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NOTES FROM SFA Gardens Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 6 Zone 7 Zone 8

Plant Hardiness Zones Based on 30-year average ending in:

Zone 9

Zone 10

2040

Projected

TNLA Green July/August 2019 Advertiser Index Creekside Nursery.............inside front cover Newton Nurseries......................................03 Horizon Irrigation.......................................04 BWI..............................................................07 Hotchkiss Insurance ..................................09 FIS ................................................................ 11 Exaco............................................................13 Simmons Oak Farms ..................................15 Rotochopper ...............................................19 Texas Mutual ...............................................21 Tree Town USA ........................................... 23 Living Earth ................................................ 23 Grow in Bag ................................................ 25 DFD Loaders ............................................... 27 Capital Farm Credit ...................................29 Romco .........................................................31 Landscapers Pride .......................................31 Quietaire .................................................... 32 Spring Meadow Nursery ........................... 33 NEEM Pro ................................................... 33 GIE+ EXPO .................................................. 35 OHP ................................... inside back cover STIHL............................................ back cover

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TNLA Green July/August 2019

especially in the U.S. A May 23, 2019, New York Times article by Nadja Popovich titled “How Climate Change May Affect the Plants in Your Yard” made the point that hardiness zones are shifting north. Based on the current global carbon dioxide level at 415 PPM and the most current projections, some places will see dramatic climate change and other areas won’t. The models say Texas will experience dramatic climate change, with warmer average temperatures predicted for all four seasons. My Zone 8 East Texas garden is predicted to be Zone 9 by 2040. I can start thinking about banana variety trialing. The caveat is that climate change is more than just average temperatures rising. It’s more violent storms, longer droughts, disastrous flooding, and early and late freezes the likes of which we’ve never seen before. It’s an energetic atmosphere. Gardening in Texas has never been easy. If the models are right, then clinging to natives might be clinging to a world that no longer exists. For East Texas, we might be thinking about the wonderful array of native plants just a bit to our south and west. For now, I vote for planting more natives and well-behaved exotics, with a focus on the right plant in the right place at the right time. It’s a simple mantra. Of course, all this may be just too much thinking; there are too many variables, too much preparation, and it may be all for nothing. After all, we’re just one meteorite, geothermal or volcanic event away from an ice age. Until next time, let’s keep planting. DAVID CREECH, Ph.D., is regent’s professor emeritus at Stephen F. Austin State University and the director of SFA Gardens.

Profile for TNLA GREEN Magazine

TNLA Green Magazine July/August  

TNLA Green Magazine July/August