwise noted, each recipe on this page calls for four thighs, seasoned well with salt and pepper.

1

Teriyaki Kebabs Brown halved thighs in an oiled pan on medium-high; remove. Sauté one diced onion, then add one minced garlic clove, one teaspoon minced ginger, one tablespoon curry powder and cayenne to taste. Cook for one minute; add half a cup white wine, 1.5 cups chicken stock and the chicken. Add diced capsicum and halved dried apricots. Boil, then simmer (covered) for 20 minutes. Stir one tablespoon cornstarch into two tablespoons water. Add to the pan. Cook until saucy.

In a large oiled pan on medium high, sauté a sliced shallot. Add chicken (either whole or cut into chunks) and cook till browned. Add one tablespoon green or red Thai chilli paste and cook, stirring, until well incorporated. Then add enough coconut milk to cover the chicken, along with some sliced carrot, spring onions, snow peas and Spanish onion. Simmer till the chicken is tender; 10-15 minutes. Garnish with lime wedges and coriander.

On each thigh, place a fresh sage leaf and a thick slab of fresh mozzarella, then wrap it with a slice of prosciutto to form a bundle. In a hot, oiled, oven-safe frying pan, sear the thighs on both sides until browned; 3-5 minutes. Transfer the pan to a 200°C oven and roast until the mozzarella is melted and the chicken is cooked through; 20-30 minutes. Serve the thighs on pasta or alongside grilled asparagus spears.

Chinese Stir-Fry

Paprika Chicken

Asian Noodle Salad

Thinly slice the thighs. In an oiled pan or wok on medium-high, sauté two cloves chopped garlic, one teaspoon chopped ginger, four chopped spring onions and the chicken. Add two tablespoons each hoisin sauce and water, plus one tablespoon each chilli paste with garlic, lime juice and soy sauce. Add one teaspoon fish sauce and some sliced capsicum. Simmer, covered, until the chicken is done; about five minutes.

In an oiled pan over medium-high, sauté a handful of diced onion till tender. Add chopped chicken thighs and cook till browned. Add three tablespoons paprika and stir until the onion is coated. Add one cup white wine. When the liquid has reduced by half, add one cup chicken stock and cook until the chicken is tender; 10-15 minutes. Add half cup sour cream, stirring it in as you remove the pan from the heat.

Cook thinly sliced thighs in a hot, oiled wok, then refrigerate. Blend three-quarters of a cup chunky peanut butter with four minced garlic cloves, half cup soy sauce, two tablespoons red-wine vinegar, two tablespoons brown sugar and sesame oil to taste. In a bowl, toss one small, deseeded, diced cucumber, half cup shredded carrot, the chicken, the sauce and 350g noodles, cooked and rinsed. Top with chilli flakes and crushed peanuts.

112

SEPTEMBER 2016

Easy Burritos

Coq au Vin

Vietnamese Wraps

Korean Bibimbap

Cut two boneless thighs, trimmed of visible fat, into thirds. Marinate for at least an hour in a mixture of three tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce, three tablespoons mirin and two teaspoons sugar. Thread the pieces onto skewers, alternating with spring onions cut into 5cm pieces. Grill, basting with any remaining marinade, till cooked; about four minutes a side. Serve with your favourite dipping sauce. Cut thighs into medium slices; toss with two tablespoons chilli powder and one tablespoon cumin. In a hot, oiled pan on medium, sauté the slices until browned; about four minutes. Add one cup crushed or puréed tomatoes and some chopped oregano. Simmer on medium-low until the chicken is tender; 10-15 minutes. Serve in a 25cm tortilla with lettuce, salted sliced avocado, grated cheese and chilli sauce. In a pan on medium, brown four strips chopped bacon; reserve. Add the chicken to the pan and brown it. Remove and set aside. Add two cups quartered mushrooms and brown. Add a medium diced onion and sauté until tender. Stir in three tablespoons flour; add one cup each red wine and chicken stock, plus the reserved bacon. Stir, add the chicken and simmer until thickened; 20-30 minutes. In an oiled griddle pan on medium-high heat, sear thinly sliced chicken thighs until cooked through; about five minutes. Then make a sauce of half a minced shallot, two tablespoons fresh lime juice, one teaspoon sugar and quarter cup fish sauce. Serve the chicken in store-bought rice-paper wrappers with thinly sliced carrot, cucumber, shredded lettuce and basil. Top with sauce, roll it all up and chow down. In a small bowl, mix quarter cup hot Korean chilli paste (gochujang) with two tablespoons water, two teaspoons fish sauce, one teaspoon sugar and one teaspoon vinegar. In a hot, oiled wok or frying pan, cook thinly sliced chicken thighs. Add the sauce and cook until everything is tender; about five minutes. Serve over rice and top with your choice of these: a fried egg, sliced spring onions, kimchi, avocado, coriander, sriracha.


NUTRITION

SEPTEMBER 2016 113


UFC MEANS BUSINESS

DESPITE ITS DISREPUTABLE UNDERGROUND ORIGINS, THE UFC HAS PUNCHED ABOVE ITS WEIGHT TO GAIN STATUS AS A MAINSTREAM SPORT IN THE US. NOW, WITH BACKERS ADOPTING A SHREWDER STANCE, IT’S POISED TO EXTEND ITS STRANGLEHOLD ON THE WORLD

BY

JAMIE MILLAR SUN LEE

PHOTOGR APHY BY

114

SEPTEMBER 2016


BUSINESS

The UFC fought hard for its spot at the top.

IT WAS THE BLOODSPORT THEY TRIED TO BAN – AND SUCCEEDED, IN 36

ADDITIONAL REPORTING: AARON SCOTT

STATES ACROSS AMERICA. In 1996, US Senator, former presidential hopeful and, it’s worth noting, Vietnam veteran John McCain famously decried Mixed Martial Arts as a pastime on a par with “human cockfighting”. It was a bloody spectacle, he stated, a brutal, no-holds-barred display of barely caged aggression. It needed suppressing. Two decades later, the Ultimate Fighting Championship is the cock of the walk. The increasingly acceptable face of two people knocking lumps out of each other – within the confines of strict parameters, of course – is dominating arenas, airwaves and agendas. In lieu of the tribal tattoo T-shirts once associated with the sport, the UFC is freshly suited, booted and primed for a corporate takeover of the sporting middle ground. And that’s just the fighters. As its popularity rises like a front kick, you wouldn’t bet against the Las Vegas-based MMA promotion going the distance to become a globally supported athletic pursuit. To a degree, it already has. By the time you read this, demand for tickets to the slated UFC event on these shores in November will most likely have outstripped supply. A similar event staged in Melbourne last year drew a crowd of 56,214 – the largest ever UFC attendance. The 20-odd thousand seats for 2011’s UFC 127 in Sydney sold out in 22 minutes – equalling the fastest sell-out in UFC history. With great popularity comes great profitability, and plainly the UFC is cashing in.

THE SLOW BURN In 2014, Forbes, the American business magazine and universal arbiter of worth,

named the UFC the tenth most valuable business brand in sport at $1.65 billion. However, the fight club’s president and charismatic impresario Dana White, a former boxing trainer and bouncer who looks pretty handy himself, begs to differ. In an interview with the UK’s Financial Times newspaper in March 2014, White put its true value at a punchier $3.5 billion. “Some would say more,” he said with characteristic bombast. “We have numbers.” Indeed, White’s “numbers” proved to be conservative, with the organisation being sold just days after UFC 200 to a new ownership group for a staggering $4 billion – the largest single sale in sports history. The numbers are now undeniable: the UFC has done exceedingly well for an organisation that essentially began life as a way to settle the age-old pub argument over who would win out of a martial artist or a boxer. Indeed, “organisation” would have been a rather imperious word to describe the first UFC event in 1993. Held in Denver and drawing a global audience of just 90,000 via pay-perview, the eight-man tournament proudly trumpeted that “There are no rules!” and displayed as much regard for weight categories as a Rocky film. (Interestingly, the original business plan pitched it as a real-life version of the notorious computer game Mortal Kombat.) In the first bout, a kickboxer swiftly dispatched a sumo wrestler with a kick to the face while he was on the ground. You can see the “fight” on YouTube, but not the fragments of teeth buried in the victor’s foot, an injury with which he fought on for the remainder of the night.

>

SEPTEMBER 2016 115


“I remember watching it with my friends and not really knowing what we were looking at,” recalls Michael Lunardelli, senior business unit director at Reebok Combat Training. “It was fascinating, but it was pretty violent and it didn’t have the rules and regulations that it has today. I lost interest in it after a short period of time because it was too rough, even for me.” Lunardelli’s and Reebok’s interest in the UFC have since been rekindled to the tune of a US$70-million six-year agreement, announced in December 2014, to provide uniforms, not just for the fighters but also their trainers, seconds and corner men. The move is part of Reebok’s savvy pivot away from the softer sports-fashion sphere and towards what Lunardelli calls “tough fitness”. Whether unable or unwilling to compete with brands such as Nike in more sanitised sports markets, Reebok has instead lent its brand equity to – and profited from – newcomers such as UFC, CrossFit and Tough Mudder. It’s a mutually beneficial arrangement that’s left both parties smiling. “Our partnership with Reebok was a really important step for us in terms of bringing a level of professionalism to our field of play,” says Tom Wright, general manager for UFC operations in Australia, New Zealand and Canada. The equation is simple: the UFC gains mainstream legitimacy, Reebok gains underground kudos. Both score a very sizeable amount of cash.

BACKING THE UNDERDOG Despite introducing such sanitising measures as rounds, weight classes and gloves (as well as outlawing things like kicking a man in the face when he’s down), the UFC was a pariah outfit, near-bankrupt and on the ropes when it was bought for US$2 million in 2001 by casino owners Lorenzo and Frank Fertitta. But with Lorenzo’s background as a member of the influential Nevada State Athletic Commission in their corner, they gradually ground and pounded their way to legality, ratifying the sport territory by territory. By 2006 UFC events were hitting a million buys on cable TV. The real game-changer in terms of mainstream visibility came in 2011 when the

UFC signed a seven-year deal with Fox Sports. “Fox covers the UFC in the same way that it covers the other big American sports,” says Gareth A Davies, the long-serving, long-haired boxing and MMA correspondent for the UK’s Telegraph newspaper. Unlike some of his fellow chroniclers of pugilism, Davies followed the UFC from the first and has become one of its most authoritative voices. “You only have to go around American bars now and the UFC is on TV along with the NFL, NBA, MLB and so on. It’s become normalised because it’s there all the time. That deal has been so significant in making it one of the big players in the sports world. It’s a genuine contender.” Now with the US conquered, the UFC has set its sights on global domination. All of which is a clear sign that the UFC has cleaned up its image problem and its down and dirty past. “We’re ambitious. We want to help elevate the UFC and have it thought of in the same realm as the other major sports,” says Lunardelli. Certainly, the trailer-trash chic of its earliest stars’ attire and the accompanying riot of sponsor logos wasn’t helping to challenge any preconceptions of the sport as a chaotic free-for-all. “It was a bad look for everybody,” says Lunardelli. “I think even a lot of the fighters are happy that it’s cleaned up, to be honest with you.” Sartorial standards have risen outside the octagon too. The trademark tailoring of Conor McGregor, current UFC poster boy, is as brash as he is. Even so, it’s a marked step up from snapback baseball caps and provides an effective contrast to his ink-stained chest piece, depicting a gorilla feasting on a human heart. Then there’s the notably articulate Canadian welterweight Rory MacDonald, who is so dapper that Vice’s Fightland channel filmed him suit shopping. The signifiers seem to say: thuggish, moi? “There are some great characters who largely are very educated,” claims Davies. “A lot of them are university grads.” He cites the example of Chuck “The Iceman” Liddell, whose explosive striking style, handlebar moustache and mohawk made him one of the best-known fighters of the mid-Noughties. Less well known is that Liddell graduated from university with a BA in business and accounting.

BLOOD MONEY GROWING GAINS Over the past 15 years, the UFC’ss value has blown up by a staggeringg 2000 times, making it one of the world’s most profitable sports

116

2001 VALUE

$2m

2016 VALUE

$4bn

SEPTEMBER 2016

Not all the fighters are happy with the UFC’s shiny new image, though. Former U fe eatherweight champ Jose Aldo is one ample. “It sucks, but what can we do?” he exa said d of the Reebok deal, before unfavourably paring the new outfits to those worn comp by the Mighty Morphin’ Power Rangers. er, most objections have not been Howeve aesthetic but economic. W le the revenue from the deal is divided among the athletes according to their d standing, some have argued that what they gain does not make up for what they lose

1 BILLION

The number of homes the UFC is broadcast to, in 30 languages across 150 countries

Defeating critics required inspiration and perspiration.

in individual sponsorships. Although these are not expressly prohibited under the new Reebok deal, its terms do make it difficult. Branded kits have to be worn not just on fight night but for the week preceding, which is prime time for sponsor exposure. The UFC counters that any hits taken in the short term will more than pay off in the future as the organisation becomes even more attractive to bigger, richer sponsors. “The deal is definitely going to help us elevate our commercial proposition to the benefit of all fighters,” says James Elliott, the UFC’s vice-president for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. “I can understand some of the comments from the fighters. But this is ultimately the best thing for the business and therefore our roster.” The Reebok deal has also thrown light onto the fighters’ earnings in general. Few people know the precise figures involved, but wages are understood to be comparatively low. While competitors can


BUSINESS

invites – and not just because you can now buy a shirt bearing the name of your favourite fighter. As every cash-strapped fan wearing their team’s latest jersey knows, kit brings lucrative new revenue streams flooding in; while Reebok makes the shirts, what’s to stop the UFC finding additional sponsors? “We’re always looking for new commercial partners to come on board and that’s something that’s factored into the plan,” says Elliott. “Again, it’s something that will help generate increased revenue for everybody involved.” And why stop at shirts: what about selling the naming rights to a UFC stadium in, say, Vegas? “We have some exciting things planned in the future,” says Elliott. “I can’t reveal what those are yet. But it’s going to be an interesting few years, that’s for sure.”

BREAKING GROUND

CONOR MCGREGOR IS SIGNIN M

A CONTRACT WORTH $10 – THAT’S ON A LEVEL ANY MAINSTREAM SPOR collect a $50,000 bonus for best knockout, submission or fight of the night at an event, their base pay might be as little as $6000 a match. Top AFL players wouldn’t lace up their boots for that amount. A boxer can expect as much as 85 per cent of the revenue from a fight. In the English Premier League, 70 per cent of the money goes to the players; in the NFL, NBA and MLB, it’s around 50 per cent. Lorenzo Fertitta has said that the UFC’s proportion is “not far off”, but after polling industry sources, ESPN put it at maybe 10 per cent.

ITH .

In its own defence, the UFC cites the costs involved in building the young sport and getting it legalised around the world. It has to act as both promoter and TV producer – infrastructure that doesn’t come cheap. Besides, as MMA matures, it argues, so will the rewards. Ronda Rousey – one of the highest-paid female athletes on the planet – is a prime example. White has said he intends for the UFC to become as big globally as soccer, which is the obvious comparison that the Reebok deal

One of UFC’s greatest strengths has been not what it has leeched from other sports, but its own ability to innovate – to roll with the punches. Ironically, one of the assets that has best equipped it for future expansion into the mainstream was acquired as a consequence of its initial marginalisation. “The UFC grew digitally because it was pushed underground after being banned in America in the Nineties,” says Davies. Where other sports played whack-a-mole trying to keep footage offline, the UFC increased its YouTube views by a billion minutes in the space of a year. While the NFL and NBA tried to ban their athletes from tweeting in the hours before a game, the UFC was handing out cash rewards to fighters who were performing best on their social channels. Despite her shock loss to Holly Holm in Melbourne last November, Rousey recently became the most followed female athlete on social media, with – at the time of writing – almost 22 million fans across Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. The UFC’s own fol ings have grown, too, by 57 per cent ok), 78 per cent (Twitter) and 770 (Fa per nt (Instagram) over the past two years. Meanwhile, its streaming Fight Pass service is oming. The UFC’s finger on the digital e is, according to Wright, “one of the damentals behind our growth. If you make it easier for your fans to find your content and gage with your athletes then you’ll grow a sstrong fan base.” Another arena in which the UFC is ahead of the curve – and gaining wider recognition – is drugs testing. In April last year, it hired Jeff Novitzky, a former agent for the US Food And Drug Administration. “We basically gave Jeff a blank sheet of paper and said, build us the most comprehensive anti-doping policy in professional sport,” says Wright. The program Novitzky created is now entirely run by the US Anti-Doping Agency. “We don’t know when they’re going to test, we don’t know who they’re going to test,” says Wright. “They have full and complete management of the anti-doping policy. So there’s no conflict of

>

SEPTEMBER 2016 117


BUSINESS

20 per cent of the old school are interested in the UFC. But that’s changing. My experience is that the younger boxing journalists also want to talk to me about Ronda Rousey’s defeat to Holly Holm and Conor McGregor’s latest movements. Some of the great writers – Norman Mailer, George Plimpton, Bud Schulberg – have been attracted to boxing. But as time goes on, the library on the UFC will grow, and it’ll be only a matter of time until there’s a form of mixed martial arts in the Olympics.”

US$700M The reported value of Fox Sports’ deal with promoters Zuffa LLC, UFC’s parent company

HEAVYWEIGHT CONTENDER

In the world of MMA, pain can reap big financial gain.

118

SEPTEMBER 2016

POPULARITY CONTEST Almost across the board, US fans have fallen out of love with traditional sports. One organisation bucks the trend

FC

NBA

MLB

NFL

AR

+14%

NA

interest for us.” The inglorious removal of Jon Jones from his title-unification bout with Daniel Cormier in the days leading up to UFC 200 was conclusive proof the program doesn’t play favourites. Decisive action has also been taken on another sporting hot topic: after Irish lightweight Joe Duffy suffered a eek suspected concussion in training a we before UFC Fight Night 76, he was sent s for testing and, despite being the main dra raw, promptly withdrawn. “That just shows how ho responsible the UFC is,” says Davies. “One man’s safety was more important than having a headline event.” In many respects, the UFC has transcended mere promotion to become a media company in its own right. This has been advantageous while the sport hasn’t benefitted from press coverage in the same way as, say, boxing. But that outdated view is being refreshed, according to Davies. “It’s a generational shift,” says the fight sports veteran. “There’s a traditionalism about boxing that makes a lot of the journalists who cover it slightly suspicious of MMA. I would say about

-12% SOURCE: SIMMONS RESEARCH H DATABASE

From spit and sawdust to TV rights and antidoping commissions, the UFC has come an awfully long way. “Our sport is a truly global sport,” says Wright. “Our content is available in 150 countries around the world, in 30 different languages, in 1.2 billion homes right now. We’ve got athletes from every corner of the world.” But despite the quantum leap it has made since its inception, the organisation is still engaged in a period of what marketeers call “education”. The upside of that is, like a loosely applied rear-naked choke, there’s still potential to exploit. So how much bigger could the UFC get? What remains in its way? “Some people are never going to be into fight sports,” Davies admits. “But when the UFC talks about global domination and wanting to be as big as football, they’re not kidding around.” It’s perhaps not as fanciful as it first sounds, especially when you drill down to grassroots level. “MMA is one of the fastestgrowing sports in the world and it’s inspiring an increase in the uptake of combat-style training,” says Lunardelli. This is something that he knows better than most because Reebok is selling the gear. “Our research found that 35 million people globally were training like fighters; 40 per cent of them had started in the past 12 months. That was conducted over a year ago, so the number may have grown since then.” To paraphrase singer Carl Douglas, soon rybody could be Ultimate Fighting – e pecially with the organisation rolling out a nettwork of UFC gyms internationally. The ing UFC Gym in Alexandria in Sydney’s sprawlin being one of the pioneers. inner s big could the UFC become in S lia? Wright smiles: “Talk to Dana White A l he’ll tell you he wants the UFC to be the ber one sport in Australia – and, hey, it’s great to have those kinds of goals. Realistically, there are certain sports that are always going to be the number one sport in a country – in Canada that’s hockey, in Brazil it’s soccer, in the US it’s American football. We can aspire to be the number one sport in those countries, but that’s unrealistic. It’s not unrealistic, however, to be a top four or top five sport in those countries – and that’s definitely my goal for Australia.”


HALF-PRICE

SALE was

now

54

$

FOR 12 ISSUES

SAVE 50% OR PAY ONLY $49.99 via automatic renewal – that’s a bigger 54% SAVING for you! AUSTRALIAN GST $8.99 NZ $9.99 INC AUGUST 2016

BUILD

BMUSIGCLE

The 8-Week Plan That MadeThis Body!

Stress

8

VISIT subscribetoday.com.au/mh916p OR CALL * 1300 668 118 and quote P69JKZZB

*Print + digital bundle orders can only be completed online. Digital edition available on iPad & iPhone. Valid in Aust. only until 31/10/16. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packed with the magazine. Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd (a subsidiary of Seven West Media Ltd) is collecting your personal information to service your subscription. Pacific will handle your personal information in accordance with Seven’s Privacy Policy, available on subscribetoday. com.au/privacy-policy. By providing your personal information, you agree to the terms of the Policy. Without limiting the forgoing, Pacific may disclose your personal information to its related entities & partners as well as carefully selected business partners for research & profiling purposes & for the purpose of sending you information directly. We will always provide you with the ability to opt out of those communications.


‘

Roasted rolled pork loin


HEALTH

THE

TESTOSTERONE TEST The big T is key to your performance in the gym, bedroom and workplace. But how much do you really know about man’s main hormone? Take our quiz to find out > BY NICKY WILLIAMS

SEPTEMBER 2016 121


Q1.

Which three statements are true? Low levels of testosterone make you likely to?

Q3.

Your new girlfriend . . . where on the w? chart are her testosterone levels now?

□ A. Get fat □ B. Develop type 2 diabetes □ C. Lose your hair □ D. Develop heart disease

ey’re on the up – it makes her want you more A. They’ve dipped now she’s no longer window shopping

B. They’re the same. Women’s T levels don’t change much

Q2.

If you really want testosterone levels to soar, what should you do?

□ A. Watch porn

Q8.

Q4.

How does testosterone affect belly fat?

□ B. Have sex

Q7.

Having extraordinarily high levels of testosterone means you’re more likely to?

TRUE OR FALSE: YOU CAN TELL WHICH MEN HAVE HIGH LEVELS OF TESTOSTERONE JUST BY LOOKING AT THEM?

□ A. Go a bit crazy □ B. Take risks □ C. Run a hedge fund □ A. Increases it

□ C.

Eat oysters

□ B. Reduces it

Q5.

Do women prefer men with more testosterone?

□ A.Yes □ B. No □ D. Listen to music

Q6.

You’re feeling fine now, but what percentage of men over 65 have normal levels of testosterone in their bloodstream?

122

SEPTEMBER 2016

□ A.

□ B.

□ C.

80 65 50


HEALTH

Q11.

Q9.

Q17.

How many times a week do you need to hit the gym to naturally boost your testosterone levels?

Which of these famous faces is likely to have the highest testosterone levels?

□ A. 7 □ B. 5 □ C. 2

You’re five drinks in. How are your testosterone levels looking?

□ A. They’re

Q14 4.

sky-high

How many hours of TV a week would it take to make your testosterone levels dip?

□ A.

□ B.

□ C.

10 40 20

□ A. George Clooney

Q15.

How can you identify which of the guys in your office has the highest T levels (and is likely the most competitive) by what he’s wearing?

□ B. Kanye West

Q16.

Which of these is most likely to increase your testosterone levels?

Q12.

Are high testosterone levels inherited?

□ C. Popeye

□ A.

□ B.

YES

NO

□ A Cabbage

□ B Kebab

□ B. They’re plummeting

Q13. □ D. The Rock

Cycling will increase your testosterone levels by how much? □ A.

15 % 33 % 97 %

□ B. □ E. Ryan Gosling

Q10.

BUT WHO IS MORE LIKELY TO BE HAPPY?

□ C.

SEPTEMBER 2016 123

>


Q21.

Q18.

Testosterone isn’t just good for men – it fires up women’s sex drives too. But how do you spark her levels? □ A.

WITH A COCKTAIL OR TWO

You’re playing football with your mates. What’s happening to your testosterone levels?

□ A. They’re on the up □ B. They’re the same □ C. They’re falling steadily

Q23.

A glass of red wine will send your T levels?

□ A. Soaring □ B. Sinking

□ B.

BY A LONG KISS GOODNIGHT

Q2 24.

Which h of the following would make e the best testosteroneboostting sandwich filling?

□ C.

WITH A BOX OF CHOCOLATES

Q22.

For how long would you have to sprint for to raise your testosterone levels?

□ A. Tuna

□ D.

WITH A ROMANTIC WALK IN THE PARK

□ A.

SIX

□ B. Peanut butter

Q19.

Q20.

□ A.

□ A.

Get fewer than eight hours a sleep a night and your testosterone levels could fall by as much as?

□ B.

□ C.

Men with higher testosterone levels are more likely to be?

25% 15% 10% FUNNY

□ B.

45

seconds

□ B.

HONEST □ C.

GENEROUS 124

SEPTEMBER 2016

□ C. Corned beef □ C.

TWO minutes

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY, ALLSTAR; ILLUSTRATIONS: ALCONIC/SYNERGY ART

seconds


HEALTH

HOW DO YOU STACK UP?

Find your score, then pump up your T levels to drop fat, raise energy levels and lift your sex life

01

PRE-EMPT DISEASE

Answer: A, B, D Low T can bring forward your date with the reaper, reports the British Medical Journal. It’s linked to type 2 diabetes, heart disease and obesity, while high testosterone is associated with hair loss.

02

X-RATED TACTICS

A, C A study in the Archives of Sexual Behaviour found porn spikes your T levels by 35 per cent; the high zinc content found in oysters has a similar effect.

03

ENJOY THE UPSIDE

C A woman’s testosterone rises when she’s in a new relationship, found the University of Pisa. It’s nature’s sly way of making her so eager to procreate, she’ll overlook your faults. For a little while.

07

PLAY IT SAFE

A, B, C Testosterone could bring out the Gordon Gekko in you. Studies conducted by Cambridge University found that men with higher levels of the hormone were more likely to go into banking, take risks and act irrationally.

08

KEY POINTERS

True It’s not just the over-inflated biceps. A University of Florida study found that men whose ring fingers were shorter than their index fingers had lower testosterone.

09

FACE YOUR RIVAL

George Clooney, The Rock University of Vienna research shows that men with high T have wider jaws, thicker eyebrows and shorter foreheads – features embodied by Clooney and Johnson.

SHRINK YOUR GUT

B Testosterone can help you shed the beer belly, found researchers at Johns Hopkins University. It reduces abdominal fat storage.

05

MAN UP

A While she might admire your T-honed muscles, it’s your chat that will seal the deal. Wayne State University found women prefer testosterone-fuelled men because they’re more assertive.

06

AGE WELL

A It’s poor health and weight gain that cut your T levels over time, not just age, according to the journal Clinical Endocrinology.

SPIN IT TO WIN

C A study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found pedalling in a high gear will almost double your T levels. Do 30 minutes of high-intensity intervals.

14

BIG TURN OFF

B Too many hours in front of the goggle box will slash your testosterone levels and sperm count, reports the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

15

SEE RED

Watch out for this colour A University of Sunderland study found men with high testosterone levels favour red clothing.

16

VEG OUT

George again Men with low testosterone are four times more likely to experience depression.

Cabbage It contains a chemical called I3C, which increases male-hormone production, Rockefeller University found. Excess saturated fats, however, can make levels of the male sex hormone dip.

11

17

SOBERING SCIENCE

LIP SERVICE

10

SHOT OF CHEER

LIFT, LEAVE AND REPEAT

04

13

C You only need to weight train twice a week to see a 49 per cent increase in testosterone compared with your lazier counterparts, according to a study by Finnish scientists.

12

TAKE CONTROL

No University of Montreal research found testosterone levels are influenced by environmental factors more than genetics. So it’s always possible to get a boost.

19

RESET THE ALARM CLOCK

B A University of Chicago study found sleeping just five hours a night causes a 15 per cent drop in testosterone. Fortunately you can scrape back the deficit in the gym with jump squats.

20

GET THE LAST LAUGH

A, B The male hormone has been linked to humour (read: banter) and honesty. But don’t expect to borrow money from your high-T friends: they’re 27 per cent more selfish with their cash, say scientists at Erasmus University in the Netherlands.

21

DITCH YOUR MATES

B Cut back on the friendlies to boost your levels. The University of Missouri found testosterone only rises on the sports field if you’re playing against rivals or strangers.

22

FAST GAINS

A No need to channel Robert de Castella: you can up your levels with six-second sprints, reports the International Journal of Sports Medicine.

23

GRAPES OF WRATH

B While you might feel fighting fit, after five drinks your T levels drop 44 per cent, found the journal Fertility and Sterility.

A Just one glass of red wine will increase your testosterone, found a Kingston University study. The effect is so powerful, the researchers referred their findings to the World Anti-Doping Agency.

18

24

CAN IT

B, D Male saliva has trace amounts of testosterone, which is a natural aphrodisiac, says psychologist Gordon Gallup. A leisurely walk should do the same trick: Boston State Hospital found sunlight raises testosterone by 120 per cent.

A Together with muscle-building protein, tuna is full of vitamin D – a nutrient that boosts T levels by up to 90 per cent say scientists at the Medical University of Graz. This country produced Arnie: they know their stuff.

YOUR SCORE

1-8

SHOOT UP YOUR KNOWLEDGE

Your low score doesn’t make you less of a man, but it is worth boning up on the male hormone: signs of low testosterone include depression, lack of energy, weight gain and loss of libido. If you’re worried, talk to your GP.

9-16

GIVE YOURSELF A BOOSTER

You’ve nailed the basics, but there’s always room for improvement. Have your doc check your levels and use the advice in this feature to fully optimise your hormonal balance if necessary.

17-24

MAINTAIN A LEVEL DOSE

You’re Mr T. Now turn that wealth of knowledge into power. As you’re no doubt aware, belly fat is the biggest predictor of low testosterone. Keep your waist circumference less than half your height and dodge low-T trouble.

SEPTEMBER 2016 125


THE EPIDEMIC SUICIDE IS THE NO.1 KILLER OF AUSTRALIAN MEN IN THEIR PRIME. IT’S TIME TO MAN THE DEFENCES BY

IAN COCKERILL

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

EDWARD URRUTIA

Save for the pinstriped waistcoat and red power tie he sports on his company website, Bernie Mitchell doesn’t present as your standard real estate wheeler and dealer. Then again, he doesn’t come across as someone who tried to take his own life with a 25-centimetre knife either. >

126

SEPTEMBER 2016


STATE

OF MIND

SEPTEMBER 2016 127


S OFT-SPOKEN, with unveiled eyes, Mitchell projects an air of calm assurance bordering on serenity when we meet in the office of his property management company above the stylish furnishing stores of Sydney’s Waterloo. Dressed in a black sweater and jeans, the 42-year-old’s warm greeting offers a jarring contrast to the knowledge that, at 24, he was so hollowed out that death seemed preferable to life. Beyond the mysterious workings of brain chemistry, the reasons remain troublingly elusive. The product of a solid and loving middle-class family, he enjoyed an expensive private school education, a loving partner, a clear direction in life and few apparent demons. Probe for any great emotional knots and you learn that, if anything, “I’m an over-sharer”. By his own lights, he’s also a joker and “a glass half-full guy . . . no, more like a glass-full guy”. It was this uncomplicated version of himself that completed a cabinetmaking apprenticeship while living at home, before deciding there was more money to be made as an insurance broker. Hungry to succeed, he completed a three-day sales course and jumped headlong into a commission-only job. It was, he recalls, a “real boilerroom” environment: 50 salespeople in an open-plan office, 40 cold calls a day, 70-plus hours a week, fortnightly sales targets. Most recruits lasted three months. Clearing that first hurdle, Mitchell moved into an apartment with his high-school sweetheart, Sam, but something wasn’t right. “I was exhausted and I didn’t understand why,” he recalls, shaking his head gently in the way you might express wonder at the first time you noticed a mole had changed colour. “I’d never not looked forward to going to work on Monday. But now I was tired . . . tired . . . tired.” After a year in his job, he found himself in front of a doctor, being told he was suffering from depression. “I didn’t understand it – this wasn’t me,” he says, the sheer implausibility of it still evident in his eyes. “Nothing was wrong with my life.” Prescribed antidepressants, he now struggled to make it into the office for more than a couple of hours a day. “It was a case of get up . . . brush your teeth . . . brush your hair . . . make the toast. Every step was a big effort.” He 128

SEPTEMBER 2016

struggled to put a sentence together or think straight. “I was scared to get on the phone. I forgot how to do my job. I was thought-stricken.” Then, out of the blue, a spike in his mood. But rather than presage his escape from depression, it led to a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. What was going on with his brain? Sinking further into a deep funk, he now rarely ventured out of the unit, except when Sam dragged him along to see friends. Beset with anxiety attacks and experiencing mood swings as often as every 20 minutes, he was prescribed eight different drugs, none of which provided relief. “It was draining. There was a feeling of despair, hopelessness, of life tumbling down, of not being able to do anything to stop it. My head hurt and I lost the ability to see ahead. I was worried about money, about work, about whether I would ever recover. Death began to look like the only way out. I just wanted the pain to end.” And so, on a late spring day, he flicked on the TV after Sam had left for work, then returned to bed, his mind in turmoil. Hours passed. Finally he rose, found himself looking at the high priestess of positivity, Oprah Winfrey, on the TV, and switched it off. Rummaging in the kitchen drawer, he drew out a long knife, a housewarming present from his parents. “I sat down on the lounge, my thoughts going to and fro, just trying to work up the courage. I ruled out thrusting it into my heart – I was worried about hitting a rib – before putting the knife to my arm.” He cut, deep enough for blood to flow, but not so deep as to be fatal. Instantly, he knew he needed to cut more savagely to finish the job. “I really wanted to follow through. But at the same time I had an inkling that it wasn’t right that I should want to do this.” That flimsy, floating thought turned into a lifevest. He stared at the phone on the table in front of him, picked it up, and dialled a doctor who’d been treating him over the preceding year. “I said ‘I have a knife to my arm’, and when he asked me to not do anything, that was enough, his voice was enough, just knowing he cared.” Eighteen years on, the last few words hang in the air between us. Recognising that someone, anyone, cares seems like a small concession to continue living. All too often, though, it’s one men aren’t making.

SIX MEN DIE BY SUICIDE every day in Australia. Every . . . single . . . day. That’s six sons, brothers, fathers and – according to Australian Bureau of Statistics figures released earlier this year – together they made up three-quarters of the 2864 people who took their own life in 2014, the latest year for which statistics are available. Why the gender imbalance? The explanation is threefold. Men are more impulsive, more sensitive to financial distress – the bread-winner tag endures – and more likely to choose violent, and hence more effective, means. Equally confronting is the knowledge that, for men between the ages of 20 and 44, suicide is the number one cause of death, ahead of road accidents, disease and any health issue you care to name. It wasn’t meant to be this way. Back in the Nineties, a national summit on suicide saw a surge in services and programs designed to tackle the issue head on. In the intervening years RUOK Day (ruok.

>


STATE

OF MIND

SIX MEN DIE BY SUICIDE EVERY DAY IN AUSTRALIA. EVERY . . . SINGLE . . . DAY

SEPTEMBER 2016 129


Active intervention is recommended if you believe someone is at risk of suicide.

3 STEPS TO PREVENT SUICIDE ASK If you suspect someone might be suicidal, don’t tip-toe around the subject – ask them outright: “Are you thinking about suicide?” Don’t worry that you’ll plant the idea in their head. The reality is there’s quite a build-up as people imagine ways they might take their life – what experts call ideation. Most people with thoughts of suicide want to talk about it. They want to live but desperately need someone to hear their pain and offer help to keep them safe. If they don’t want to talk, don’t give up. Try another time, or let someone else (parents, a counsellor, another mate) know you’re worried.

130

SEPTEMBER 2016

LISTEN If they say “Yes”, let them do most of the talking and don’t dismiss their feelings or judge them. Listen to their story without imposing your own outlook. They’ll often feel a great sense of relief that someone wants to talk about their darkest thoughts.

ACT Talk about steps you can take together to keep them safe. And don’t agree to keep it a secret. You shouldn’t be the only one supporting them and you may need help to persuade them to get help. If you feel they are in immediate danger, call a crisis line like Lifeline (13 11 14) or 000. If you can get in straight away, visit a GP or psychologist with them. Even if the danger is not immediate, suicidal thoughts may return, so ask them to promise to tell someone if they do – it will make it more likely they will. Sources: Beyondblue, Lifeline


STATE

OF MIND

org.au), Soften The Fuck Up (softenthefckup.spurprojects. org) and programs like Mental Health First Aid (mhfa. com.au) have risen to the challenge. For all that, the 2014 ABS figures revealed the highest suicide rate since 2001, prompting Lifeline Australia chairman and former NSW Liberal Party leader John Brogden to call for suicide to be declared a national emergency. Brogden followed up by recommending that the suicide toll be published like the road toll. He wants it in our faces and under our noses, a pungent and nagging reminder that we walk among wounded individuals who need our support. He spoke, of course, from experience, his call coming on the 10th anniversary of his own attempted suicide aged 36, made after he resigned from politics for inappropriate conduct. As one of the Mental Health First Aid program’s founders, the University of Melbourne’s Professor Tony Jorm shares Brogden’s concerns, while stopping short of declaring the 2014 figures a trend. It will be some years, he says, before we can be sure they are not “a statistical blip”. In the meantime, Jorm is placing his faith in programs like his – MHFA has been adopted in 23 countries since its inception in 2001 – that put the emphasis on equipping people to fill the space between the suicide candidate and services on stand-by to help. His one reservation? Men, he says, need to do more to help other men. “Men need to lift their game,” he insists, pointing out that when instructors present the MHFA program in workplaces, male faces are notable by their absence. “When it’s voluntary and when it comes to caring, it’s women who overwhelmingly turn up.” Which is strange, isn’t it, considering that we’re the ones taking our own lives, the ones crying over mates and fathers and sons? The ones who, as Bernie Mitchell attests and the statistics highlight, can be knocked sideways by life no matter how strong a wind is at our back when we first leave harbour.

MY FIRST ENCOUNTER with suicide came before I was even out of primary school, when a friend’s mother overdosed. Then, while visiting remote aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory a decade ago, a teenage boy hanged himself. That same year, a former work colleague swallowed pills before wading into a Melbourne river. More recently, a friend jumped from a Sydney headland, leaving behind two high-school-age children. “The truth is, most people know someone, and that’s a huge motivation,” says Jorm. If you happen to be one of those fortunate people who don’t know anyone, here’s the thing. Yes, deeply scarred battlers from broken or abusive homes, unemployable heroin or ice addicts, men with severe psychological problems – they all feature among the suicide statistics. But then, so do lawyers and accountants, heavy-machine operators and electricians, teachers, soldiers and policemen. Men who, behind their suits and their uniforms and their King Gees, are picked apart by unrelenting pressure and six-minute billing units, trauma, toxic marriage breakdowns, financial setbacks, grief. Men who, for all you know, could be you if you could just peer into your future. As US psychologist and suicide expert David Jobes observed, “every man is capable of reaching a desperate place where suicide can move onto his psychological

radar screen. But who goes there, when, how and why is this unique interplay of biochemistry, social forces, family modelling and other factors. How those queue up is remarkably complex and specific to the man who’s struggling at that moment.” Complex and specific. But there are aspects those who end their own life share too: a sense of being trapped in their lives, a belief they’re a burden on others, and a gradual disconnection from the world and everything that inhabits it. Bernie Mitchell recalls loving the woman he shared an apartment with; he just didn’t feel anything for her. When it came to a choice between life and death, though, it was the realisation that someone cared for him that stayed Mitchell’s hand. Which is precisely where you enter this story. Because all but a very few people actually want to die. Like Bernie, they just want their pain to stop. And while they’re weighing their choices, being reminded that there’s someone who cares for them – even when it’s obvious to all those around them that many people care for them – can be the thread that draws them back to safety. In the process, they’re reminded of one incontestable truth, a truth often cited as the most potent barrier preventing them moving to the final act: that while their pain might end, it merely passes to those around them.

MELBOURNE SOCIAL WORKER Russell Miles concedes he comes from a long male line of “worry warts”. It’s an understated descriptor – his father, a railway man like his grandfather before him, worried himself into suicide. Life continued to throw brickbats Russell’s way when his wife, Rosemary, died of breast cancer, leaving him to raise three sons. Another challenge arrived when his middle son, Nick, was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome and grew into a young man locked in battle with the black dog. As someone who taught a TAFE course that included suicide prevention, Russell was alert to his son’s struggles and made every effort to keep Nick engaged and connected. It wasn’t easy, even as Nick took part-time jobs in pubs and aged care, joined his older brother Chris at the gym, and turned his passion for drawing into art classes. “You just want to lock them in a room so they can’t hurt themselves, but that’s not practical,” says Russell. Instead, searching for ways to boost Nick’s spirits and knowing he had fond memories of childhood trips to Tasmania, Russell suggested a holiday there early last year. He and his partner, Louise, would drive around the island before rendezvousing with Nick and his younger brother, Liam, in Hobart. Two days before they were due to meet, Russell’s phone rang. It was Chris. “I remember it so clearly. He said, ‘Nick’s dead. He’s killed himself’. I went numb.” Nick, 22, had walked a kilometre from the home he shared with his father to a railway line and then waited for a train. Says Russell: “From talking to the policeman I have a mental image of the driver sounding his horn repeatedly, frantically, and trying to stop. Of Nick’s utter determination and the driver’s utter distress as he tried to prevent it. “Trains were our family thing, and I’ve got no end of photos of Nick with trains. Now there’s this hideous thing that spoils a memory.” Somehow, Russell is able to look back on the “deep grief” Nick felt after his mother died when he was just nine

>

SEPTEMBER 2016 131


and allow “that was a lot for him to carry and he doesn’t have to carry it anymore”. But it’s an insufficient salve. “The level of awareness, of knowing what he must have gone through . . . that tears me up.” Was there anything he’d learnt that he could apply in his role as a social worker? “That as much as we’d like it, there aren’t any ready-made responses that fit every case. It’s such an individual thing. If I look at how I might have done things differently, I can’t see anything, but I’m still the parent and so I’m still responsible. “I know I will carry this until the day I die.” You can’t help but wonder: would hearing that have impelled Nick to step off the track?

SO, WHAT TO DO? How do you, at ground level, play a part in reducing the suicide toll? By being as subtle as a sledgehammer. “It’s a very hard conversation to ask someone ‘Are you thinking about suicide?’,” explains Jorm, “but without being able to use that word the sufferer is isolated. Once you open that conversation up, you open the gateway for support. Facebook friends aren’t going to do it.” It’s a new spin on manning-up, and a decidedly uncomfortable one. For both parties. A 2015 Medical University of Vienna study of male suicide survivors found that, for some of the men, the “feelings associated with being vulnerable provoke greater anxiety than the thought of being dead”. The sentiments would come as no great shock to Gerald Haslinger, an MHFA instructor in Sydney. One of the 44-year-old’s earliest memories, “when I was three or four”, was hearing how his godmother’s son had found his father hanging in the attic of the block of apartments where they lived in Austria. “So I guess you could say it’s always been an area of interest,” says Haslinger, who acquired his own experience of grim outlooks – “I went to some very dark places” – in 14 years working in finance. Changing tack a decade ago, he completed a psychology degree and, like a spelunker who’s extracted himself from a deep cave, now spends his days returning to comfort others mired in the gloom. “When someone says, ‘I feel like shit and I don’t think I can do it anymore’, I’d like to think we’ve moved beyond saying, ‘Don’t be stupid, you’ll feel better with a couple of beers in you’, and taking them down the pub. It’s an invitation to help. “Women are much better at bringing in others to help solve shitty situations. Men try to solve things internally at first and only externalise when we’re right on the edge, if at all.” And this is where another, distinctly male, trait needs to be suppressed: our impulse to problem-solve. “What they want to hear is, ‘That must be really hard’, not suggestions on how to fix it,” says Haslinger. “You need to be willing to get in the hole with them for five or 10 minutes, and resist the temptation to pull them out.” Having spent years after his suicide attempt battling to achieve equilibrium, Bernie Mitchell agrees. “You don’t want them to be a doctor. It’s just a matter of being together. And don’t give them the option by asking, ‘Do you want me to come over?’, because they’ll say ‘No’. It’s best to swing by. As uncomfortable as that might be, 132

SEPTEMBER 2016

they’ll appreciate it. They just may not say it.” Think of that connection as providing a barrier between thought and deed. And obstacles, whether physical or psychological, are remarkably effective at preventing suicides. A recent Black Dog Institute study found that barriers and signs installed at notorious suicide locations – barriers that could be easily bypassed by a determined person – cut suicide attempts by up to 90 per cent. “Most people who think about suicide are ambivalent . . . so if someone is blocked, they get extra time to think about other options,” explained the report’s author, Dr Karolina Krysinska. Haslinger puts it another way. “It’s rare that anyone wakes up and is 100 per cent certain they’re going to kill themselves that day. Everyone has a tug of war. They know they’ll devastate their parents, their kids.” In that tug of war, simply showing you care carries more weight than you might credit. Haslinger recalls one hard-drinking client who’d received the rough end of the pineapple in life. He’d talked openly about suicidal thoughts and when he didn’t turn up for a scheduled appointment or answer his mobile, Haslinger became worried. “I called his work and he wasn’t there either, so I called the police and asked them to go around to the boarding house where he was living to check on him. I’ve got one of those voice-to-text mobiles and the next day I get a text: ‘I’m a wife’. I’m thinking, ‘Why’s my wife sending that?’. Then I realise, it’s from this guy – ‘I’m alive!’.” “When I next saw him he gave me a bit of a grief: ‘Thanks for sending the cops around’. But then 15 minutes after he leaves I get a text: ‘Thanks for caring enough to send help’.”

BERNIE MITCHELL DRAINS his coffee and attempts to summarise his life since he put down that knife. For more than two years afterwards, he relied on disability payments while undergoing a course of electroconvulsive therapy (“It didn’t work for me”) and refining the mood-stabilising, antidepressant and antipsychotic drug regimen he remains on to this day. Sam and his family stayed close, “reminding me that the future I couldn’t see was there. People say snap out of it, but it took me two years to fully understand my condition. There is no snapping out of it. It’s a sort of blindness.” Ultimately he married Sam, built a business, had five kids, took up scuba diving and wrote a book about living with bipolar disorder (Bipolar: a path to acceptance). He also had “about 400 psychotherapy sessions delving into the broken person you become because of depression, and looking at what brought you to that place”. He still has days when three emails is three too many. “I know it and I just go home.” Can he put his finger on the one thing that has stopped him sliding back? “At the age of 24 I learnt what is important in life. Value every moment; your family and friends, the breeze on your face, the smells as you walk down the street. I realised that long before a lot of others.” As I digest that, I notice something I hadn’t in the previous two hours. Mitchell doesn’t wear a watch. He’s living . . . in the present.


STATE

OF MIND

HELP IS AT HAND Described as a “suicide prevention tool”, the locally developed BeyondNow app enables users to create a step-by-step plan they can quickly consult if they’re considering suicide. The free app prompts users to list the following:

WARNING SIGNS: “feeling like a burden”, “feeling trapped”, “drinking to cope”, “conflict with people”

REASONS FOR LIVING: “experiences I haven’t had yet”, “a special friend”, “seeing my children grow up”, “my faith or spirituality”

WAYS TO MAKE THEIR ENVIRONMENT SAFE: “give my medication to someone else to look after”, “lock up or get rid of anything that could be used to harm myself”, “avoid people who upset me”, “avoid driving”

THINGS TO DO BY YOURSELF: “do some exercise”, “play with a pet”, “be creative”, “see a movie”

WAYS TO CONNECT WITH PEOPLE AND PLACES: “go to a busy park”, “spend some time in a cafe”, “go to the library”, “go to a sports match or concert”

FRIENDS AND FAMILY THEY CAN TALK TO, AND PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT. If you have been affected by this story, support is available here. Lifeline: 13 11 14 Suicide Call Back Service: 1300 659 467 Beyondblue: 1300 224 636 ruok.org.au

SEPTEMBER 2016 133


ELITE

138 HOW TO EAT FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE 149 SUPERCHARGE YOUR LEAPS AND BOUNDS 151 RELEASE THE RUNNING PRO INSIDE YOU

Because fit is the new rich

AUSTRALIAN

READY TO ROLL

AUSTRALIA’S RUGBY SEVENS SKIPPER ED JENKINS REVEALS HOW NAILING THE BASICS OF FITNESS LETS YOU

>

PHOTOGRAPHY: GILES PARK

TURN ON THE RAZZLE-DAZZLE

SEPTEMBER 2016 135


ELITE THE ROAD TO RIO

TOUGHER

THAN THE REST

Sevens ace Ed Jenkins shows you how to build brawn, speed and endurance – all on the same day

BY

DANIEL WILLIAMS

PHOTOGR APHY BY

GILES PARK

AT A GLANCE NAME

Ed Jenkins AGE

30

UP CLOSE, ED JENKINS looks every inch the model he once was. Good luck finding a squarer jaw in a Hollywood Western. Alas, trying to pursue dual careers in modelling and international rugby wasn’t working. Even if Jenkins happened to be in town on the day of a shoot, there was every chance he’d show up wearing some mark of battle – like the shiner he’s sporting today. You may be wondering: how battered can a man get playing glorified touch football? If that’s how you think of Sevens, Jenkins counters, then you couldn’t have watched a game this century. “When Fiji were dominating 20 years ago playing nice, attacking rugby, maybe you could have argued that,” says Jenkins, who’s savouring a posttraining coffee and sandwich at the Sydney Academy of Sport, HQ for the Australian Sevens squad that’s a medal chance in Rio. “Defence wasn’t crucial back then,” he explains. “Now, if you’re shying away from contact and not making your tackles, you’re going to be a liability to your team.” The hits, he adds, are as ferocious as those in the 15-a-side game. The takeout for you is that as Sevens has evolved, so have the body shapes and athletic profiles of its combatants. Players nowadays need to be the whole package: quick and brutishly strong with big engines. Incorporate some of the key planks of their training into your own regimen to unleash the gun competitor and imposing physical specimen you always knew was in you.

SPORT

Rugby Sevens POSITION

Forward (and captain) LIVES

Sydney HEIGHT

187cm

WEIGHT

96kg

136

SEPTEMBER 2016

FIND YOUR CALLING Life has a way of steering you to the place you’re meant to be. As a schoolboy on Sydney’s north shore and into early adulthood, Jenkins was a fine rugby winger who might have made it to the top but wasn’t single-minded about doing so. When his Sydney University coach Bill Millard (who at the time was also Australian Sevens


09/16 coach) suggested he try the abridged game, Jenkins was up for it. He’s now Australia’s mostcapped player. As Jenkins’ star has risen, so has Sevens’ professionalism. When he first made the national side almost a decade ago, preparations for a tournament went little beyond learning your teammates’ names and running some moves. Now the guys live in one another’s pockets and lean on a diverse support staff. Champions of traditional rugby and other codes who fancy they’d carve it up in Sevens can get a shock when they try. Ask the twinkle-toed Quade Cooper. And dream-chaser Jarryd Hayne.

NO WEAK LINK Remember as a kid kicking a ball around at the park on your own or with a mate? When you’re light on numbers, the rugby pitch becomes colossal. This is both the appeal and challenge of Sevens, as open space means equal parts opportunity and lung-busting toil. The imperative for Jenkins is to build top-notch endurance and agility while keeping on enough beef for the physical contest. “We don’t have the luxury of splitting strength and conditioning days,” he says. “We’re here six days a week and the days are full.” He rattles off his day so far. It’s a logjam of weights and contact sessions butted up against pool recovery and a team talk. “A lot of the conditioning is game-scenario minus the contact,” Jenkins says of sessions in which he’ll cover up to 10 kilometres. And you can’t coast. Live GPS data exposes those who don’t clock up enough so-called high-speed metres. “The strength and conditioning coach will give you a tap on the shoulder if you miss those targets, and then you’re on the sideline doing shuttles.” Jenkins may be pretty but he’s also a beast. Watching him in the gym, you notice the rope-like veins protruding from his biceps (see “Call to Arms” for your guns

JENKINS MAY BE PRETTY BUT HE’S ALSO A BEAST. HE CAN DEADLIFT 240KG AND SQUAT 210 workout) and calves. In his right hand he’s holding a 45-kilogram dumbbell that most guys couldn’t row. Jenkins snatches it from waist height to his shoulder before hoisting it overhead. He can deadlift 240kg and squat 210. And the man can move: he does 100 metres in 11.5 seconds; 400 in 49 seconds; 800 in 1:56 and 2km in 6:30. Now 30, he feels as fit as ever. “A few years ago the Olympics were being tossed up and I was wondering if I was going to be in good enough shape to get to them,” he says. “But it’s actually getting easier in some ways. The first thing that goes is your speed.

CALL TO ARMS Generally, footballers obtain their oversized arms through compound moves that hit multiple muscle groups at once. “But if the strength and conditioning coach is feeling generous on a Friday afternoon he’ll let us do this session where he gives us free rein to have a crack at some bis and tris,” says Jenkins. “It usually gets the boys ready for the weekend.”

[Keeping mine] will probably dictate whether I can play the game for a few more years or not.”

FIRST AMONG EQUALS Not a bad gig, Sevens. The circuit sweeps you through London, Paris and Las Vegas. And while you can revel in the prestige of playing footy for your country, no one outside the team set-up really cares very much if you win or not. Jenkins concedes the Wallabies face more external pressure than the Sevens guys. “But we put high standards on ourselves,” he says. “We have the drive and motivation to play for one another every tournament.”

Jenkins carries the extra responsibility of leadership. It’s something he neither sought nor chose. “I don’t think you’re born a leader,” says Jenkins, who admits he’s had to work at developing his captaincy skills. “Work quite hard, to be honest. It’s not something I feel natural with.” Doubting your right to reign? Simply lead by example, Jenkins advises. “That’s the one motto I try to practise. If you can go out there and show the way with your actions, guys will try to follow suit. Show them you’re going to do the hard yards and dig in when it gets tough. Guys will look at that and want to follow you in.”

Jenkins has rippling arms purpose-built for tackling, fending . . . and catching the female eye. Here’s the secret to building them

WHAT TO DO This workout exploits the tried-and-tested principle of time under tension to trigger sleeve-stretching hypertrophy. On every rep, take six seconds to perform the eccentric (downward) phase of the movement. Do 10 reps with the heaviest weight you can manage. Then immediately remove 10kg or thereabouts from the bar and do 10 more reps. Then drop another 10kg and do another 10 reps. That’s one set. Perform three sets of each exercise, resting for 90 seconds between sets. Do all curls – a total of 90 reps – before moving on to the skull-crushers.

1

BICEPS CURL Stand with feet hip-width apart, holding a barbell with an underhand grip, arms hanging in front of you. Lock your core and curl the bar up to your shoulders, keeping your elbows in tight to your sides throughout the movement. Take those six seconds to lower the bar to the start position.

2

SKULL-CRUSHER Lie on a flat bench, a loaded barbell held at arm’s length above your face in a neutral grip. Keeping your arms fixed, hinge at the elbows so the weight is lowered (slowly) to just behind your head. Squeeze your triceps, lock your core and return the weight to the start position.

SEPTEMBER 2016 137


ELITE

FIX YOUR FUEL CRISIS Stuck on a training plateau? Outdated nutritional ideas could be preventing you from achieving peak performance. Use our cheat sheet to focus on function rather than fiction Walk into any gym in the country and you’ll likely be privy to the weights room wisdom of fitness and nutrition “experts” exchanging the latest in “bro” science as they yack between sets. Mostly their patter is harmless, if misguided. Here’s a better option. Heed the advice of actual sports nutrition researchers, who work hard to uncover the scientific truth. Here they debunk five food myths that could be hurting your training efforts.

138

SEPTEMBER 2016

1

MYTH

2

MYTH

IF YOU HIT THE GYM HUNGRY, YOU’LL PREP YOUR BODY FOR MAXIMUM FAT LOSS.

EATING ENERGY GOO DURING A SHORT WORKOUT IS THE BEST WAY TO FUEL IT.

Some research suggests that if you exercise while your blood sugar and carb levels are low, your body will suck energy from fat reserves. But that’s not the best plan for high-intensity exercise, which fries the most lard, says nutritionist Dr Mike Roussell. The real key to stoking your fat furnace: managing insulin. Low-glycaemic foods (apples, peanuts, peaches) cause your body to release controlled doses of insulin, providing you with a steady stream of energy. High-glycaemic foods (white bread, pasta) cause insulin to spike, which can stimulate fat storage. FUEL SMART Build a base: two-and-a-half to three hours before a hard workout, eat a low-glycaemic meal of carbs, protein and healthy fats, says sports nutritionist Dr Christopher Mohr. Think quinoa, chicken, avocado. Then, 30-45 minutes before you hit the gym, grab a low-glycaemic 600-kilojoule snack, such as almond butter on a wrap or yoghurt with granola.

If you didn’t stick to your fuel-up plan earlier in the day, goo may help. According to a Sports Medicine review, consuming carbs during a 45- to 60-minute high-intensity workout may enhance your performance by helping you fight fatigue. But there’s a better strategy: eating carbs before exercise prevents your body from tapping its protein reserves, says Roussell. And it helps you power through your entire workout. Plus, carbs help manage your central nervous system’s perception of effort. FUEL SMART Fifteen minutes before a hard workout, consume about 30 grams of easily digested carbs, such as those in gels or chews, Roussell says. Not a fan? Try a smoothie. If you like your workouts caffeinated, save the buzz-inducing sports products (or coffee) for 30-60 minutes before exercise, says Dr Matthew Ganio, from the Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation at the University of Arkansas.


09/16

Want some serious help to stack on muscle and torch fat? You’ll find more workouts, recipes and motivation boosters in MH TRANSFORM, on sale now.

TRANSFORM REBUILD YOUR BODY AT ANY AGE

GET IT:

BOLDSHOULDERS 6-PACKABS BIG BICEPS

DANGER!

5 Mistakes ThatMake You Fat

LARRYEMDUR HOW I LOST 13KG IN 12 WEEKS . . . AT 50! MUST-HAVE MUSCLE SNACKS

INSTANT WORKOUT UPGRADES

WEIGHT-LOSS CHEATS

BUY ONLINE AT SUBSCRIBETODAY.COM. AU/PRODUCTS/MHTRANS

3

MYTH

WHEN IT COMES TO MUSCLE BUILDING, IT’S WHEY OR THE HIGHWAY. Nutritionists long thought that you needed all nine essential amino acids to build muscle. That’s why lifters scooped up whey, a cheese by-product that has a full set of amino acids and can be turned into powder. But a 2013 University of Tampa study found that men who lifted three days a week for two months showed similar gains in muscle growth and strength whether they ate whey protein or rice protein powder after workouts. FUEL SMART Most your protein for bulking up should come from food sources for the added nutrients. Try tossing whey, egg, rice or pea powder, which all deliver the amino acid trinity (leucine, isoleucine and valine), into your shakes. Be sure to eat 2-3g of leucine per session for best muscle growth.

4

MYTH

ANTIOXIDANTS PATCH DAMAGED MUSCLES, SO LOAD UP! “Antioxidant supplements might do you more harm than good,” says Dr Mari Carmen Gomez-Cabrera, an antioxidant expert at the University of Valencia. A 2014 study at the Norwegian School of Sport Sciences found that amateur athletes who took an antioxidant and vitamin supplement for six weeks reduced their endurance training efficiency compared with athletes who took none. A separate 2014 review saw similar effects in sprinters. Why? Antioxidant supplementation may block formation of energy-producing mitochondria. FUEL SMART Antioxidants may still protect you from heart disease and cancer. Buy colourful fruits and vegetables, says GomezCabrera. The colours represent antioxidants with unique benefits. We suggest 2-4 servings of green vegetables, 2-3 servings of starchy vegetables and legumes, and three servings of fruit daily.

5

MYTH

CREATINE SUPPLEMENTATION IS GOOD FOR SERIOUS BODYBUILDERS ONLY. The benefits go beyond the bench press: taking creatine may improve speed-training performance, aerobic activity and perhaps even neurological function, according to a study review in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. Why the aerobic boost? The study notes that creatine may raise blood plasma levels and help you use oxygen more efficiently. It’s true that your body already produces about 1g of creatine a day and that you ingest additional creatine in animal proteins. But your diet may not be consistent from day to day, so supplement for a constant supply. FUEL SMART After a loading phase of 20-25g of creatine daily for the time period recommended in the supplement directions, keep taking 3-5g a day. This will help you derive the most benefits, according to the review.

SEPTEMBER 2016 139


ELITE

KNOC Power, stamina and a punchy eight-pack – use hard-hitting UK fight coach Shane McGuigan’s kno ockout session to blast your belly fat in just 28 days

01A

02A

BAG A NE EW UE PHYSIQU Today’s cohort of pro box xers are elite athletes, not barrel-bodie ed brawlers. McGuigan is at the vangu uard of this assault, building fighters who are fit and light on their feet, wh hile packing show-time power. His workout orkout fuses technical punching with body-weight bruisers, designed to elevate your heart rate and strip fat. It’s time to go down a weight class for the right reason.

140

SEPTEMBER 2016

ROUND01

01B

POWER PUNCH 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

PUSH-UP BU URPEE 5 SECS’ REST 3 X 15 SEC, 15

In each round, repeat the first move for 15 seconds, rest for 15, then go to the next move. Once your three sets are done, rest for 90 seconds and start round two. First up, punches: don’t just start swinging – you’re you re more likely to sprain your wrist than rock the bag. Pick a spot and punch straight with a hard right hand; draw it back to head height. Repeat with your left to build power in your arms and back.

You won’t find a boxer with more weight on his waist than his shoulders. To re everse your own build, there’s no o avoiding the dirty work. From m a push-up, hop your legs forward and jump as high as you can can, legs straight. On landing, drop back into a push-up and do one rep. McGuigan recommends leaving your gloves on – you’ve only got 15 seconds before it’s back to the power punches.

02B


09/16

EXPERT PROFILE Name Shane McGuigan Experience Boxing prodigy McGuigan earned his own welterweight title before coaching some of the sport’s fittest and meanest. A good man to have in your corner.

04A

04B

03B

03A

ROUND02

DO THE WORKOUT USE THE VIEWA APP TO ADD THE MOVES ON THESE PAGES TO YOUR PHONE

03

04

POWER HOOK 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

JUMP LUNGES 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

Set up in a wide stance, knees bent, core tight. Punch one side of the bag with a wide hook, then bring your fist straight back as you hook with the other side. Keep your wrists locked as you make contact with the bag. And rotate at the waist; you should feel the effort in your obliques. This hook is among the strongest weapons in your arsenal thanks to that core twist. It’ll draw out those “Bruce Lee” lines too.

A deceptively difficult move, these require good coordination to avoid ending in a heap on the canvas. Step into a deep lunge with your left leg, your right knee just above the floor. Without moving forward, jump with both legs – drive your right leg forward as you push the left back, landing in a lunge on the opposite side. Keep your arms straight ahead to ensure your upper body keeps fighting. > SEPTEMBER 2016 141


ELITE

05A

05B

06B

07B

06A

GO T THE TAN DIST

07A

06

Week one: three x three-minute rounds, work-rest ratio of 15:15. Rest for 90 seconds between rounds. Week two: three x three-minute rounds, work-rest ratio of 20:10. Rest for 90 seconds between rounds. Week three: three x three-minute rounds, work-rest ratio of 15:15. Rest for 45 seconds between rounds. Week four: three x three-minute rounds, work-rest ratio of 20:10. Rest for 45 seconds between rounds.

142

SEPTEMBER 2016

ROUND 03

Guarantee weekly progression with these upgrades to your work-rest ratios, according to McGuigan’s proven program.

PYRAMID PUNCH 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

PAUSED JUMP SQUAT 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

The logic behind this pyramid is simple, if not easy: perform one punch with your right hand, then reset your position. Now do the same again but follow it up with one from your left. Again, reset before punching right, left, right. Keep building up, taking a second to compose yourself before each combo. This will steadily increase your muscles’ workload, conditioning them to perform under fatigue.

Plyometric jumps overload your already tired quads to recruit more muscle and burn extra fat. This is also why you’re working for only 15 seconds. Drop into a low squat and push your arms back, then jump as high as you can, swinging your arms up for momentum. When you land, drop back into a squat and stay put. Stabilising that explosive movement engages more of the muscle.


09/16 MUSCLES

09A

WORKOUT

25 MIN

RESULTS IN

4

WEEKS LEVEL

09B

MED

10A

08A

08B

07

08

09

10

PLANK PUSH-UP 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

KNEES-UP STRAIGHTS 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

SANDBAG SLAM 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

BEAR CRAWLS 3 X 15 SEC, 15 SECS’ REST

Regular planks are great for building core strength and the disjointed press makes your abs work even harder in order to maintain stability. Drop into a forearm plank. From there, raise yourself one arm at a time to end in the top position of a push-up with arms extended. You should be propped on your knuckles. Keep alternating between the positions for the full 15 seconds.

Combining cardio bursts with punches prepares McGuigan’s athletes for the later rounds of a bout, but you can receive the same conditioning benefits without the concussions. Jog on the spot, an arm’s length from a bag, raising your knees to hip height. Keep jogging, punching the bag in time with your steps. As you raise your right knee, punch with your left hand and vice versa.

The gloves are off for your final round, though the fight is far from over. This superset ups your workload, hiking your metabolism to scorch fat for hours after you’ve picked yourself up off the floor. Keep your core tight as you raise a sandbag (or medicine ball) high and slam it down. Lean forward onto the balls of your feet to generate extra power. Pick the bag up, then slam it again.

Finally, beast your body with the bear crawl. Get down on all fours and crawl forward, first with your left hand and right leg, then the alternate. Keep your hips high and your shoulders square – take small steps and keep each movement precise. This is the final part of the workout, so leave nothing in the tank. Pick up the pace to ramp up your metabolism for a total body-fat KO.

ROUND05

ROUND 04

10B

SEPTEMBER 2016 143


MEN’S HEALTH SUBSCRIPTION OFFER

AUSTRALIAN GST $8.99 NZ $9.99 INC AUGUST 2016

BUILD

BMUISGCLE

The 8-Week Plan That MadeThis Body!

The Sex Robots Are Coming! Strike Out Stress p18

8 FROM ONLY $54 for 12 issues of Men’s Health CHOOSE from print, digital or bundle subscription options SAVE 50% on the cover price FREE DELIVERY direct to your door

^ MyVIP is available to renewed and active customers only for the life of the subscription (Registration details will be sent via email within 7 days of renewal). *Print + digital subscription bundle orders can only be completed online, not by phone. Digital edition available on iPad and iPhone. Offer available in Australia only and ends 31/10/2016. This offer cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer. Subscriptions may not include promotional items packed with the magazine. Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd is collecting your personal information for the purpose of processing your order. As a subsidiary of Seven West Media Limited, Pacific will handle your personal information in accordance with Seven’s Privacy Policy, which is available on subscribetoday.com.au/ privacy-policy. By providing your personal information, you agree to the terms of the Policy. Without limiting the foregoing, Pacific may disclose your personal information to its related entities and service providers for research and profiling purposes as well as processing your order. Pacific may also use your personal information for the purpose of Pacific and its related entities sending you information regarding programs, products and services available through them and/or through their business partners, and to Pacific from time to time sharing your personal information with carefully selected business partners for the purpose of them sending you such information directly. We will always provide you with the ability to opt out of those communications.


HALF-PRICE

SALE was

now

54

$

SAVE 50%

OR PAY ONLY $49.99 via automatic renewal – that’s a bigger 54% SAVING for you!

VISIT subscribetoday.com.au/mh916 OR CALL* 1300 668 118 and quote P69JKZZA


ELITE

READY FOR ANYTHING

ELITE OBSTACLE RACER JARAD KOHLAR SHOWS YOU HOW TO EXCEL IN A SPORT THAT TESTS EVERY ASPECT OF YOUR FITNESS BY DANIEL WILLIAMS

NEW

Spartan World Championships in Squaw Valley, Lake Tahoe, where he finished as the highest-placed Australian and in the top 15 overall in a 15,000-strong field. “That was eye-opening – to see there are some seriously fit, strong and fast athletes doing just obstacle-course racing now.” Are you ready for your next challenge? Have you signed on for Men’s Health’s Survival of the Fittest race at Sydney’s Olympic Park in December (mhsurvival.com.au)? Follow Kohlar’s five-step plan to be in beastly shape come race day.

1

RUN,MAN,RUN

There’s no escaping the need to put miles in your legs. “Most guys hate running, but for an event where you’ll be covering, say, 10km you should be doing two or three 30- to 40-minute runs at a steady pace per week for the duration of your training block,” says Kohlar.

Injury prevention sports massage range.

Ideally, he stresses, you’ll be doing these runs not on bitumen but on surfaces that force you to think about foot placement. You’ll find Kohlar clocking up the kays on grass, bush tracks, rocky outcrops and pipelines. But running on any surface beats neglecting this basic of time on your feet. “At obstacle-course events you see a lot of guys who clearly do plenty of training in the gym, but who’d benefit more from training outdoors,” says Kohlar. “My personal philosophy is get out there and sweat, enjoy the effort and don’t be obsessed with times.”

2

MOVEMETAL

That said, you can’t dodge resistance training sessions. As well as your three runs per week, you’ll be doing two sessions of what Kohlar calls SAS: Strength, Ability, Stability. For Kohlar and his clients at Peak Adventure (peakadventure.com.au), these workouts

PHOTOGRAPHY: AARON JOHNSON

JARAD KOHLAR RUNS like a fugitive. On the road he’d need little more than half an hour to cover 10 kilometres. But where he really comes into his own is over rough terrain. “My strength is trail running,” he says from his Melbourne home. “I’ve raced 28-minute, 10-kay road runners in crosscountry events and I’m six or seven minutes in front of them over that distance.” It’s the mark of a man who’s ripping it up as an obstacle racer. Emerging from adventure and multi-sport racing, Kohlar competed in his first obstacle event only four years ago. Nowadays, he and former triathlete Matt Murphy could each mount a case for being Australia’s premier racer. For Kohlar, obstacle racing’s appeal is threefold. The prize money’s welcome, as is the bonhomie of most competitors. But most compelling is the challenge posed by events demanding complete physical conditioning. “It’s not a pure heart-rate activity,” says Kohlar, who turned heads at last year’s

Tested by sporting professionals.


09/16

DO THE WORKOUT USE THE FREE VIEWA APP TO ADD THE ROUTINE HERE TO YOUR PHONE

manage a chimp-like 5-10 minutes after a few months of his killer workouts. “Some guys can do a pull-up or two – you’ve got the muscular strength – but you don’t have the finger, forearm or tendon strength and it’s a matter of building those up,” Kohlar says. “You can use grip balls and grippers, but I find just a lot of hanging, pull-ups and carries work the best.” Kohlar admits that he, too, was once held back by subpar forearm strength. With a race weight of roughly 68 kilograms, he was up against it nailing those race-day obstacles that amount to a test of might. “The long carries are taxing and suit the bigger, stronger guys of 80kg or more,” he says. “So I had to work on that by carrying those heavy weights.” Round out your prep with a weekly hill session to boost aerobic capacity, urges Kohlar. Ideally, you’ll find an incline that takes three minutes to scale at a fair clip; recover by jogging back down. Repeat for five reps in total.

4

typically consist of multiple five- to 10-minute bursts of kayaking interspersed with compound moves such as kettlebell swings, carries, dips, pull-ups, push-ups and burpees. You’re free to sub out kayaking for cycling, skipping, swimming or running – anything with a taxing aerobic component. “Any combo that involves burpees is going to push you over the edge,” advises Kohlar, sadistically.

3

HANGINTHERE

Obstacle racing will expose deficiencies in your grip strength, causing a red-hot time to slip through your fingers. “I’m amazed at how a lot of the multisport athletes can’t even hang onto a rope for one minute,” says Kohlar. The good news: grip strength responds swiftly to targeted training. Guys in Kohlar’s SAS sessions who could hang from a rope for only 30 seconds when they joined can now

WIN

TOUGHENUP

Most competitors hit the wall at some stage of an obstacle race and have to overcome thoughts along the lines of, There’s still so far to go and I’m rooted. If you’re prepared for this phase you’ll get through it, says Kohlar, who suggests having a mantra ready, something like “pain is temporary”. “Because if you really take a course on then it’s going to hurt,” he says. “Try to be positive. No negative thoughts. Think about something that gives you energy or makes you happy. It may have nothing to do with training. It could be your daughter, your grandmother or a friend.”

5

ATTENTIONTODETAIL

Getting the little things right on race day can be the difference between a flameout and a PB. For fuel, Kohlar eats a meal of white toast with jam, honey or peanut butter 2-3 hours before he races. He’ll have an energy gel half an hour before the gun and another midrace. “If the weather’s hot, drink a little more than normal beforehand, but only according to thirst,” says Kohlar. “A lot of guys in these mass-participation events cramp because they’ve overhydrated.” And dress appropriately. In hot weather, that means long sleeves and a hat you’re willing to lose. And lather on the sunscreen: “There’s nothing worse than getting burnt.” Except getting beaten home by your mother.

1 of 50 GoPro HD HERO 4

Silver Edition Action Camera’s!

Valued at

$599

ALL-ROUND ATHLETICISM Obstacle racing probes your body for weaknesses, testing the aerobic and anaerobic systems. To prepare for this onslaught, you need to mix running with high-intensity resistance work. This Kohlar-designed workout is a proven all-body conditioner that has helped transform him into one of Australia’s best obstacle racers. Do it twice a week to become an unstoppable force.

DIRECTIONS

Get yourself and the required equipment down to your nearest park. Your backyard may also do the trick. Place all the equipment in one place and pace out 75 metres to your start line. Perform the following sprintsweights moves without rest. Depending on your level of fitness, start with two rounds, building up to four, taking a minute’s breather between each round. “You’ll be smashed if you get through this,” warns Kohlar.

YOU’LLNEED

► 1 sandbag ► 1 dead ball/slam ball ► 2 kettlebells ► 1 tyre, connected to a rope ► 1 small medicine ball NB: select equipment weights according to strength.

WORKOUT

► Sprint 75m to your stash of equipment ► Grab the sandbag and place it across your shoulders. Run 75m back to the start line and dump the sandbag ► Run back to the equipment, grab the dead ball and hold it at your chest. Run 75m and dump the dead ball. ► Run back, grab the two kettlebells and carry them like buckets back to the start line. Dump. ► Run back, grab the tyre and pull it back to the start. Dump. ► Run back, grab the medicine ball and hoist it overhead. Sprint back to the start line.

Find out more at deepheat.com.au * Terms and conditions apply. See website for details.


ELITE

09/16

CAMPSITE KING THE PROSPECT OF STAR-FILLED NIGHTS, A ROARING FIRE AND A COSY TENT LURING YOU INTO THE WILD? NOTHING SAYS “COME AT ME, WILDLIFE!” LIKE A MAN WHO’S PREPARED FOR EVERY EVENTUALITY RIGHT ON TIME

SWEET RELIEF

Tackle the aches of a day’s hard treking with Deep Heat PRO Sports Recovery Massage Oil ($10.99; mentholatum.com.au). Its “Hotflux” heating agent delivers a lasting warming sensation that increases blood circulation, to relax sore muscles and soft tissue.

Strapping the Garmin Fenix 3 ($899; harveynorman.com.au) to your wrist is akin to having Christopher Columbus as a wingman. This tough-as-nails GPS-enabled watch contains an altimeter, barometer, compass and an intriguing “bread crumb trail” feature that tracks precisely where you’ve been.

THIRST IN LINE

Become the pride of the pack by adding a layer of activated carbon filtration to your treated spring water, courtesy of the Brita Fill and Go Vital ($19.95; brita.com). Water makes up 75 per cent of your muscles; it’s your key to survival.

QUICK FIX

Protein is essential in the growth and repair of muscles, so the ability to tuck 19 grams of the stuff in your pocket will count as a sweet blessing after another brekky of lukewarm baked beans. (INC Muscle Deluxe bar, $1.99; chemistwarehouse.com.au) FEET FIRST

HOT STUFF

Nothing puts the smile on the face of an up-at-the-crack-ofdawn camper like a steaming coffee. Caffeine boosts your metabolism and generally makes life more satisfying – but you’ll want it piping hot. The Thermos Element 5 Backpack Bottle ($24.99; shopthermos.com) will keep it that way for 12 hours.

148

SEPTEMBER 2016

LET THERE BE LIGHT

It took God until the fourth day to create the sun – you’ll be bathed in bright light from the get-go if you’re carrying the Dolphin Everyday LED Lantern ($27.95; dolphintorches. com). A dazzling 100 lumens with a 365-metre reach will illuminate even the darkest trip to the dunny.

WORDS: LIAM CURTIS; PHOTOGRAPHY: EDWARD URRUTIA

Sure, nobody wants socks for Christmas – but the Icebreaker Hike Lite Crew Socks ($35; icebreaker.com) should sit at the top of your camping wish list. Mesh panels over the instep increase breathability, while the Merino wool blend delivers natural temperature control.


ELITE

09/16

Jumpstart Your Fitness Game PLYOMETRICS – EXPLOSIVE JUMPING AND FOOTWORK DRILLS – ARE NOT THE PRESERVE OF RIO-BOUND PRO ATHLETES. USE THEM TO IMPROVE YOUR STRENGTH, SPEED AND SIX-PACK ABS BY LEAPS AND BOUNDS

EXPERT Ben Camara EXPERIENCE Camara is a movement specialist with a background in top-flight football and athletics. He fuses science and experience to hotwire your body.

GO HUNGRY Plyometric movement burns huge amounts of energy in a short space of time, so it’s the perfect workout for shifting any body fat that’s long outstayed its welcome. Train on empty and it’s even more effective for fat – just limit your sessions to 25-30 minute es and make sure you eat within an hour of hitting the show wer.

PUT THE BOOT ON

TEST YOUR METAL Review your program after six weeks and add resistance wherever you’ve made significant progress. Hold a pair of dumbbells while performing your jumps or strap on a weighted sled when doing shuttle runs outside.

If you’re training for a particular sport, perform plyometrics in your match-day footwear whenever possible. Fully cushioned training shoes are all well and good, but if you can’t put your preparation to use in studs, it’s wasted effort. You don’t get competition points for being a workout warrior.

DO THE LEGWORK While explosive pull-ups count as plyos, your hamstrings and glutes are the powerhouses for the big jumps that improve performance. Single-leg squats train them to work unilaterally, while heavy back squats will build power.

ILLUSTRATIONS: BEN MOUNSEY

MEASURE SUCCESS

OFFLOAD Plyos are made up of eccentric and concentric phases. The first loads your muscles with energy; the second uses the stored energy to propel you. Stockpile extra force by slowing down on deadlifts: take four seconds to lower, then stand up as fast as possible (but still with good form).

On day one of plyo training, the most important thing to remember is a pen. Record the height and distance of your jumps, and time how fast you run. It won’t just give you an ego boost in a month’s time – the surprisingly significant incremental improvements along the way will also give you a psychological edge in every session. Hop to it.

AND THE REST . . . To get the most out of plyometrics you have to put 100 per cent into every rep. If your muscles are toast there is simply no point to any bounding around. Set aside a full 2-3 minutes between each set to stretch and bring down your resting heart rate before your next max effort. Tabata class this ain’t.

SEPTEMBER 2016 149


ELITE

09/15

READY, SET, RUN RACK UP SMARTER, SAFER KAYS THIS SPRING. HERE’S HOW BY MIK E DARLING

When I crossed the finish line at the Boston Marathon this year, my old uni mates were in disbelief – back then, I wasn’t exactly known for my athleticism. But Boston was my third marathon, and I now consider myself a real runner. I revel in my daily runs – and the heft of a race medal in my hand. In truth, my transition from beer runs to road runs didn’t happen smoothly. I’ve had sore knees, a cranky Achilles and more, mostly due to my novice mindset. Like many running rookies who end up injured, I thought the only things I needed were running shoes and a willingness to sweat. “Most people are poorly prepared for the stress that running puts on the body,” says Kelly Starrett, author of Ready to Run. Use this plan to prep yourself so you don’t wreck yourself. Consider it your starting line to incredible fitness.

More than 25 per cent of new runners end up injured. Avoid that fate with our plan.

1

BUILD A FOUNDATION

Miniband Sidestep

Don’t explode from the blocks: spend two weeks walking while doing these moves three days a week, then once or twice a week afterwards.

2

PREP YOUR MUSCLES

Readying your body requires loosening up your muscles and locking down your nutrition. Run through this routine before you hit the streets.

Cadence Lunge

For the ultimate hip fortifier, position a miniband around your legs just below your knees. Keeping your upper body still, take small steps to the right for about 10 metres, then sidestep back to your left for another 10m. That’s one set; do three.

Open Your Hips With a wall directly behind you, assume a lunge position with your left knee forward and your right knee behind you on the floor close to the wall; your right shin should be running up the wall. You’ll feel your right hip and quad stretch. Switch legs and repeat. This move opens up your hips and helps prevent knee, back and hip pain, says Starrett. Do it for a minute per leg before and after you run.

Build strong strides: holding a dumbbell in your right hand, step back with your right leg into a reverse lunge as you swing the weight in front of you. Explosively stand back up. That’s one rep; do 10 and switch sides. Do three sets of 10 per side.

Stretch Your Calves Prevent Achilles tendonitis and shin splints: stand on the balls of your feet on a step with your heels hanging off the edge. (You can use a railing or a wall for balance.) Push yourself up and slowly (to a count of 10) drop your heels below the level of the step. Push back up and repeat. Do three sets of 15 every day after your run.

Band Lying Leg Extension For bulletproof legs, lie on your back with your hips and knees bent 90°. Loop a miniband around your feet. Straighten your right leg. Reverse and repeat with your left. Do three sets of 10 reps per leg.

Don’t Carb Load Step away from the pasta. Beginners often over-fuel, not realising that a five-kilometre run burns only around 1650 kilojoules – roughly the amount in two energy bars. Your normal diet will give you what you need until you reach half-marathon distance and beyond, says sports medicine specialist Dr Jordan Metzl.

Hydrate Gradually Resist the urge to suck down litres of H20 before a run; you shouldn’t feel as if you’re cramming for an exam, says dietitian Pamela Bede. A better strategy is to drink when you feel thirsty, she says. For any run under an hour – as long as conditions aren’t too hot or humid – you shouldn’t need to carry water. You’ll be perfectly fine with the fluid you have on board.>

SEPTEMBER 2016 151


ELITE

09/16

4

INCREASE YOURSPEED

With a solid base and a plan to become strong and avoid injury, you’re ready for the long haul. Follow these rules of the road.

Build Distance Slowly An abrupt spike in distance – more than 30 per cent over a two-week period – dramatically increases a new runner’s risk of injury, according to a 2014 study in the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy. You can stave off a crippling injury by allowing your body sufficient time to adapt: increase your kays by no more than 10 per cent a week.

3

Finesse Your Speed

STARTRUNNING Your first outings are critical. Learn proper running mechanics early so you can make faster progress and protect yourself from injury.

Don’t Overstride Try to maintain a compact stride and rapid cadence (stride rate), says coach Mark Coogan. A short, light stride will help you avoid landing on your heels too much. If you’re on the heavier side, it could also moderate the impact on your lower back. “It’s especially important when going downhill,” adds Coogan. “That’s when the quads and knees can take a flogging, and also when new runners tend to go for it.”

Relax Already Avoid shuffling through your runs like Frankenstein’s monster. “I tell people to imagine they’re holding an egg in each hand,” says Coogan. “You don’t want to be squeezing so hard that you’d break it.” Looseness through the hands helps you stay loose everywhere, including your upper back and shoulders.

RACE DAY

Beginners have a tendency to swing their arms across their body as they gain speed. This motion wastes energy because it’s side to side rather than forward. Swing your arms naturally back and forth; the movement should be a perfect counterbalance to your legs, propelling you forward.

Foam Roll Roll everything. Set a timer for 10 minutes and foam roll back and forth over the prime movers in your lower body – glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves – for about 30 seconds each. When you’re really feeling the pinch, dig into achy spots with a golf ball, Starrett says. Align the ball with the tight area, take a deep breath and relax around it, letting the ball sink in and knead the spot. Then roll the area very slowly.

Tackle a Hill Add a weekly hill workout and you’ll quickly become a stronger runner, says Coogan. He recommends finding a gentle hill – at least 120m – and running quickly up it. “Try to do it five times the first week; add a couple more every two weeks. When that becomes too easy for you, find a steeper, longer hill.”

Recruit a Friend You’ll be more likely to stick with the sport if you have a running partner. If your mates hate running, join a club. Many running clubs are free and draw big crowds.

Need inspiration to lace up? Target one of these events

HARD

Blackmores Sydney Half Marathon

(18 September, 2016) Starting at the Harbour Bridge and tracking the foreshores of Pyrmont and Barangaroo before finishing at the steps of Opera House – is there a more beautiful half-marathon course on Earth? sydneyrunningfestival.com.au

152

Be Efficient

Now let’s go fast. Speed work can help you burn more kilojoules and train you to run fast without going into the red zone. Coogan recommends “strides”. In the middle or at the end of a normal run, increase your pace to a near sprint for 100m, then resume your normal pace. If you do 8-10 of these, recovering after each one, every second day for two weeks, you’ll start to see your times improve.

SEPTEMBER 2016

HARDER

Great Ocean Road Marathon

(20-21 May, 2017) If trundling along city streets is too dull to contemplate, this marathon offers sublime views with the roar of the Southern Ocean drowning out the monotonous thud of footfalls. greatoceanroadmarathon.com.au

HARDEST

Buckley’s Chance Running Festival

(18-20 November, 2016) The name says it all, really. This hard-core running festival provides off-trail 10-, 25- and 50km courses mapped out on the jungly slopes of Mt Warning on NSW’s north coast. survivalrun.com.au


ONE WORD ANSWER

ANSWER

Fingers Grasp the honest truth about T.

154

SEPTEMBER 2016

You know what they say about men with big feet? That’s right: big shoes. And if you buy into the myth that a pair of size 12s means anything more, frankly you could do with a science refresher course. It turns out it’s all in the hand: recent studies have linked your finger length to the amount of testosterone in your body. Researchers at McGill University in Canada discovered that men with ring fingers longer than their index fingers are more likely to have been exposed to high levels of the hormone as a fetus. They also concluded that, as a logical corollary, if your index finger is longer it could be down to oestrogen exposure. But before the chest-beating commences, it’s worth considering subtler implications. While high testosterone levels are associated with dominant and competitive characters, a University of Bonn study also linked it to increased honesty. Next time you’re at a work meeting or trying to suss out a client, scan the digits at the table. It might help you establish whose handshake you can most trust.

PHOTOGRAPHY: AGATA PEC @ HEARST STUDIOS

QUESTION Which body parts are the best measure of manliness


Find the ring of

HER DREAMS Book a one-on-one appointment at our North Melbourne studio. We’ll help you choose the perfect ring at a price that won’t break your budget. By appointment only. Contact Claude on 1300 430 530 or email claude@diamondcoco.com.au 480 Abbotsford Street, North Melbourne 3051 diamondcoco.com.au


(6

F

5 0- e r rp o of nium c se. Fully sa fini , ghlyy go mic an nd e p pp wi h helium a e c se of the e ag g d l ha en d siign o hsta ta the most x e di s

TU TUD UD h s movement 62 Off ffe e ng a 7 ou ur r se e ea d reg la d a ia i a ossci o with th si c ba a anc ri , it is ce ifi fie fi e b th by fficcia ffi i Ch o err Te in In e CO C). )

# D A CH U W CH CO O


Men s health australia september 2016