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The New Hampshire Friday, February 18, 2011

www.TNHonline.com w ww.TNHonline.com

Vol. V ol. 1100, 00, N No. o. 32 32

SPORTS

ARTS

Despite a record below .500, the women’s hockey team still has a shot at the tourney.

Grammy-winning guitarist Robert Cray is heading to the Port City. Page 9

Page 20

With amendment, business school motion passes Clause referencing tuition spike axed

This illustration shows the Peter T. Paul School of Business and Economics from the corner of Garrison Ave. and Main St.

By THOMAS GOUNLEY EXECUTIVE EDITOR

The University System of New Hampshire Board of Trustees on Thursday unanimously passed a motion detailing a project budget for the construction of a new business school at UNH, but only after passing an amendment removing a clause that stated that the project would be partially funded by an increase in tuition for UNH undergraduate students.

COURTESY PHOTO

The approved motion included a controversial $16 million loan from the university system to UNH. The final portion of the original motion, which stated that the loan would be “funded from an increase in tuition to all UNH undergraduates not to exceed $160 per year beginning in FY13, was unanimously removed prior to voting. “It was never their [the board’s]

BUSINESS continued on page 3

USNH sets tuition for next year

Ward Bird, center, speaks with Gov. John Lynch while daughter Emily, far left, looks on. Emily talked with TNH about the case.

Cost of attendance set to increase by $1,328 By THOMAS GOUNLEY EXECUTIVE EDITOR

The University System of New Hampshire (USNH) Board of Trustees set the tuition and fee rates for UNH for the 2011-2012 academic year at a board meeting held in Keene on Thursday. Cost of attendance will increase $1,328 for both in-state and out-of-state students. This amounts to a 5.9 percent increase for in-state students and a 3.6 percent increase for out-ofstate students. Cost of attendance

includes tuition, fees and room and board. USNH Chancellor Ed MacKay attributed the increase to a variety of factors. “These increases are driven mainly by the substantial challenges we face in terms of student financial aid needs, the need to address deferred maintenance of facilities, continued pressure on increased cost of employee medical plans, and significant constraints on the state budget being developed for the next biennium that make any appropriation increase

very unlikely,” he said in a press release. New Hampshire currently ranks last in the nation in per capita funding of higher education. The amount that the state legislature has appropriated to the university system has remained stagnant at $100 million for the past two years. The release of tuition figures in February represents an accelerated schedule from previous years; last year, the cost of atten-

TUITION continued on page 3

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Daughter of Ward Bird speaks of difficulties By CHANTEL McCABE

A SIGN OF SPRING

STAFF WRITER

ERICA SIVER/STAFF

Lydia McLaughlin looks to make a catch during a game of ultimate frisbee in the 50-plus degree weather yesterday. Today is expected to hit 48 degrees before a return to the cold Saturday.

On Feb. 3, Ward Bird, a resident of Moultonborough, N.H., was released from Carroll County House of Corrections after serving a 77-day sentence for threatening a woman with a gun back in 2006. The case received a great deal of media attention nationally; with controversy surrounding the case because of what evidence was allowed in the trial. A campaign to get Bird released from prison gained an overwhelming amount of support from the community and urged the state house to reconsider the court’s decision. The Executive Council, with the support of Gov. John Lynch, voted unanimously on Feb. 2 to release Bird early from his mandatory three- to six-year sentence. Lynch

vetoed the full pardon the council wanted to give Bird however, so the felony charge will stay on Bird’s record. One of Bird’s children, Emily, an 18-year-old freshman at UNH, spoke about her life with her dad’s absence and her experiences dealing with media, the government, school, and her family’s farm. Chantel McCabe: Your family manages a farm. Talk about the

BIRD continued on page 3 WEB EXTRA For more on Chantel McCabe’s interview with UNH student Emily Bird, check out the video supplement at tnhonline.com.


2

INDEX

Friday, February 11, 2011

Contents

Robert Cray visits Portsmouth

The New Hampshire

Women’s hockey has shot at tourney

9 Jazz guitarist Robert Cray is slated to perform at Portsmouth’s Musical Hall on March 1 to promote his new live DVD.

Degbe.com

20 After a rough start to the season, goalie Kayley Herman and the UNH women’s hockey team have a shot to make the Hockey East Tournament heading into their last two games of the regular season versus BC this weekend.

Wiz Khalifa line starts early

12

6 After developing Degbe.com - a textbook sharing website - senior Jeffrey Levesque has received recognition from Durham landlords, who expressed interest in Degbe as a means of property advertisement.

Contact Us: The New Hampshire 156 Memorial Union Building Durham, NH 03824 Phone: 603-862-4076 www.tnhonline.com Executive Editor Thomas Gounley tnh.editor@unh.edu

Managing Editor Chad Graff tnh.me@unh.edu

Feb. 18 • Yoga for Students. 12-1 p.m. MUB Wildcat Den. • Staged Reading in Rep. 7p.m. Hennessy Theatre, PCAC. • Cultural Connections. 3:305p.m. MUB Entertainment Center.

Content Editor Brandon Lawrence tnh.news@unh.edu

Students waited in line outside in the cold morning hours for a chance to purchase tickets for SCOPE’s Spring Climax show, featuring Wiz Khalifa.

4

UNH’s own Iron Chef UNH’s first-ever Iron Chef competition is two weeks underway, as students competed in the second round at Stillings Dining Hall on Wednesday.

Corrections If you believe that we have made an error, or if you have questions about The New Hampshire’s journalistic standards and practices, you may contact Executive Editor Thomas Gounley by phone at 603-862-4076 or by email at tnh.editor@unh.edu.

The next issue of The New Hampshire will be on Tuesday, February 22, 2010

This week in Durham Feb. 19 Feb. 20 • UNH Observatory- Public Viewing Session. 8-10 p.m. UNH Observatory. • Staged Reading in Rep. 7p.m. Hennessy Theatre, PCAC.

• Women’s Ice Hockey vs. Boston College. 2p.m. Whittemore Center Arena. • Open Stick and Puck. 5:45-7p.m. Whittemore Center Arena. • Staged Reading in Rep. 2p.m. Hennessy Theatre, PCAC.

Feb. 21 • Open Skate. 10:30a.m.-12p.m. Whittemore Center Arena. • Living Well Chronic Illness Support Group. 12-1p.m. 2nd floor Health Services Center.


FROM PAGE ONE

The New Hampshire

BIRD CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 drastic difference it was not having your dad there for that. Emily Bird: We own Picnic Rock Farms in Meredith. I’m the eighth generation to work there. My dad and his cousin opened it three years ago - they own it - and my mom works as a bookkeeper. We have 125 acres in Meredith and 40 in Gilford. So for us to all do that on our own when none of us know anything about farming - my dad is the only one to know anything about it really - so when he found out he was going to jail he took my boyfriend and uncle and the other two top farmers and basically told them all the stuff that needs to get done, when it needs to get done and how. They were completely overwhelmed. Everyone had to learn how to use all of the equipment. The community helped a lot. We had 20 people come in every day just to help out with whatever we needed them to. Our town is really small, and we knew we were close to a lot of people, but we never expected anything like that to happen. My dad was planting his fields in jail. We sent him a seed book and he would tell us what to order and everything like that. We got through it but it was just really, really different. CM: You held all sorts of events to try to make people aware of the situation. What were the things that you and your family planned? EB: It really started on Facebook. Myself and one of my best friends from high school started this ‘Free Ward Bird’ page on Facebook. It kind of gave an overview telling [people] that he was in jail for three to six years. We gave links to all the transcripts online, and people were outraged by it. Then parents and other community members who were close to my dad started a ‘Free Ward Bird’ team. They had meetings every Sunday to decide what we were doing in the legal way, and also what we can do to raise money for legal fees. We had [these] bracelets, pins that say “Free Ward Bird,” bumper stickers that say “FreeWardBird. org,” which is the website that we made. We had a lot of people coming to the [farm] and saying, “Can I have a free Ward Bird?” They thought it was a type of bird, and they were asking for free ones. It was just kind of getting people aware of what happened. We were just trying to make people realize this could happen to anyone. It set such a big precedent – anyone could walk on your land and tell the cops something that could get you thrown in jail. CM: A lot of community members stepped up to help the cause. What were you thinking when all of these people were coming out of the woodwork? EB: It was crazy, we didn’t expect it. Once we put it on Facebook - I have a Blackberry and it gives me all of my notifications - it honestly did not stop going off for a week straight. It would constantly go off in class. I would have all these messages from people that I’ve never met but knew my dad. It was also interesting to see all the people that completely didn’t know the facts but would bash my

dad. That was kind of hard to deal with but we just ended up not reading that stuff online. CM: Talk about what it’s like going to UNH, being a student and having to deal with this. EB: The first semester was a big change for me. UNH was so big compared to my town that probably has 5,000 residents during the winter. I’m in civil [engineering], so all my classes were really hard. I was taking 19 credits last semester. It didn’t really affect my schoolwork at all; it was just a focus for me to do well. A lot of people are saying to me, “If I were you I would drop out,” and I’m like, “It’s not even an option that passed through my head.” It was good to have people here to support me, and I’m an hour and a half away [from home], so on the weekends I could go home to see my boyfriend and everybody. I think the stress got to me afterwards. I sort of pushed it aside while it was going on. CM: What it was like seeing him for the first time? EB: It was crazy. We had to pick out clothes [for my dad] because all he had was his orange jump suit. He had a huge plastic trash bag filled with books and letters that we hadn’t picked up yet. We all just ran up to him and hugged him …. it was really cool. We walked over to my mom’s truck and we had “Free Bird” playing. We blasted that as we drove out of the jail. When we got to [Route] 109 and [Route] 171 there were probably 100 to 150 people standing in the middle of road with signs and their cars on the side of the road … It was really snowy so nobody was really out on the roads so we just blocked off the entire road … It was crazy to see how many people showed up there. It makes sure that you don’t take things for granted. CM: Talk about how influential this commutation was for N.H. politics. EB: It was really big. Few gave all the executive office members a packet with a bunch of stuff we weren’t allowed to have as evidence in the trial. It was really important that they did their homework. I’ve been in the state house for field trips but I had never been there to talk to people. We went to the swearing in of the Executive Council, and we met the governor. The ‘Free Ward Bird’ team and my brother and I met with the governor ourselves, so that was interesting to sit at a table and talk to him one-on-one. It was a big learning process for all of us. To have all five of the executive councilors vote for a full pardon was really big. CM: This sparked an interest in law for you. What’s next for you? EB: Since this whole thing has happened I think, because UNH doesn’t have a single major justice studies program, I’m going to continue with civil engineering and take a dual major with justice studies, and from there hopefully I’ll go on to law school. I think I want to have my own paralegal sort of thing.

Friday, February 18, 2011

3

COURTESY PHOTO

The Peter T. Paul School of Business and Economics, illustrated above, remains on its original path despite a lack of fundraising thanks to a loan approved by USNH yesterday.

BUSINESS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 intent to have students pay for it,” Matt Cookson, who handles media relations for USNH, said. “It was their intent to find other sources.” The vote, which took place on Thursday in Keene, approved the $55 million budget for the Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics, which will replace the current Whittemore School of Business and Economics, currently housed in McConnell Hall. In addition to the $16 million loan, the building will use $10 million in WSBE reserves and a total of $29 million in donations - $25 million of which came in the form of UNH’s largest-ever single donation from Paul in June 2008. At the time, the university committed to financing the rest of the building by raising matching donations. UNH officials hailed the board’s decision. “We are very pleased with the board vote and look forward to breaking ground on the new college

TUITION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 dance was approved on June 24. “Knowing these costs at an earlier date will assist parents and students in budgeting, and enable significant efficiencies in early and accurate packaging of financial aid,” USNH Board Chair Ed Dupont said in a press release. The cost of attendance rose throughout the university system. Costs of attendance will increase $1,082 at Plymouth State University, $1,090 at Keene State College and by $12 per credit hour at Granite State College.

this summer,” Erika Mantz, director of UNH Media Relations, said in an e-mail yesterday. “My opinion is that the board was thoughtful in their approach and careful in the process and smart in their decision,” Peter Weiler, vice president for advancement and president of the UNH Foundation, said in an e-mail. “A great moment for UNH.” University officials defended the project and addressed the UNH community through e-mails and the university’s website on Wednesday and Thursday prior to the vote. Daniel Innis, dean of WSBE, addressed what he called “considerable negative media attention” toward the building project that has been “largely inaccurate” in an e-mail to all WSBE students on Wednesday. Innis referred to an undergraduate tuition increase as “a last resort contingency.” “It is our expectation that growth in business school enrollment will generate incremental tuition revenue that will cover the cost of repaying the loan, and that there

Breaking down next year’s tuition In-State: Tuition: $11,410 Fees: $3,190 Room & Board: $9,452 Total: $24,052

Out-of-State Tuition: $25,380 Fees: $3,190 Room & Board: $9,452 Total: $38,022

Journalist: Tweets about Egypt assault not serious NEW YORK - A journalist who resigned from a university fellowship over his tweets about an assault on a TV newswoman says it is “silly” to think his comments were

serious. Journalist Nir Rosen tweeted Tuesday that CBS’ Lara Logan “was probably groped like thousands of other women.”

will be no tuition increase to cover the cost of the loan,” he said. In a statement published on UNH’s website Thursday, UNH President Mark Huddleston said the contingency was not unusual. “This is not a new practice,” Huddleston said. “A contingency is built into all of our funding plans for building projects. Capital projects at UNH, throughout the university system and indeed across the country are partially or fully funded by tuition dollars.” In his e-mail, Innis said that there is “no question” that a new business school is needed. “McConnell Hall, which was built to accommodate 1,000 students, does not meet our needs for business education in 2011,” Innis said. “It is too small for our current enrollment of approximately 2,000 undergraduate and graduate students.” Huddleston referred to the project as “vital to the success of our students and to the economic success of our state.” “We will stay the course and build this facility,” he said.

Ball field named for young shooting victim TUCSON, Ariz. - The child and federal judge killed in last month’s Tucson shootings are being honored. Nine-year-old Christina-Taylor Green will have a baseball field named after her where she played second base for her Little League team. Her family is expected to throw out the first pitch when the season begins April 1. Pima County, where Tucson is located, will also name a county park after Christina. And President Barack Obama plans to sign a bill Thursday to name a new courthouse in Yuma after U.S. District Court Judge John M. Roll, another of the six people killed in the shootings that wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 13 others. Jared Loughner has pleaded not guilty to federal charges in the case.


4

NEWS

February 18, 2011

The New Hampshire

Ticket sales draw big turnout for Khalifa By KERRY FELTNER STAFF WRITER

More than 4,000 students lined the UNH campus in the early morning of Friday, Feb. 11, huddling together for warmth, taking shifts with friends and withstanding the frigid February temperatures to buy concert tickets to Wiz Khalifa,

SCOPE’s chosen performer for the annual Spring Climax. “I ended up leaving at 10 a.m. after waiting for four hours,” junior Danielle VanEron said. “It just wasn’t worth it.” Members of SCOPE, the Student Committee on Popular Entertainment at UNH, were not expecting such a turnout.

”[SCOPE members] were definitely surprised,” Kristen Morin, director of publicity for SCOPE, said. “We knew it was going to be a hectic day, but we didn’t think it would be that bad.” For those that waited in line, the experience was less than enjoyable. “I waited from 6 a.m. until 3:15 p.m. and was only inside for about 40 minutes,” sophomore Steve Johnson said. “I actually wanted to get the tickets to see him, I listen to his music.” The concert sold out at 4:30 p.m. on Friday afternoon after all 5,800 tickets were gone. Everyone who waited in line received a ticket. “I was under the impression that I would be waiting inside,” Johnson said. “I got my tickets but it was clear that SCOPE wasn’t prepared for the turnout.” Student frustrations ran high throughout the day as most felt that SCOPE was disorganized and unprepared to accommodate the level of student interest in the event. “We are taking recommendations into account, and we are exploring online options and new tactics for our next concert,” Morin said. “We have to change something.” Although SCOPE members realize they could re-evaluate the ticket process, the organization does acknowledge that students were aware that ticket sales began at 9 a.m. “I waited eight hours and it was awful,” a student who wished to remain anonymous said. “I think it was very disorganized, but it was

not necessarily SCOPE’s fault. There are only so many people in SCOPE for 5,000 students.” Members of the organization agreed. “It was definitely overwhelming for us,” Morin said. “It helped a lot having campus security there. Obviously every show and every ticket line are going to have their complaints, and this was the biggest line we’ve had on one of the coldest mornings.”

“I think it came

down to freshmen who don’t know that you don’t have to wait overnight to go to a UNH concert. It’s not like Jesus Christ is coming.” Carly Doran Junior One student was arrested in line, and others were considered “unruly” by members of SCOPE. Some students believe that the reason the line was so long was because of underclassmen. “I think it came down to freshmen who don’t know that you don’t have to wait overnight to go to a UNH concert,” junior Carly Doran said. “It’s not like Jesus Christ is coming.” Many students planned their day around getting the tickets, and

some friends served as supporters for those in line. “I was the transporter of my friends,” junior Ashley Williams said. “I picked people up, brought them coffee and was there to help.” According to some UNH students, Wiz Khalifia was not the main attraction for the event. “A lot of people aren’t going because of the music,” a student who wished to remain anonymous said. “The only reason I waited was because it is my senior year.” The spring concert is merely a tradition for others. “I waited in line because I have gotten tickets for each concert since my freshman year,” Doran said. “Even if I didn’t end up going to a concert I got tickets and it was never this bad.” Despite the long ticket line, SCOPE is looking forward to the concert, as students are clearly supportive of its selection in an artist. “Just by the show of the number of people in line, we know students are interested,” Megan Murphy, a junior and a member of SCOPE, said. “We have good expectations about this concert. He was the second most requested artist by students.” “We [at SCOPE] are really excited about the concert, and are ready to be back at the Whittemore Center,” Morin said. “I think everyone is going to appreciate the concert a lot more because they waited so long,” Doran said. The spring concert is scheduled for Friday, Apr. 4, at the Whittemore Center.


NEWS

The New Hampshire

Friday, February 18, 2011

5

Police Department hosts fifth annual Citizens Police Academy By ALEXANDRA CHURCHILL STAFF WRITER

The University of New Hampshire Police Department is hosting its fifth annual Citizens Police Academy, which is now two weeks into the program. Officer Joseph Morganella, a member of the UNH Police Department and a veteran in the law enforcement field, developed the 12-week program four years ago. “Our motto is, ‘No yelling! No tests! No pushups!’” Officer Morganella said. “It’s not your typical

Bill Monroe, former ‘Meet the Press’ host, dies By JESSICA GRESKO ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON - Bill Monroe, who hosted the long-running Washington political television show “Meet the Press” for nearly a decade, died Thursday at a Washington-area nursing home. Monroe, 90, was the NBC show’s fourth moderator, from 1975 to 1984, and interviewed prominent political figures ranging from President Jimmy Carter to U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger. Tim Russert, the best known host of “Meet the Press,” assumed the host’s chair in 1991 after a series of short stints by others following Monroe’s departure. Monroe’s daughter, Lee Monroe, said he her father had taken a fall in December that put him in a nursing home and had not been well since. Bill Monroe was born in New Orleans on July 17, 1920. He graduated from Tulane University, served in World War II and later began his career in television journalism the New Orleans NBC affiliate, WDSU. In 1961 he moved to Washington, where he became NBC’s bureau chief. He worked on the “Today Show,” winning the Peabody Award in 1972, and succeeded Lawrence Spivak as host of “Meet the Press” in 1975. On his first day as the show’s permanent moderator he interviewed Gov. George Wallace of Alabama, the staunch segregationist who was at the time running for President. “Have you personally changed your views about segregation?,” Monroe asked. When Wallace didn’t respond directly, Monroe cut him off and repeated the question. Wallace began to stumble through his next response, and Monroe asked a third time: “Have your views changed?”

police academy.”

“On average, 5 percent of the student body gets to know their police department.”

Joseph Morganella UNH Police Officer Officer Morganella has been a longtime moderator for the program, which is meant to provide

community members and students with an inside look at local law enforcement. Lecture topics vary from town ordinances and liquor laws to motor vehicle laws and search and seizure. “On average, 5 percent of the student body gets to know their police department,” Morganella said. “This gives us the opportunity to interact with our customer base.” This year’s itinerary includes visits from the N.H. U.S. Attorney General, a regional SWAT team and other veterans in the law enforcement field. Besides lectures, there are plenty of opportunities

for hands-on experience, including a bomb squad demonstration, tours of the fire department, McGregor Ambulance, UNH Dispatch Center, and Strafford County Jail, as well as a mock DWI accident in collaboration with these other agencies. In addition, each enrollee is given the opportunity to ride along with a UNH police officer. The academy hosts a concluding graduation ceremony, in which certificates are awarded to enrollees who compete the program. Morganella said that enrolled students in the UNH Justice Studies Department have been known to

receive extra credit from their professors. The program averages 30 participants each session, but that number is significantly lower this spring. Officer Morganella intends to expand the program to the fall semester. The academy meets weekly on Wednesday nights from 7 to 10 p.m. in the media room of the Dimond Library. There are still numerous spots available for this year’s session. Prospective participants should contact Officer Joseph Morganella through the UNH Police Department.


6

Friday, February 18, 2011

NEWS

The New Hampshire

Degbe.com an online marketplace for student to student sales By ALEXANDRA CHURCHILL STAFF WRITER

With Degbe.com approaching up to 1,000 registered users and hundreds of cataloged goods for sale, Jeffrey Levesque, UNH student entrepreneur and creator of the website, is looking to expand. “The system is founded on the principle that if a large amount of students know about the site then the system will prosper,” Levesque said. “The more people that check Degbe out and post items, the more it will increase exchanged items, and the more students will save money.” Levesque is a math major in his senior year at UNH, and provides tech support for the College of Liberal Arts. His website, Degbe.com, is an online marketplace to facilitate

the sale of textbooks between students. It provides an alternative to the local bookstore outlets such as the MUB Bookstore and Durham Book Exchange. But since the website has grown greatly since its launch last semester - with over 63,000 total online hits - Levesque is pushing to expand Degbe.com’s classified ads beyond textbook sales to include a variety of products. “Degbe.com should allow students to find basically anything they need, like a newer version of Craigslist, but exclusively for large universities,” Levesque said. His next frontier for the website is student housing. “I’d like to have more students post their sublets,” Levesque said, who already has three apartments listed for summer sublet on the site. Levesque was recently ap-

proached by representatives of the Durham Landlord Association (DLA) to use Degbe as an advertising platform for apartments, and they would like him to attend a DLA meeting to discuss it. Levesque said he is considering the offer.

I feel the “siteOverall, is needed for some competition to the overpriced books sold around campus.” Jesse Mills Junior Finance and Business Management Majors “I have yet to organize a time

to go,” Levesque said. Meanwhile, the success stories of Degbe continue. Jesse Mills, a junior majoring in finance and business management, recently bought a textbook on Degbe.com from a student for less than half the price offered at the Durham Book Exchange, and enjoyed the simplicity. “It was a simple transaction where I just went and met up with a fellow UNH student taking about 15 minutes out of my day,” Mills said. “Overall, I feel the site is needed for some competition to the overpriced books sold around campus.” The efficiency is a major selling point for students. “It was a simple process that didn’t take up much time,” Sarah Smith, a sophomore who sold two books on the website, said. “This website is perfect for students, and

I like the idea behind it all..” Joseph Arsenault, a sophomore mathematics education major, successfully sold five textbooks on Degbe for $140, as well as an iPod shuffle for $30. “The transactions were great and smooth, and I’m definitely going to keep using Degbe,” Arsenault said. Benjamin Hebert, a mechanical engineering graduate student, sold a calculus book for $60. Ten people had been interested in buying it through the site. “I thought Degbe was very easy to use and way more convenient than any other method I have tried to use for selling books such as Amazon,” Hebert said. “The fact that you are dealing with students at your own university makes it easier to conclude the sale and get the product to the buyer on time.”

Alaska governor Sean Parnell refusing to enact health care law By BECKY BOHRER ASSOCIATED PRESS

JUNEAU, Alaska - Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell said he will not implement the federal health care overhaul after a judge in Florida struck down the law as unconstitutional. It’s not immediately clear what practical impact the unusual move would have on Alaskans, an estimated 14 percent of which are uninsured

year-round. A major expansion of the federal law is still pending, and a legal expert and health care consumer advocate say any refusal by the states to participate in the law is an invitation to the federal government to step in and implement it for them. Parnell, who sought the advice of his attorney general amid concerns implementing the law would violate his oath of office, told the

Juneau Chamber of Commerce the state would pursue lawful, marketbased solutions to making insurance affordable and accessible to Alaskans. He said the Florida judge’s ruling is the law of the land, as it pertains to Alaska, barring implementation of the federal law here. He said the state will pursue options of its own instead. Alaska was one of 26 states that

were party to the Florida lawsuit; however, in other cases, two federal judges have upheld the law and one judge ruled a provision requiring citizens to buy health insurance or face penalties - a major point of contention in the Florida case - is unconstitutional but did not strike down the rest of the law. While the ultimate decision is likely to rest with the U.S. Supreme Court, for now, the overhaul is the law of the land, contends Timothy S. Jost, a professor at the Washington

and Lee University School of Law. “This is one renegade judge that has reached this decision,” he said. In refusing to participate in the law, he said, Alaska “is really the outlier” among states. Ron Pollack, executive director of Families U.S.A., said currently states have an “enormous amount of discretion” in how they implement provisions of the law. If the governor refuses to exercise that, the federal government will have the say, he said.

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NEWS

The New Hampshire

Friday, February 18, 2011

7

Protests in Egypt hit close to home By FARIS AL-HASHMI CONTRIBUTING WRITER

The revolution in Egypt was historic, as the people demonstrated their power to topple a regime, an event that “shook Arab history,” as described by The New York Times. Grand aspirations of democracy, freedom, reform, justice, and equality abounded while the revolution was unfolding. Despite the constant media coverage, UNH professor Ihab Farag was more concerned with where his wife was. During the protests, Farag’s wife was caught up in the turmoil in a visit to see her relatives in Egypt, exemplifying the personal tone the events had for the UNH community members with ties to Egypt.

“The men would

go out at night with sticks and brooms — anything they could find — and blocked the streets.” Ihab Farag UNH Professor Farag, a native Egyptian who teaches chemical engineering at UNH, still has relatives in Egypt, but it was his wife who happened to take a vacation there to visit her mother and sister on Jan. 19, right before the protests began less than a week later on Jan. 25. They live in Cairo, in a neighborhood on the other side of the Nile from Tahrir Square, the main sight of the protests. At the time of her arrival, there was no indication anything would happen, Farag said. Even by midday on Jan. 25 — National Police Day — things were quiet as his wife went out to lunch with a friend. However, noticing a lot of policemen around, his wife asked one if everything

was all right, to which he replied, “Everything is under control,” according to Farag. From that point, things would change dramatically. As protestors descended on Tahrir Square, the government responded by blocking the Internet and mobile phones, which had hitherto been used by protestors to organize demonstrations. Farag had relied on the Internet to call his wife via Skype. At that point, he tried calling using a landline, but the call traffic was so high that he couldn’t get through. After several tries, he finally was able to communicate with her. However, the government’s response was not uniform around the country. Medhat Rehan is a graduate student of genetics, who came to UNH in 2009. He is from the Kafr El-Sheikh province, in the North of the country, where his wife and other relatives still live. While there were protests in that province, as, he said, there were in all 29 provinces, it was not a major flashpoint. Mobile phones were cut off, but the Internet remained open, thus not significantly disrupting his ability to contact his family using Skype. What was uniform, however, was the government’s subsequent decision to withdraw the police from the streets, a move, according to Farag, intended to encourage chaos, and thus discredit the protest movement. In a way, the move would probably not be objected to by most Egyptians — Rehan claims the arbitrary power of the police was one of the major sources of discontent the people had with the previous regime. “[They] can use [their] power to prevent you from all your rights,” Rehan said. “There is no

trust between the people and the police.”

“[They] can use

[their] power to prevent you from all your rights. There is no trust between the people and the police.” Medhat Rehan UNH Genetics Graduate Student In response to the removal of the police, neighborhood security teams were formed in Rehan’s village. These spontaneously formed groups were set up in every village in Egypt to prevent looting and theft. They set up checkpoints, checked for identification and searched cars for weapons to make sure they were not from the secret police. In the apartment blocks of Cairo, doors were chained and security groups were formed. “The men would go out at night with sticks and brooms — anything they could find — and blocked the streets,” Farag said. At this point, Farag scrambled to try to get his wife evacuated. Beyond the security situation, the air quality was untenable due to the amount of tear gas used by riot police. He and his wife had to tackle the bureaucracy of the U.S. embassy in addition to the limited window of movement due to the 3 p.m. to 8 a.m. curfew. “The concern was not whether she will come back, but when,” he said. The embassy required his wife

to register online, but as there was no Internet access, Farag ended up having to register her himself from thousands of miles away. When she finally reached the airport to leave, it was “like a zoo,” he said, without announcements about which flights were leaving when. Finally she made it back, exhausted not only physically but also emotionally, as she had to leave her mother and sister behind. Despite the volatility, in the period after she left the revolution did not end with major rises in violence or instability. After Hosni Mubarak resigned as president, Farag and Rehan’s relatives celebrated through the night, just as many Egyptians did throughout the country. Rehan estimates that 95 percent of Egyptians agree with the revolution. The other five percent of the population are people who got benefits from the regime, Re-

han said. Farag and Rehan both described Egypt as close to normal now, with most of the police back in the streets under new leadership. Rehan believes democracy can solve 80 percent of the fundamental inequalities in Egypt, by creating rule of law and employment based on qualifications, not connections. Now Farag, his wife, and Rehan can all return to concentrating on their academic work, which they admitted was affected by the events. But the story, like that of Egypt, is not yet closed for Rehan. He relies on monthly government funding for his studies — a government that in a matter of weeks has transformed from a presidential autocracy to an interim one headed by a military council. “I’m a little bit worried,” Rehan said. “Maybe I won’t get my funds. I don’t know what my future will carry for me.”


8

Friday, February 18, 2011

Seacoast Series:

NEWS

The New Hampshire

FARMpreneurs all about organic gardening By EMILY BOWERS CONTRIBUTING WRITER

In 1968, Charlie Reid and some friends ventured from Hampton Beach, N.H., across the country to California to see Hollywood. Instead of rubbing elbows with the stars, however, Reid learned about organic gardening from a woman on his block. “There was no such thing as the word ‘organic’ to describe what she was doing,” Reid said. “It was just growing food with no chemicals.” In 1968, Reid learned that craft and helped his neighbor with her garden every day. One of those days he headed to her house to find a black limousine parked out front and the woman arguing with some men in suits. When they left she told him that those men were the American Cancer Society. “She showed me her X-rays,” Reid said. “She had cured herself of cancer — she had cancer all through her — and they wanted to know how she did it.” Reid said she attributed her healing to her garden and a fresh

supply of chemical-free fruits and vegetables. Reid spoke as a recent panelist at FARMpreneurs, a panel discussion organized by UNH professor John Carroll in Durham last week. The purpose of the event was to demonstrate, in Carroll’s words, that “local food and farming is economic development, at both the production and the consumption level.” While based upon the potential of local farming for economic development, one of the themes that surfaced at the event was the positive impact of “real” local food for personal and community health and well being. Reid continued his story by telling the audience that the woman who had cured herself of cancer blamed the food supply for her illness. “She pointed down the valley at Glendale, Calif., and said, ‘There’s your problem right there. There’s where all your cancer is coming from. All the processed foods, they’re all full of chemicals,’” Reid said.

Cancer is only one of America’s health concerns. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s website states that in 2007-08, 34 percent of adults over the age of 20 were overweight, and an additional 34 percent were obese. The American Heart Association’s website states that cardiovascular disease was responsible for 34 percent of all deaths in the United States in 2006, or about one out of every three. Coronary heart disease was the single leading cause of death in that year. Carroll, professor in the natural resources department and author of many books, including, Pastures of Plenty: The Future of Food, Agriculture and Environmental Conservation in New England, and, The Real Dirt: Toward Food Sufficiency and Farm Sustainability in New England, said that what America eats is largely to blame. Consumption of processed foods has only increased since the middle of last century with the emergence of our industrial food system. “It’s not food,” Carroll said. “It’s highly processed, manufac-

tured product that we eat, but it’s not food.” He cites the lack of nutrition in these foods as one force behind America’s poor health. Kate Kennington, a certified holistic health coach in Berwick, Maine, who works with her clients on finding diets that are best for their individual bodies, said that nutrition is often lacking in processed food. Kenningtion’s example was that of processed white bread, in which the brown hull of the wheat grain, where the majority of the nutrients occur, is stripped away. Manufactured nutrients must be added in during processing in order to compensate for the refining of the grain. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, 90 percent of American food is processed, which means the food has been mixed with other ingredients — often preservatives — before being sold to the public. “If your food comes in a box or a package,” Kennington said. “It has been processed.” Even the World Health Organizations (WHO) cited processed foods as largely to blame for the sharp rise in rates of obesity and chronic disease. In a report they released in 2003, the WHO encouraged people to eat less of these foods and eat more fruits and vegetables. Because these recommended foods are found in abundance at local farmer’s markets, eating locally might become a solution to America’s health problems. In 2008, a group of MIT researchers released results of a study in which they concluded that America’s obesity problem was largely due to the national scale of our food supply production and distribution system. A year later, in October of 2009, the same researchers proposed a solution to this problem by suggesting a substantial increase in regional food consumption. They recommended that Americans living in metropolitan areas should get most of their nutrition from the regional ‘food shed’ that surrounds their cities. This solution may take into account that most locally grown food is unprocessed, or in ‘whole’ form, as both Kennington and Carroll point out. “To end obesity, we need to produce healthier, more accessible, more affordable food,” Dr. Tenley Albright said in a 2009 article in MIT news. Along with Reid, Joseph Marquette of Yellowhouse Farm was also a panelist at FARMpreneurs. Marquette raises heritage poultry in Barrington, N.H., for sale at local markets. Heritage poultry refers to, in Marquette’s words, “real chickens” versus their factory-farmed, hybridized equivalents sold at grocery stores and served in most restaurants. Marquette raised the point that the requirements of a large and diverse breeding pool, coupled with

the land required to raise heritage poultry, begets much higher costs than are associated with factoryfarmed poultry. This is one of the challenges of small-scale local agriculture operations: prices are often higher. But that hasn’t been a problem for Marquette. “Many people have woken up to the idea that quality food comes with expense,” Marquette said. “It’s not so much that we are discovering this, it’s that we are remembering it. Food was always costly, but it was also always food.” While the general affluence of the Seacoast may protect Marquette from a lack of customers, the U.S. Census Bureau still estimates that between 3 to 10 percent of Seacoast residents live in poverty. The higher price of local food, due in part to a lack of federal subsidies that the industrial sector is afforded, can prevent people of lower income brackets from making healthy food decisions that include locally grown food. The difference in price between whole foods and processed foods is astounding. In 2004, the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition released a study that showed that although one dollar could buy 1,200 calories of potato chips and 875 calories of soda, it would only stretch to cover 170 calories of fresh fruits and 250 calories of fresh vegetables. Sara Zoe Patterson, the coordinator of Seacoast Eat Local — an organization that connects consumers with sources of locally grown and locally made food — is already on top of that issue. Also a panelist at the FARMpreneur event, Patterson mentioned that Seacoast Eat Local was working on bringing Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program food stamp access to farmer’s markets in the Seacoast area. According to the USDA, the number of N.H. residents that participate in the SNAP increased by more than 14.5 percent between 2009 and 2010. Bringing food stamp access to Seacoast farmer’s markets could allow lower-income residents greater access to fresh and healthy local food. The processing of making farmer’s markets SNAP accessible could also have positive benefits for sales. “The brilliance is that with the machinery required to run the SNAP program … comes the ability to accept debit cards as well,” Patterson said. This initiative is just one aspect of what Seacoast Eat Local is doing to provide Seacoast residents with fresh, local food while supporting local farms. “We think that farms are businesses that deserve a special place in our culture; they are growing our food, and I feel like there’s nothing more personable, more intimate, than being able to know the person that’s growing the very thing that is keeping you alive and contributing to your health, and making you happy,” Patterson said.


the

verb

UNH’s one-man show

helping you get action 18 february 2011

Improv Anonymous adds member, fans By BRI HAND CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Three members of Improv Anonymous stand onstage in the Entertainment Center, wrapping up a scene, miraculously without erupting into laughter. The rest of the members clap, then immediately launch into comments about the short performance. “Where were you guys?” Joe Nelson, the director of the group, asked. “I thought we were in a lunchroom!” member James Conklin said. “I didn’t know what we were doing until you called me Mom,” Amy Riley, the group’s producer, said. “So, what we learned here was listening ... .Nolan!” Nelson said laughing. Three more members take

the stage. This week, Improv Anonymous added a new member to its nine-member cast, a theatre major named Dan Shine. A freshman from Shrewsbury, Mass., Shine beat out 13 hopefuls during auditions on Tuesday. “It’s really exciting to make it in the group,” Shine said. “It’s clearly very competitive. Sometimes they don’t take anyone.” Shine will join Cady Hickman and Nolan Russell, who only have a semester’s experience performing with Improv Anonymous. Russell said that being so new to the group made it difficult to run this semester’s auditions.

IMPROV continued on page 10

ERICA SIVER/STAFF

Rent actor Anthony Rapp performed his one man show for an enthusiastic crowd on Wednesday night.

In this week’s The Verb 11th Annual Drag Ball page 10 Improv Update page 10

COURTESY PHOTO

Guitarist Robert Cray to play in Portsmouth By MAX SULLIVAN

Why ASUM Klub Rules page 11 BNG Open Mic page 11

CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Robert Cray, five-time Grammy Award winning blues guitarist, says he’s looking forward to having plenty of lobster when he gets to New Hampshire. “We travel by our stomach,” Cray, a recreational cook in his free time, said. Soon, Cray will have his chance when he performs at the Music Hall on March 1. He claims he doesn’t play favorites with tour dates, but Cray always welcomes a trip to New Hampshire. “I love New Hampshire,” Cray, having played almost annually in the Granite State for much of his

career, said. In fact, Cray has quite a history with New Hampshire, having filmed the music video for his 2005 song, “Twenty,” in Dover. “We have some good friends up there,” Cray said. Cray is on a tour of North America, heading up and down the East Coast, from New York to Florida, and ultimately heading out to Texas and California. Born into a military family, Cray learned to get used to the road at a young age. Today he still embraces it.

CRAY continued on page 11


The New Hampshire • February 18, 2011

10

Annual Drag Ball returns to UNH

IMPROV CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

By SAMANTHA PEARSON STAFF WRITER

The cast of Improv Anonymous recently held auditions to complete its comedy family “Now I’m in their seat seeing myself in these kids,” Russell said. “I could see what mistakes I made during my auditions and the things that I did right. I felt like I was Simon Cowell. It was weird being in the judgment seat.” Conklin, who was added to the group at the end of the 2010 spring semester, said deciding who gets into the group is harder than auditioning. “It’s hard to critique everyone auditioning,” Conklin said. “It’s harder than doing improv. I’m more critical of myself than I am of everyone else.” Although the auditioning process seems difficult, Improv Anonymous can agree that new members to the group are pivotal for maintaining energy in the group. “Having new members is always good- it brings a new energy to the group, not that we don’t al-

ways have it,” Parker Callahan, a sophomore member of the group, said. “We can get worn down over the semester and bringing new people in keeps us on our A-game. We have to teach them, impress them, and make sure they’re comfortable onstage.” Other members liked the new characters that added members bring to the group. “It adds a different flavor to the group, different styles and jokes,” Hickman said. Conkin said it is refreshing to add new members, even though there is always an adjustment period after the group adds new members. “It’s harder because you don’t know how to perform with them,” Conklin said. When auditioning potential comedians, the group said that it does not typically rank funniness as the most important and defining trait.

BRI HAND/CONTRIBUTING

“What I looked for most was someone who brings something new,” said Russell. “New characters, a new vibe, and new energy that spreads the energy to us and gets us revamped. I think it’s funnier when people don’t try to be funny.” Many other members looked for members that they knew would work well with the rest of the group. “We look for someone with a good sense of humor, but we want someone who will work together with everyone else to be funny,” Riley said. “Improv isn’t about being funny alone.” Weekly improv performances take place at 9 p.m. every Thursday in the Entertainment Center. In addition, Improv Anonymous is also slated for some dorm shows, a Mills coffee house, and is hoping to put together another benefit show later in the semester.

The UNH Alliance is hosting the 11th Annual Drag Ball on Friday, Feb.18 in the Granite State Room. This year’s theme is “Hollywood”, for students who need a starting point to plan their ensembles, but neither thematic dress nor drag are required for entrance. Sophomore Joshua Swanson, chair of the Alliance, said people who have never attended a Drag Ball before can expect a huge dance party where people are allowed to be themselves, no matter what that means for any individual. “It’s about breaking down the norms and encouraging people to let loose,” Swanson said. “It’s not about the clothes we wear; it’s about the people we are.”

According to the Facebook event page, well over 200 people are planning to attend the event and Swanson said the Alliance hopes for about twice that, which would be more than last year’s attendees. “The time is now, you have to be unique and different, and shine in your own way,” Swanson said, quoting pop icon Lady Gaga. “Essentially, we want people to explore themselves, try something new, and not feel bad about it.” For more information about the event, check out the Facebook page or contact the UNH Alliance. Tickets are on sale now at the MUB ticket office. They are free for UNH undergraduates and $5 for all others with cash only. Student IDs are required for undergraduate tickets.

MUSO Presents….

Movies for the Week of February 18-24 WAITING FOR SUPERMAN Friday, February 18 Saturday, February 19 Sunday, February 20

7:00 PM 9:00 PM 7:00 PM 9:00 PM 7:00 PM 9:00 PM

UNH Peace and Justice League Presents:

Scarred Lands & Wounded Lives: The Environmental Footprint of War This film explores our dependence on the natural world and the threat that war and preparations for war poses to that world. From the production weapons to the clean up and restoration, war has a significant impact on the Earth. The Fund for Sustainable Tomorrow’s wrote, “The environment remains the war’s ‘silent casualty’”.

Tuesday, February 15th @ 7pm MUB Theater II

RESTREPO Friday, February 18 Saturday, February 19 Sunday, February 20

7:30 PM 9:30 PM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM

Starts Thursday (2/24):

The War on Democracy This film is the story of the manipulation of Latin America by the United States over the past 50 years. It reveals the story behind the attempted overthrow of the Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez in 2002. John Pilger says “[The film] is about the struggle of people to free themselves from a modern form of slavery”. (As quoted by johnpilger.com)

Monday, February 21st @ 7pm MUB Theater I

Megamind 9:00 PM Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (part 1) 6:45 PM 9:30 PM (2/24) Free to All Special UNH Film Underground Screening

7:00 PM

Peace, Propaganda, & the Promised Land This riveting documentary exposes how foreign policy of America works in combination with Israeli public relations. It analyzes how the Israeli occupation in The West Bank and Gaza remains hidden in the media. Raising questions about the ethics and role of journalism, and the relationship between media and politics. (As sited by media education foundation)

Tuesday, March 1st @ 7pm MUB Theater II

Taxi to the Dark Side “Winner of the 2007 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature about the U.S. government’s policies on interrogation of terror suspects.” This documentary investigates the suspicious death of an Afghani taxi driver at Bagram air base in 2002. Introducing the film and answering questions after is John D. Huston who is the recently retired President of the UNH School of Law.

Monday, March 7th @ 730pm MUB Theater I Free and Open to the Public Ad funded by your Student Activity Fee

for more details go to: www.unhmub.com/movies Tickets are $2 for students with ID and $4 for others. Movies sponsored by Film Underground are FREE. Tickets go on sale 1 hour before show time. Cat’s Cache and Cash are the ONLY forms of payment accepted.

For more info contact:

MUB Ticket Office - University of New Hampshire (603) 862-2290 - Email: MUB.tickets@unh.edu 83 Main St, Durham, NH 03824


11

The New Hampshire • February 18, 2011

CRAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

SAM MAJOR/CONTRIBUTING

COURTESY PHOTO

“(I look forward to) every place,” Cray said. “Everyone should travel. You get on the coach, you lock in at the window and you take it all in.” Cray is touring to promote his 2010 DVD, Cookin’ In Mobile, recorded live at the Mobile Saenger Theater in Mobile, Ala. Cray said that the experience was a memorable one, partly because of the opportunity to visually showcase the band’s then new lineup, not only to the audience in Mobile, but also to the DVD’s audience. “The vibe was great,” Cray said. “People didn’t expect it. They were gassed.” Cray is also playing material from his 2009 Grammy nominated

studio release, This Time. But, with the recent band changes in the form of bassist Jordan Cousins and drummer Tony Braunagel, Cray and his band have prepared for the tour by hashing out and perfecting older material in addition to the newer songs. “We’ve been digging into the archive,” Cray said. “Richard (Cousins) hasn’t played much of the material at this point.” Cousins, who played with Cray from 1971 to 1990, has rejoined the band since recording This Time with the group in 2009. According to Cray, relearning two decades worth of music with Cousins, as well as the rest of Cray’s catalogue with Braunagel, who also joined in 2009, has been nothing short of a good time.

“We’re having a ball,” Cray said. Cray will have Shemekia Copeland, renowned blues singer and daughter of famed blues guitarist Johnny Copeland, opening for him in Portsmouth. Cray holds Copeland in high esteem. “She’s fantastic,” he said. “She’s really gifted, she’s a great person, she gives it (when she plays).” Before his show in Portsmouth, Cray will be just beginning his tour on the East Coast, making his way up from locations in Virginia, Pennsylvania and upstate New York. If all goes as planned, there will be plenty of lobster waiting for him when he gets here.

Breaking New Grounds continues artist open mic night tradition By BRI HAND CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Grab a coffee, a guitar, or your favorite poem because Wednesday Open Mic nights at Breaking New Grounds have officially resumed this semester. These coffee houses, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Durham BNG, were started last year through a group called “The Other”, which looked to promote lesser heard voices in literature. The local Durham pit stop quickly became a popular venue for local musicians, poets, and readers. “We get a lot of dudes with guitars singing,” Kayleigh Michael, a UNH graduate student and host of the

Open Mic nights, said. “It’s what everyone does. We do want more poets and readers though.” Breaking New Grounds has hosted one Open Mic night since the beginning of the semester, but will soon fall into the pattern of hosting one every other Wednesday. The next event will be on March 2. However, to avoid a conflict with spring break, the next event after March 2 may be held on March 9 instead. Performers of all ages have showcased their talents at BNG, from Oyster River and UNH students to older Durham community members. “Last year, word got around in a weird way,” Michael said about the variety of performers. “It wasn’t really

advertised, but still, different kinds of people showed up.” Michael also said that in addition to the musical and literary showcases, she would like to add an art portion to the night where local artists can hang their work in the coffee shop and sell them. If you are interested in performing at the next Open Mic night, you can show up at BNG before 6 p.m. to sign up, or you can book a slot ahead of time by sending a message to Kayleigh Michael on Facebook. Michael said that she thinks these Open Mic nights have definitely had a positive impact on Durham. “I like it a lot,” she said. “It’s very good for the community.”

Notes from an Audiophile: Why ASUM is awesome By SAMANTHA PEARSON STAFF WRITER

There are not many cover bands that have a repertoire more impressive than a handful of greatest hits by a single band. There are also not many cover bands comprised of UNH students who are interested in playing music that they love, for people that they love, regardless of how different or bizarre that music is. ASUM Klub is pretty unique for those reasons and more. The Association of Students United by Music presents a handful of shows each year and each one, while “themed”, is generally a massive party that the entire student body is invited to attend. Set lists range from mainstream pop-punk bands to hip-hop artists to classic rock staples and beyond. At the club’s winter concert last semester, they opened with Fall Out Boy, went as far back as The Beatles and featured a song by rap superstars Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj. Are you intrigued yet?

In addition to a wide variety of musical interests, the club features several members on several different instruments, alternating songs and styles to create a new and exciting energy each time someone new walks on stage or a different opening chord is played. As its members will be the firsts to inform you, ASUM Klub has its own individual brand of humor, and it can seem a little overwhelming to a first-time audience member. If you take a deep breath, let yourself get lost in the music – new or old, because you’re almost guaranteed to know the words to at least one song and have never heard of atleast one other – and take the club at face value, it becomes apparent pretty quickly why it’s so awesome. There are no barriers with ASUM Klub. Everyone is welcome, everyone is part of the family and everyone, on some level, belongs to that acronym, because performances like their’s unite everyone in the room through music.


The New Hampshire • February 18, 2011

10

Annual Drag Ball returns to UNH

IMPROV CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

By SAMANTHA PEARSON STAFF WRITER

The cast of Improv Anonymous recently held auditions to complete its comedy family “Now I’m in their seat seeing myself in these kids,” Russell said. “I could see what mistakes I made during my auditions and the things that I did right. I felt like I was Simon Cowell. It was weird being in the judgment seat.” Conklin, who was added to the group at the end of the 2010 spring semester, said deciding who gets into the group is harder than auditioning. “It’s hard to critique everyone auditioning,” Conklin said. “It’s harder than doing improv. I’m more critical of myself than I am of everyone else.” Although the auditioning process seems difficult, Improv Anonymous can agree that new members to the group are pivotal for maintaining energy in the group. “Having new members is always good- it brings a new energy to the group, not that we don’t al-

ways have it,” Parker Callahan, a sophomore member of the group, said. “We can get worn down over the semester and bringing new people in keeps us on our A-game. We have to teach them, impress them, and make sure they’re comfortable onstage.” Other members liked the new characters that added members bring to the group. “It adds a different flavor to the group, different styles and jokes,” Hickman said. Conkin said it is refreshing to add new members, even though there is always an adjustment period after the group adds new members. “It’s harder because you don’t know how to perform with them,” Conklin said. When auditioning potential comedians, the group said that it does not typically rank funniness as the most important and defining trait.

BRI HAND/CONTRIBUTING

“What I looked for most was someone who brings something new,” said Russell. “New characters, a new vibe, and new energy that spreads the energy to us and gets us revamped. I think it’s funnier when people don’t try to be funny.” Many other members looked for members that they knew would work well with the rest of the group. “We look for someone with a good sense of humor, but we want someone who will work together with everyone else to be funny,” Riley said. “Improv isn’t about being funny alone.” Weekly improv performances take place at 9 p.m. every Thursday in the Entertainment Center. In addition, Improv Anonymous is also slated for some dorm shows, a Mills coffee house, and is hoping to put together another benefit show later in the semester.

The UNH Alliance is hosting the 11th Annual Drag Ball on Friday, Feb.18 in the Granite State Room. This year’s theme is “Hollywood”, for students who need a starting point to plan their ensembles, but neither thematic dress nor drag are required for entrance. Sophomore Joshua Swanson, chair of the Alliance, said people who have never attended a Drag Ball before can expect a huge dance party where people are allowed to be themselves, no matter what that means for any individual. “It’s about breaking down the norms and encouraging people to let loose,” Swanson said. “It’s not about the clothes we wear; it’s about the people we are.”

According to the Facebook event page, well over 200 people are planning to attend the event and Swanson said the Alliance hopes for about twice that, which would be more than last year’s attendees. “The time is now, you have to be unique and different, and shine in your own way,” Swanson said, quoting pop icon Lady Gaga. “Essentially, we want people to explore themselves, try something new, and not feel bad about it.” For more information about the event, check out the Facebook page or contact the UNH Alliance. Tickets are on sale now at the MUB ticket office. They are free for UNH undergraduates and $5 for all others with cash only. Student IDs are required for undergraduate tickets.

MUSO Presents….

Movies for the Week of February 18-24 WAITING FOR SUPERMAN Friday, February 18 Saturday, February 19 Sunday, February 20

7:00 PM 9:00 PM 7:00 PM 9:00 PM 7:00 PM 9:00 PM

UNH Peace and Justice League Presents:

Scarred Lands & Wounded Lives: The Environmental Footprint of War This film explores our dependence on the natural world and the threat that war and preparations for war poses to that world. From the production weapons to the clean up and restoration, war has a significant impact on the Earth. The Fund for Sustainable Tomorrow’s wrote, “The environment remains the war’s ‘silent casualty’”.

Tuesday, February 15th @ 7pm MUB Theater II

RESTREPO Friday, February 18 Saturday, February 19 Sunday, February 20

7:30 PM 9:30 PM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM 7:30 PM 9:30 PM

Starts Thursday (2/24):

The War on Democracy This film is the story of the manipulation of Latin America by the United States over the past 50 years. It reveals the story behind the attempted overthrow of the Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez in 2002. John Pilger says “[The film] is about the struggle of people to free themselves from a modern form of slavery”. (As quoted by johnpilger.com)

Monday, February 21st @ 7pm MUB Theater I

Megamind 9:00 PM Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (part 1) 6:45 PM 9:30 PM (2/24) Free to All Special UNH Film Underground Screening

7:00 PM

Peace, Propaganda, & the Promised Land This riveting documentary exposes how foreign policy of America works in combination with Israeli public relations. It analyzes how the Israeli occupation in The West Bank and Gaza remains hidden in the media. Raising questions about the ethics and role of journalism, and the relationship between media and politics. (As sited by media education foundation)

Tuesday, March 1st @ 7pm MUB Theater II

Taxi to the Dark Side “Winner of the 2007 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature about the U.S. government’s policies on interrogation of terror suspects.” This documentary investigates the suspicious death of an Afghani taxi driver at Bagram air base in 2002. Introducing the film and answering questions after is John D. Huston who is the recently retired President of the UNH School of Law.

Monday, March 7th @ 730pm MUB Theater I Free and Open to the Public Ad funded by your Student Activity Fee

for more details go to: www.unhmub.com/movies Tickets are $2 for students with ID and $4 for others. Movies sponsored by Film Underground are FREE. Tickets go on sale 1 hour before show time. Cat’s Cache and Cash are the ONLY forms of payment accepted.

For more info contact:

MUB Ticket Office - University of New Hampshire (603) 862-2290 - Email: MUB.tickets@unh.edu 83 Main St, Durham, NH 03824


11

The New Hampshire • February 18, 2011

COURTESY PHOTO

CRAY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9 “(I look forward to) every place,” Cray said. “Everyone should travel. You get on the coach, you lock in at the window and you take it all in.” Cray is touring to promote his 2010 DVD, Cookin’ In Mobile, recorded live at the Mobile Saenger Theater in Mobile, Ala. Cray said that the experience was a memorable one, partly because of the opportunity to visually showcase the band’s then new lineup, not only to the audience in Mobile, but also to the DVD’s audience. “The vibe was great,” Cray said. “People didn’t expect it. They were

gassed.” Cray is also playing material from his 2009 Grammy nominated studio release, This Time. But, with the recent band changes in the form of bassist Jordan Cousins and drummer Tony Braunagel, Cray and his band have prepared for the tour by hashing out and perfecting older material in addition to the newer songs. “We’ve been digging into the archive,” Cray said. “Richard (Cousins) hasn’t played much of the material at this point.” Cousins, who played with Cray from 1971 to 1990, has rejoined the band since recording This Time with the group in 2009. According to Cray, relearning two decades worth of music with Cousins, as well as the rest of Cray’s catalogue with Braunagel,

who also joined in 2009, has been nothing short of a good time. “We’re having a ball,” Cray said. Cray will have Shemekia Copeland, renowned blues singer and daughter of famed blues guitarist Johnny Copeland, opening for him in Portsmouth. Cray holds Copeland in high esteem. “She’s fantastic,” he said. “She’s really gifted, she’s a great person, she gives it (when she plays).” Before his show in Portsmouth, Cray will be just beginning his tour on the East Coast, making his way up from locations in Virginia, Pennsylvania and upstate New York. If all goes as planned, there will be plenty of lobster waiting for him when he gets here.

Breaking New Grounds continues artist open mic night tradition By BRI HAND CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Grab a coffee, a guitar, or your favorite poem because Wednesday Open Mic nights at Breaking New Grounds have officially resumed this semester. These coffee houses, beginning at 6 p.m. at the Durham BNG, were started last year through a group called “The Other”, which looked to promote lesser heard voices in literature. The local Durham pit stop quickly became a popular venue for local musicians, poets, and readers. “We get a lot of dudes with guitars singing,” Kayleigh Michael, a UNH graduate student and host of the

Open Mic nights, said. “It’s what everyone does. We do want more poets and readers though.” Breaking New Grounds has hosted one Open Mic night since the beginning of the semester, but will soon fall into the pattern of hosting one every other Wednesday. The next event will be on March 2. However, to avoid a conflict with spring break, the next event after March 2 may be held on March 9 instead. Performers of all ages have showcased their talents at BNG, from Oyster River and UNH students to older Durham community members. “Last year, word got around in a weird way,” Michael said about the variety of performers. “It wasn’t really

advertised, but still, different kinds of people showed up.” Michael also said that in addition to the musical and literary showcases, she would like to add an art portion to the night where local artists can hang their work in the coffee shop and sell them. If you are interested in performing at the next Open Mic night, you can show up at BNG before 6 p.m. to sign up, or you can book a slot ahead of time by sending a message to Kayleigh Michael on Facebook. Michael said that she thinks these Open Mic nights have definitely had a positive impact on Durham. “I like it a lot,” she said. “It’s very good for the community.”

SAM MAJOR/CONTRIBUTING

Notes from an Audiophile: Why ASUM is awesome By SAMANTHA PEARSON STAFF WRITER

There are not many cover bands that have a repertoire more impressive than a handful of greatest hits by a single band. There are also not many cover bands comprised of UNH students who are interested in playing music that they love, for people that they love, regardless of how different or bizarre that music is. ASUM Klub is pretty unique for those reasons and more. The Association of Students United by Music presents a handful of shows each year and each one, while “themed”, is generally a massive party that the entire student body is invited to attend. Set lists range from mainstream pop-punk bands to hip-hop artists to classic rock staples and beyond. At the club’s winter concert last semester, they opened with Fall Out Boy, went as far back as The Beatles and featured a song by rap superstars Lil Wayne and Nicki Minaj. Are you intrigued yet?

In addition to a wide variety of musical interests, the club features several members on several different instruments, alternating songs and styles to create a new and exciting energy each time someone new walks on stage or a different opening chord is played. As its members will be the firsts to inform you, ASUM Klub has its own individual brand of humor, and it can seem a little overwhelming to a first-time audience member. If you take a deep breath, let yourself get lost in the music – new or old, because you’re almost guaranteed to know the words to at least one song and have never heard of atleast one other – and take the club at face value, it becomes apparent pretty quickly why it’s so awesome. There are no barriers with ASUM Klub. Everyone is welcome, everyone is part of the family and everyone, on some level, belongs to that acronym, because performances like their’s unite everyone in the room through music.


12

NEWS

Friday, February 18, 2011

The New Hampshire

UNH students cooking up some competition By KERRY FELTNER STAFF WRITER

If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen. The first UNH Iron Chef competition is currently underway, allowing students to get their hands dirty and cook up some dishes of their own. Inspired by the popular TV shows “Iron Chef America” and “Top Chef,” UNH Iron Chef is a competition in which groups of two compete by preparing one dish for five judges to evaluate. The competition hosts 18 UNH students competing to win over the judge’s stomachs. Judges include a member of student senate and Jon Plodzik, the director of UNH Dining, among others.

The competition consists of three cooking events, at Stillings Hall, Philbrook Hall and at Holloway Commons for the final cookoff. Coca-Cola is the sponsor for the events. “We have great student involvement in this event, and we want students to engage with us and have some fun,” Deb Scanlon, area manager of Holloway Commons, said. “We want to give the students a platform to demonstrate the great things they do and to show them that we are invested in the whole experience.” The dish that competing students must create consists of a protein counterpart, a side of a vegetable or fruit, and a starch or grain component. Teams also have to include the secret ingredient (Coca-Cola) in one

We have great student involvement in this event, and we want students to engage with us and have some fun. We want to give the students a platform to demonstrate the great things they do and to show them that we are invested in the whole experience.” Deb Scanlon Area Manager, Holloway Commons “We thought it would be exciting for students who embrace the culinary profession,” Plodzik said. “We hope it will bring great awareness and good competition.”

or more parts of the dish. “Typically we [UNH Dining] do a staff competition each holiday season,” Ralph Coughenour, direc-

tor of culinary services, said. “Our mantra for UNH Dining is to make everything from scratch.” The event has been an educational experience for many individuals. “It has been awesome having [UNH Dining] to answer questions and to learn more about food,” sophomore Carter Boscom, a student senate representative and judge of the competition, said. “I am learning a lot about how to prepare foods.” Judges rate the dishes on a scale of one to five, five being the highest score. The groups are evaluated based on technique, appearance, texture, taste, nutritional content, and secret ingredient usage. “I am more of an observer, so I am comparing teams on their technique, and of course on the taste of the dish,” Boscom said. “Everyone seems to be on top of their game.” There is one final cook-off on March 2 at Holloway Commons. Winners of the final competition will receive a flat screen TV. All participants were presented with “Top Chef” cookbooks. The winners of the semifinals received a knife set. For the students involved, the competition offers a chance to get creative. “[Myself and my partner] are both hospitality majors, and

have been involved with the UNH gourmet dinners,” senior Emily Goldman said. “We also both have background experience in restaurants and cooking, so we thought it

“We thought it

would be exciting for students who embrace the culinary profession. We hope it will bring great awareness and good competition.” Jon Plodzik Director, UNH Dining would be a fun experience.” Students gathered to watch the competition in Stillings Hall as Goldman and her partner, Kayla Oteri, cooked up a win. “The main goal was to create excitement around the culinary program of the Thompson school, and to cater to the aspirations of the students,” Plodzik said. “There are a lot of talented individuals on campus, and it is neat to see the chefs working with them.” The UNH Dining staff sees the event as an opportunity to expand its connection to the students they feed on a daily basis. “It demonstrates how [UNH

Dining] goes above and beyond just putting chicken nuggets on a plate,” Plodzik said. “The competition is fun for us too because we want to have that relationship with our students and guests.” The dining staff is already looking towards the future, even as one competition has yet to take place. “I’d love for this to be an annual competition,” Scanlon said. “We would love to expand it so more students could participate.”

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The New Hampshire

10th Annual MLK, Jr. Leadership Summit sees an increase in applicants By RAYA AL-HASHMI STAFF WRITER

The 10th Martin Luther King, Jr. Leadership Summit, sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Affairs (OMSA), will take place from Feb. 25-27. The MLK Leadership Summit is a three-day leadership development institute for UNH undergraduate students. Participants in the MLK Leadership Summit have the opportunity to examine and develop their own leadership potential within a multicultural context. In its first year, the MLK Leadership Summit was open to students that were only affiliated with the Diversity Support Coalition. After reflection and evaluation of the first summit, the students decided they would like to see more people from majority identities, and opened the application process to all full-time undergraduate students at UNH. This co-curricular program evolves with student feedback every year. “You are not only meeting people in your social and cultural networks, but also outside of your experiential networks, and forming not only friendships but working relationships,” OMSA Director Sean McGhee said. UNH Sophomore Noha Elmohands said that the summit is a positive way for UNH students to get past preconceived notions and stereotypes of others since, “Students get emotionally attached to others at the summit, which allows an understanding of each other.”

“You are not only

meeting people in your social and cultural networks, but also outside of your experiential networks, and forming not only friendships but working relationships.” Sean McGhee OMSA Director According to Multicultural Coordinator Otis Douce, there is a selection process based on a comprehensive application, due to the high number of application submissions. On average, 70 students apply and only 30 can be accepted, Douce said. With the increase in applicants every year, the program is proving to be successful. Nevertheless, due to budgetary constraints, the summit will take place on campus, unlike in past years when it was held at Camp Merrowvista.

McGhee said that the MLK Leadership Summit allows students to see themselves in this world in a different way. “When you are talking about oppressions and various forms of ‘-isms’ and empowerment, people are telling their very personal stories,” McGhee said. “Telling the stories are a part of it, but the other part of it is the work that needs to be done behind the stories that are being shared.” The OMSA staff is looking for students that come from different kinds of backgrounds in terms of all types of diversity, geographical locations and life experiences. Heather Rollins, a UNH student attending this year���s summit, hopes to gain a better knowledge of leadership in a way that incorporates a multicultural context. “I will take what I learn and will apply it to the organizations I belong to and use this experience to educate myself so I can grow as an individual,” Rollins said. The summit includes students from majority identities to create an experience that has all angles covered. One such student, who is attending this year’s summit, is sophomore Sara Dillingham, who said that being both the minority and the majority allows her to contribute a different perspective. “I am white and have that quote, unquote superiority, but I am also a minority being a lesbian,” Dillingham said. McGhee encourages students who are at the very beginning of their understanding of diversity and leadership, all the way up to the very advanced, and everything in between, to consider the summit. “They don’t have to totally get it on diversity, or get it on social justice,” McGhee said. Senior Cate Reynolds is one of the student coordinators this year, and said that attending the summit her freshman year helped define herself to a deeper capacity than she has before. “It probed my interest in social justice and being more active on campus,” Reynolds said. Senior Vivian Sevilla was motivated to sign up after participating in the Photo Art Exhibit that was revealed this year as a part of the MLK Jr. celebration. “I am really interested in exploring and immersing myself in cultural and social justice, while enhancing some of the leadership tools I have already gained at UNH,” Sevilla said. The application deadline was Feb. 9, but for students interested in the MLK Leadership Summit for next year, applications are available starting in December of 2011. For more information, contact Otis Douce, multicultural coordinator, at otis.douce@unh.edu, or visit OMSA in MUB 327.

Friday, February 18, 2011

13

WACKY WINTER WEATHER

ERICA SIVER/STAFF

JULIE FORTIN/STAFF

(Top) Students make use of the frozen ice rink for a pick-up hockey game, while (below) students are forced to pack up their skates as the warm weather turned the ice to slush, making it impossible to skate.

Ohio GE Aviation plant will battle on for funding By DAN SEWELL ASSOCIATED PRESS

EVENDALE, Ohio - Folks involved with the GE Aviation plant in southwest Ohio are used to being in the target sights of Washington budget-cutters, but the latest shot at a key project here has hit hard.

“We have to cut

money somewhere.” John Pollock GE Retiree The Republican-controlled House voted Wednesday to cancel $450 million for an alternative engine being developed for the F-35 fighter jet. The vote backed Barack Obama’s administration and the Pentagon in saying that the GE Aviation-Rolls Royce joint project can be sacrificed in the effort to rein in the federal deficit. President George W. Bush’s administration had said the same

thing, but the House - with backing from Ohio political leaders including now-Speaker John Boehner - had kept funding the program. Boehner’s district neighbors the plant. Word of the vote spread quickly in this northern Cincinnati suburb just off of Interstate 75. “It’s sad. It could hurt,” John Pollock, a GE retiree said. But he said he wasn’t surprised. “We have to cut money somewhere,” he said. Jeff Famble, whose wife works at GE, said losing the project would come at a bad time. “Ohio is one of the states that needs jobs the most. We’re trying to get the economy going,” Famble said. “I don’t know what’s going on behind the scenes in Washington, but I know what the scene is here: We need jobs. You’ve got take care of your backyard.” Some 1,000 jobs, including GE employees and subcontractors, are linked to the project in the Cincinnati area, GE Aviation spokesman Rick Kennedy said.

The General Electric Co. division has long been a major player in the southwest Ohio economy. It still has some 7,500 employees in the region, though that’s less than half of what it had in Cold War days. Kennedy said the workers will keep going on the project. “They will continue to until we get this resolved. It’s a setback, but it’s not over,” Kennedy said. “We will take this fight to the Senate.” Republican Rep. Steve Chabot, whose district includes the plant, pledged Wednesday to keep battling for funding, as did Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown, a Democrat. Political ramifications remain to be seen. While Ohio is a pivotal swing state in presidential elections, Cincinnati’s northern suburbs are solidly Republican and the GE Aviation project has enjoyed support from leaders of both parties in the region. The main engine is built by Connecticut-based Pratt & Whitney, a unit of United Technologies Corp.


The New Hampshire

14 Friday, February 18, 2011

Revel gets money to finish Atlantic City casino By WAYNE PARRY ASSOCIATED PRESS

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - Revel Entertainment said Thursday it has secured the final $1 billion-plus it needs to finish its half-built casino on the Atlantic City Boardwalk, a project that is widely considered the best chance for the nation’s second-largest gambling market to recover from four years of plunging revenue. The remaining $1.15 billion in financing was secured Thursday, and work on the stalled $2.4 billion project will resume as quickly as possible, Kevin DeSanctis, Revel’s CEO, told The Associated Press. In what was surely an understatement, he described himself as “a little relieved.” “We’re extremely pleased to be moving forward,” DeSanctis said. “We think we will have a really positive impact on Atlantic City and South Jersey.” Bob Griffin, CEO of Trump Entertainment Resorts and president of the Casino Association of New Jersey, said Revel’s resumption marks “the rebirth of Atlantic City.” Revel was begun in 2007, before the national recession hit and credit markets dried up. It ran out of money in January 2009 and halted work with just the exterior nearing completion. Gov. Chris Christie has committed $261 million in state tax credits to help Revel once it’s open. Michael Drewniak, a spokesman for the governor, termed Thursday’s announcement “good news,

just what we wanted to hear. We hope to see things move forward in earnest now.” Revel will open in the summer of 2012 with 1,100 hotel rooms, and is likely to be Atlantic City’s last mega-resort for some time. When fully operational, Revel will employ 5,500 people. It will generate about 2,100 construction jobs, providing a much-needed boost for the southern New Jersey economy.

DeSanctis said work will resume soon on the project. “We will be moving as quickly as we can,” he said. “Every day, you’ll see a little more starting up there.” Revel is likely to be the last project of its kind in Atlantic City for the foreseeable future. It was begun when the resort was awash in grand construction plans, including four new casino-hotels worth more than $10 billion. The first (and only)

I’ve been saying we need new product, “something more than just new rows of slot machines, something transformational from convenience gambling to a true destination resort like Borgata.” State Sen. Jim Whelan Former Atlantic City Mayor But just as big is the psychological boost that completion of Revel will provide for Atlantic City. “It’s a win for the city,” said Joe Weinert, senior vice president of Spectrum Gaming Group, a New Jersey casino consulting firm. “This should be a morale boost for everyone who has a stake in Atlantic City. Revel itself is going to be a catalyst for a rebound after four years of discouraging news.” Wall Street giant Morgan Stanley, the project’s major backer, pulled out in April 2010, deciding it was better to take a nearly $1 billion loss on the project than see it through to completion.

project to actually put shovels in the ground and begin construction, Revel progressed to the point where it was considered too far along to abandon when money ran out. Atlantic City has since set its sights lower. Christie signed legislation last month to allow construction of two “boutique” casinos in Atlantic City with a minimum of 200 hotel rooms. Previously, New Jersey law required at least 500 rooms, and the most successful of the city’s 11 casinos have 2,000 rooms or more. Yet Revel plans to be exactly the type of destination resort Atlantic City says it must have in order to compete successfully with the

racetrack casinos and slots parlors that are bedeviling Atlantic City in neighboring states. In that regard, it is following the blueprint set out by the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa which has been Atlantic City’s most successful casino since it opened in 2003 with an emphasis on luxury Las Vegas-style gambling, accommodations, top restaurants and entertainment. “I’ve been saying we need new product, something more than just new rows of slot machines, something transformational from convenience gambling to a true destination resort like Borgata,” said State Sen. Jim Whelan, a former Atlantic City mayor. “That’s what Revel is going to be. I think Atlantic City is positioned well for the future.” Even competitors welcomed Revel into the market. Don Marrandino, eastern division president of Caesars Entertainment, which owns four of Atlantic City’s 11 casinos, said the jobs and renewed buzz Revel will bring to the market will benefit everyone. “It will help by bringing more people down to that end of the Boardwalk,” he said. Together with the announcement Monday that the Houston-based owner of the Golden Nugget is buying Trump Marina Hotel Casino, Marrandino said “there’s great optimism in the city right now.” Nothing about Revel has come easily. Six months before its developers ran out of money, and interior construction slammed to a halt, three key executives working on the project died in a plane crash in Minnesota.

IN BRIEF Arrest made in case of stolen military laptops TAMPA, Fla. - Investigators say they’ve cracked the case of the 3,000 stolen military laptops in Tampa that were headed to U.S. Special Operations Command. Hillsborough County Sheriff David Gee announced the arrest of the suspected ringleader Wednesday. He says 55-year-old Rolando Coca led a crew of about 10 people who stole the laptops from a government contractor’s warehouse last March. The $7.4 million worth of new computers didn’t have any data but were bound for U.S. Special Operations Command at MacDill Air Force Base. Gee says the thieves gained entry into the warehouse by cutting a hole in the roof. They disabled security systems and cameras. Gee says images of Coca on a surveillance camera from a nearby McDonald’s drive-thru helped crack the case.

Dementia patient’s homicide still under review EBENSBURG, Pa. - A Pennsylvania prosecutor says a dementia patient’s mental state must be determined before authorities decide whether to charge him with homicide in the death of a fellow nursing home patient. For now, 78-year-old Raymond Dunmyer Jr. remains in an undisclosed, secure facility. He is charged with aggravated assault in Saturday’s beating death of 70year-old Theodore Shaw, who was also a dementia patient at the Cambria Care Center in Ebensburg. Cambria County District Attorney Kelly Callihan says Dunmyer’s son is his guardian and will likely request a public defender. Callihan says if the public defender doesn’t ask for a mental evaluation of Dunmyer, her office will. Police say Dunmyer beat Shaw and hit his head with a heavy door before aides could intervene.

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Get the story straight Admin’s response doesn’t instill confidence; Board’s amendment means little If you don’t have anything substantial to stand on, you can always blame the press. That’s the method WSBE Dean Daniel Innis took in an e-mail he sent out to WSBE students on Wednesday. “Over the past few days the new Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics building project has received considerable negative media attention,” he said. “These reports have been largely inaccurate.” First of all, we’re flattered to, along with the New Hampshire Union Leader, comprise what constitutes “considerable media attention” these days. But we disagree with the “largely inaccurate” bit, as we don’t believe that the article we published on Tuesday fits that category at all. Neither would UNH’s Associate Vice President of Finance David Proulx. In e-mail correspondence with the reporter of that story on Tuesday, he referred to the article as “fair and well-written.” Two members of the administration, two polar opposite statements. Unfortunately, that’s been standard for the course in the grand history of the someday-to-be Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. Consider the following statement from Matt Cookson, who handles media relations for USNH: “It was never their [the board’s] intent to have students pay for it [the $16 million loan],” he said. “It was their intent to find other sources.” Really? Then can someone explain why the original motion on the agenda for yesterday’s board meeting in Keene stated that the “internal loans be paid back over a period not to exceed 10 years at an interest rate of 4.5% and funded from an increase in tuition to all UNH undergraduates not to exceed $160 per year beginning in FY13?” The motion did not say that the tuition hike would occur if all other revenue sources failed. It did not suggest that the increase was a “last resort contingency,” as both Innis and UNH President Mark Huddleston referred to as. It said that the repayment of the loans would be funded through an increase in tuition. It’s pretty straightforward. They went to the effort to come up with a $160 limit. Clearly, a tuition hike was hardly on their minds at all.

In his e-mail, Innis did not point out a single inaccuracy in what has been reported; instead, he offered the best spin he can muster on the subject.

Instead of passing a motion saying how the loan would be repaid, the board just passed a motion that left that part out. There’s no real sign of any change in the university’s position, or its future actions. “The new business building is the first building at UNH to be funded primarily through donor funds,” he said. Yes, that was indeed the original aim; back in June 2008, the university committed to matching Paul’s $25 million gift through matching donations. But the $16 million loan granted yesterday is a sign that effort was not successful (back in 2008, there was also no mention of a plan to raid WSBE reserves for $10 million, either). If there’s one good thing to say about Innis’ e-mail, it’s that he finally got around to telling students of the situation confronting the school for the first time; apparently, students didn’t need to know anything before that. It’s not as if the issue concerned them. Murky responses to the situation aren’t limited to Innis. In a statement published on UNH’s website on Thursday, President Huddleston said of the project’s funding: “We’ve come a long way since that day in 2008.” That “long way” is, apparently, the $4 million in donations that the university has raised in two-and-a-half years (plus, the $10 million reserve raid, if you consider that a positive). However, Huddleston feels obliged to inflate that numbers to some desired future state, referring to it as “an expected $5 million-plus from donors and alumni who know how important this new business facility will be to our students and faculty and to the state of New Hampshire.” Unfortunately, that’s the same line

we’ve been fed for the past two-and-ahalf years. In June of 2008, Huddleston said: “We’re already talking with others who want to join this effort.” In September of 2009, Innis said: “What we need now is a large gift of $1 million or more. We have a lot of people willing to do that. I’m not concerned - it’s just a matter of time.” Now, months and months after these overconfident statements, the two of them are attempting to continue to project an image that they’re not concerned. This time around, is anyone actually buying it? In contrast, we have Proulx, who earlier this week told The New Hampshire: “The university probably made a mistake in believing that it could find another $25 million” in matching donations. Some in the administration are willing to admit mistakes. Others will do whatever it takes to deny them. On Thursday, the University System of New Hampshire board elected to amend the original motion and remove the clause stating the repayment of the loan would be “funded from an increase in tuition to all UNH undergraduates not to exceed $160 per year beginning in FY13.” Should we view that as progress? Well, it’s certainly a reaction to that “considerable negative media attention.” But it doesn’t necessarily mean anything. Instead of passing a motion saying how the loan would be repaid, the board just passed a motion that left that part out. There’s no real sign of any change in the university’s position, or its future actions. On the same day that the motion was passed, the cost of attendance for the next academic year was revealed as well. That cost will increase by $1,328 next year for both in-state and outof-state students. Despite the vague references to the challenges facing the university system at this time, we don’t have the true breakdown behind that number. That means the university can hike tuition for a new business school whenever they want. Most likely, the greatest regret is that they made its intentions so clear to start with. That or the fact that it has made its response to questions so incredibly unclear.

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16

OPINION

Friday, February 18, 2011

OP-ED The facts about the funding of UNH’s new business college By MARK HUDDLESTON GUEST COLUMNIST

Everyone appreciates sound business practice, especially in these challenging times. The first person to call me after the media coverage surrounding the funding proposal for the new business school was Fred Whittemore. Fred, for whom the University of New Hampshire’s Whittemore Center is named, is the son of the late well-known industrialist Laurence Whittemore, for whom the Whittemore School of Business and Economics is named. He agrees with us that the funding plan for the new business facility is sound business practice. He urged me to stay the course, that this new facility is important to UNH and to the state of New Hampshire. We will have generated at least $30 million in private money toward a $55 million building – that’s our largest privately funded capital project ever – and we are using an internal loan to fund the balance.

As Fred Whittemore so aptly said to me on the phone this morning, this is absolutely the right thing. We will stay the course and build this facility. The repayment of that loan includes a last-resort contingency to use a tuition increase cap to assist in paying it back. This is not a new practice. A contingency is built into all of our funding plans for building projects. Capital projects at UNH, throughout the university system and indeed across the country are partially or fully funded by tuition dollars. Kingsbury, DeMerritt, James, and Parsons Halls, UNH’s cogeneration plant – all these projects were in some way funded by tuition. It is a core expense of operating any university.

State law does not permit a public university to finance externally any of our academic or administrative building. This limits our funding options. We must rely on grants, gifts, state capital appropriations, and tuition/fees. In June 2008, when the gift was announced, the donor - Troy native and UNH alum Peter T. Paul – intended for his $25 million challenge to be leveraged from several sources, including the state and our own alumni. We knew then that the opportunities we envisioned for our students and faculty could be realized despite economic conditions, but we’d have to roll up our sleeves to get it done. With the national economy on the verge of the greatest economic collapse since the Great Depression, most colleges and universities had to recalculate their fundraising aspirations – and many of them were in the middle of major capital campaigns. We’ve come a long way since that day in 2008. Consider the math: a very generous $25 million gift; a $10 million strategic building fund that has been percolating for years, thanks to the foresight of past and present WSBE deans; and an expected $5 million-plus from donors and alumni who know how important this new business facility will be to our students and faculty and to the state of New Hampshire. Why are we staying on schedule with this project? Because it is vital to the success of our students and to the economic success of our state. A conservative estimate puts the amount UNH educated students contribute annually to the state’s skilled workforce at $562 million. And businesses in the state are clamoring for more. So, as Fred Whittemore so aptly said to me on the phone this morning, this is absolutely the right thing for the University of New Hampshire to do right now. We will stay the course and build this facility. „„„ Mark Huddleston is the president of UNH.

The New Hampshire

My N.H. gay marriage story By MATTHEW THORNTON GUEST COLUMNIST

On June 25, 2009, I went to Dover City Hall to file for a civil union with my partner of five years, Stephen. It was a glorious day for us both, and we were honored to live in a state that would acknowledge the love we share. The day was cut short, though, as I had to get over to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard and help the apprentices there enroll into their Associate Degree programs with Great Bay Community College. Anything to help better my community, even on my sort-of-wedding day. About a year later, on March 25, 2010, we returned to the City Hall and filed the paperwork to convert our civil union to a marriage. Imagine! The joy that our state was finally standing behind us, saying that New Hampshire would not tolerate discrimination any further, and that our marriage was just as valuable as a heterosexual one. I could not have been more proud of my state at that moment, and with friends and family all over the world, you better believe I was bragging about it. We solidified our marriage with a formal ceremony at our new home, a six-acre farm in Barrington on Oct. 9, 2010. A hundred of our closest friends and family joined us for a beautiful (albeit freezing) fall day, and a priestess pronounced us married, partners for life, much to the joy and happiness of everyone around us. The day was magical, and by far the most wonderful day of our entire lives. When we heard that the House Judiciary Committee had scheduled hearings on two bills designed to take away this right to marry, our hearts sank. This could not possibly be true! We live in the greatest state in our nation! Why would they want to take that right away from us? How could we possibly be considering

legislation that would undo the greatest and proudest moment in my life? And, Heaven forbid, if the bill actually comes to pass, why would I stay here? Why should I continue to give back to my community that clearly thinks less of me? The comments from Lew Feldstein, co-chairman of Standing Up for New Hampshire Families, in today’s news rang clear with me: “For 25 years, we were part of an effort to build New Hampshire communities. The withdrawal of these rights rends this garment; it rips up just what helps hold our communities together. If you leave people without protection, if you say we can pass something one year and take it away the next, people sense that and you can’t build anything.” I realize that there are many who oppose gay marriage, and that there is some strange fear of the unknown or different. I assure you, the marriage between my husband and I is no cause for any fear! We have not, nor would we ever cause any harm to the state or the community that we both love so much. I also realize that there are those that oppose gay marriage on religious grounds, citing the Holy Bible, which describes our relationship as an “abomination.” I respect these beliefs, but I must point out that if we did everything the way the Bible asked us to, we would be putting every adulterer in New Hampshire instantly to death. There are reasons that our government laws do not follow the word of any religious text, and there are plenty of religions that support our marriage. Perhaps my marriage does not fit your model of a “traditional” marriage. Which tradition is that exactly? History, even Christian history, shows tradition of polygamy. Will we now advocate for multiple marriages (as long as they are heterosexual ones?) If your religion prevents you from agreeing with gay mar-

riage, you are free to disagree, and by all means, do not get gay married. That does not give you the permission to strip away our rights. It is so very cruel to even consider taking away our right to marry whomever we choose. It creates a tier-system of relationships, where gay marriages are considered “second-class” to straight ones. We stand back in horror and awe when teenagers (and even adults) commit suicide because of bullying and discrimination based on their sexual orientation, and yet we create this culture ourselves by suggesting that homosexuals are second-class citizens to heterosexuals through our state laws. We must stand up and fight for every minority, be it based on gender, race, religion, or sexual orientation. All men (and women) are created equal in the eyes of God, and all should be treated fairly and equally in the eyes of the law. I implore you not to pass these hateful bills before the legislation. My perception of our great state will be forever destroyed, and I would quickly seek to leave it. Do not doubt that New Hampshire is leading the way for the rest of this nation for true “Live Free or Die” style equality. If we back down now, we will surely be humbled by that mistake in the future. I want to live a long, happy life in this state, and I want to promote the love, respect and honor that I share with my husband every day. Our marriage is just as valuable, and meaningful, and treasured by us as any other marriage. I would feel so betrayed by my state if you pass these bills. Please don’t do this. Please. „„„ Matthew Thonton lives in Barrington, N.H.

„ Letter to the editor Need accountability for series of failed mistakes Someone in the administration needs to be held accountable for a series of failed decisions ever since the beginning of the building fiasco. The money from Mr. Paul should never have been accepted in the first place. Donating $25 million is generous, but donating half a building is not. It is a sneaky trap that only adds a burden to the university. The university was obviously not prepared to match such a commitment. In light of the renovations in McConnell in recent years, it was obvious the school made the decision to stick with the old building for the foreseeable future. By salivating over the prospect of $25 million, the university was now held at the mercy of Paul

and forced to scramble for the rest of the money. Second, there’s the naming controversy. It would make sense that the new building, if it is ever to be built, should be named after Peter T. Paul, in the same was that McConnell is the name of the current building. But I’m not sure why the name of the college itself – WSBE - had to change. Instead, we have the current planned amalgamation of only graduate programs named after WSBE. So much for the branding Mr. Proulx speaks of. Third, construction should never have started before the funds were amassed. As a result of the decision to immediately begin the relocation process, residents of Smith Hall, a historic dorm dedicated to a mix of U.S. and international students, were hastily forced into Fairchild. At the moment, Smith Hall is merely surrounded by

a fence, with no sign of the renovation work to turn it into offices. Besides, was the administration planning on half a building being constructed if fundraising fell short? Evidently not, since we students are forced to cover for their mistakes out of our pockets. For a university that faces unique financing challenges as it is, this was not a sound financial decision. As a fellow student said, how ironic that a business college should act so carelessly. The principle of using student tuition to fund projects in and of itself is not the problem. It is more about how the whole process has been handled and the way in which students are seen as the last resort bailout for others’ mistakes. Faris Al-Hashmi Senior, Political Science


OPINION

The New Hampshire

Prospects for medical marijuana in N.H. less than spectacular This legislative session, freedom-friendly lawmakers have chosen to pursue the passage of a bill to protect medical cannabis patients from arrest and prosecution for medicating with their preferred method. Currently, HB 442 has eight co-sponsors in the General Court: four Democrats and four Republicans with one co-sponsor in the Senate. Prospects for the bill are less than spectacular. Given the latest shift in the state legislature from last November’s election, don’t expect drug law reform to be on the minds of a class of legislators elected to balance the budget and turn the state away from the perils of impending bankruptcy that so many face today. Recently, I spoke with State Senator Jim Forsythe, a liberty-minded Republican who is the sole sponsor of HB 442 in the Senate. During our conversation, he expressed to me his skepticism that the bill could make it through the current Senate with 19 Republicans, none with a sense for individual freedom as strong as Forsythe. And even if the bill made it to Governor Lynch’s desk, his veto pen looms. Unfortunately for those who find relief in the therapeutic effects of cannabis, Governor John Lynch has been unwilling to sign any changes to the state’s drug laws. Citing that increased availability will undoubtedly lead to increased use and thus increased addiction rates, Governor Lynch has been able to stymie the debate on cannabis laws. His faulty logic is something to examine closely: If indeed we believe that any other regulatory scheme besides prohibition will increase the availability of marijuana on the market, Lynch believes that more people would use the drug. While this assumption is not necessarily incorrect, it ignores the basic right of responsible adults to choose what they ingest.

From the Right Nick Murray The ability of adults to purchase marijuana in a legal, regulated establishment means that street corner drug dealers who target children will no longer have the revenues to stand on. Vendors of illegal drugs make most of their profits from cannabis, aided by extremely low growing costs and sky-high prohibition prices. By legalizing the plant, prices will come down. Yes, that inevitably means an increase in supply but the chain of production is shifted from a sphere that includes cartels, gangs and high-school-aged sellers to businesses and licensed growers. The market will exclude minors because legal drug sellers (including the state of New Hampshire) require consumers to show ID. Though not a fail-safe for keeping legal drugs away from children, regulated markets provide a legal barrier absent in today’s prohibited market. Luckily for the governor, he doesn’t have to be right on the issue. He doesn’t need to say anything at all to maintain the preferred status quo. When the time comes to sign the bill (if it ever gets to his desk), he’ll merely defect to the Police Chiefs Association for the final verdict on drug reform legislation as he did with the 2009 medical bill. It is unfortunate that the chief executive of New Hampshire’s state government is so greatly swayed by those in power poised to benefit most from perpetual prohibition. The police is

not a public interest group. Agents of the state and will continually support the policy that further empowers the state. A governor that defects to the interests of the police is no governor at all, he is a tyrant. And if he cites existing federal law in his veto message, we’ll know he’s a hack. State governments are instituted to protect the rights of its citizens, especially against federal abuses. Harking back to our nation’s founding, the right of nullification of state laws has been a fundamental principle to which the concept of federalism was adhered. The right of states to challenge federal law must be asserted from time to time, lest we lose our sovereignty over matters best left to individuals and localities. In 2009, 71 percent of New Hampshire residents support legalized medical cannabis use. Our governor and state legislators should be willing to challenge the federal government on its outdated and failed drug policies for the benefits of its citizens. The fact is, there are many Granite Staters that use cannabis for their various ailments and find relief in it. Who is John Lynch or any state official to say what is medicine? Is that not to be determined by a patient and his or her doctor? On March 1, I plan to venture to Concord for the first hearing on HB 442 to defend the rights of medical cannabis patients in New Hampshire, no matter what political conventional wisdom ascribes. I hope you’ll join me. „„„ Nick Murray is a junior political science major. Last fall he founded the UNH chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (UNH NORML). He is an active member of Young Americans for Liberty.

Friday, February 18, 2011

17

OP-ED The Oddsmaker 74%

chance the vending machines on the first floor of the MUB break down by the end of the weekend.

89%

chance Blake Griffin wins the Slam Dunk Contest on Saturday.

18%

chance that people actually care about Nascar.

15%

chance that “I’m On a Boat” is still an underrated song.

6% 78% 0% 7%

chance that “Granite State of Mind 2” will be just as successful as the first one. chance the men’s hockey team rebounds this weekend against Vermont after a rough showing last weekend.

chance Esperanza Spaulding ever makes as much money as Justin Bieber.

chance girls start tanning this weekend for the summer.

The oddsmaker is the collected opinion of The New Hampshire staff. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of UNH students, faculty and staff. You can send your own submissions for The oddsmaker to tnh.editor@unh.edu. All submissions will be kept anonymous, but please no personal attacks.

TNHonline.com comments of the week “I just feel badly for Mr. Paul. The level of drama that is going on at the grad level in WSBE is eventually going to make it to the press. When that happens, he is going to realize that he was scammed out of way more than just the $25 million. “ WSBE Alum

“ If the video shows a student cheated during the The issue is not if we What about a right to test, then he/she will know need a new WSBE buildprivacy? Or even just being or not. Some will argue ing able to take an exam the consequences of doing something he/she already that there are many other without having to worry buildings that need basic about big brother watch- knows should not be doing, but that the professor maintenance if they are re- ing you? Some students or the TA was unable to quired to pay for anything are under enough presadditional in their tuition sure having to take a diffi- catch. If the video doesn’t ... There was a serious lack cult exam without having show any student cheatof communication and the feeling they are being ing, then all students know planning and it is now spied on.” the exam was fair.” coming to light.” Anonymous

Anonymous

These comments were left on “Tuition hike likely after school fails to raise enough money for business school” from the Feb. 15, 2011 issue.

Engineering Student

These comments were left on “Engineering profs may use cameras to counter cheating” from the Feb. 15, 2011 issue.


18

Friday, February 18, 2011

SPORTS

The New Hampshire

KALAF

HERMAN

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20

not the same atmosphere everywhere. “We go on the road to places that don’t have fan support,” Sislo said. “It definitely has an impact on the game.” Campanale feels that the fans are allowed to have expectations of the athletes. “We’re there to represent them,” he said. “We should perform a certain way.” The students’ views on the issue were interesting. Mike List, a senior majoring in psychology, is a big fan of UNH sports, especially hockey. He described it as a “giveand-take” relationship and said that his expectations vary by sport. List holds the hockey program to a high standard because of its winning history, but he also thinks football and basketball should be competitive as well. As for the behavioral aspect, List knows that these athletes he cheers for are all around the same age as him. “They’re in college, so they’re going to live the lifestyle,” List said, “[But] when you’re an athlete you’re held to a higher standard.” Sociology major Olivia Cristaldi is also a senior and a big fan of volleyball at UNH, but doesn’t seem to expect a lot from athletes. “I think, on the field, I expect good performance,” Cristaldi said. “Off the field, I expect them not to be jerks.” She added, however, that she hasn’t had a bad experience talking to an athlete in Durham so far. You’ve now read what athletes have to say and what fans have to say. How do I feel about this, you ask? Of course, it wouldn’t be a

except to stay positive.” Surgery sidelined Herman for nine game, and the Wildcats went 6–3 in that span with junior Lindsey Minton in goal. Herman said it was great to see Minton and the Wildcats having success while she was injured. “Lindsey kind of pushed me to get back faster,” Herman said. “We have a competitive but healthy relationship. We’re there for each other on and off the ice.” After recovering from surgery, Herman’s return in November was short-lived, playing in only two games before she sustained a severe ankle injury, an injury that caused her to miss eight of the Wildcats’ next 10 games. “We were hoping to have her back longer. That ankle injury was bad, especially for a goalie,” UNH head coach Brian McCloskey said. While Herman was disappointed, she said she tried to remain positive and connected with the team. “It was frustrating for me,” she said. “I helped out when I could. I tried to get treatment for my ankle everyday and try to get back faster.” 20 games into her senior season, Herman had only appeared in 5 games. It was a start to the season that Herman did not expected at all. “You don’t think that you’re not going to be able to play because of injuries,” Herman said. “I try to do my best when I can play.” When Herman did return to the ice on Jan. 22, she put on a performance that showed her true form

TYLER MCDERMOTT/STAFF

Wildcat faithful break out the ThunderStix as they cheer at a recent men’s hockey game against the University of Maine. good opinionated sports column unless I was able to push my views on you. Here’s my thought process: we pay a student athletic fee every year while enrolled at UNH, and that money goes towards the budget of the athletic department for whatever they decide to do with. I’m guessing that part of the money goes towards equipment and maintenance for the sports teams, which is great. This means I’m investing some of my (or my parents’) money into UNH athletics, so I deserve to hold some kind of expectations for them. There is a limit to how much you can expect from them, however. My only two requests for the student-athletes of Durham are these: working hard to make their team better and not messing around. I’m grateful that there aren’t many stories each year about UNH athletes getting arrested or

into trouble. The athletes who represent UNH have great character and don’t make stupid decisions. Let me take this moment to say that I know I sound very righteous, but that’s not my objective at all. I’m just trying to analyze the kind of athletes who come to UNH and how they act. They’re all human, but they do a good job of determining what’s right and what’s wrong. There aren’t a lot of things you can ask from an athlete before it gets too demanding, and the reason for this is that while they are athletes, they are still also students. Their free time is severely decreased because of their responsibilities to academics and sport, but I feel like that’s basic knowledge. All I care about is that as long as the teams at UNH do well and don’t show up in the police log, I’m content and can feel completely fine rooting for them.

that she had displayed the previous three years at UNH. She posted a career-high 40 saves in a 4-3 overtime win over Northeastern. “It was my first game back, all I really cared about getting the win, 40 saves didn’t really matter,” Herman said. A week later, against No. 3 Boston University, Herman recorded 52 saves, setting a school record for saves in a huge 4-2 upset win. “They took a lot of shots and I just had to make sure I did the little things right and not give up rebounds,” she said. In total, Herman has started 12 games this season, holding a record of 6-5-1 with one shutout. She has gotten more ice time since her return, starting the Wildcats’ last six games with a record of 3-2-1, including a shutout over Vermont. “She looks comfortable out there,” McCloskey said of Herman’s recent play. “She’s really playing some of her best hockey lately, it’s just what we needed.” Heading into the final weekend of the season with a home-andhome series against Boston College, the Wildcats currently hold the sixth and final playoff spot for the Hockey East tournament and will likely need at least one win this weekend to secure a spot. Herman knows it will be an important weekend for the team. She has never missed the NCAA tournament during her previous three seasons, and does not want that streak to end now. “The playoff spot isn’t guaranteed,” she said. “We really have to work hard as a team and focus on BC.”

2011 UNH Football Recruiting Class The UNH football program has received national letters of intent from these 16 incoming freshmen since National Signing Day on Feb. 2. Name

Pos.

Ht.

Wt.

Hometown/High School

Jared Allison

WR/DB

5-8

165

Cliffwood, N.J./Matawan Regional

Akil Anderson

FS/WR

6-1

190

Morristown, N.J./Morristown

Rashid Armand

DL/OL

6-0

300

Brooklyn, N.Y./Sheepshead Bay

Kalil Bailey

DB/WR

5-10

160

Lancaster, Pa./Manheim Township

Nick Cefalo

DB/WR

6-2

185

Basking Ridge, N.J./Ridge

Mike DeTroia

WR/FS

6-3

193

Barnegat, N.J./Barnegat

Seth Geyer

LB/RB

6-1

220

Valencia, Pa./Mars Area

Sean Goldrich

QB/FS

6-3

195

West Haven, Conn./Notre Dame

Austin Heter

OL/DL

6-4

250

McKees Rocks, Pa./Montour

Zach Hundertmark

OL/DL

6-2

280

West Windsor, N.J./Hun School

Mike Kelly

DB/WR

5-9

175

Merrimack, N.H./Bishop Guertin

6-2

250

Whitehall, Pa./Allentown Cent. Cath.

Shane McNeely

TE/DE

Douglas Moss

DB/WR

5-10

165

Columbia, Ala./ Columbia

Dan Riley

DE/TE

6-4

230

Danielsville, Pa./Northampton Area

Jullian Turner

DL/OL

6-0

300

East Pittsburgh, Pa./Woodland Hills

Ryan Welch

DL/OL

6-3

300

Dunstable, Mass./Lawrence Acad.


SPORTS

The New Hampshire

HOCKEY CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 Maine (7-2). Despite last weekend’s struggles, No. 8/9 UNH still sits tied for first in Hockey East at 15-4-2 (177-4 overall) with six games remaining. Only five points separate the top four teams, however, making every game down the stretch crucial for playoff seeding. “This is by far one of the weekends that we really need, both in the national rankings and [in] Hockey East,” sophomore Dalton Speelman said. “It’s a huge weekend for us.” The Wildcats lit the lamp early and often in their only meeting with UVM this season, with Paul Thompson recording a hat trick in a 5-1 win on Dec. 5. The Catamounts will not be overlooked, however, as

the memory of last year’s quarterfinal defeats is still fresh in the UNH players’ minds. After the Wildcats won the first game of the three-game series, the Catamounts rallied to win twostraight 1-0 decisions, the final one coming in overtime, to take the series and shock the top-seeded ‘Cats on their home ice. Goalie Rob Madore carried Vermont in that series, and has continued to backbone the Catamounts this season, playing in all 28 games. “We know what Madore can do, we know what we did to him last year,” Umile said. “We beat him pretty good the first game then he just stoned us for two nights.” Madore will likely face a barrage of shots from the powerful UNH offense, which sent more than 80 shots Joe Cannata’s way last Sat-

urday night. Less than half of those shots were on net, however, with many being blocked by defensemen or soaring wide of the net. “We were trying to pick corners instead of getting [shots] on the goalie’s pads,” Umile said. “If you get them on his pads it’s hard for him to handle, we practice that. Too many of them went over the net.” While the seeding for the Hockey East tournament is still very much undecided, UNH can clinch a top-four seed with a win this weekend, which would guarantee homeice advantage in the first round of the tournament. “We know what we need to do, we need to come in and take the four points on the weekend,” Speelman said. “Don’t worry about the other team, just play how we can play.” Game time is 7:30 p.m. on Friday and 7 p.m. on Saturday.

Friday, February 18, 2011

Hockey East Standings 1. Boston College UNH 3. Merrimack 4. Boston U. 5. Maine 6. Northeastern 7. UMass-Amherst 8. Vermont 9. Providence 10. UMass-Lowell

Conference Points Overall 32 22-6-0 16-5-0 15-4-2 32 17-7-4 13-5-3 29 19-5-4 11-5-5 27 14-9-7 9-8-4 22 12-10-6 8-8-5 21 10-12-6 5-11-5 15 6-16-5 14 7-16-5 5-12-4 12 7-14-7 3-12-6 3-18-0 6 4-22-4

This week’s results: Beanpot Tournament Monday BC 7 vs Northeastern 6 (OT- championship game) Harvard 5 vs BU 4 (consolation game )

PLAYOFFS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 20 have a one-point lead over seventhplace Maine and a two-point lead over last-place Vermont. Since both of UNH’s games this weekend are against the Hockey East-rival Eagles, there is no margin for error if the Wildcats want a spot in the tournament. BC, on the other hand, doesn’t have much at stake this weekend other than bragging rights. The Eagles are in second place in Hockey East with a 12-4-3 conference record and a 19-6-5 overall standing. UNH head coach Brian McCloskey doesn’t want the team to take a mindset of sitting back and seeing how the other games play out, however. The main goal is ensuring the Wildcats a spot in the tournament. “The team knows we have to win both games,” McCloskey said. “The players feel we need to win this weekend.” He also added that lately, his team has “been playing really good hockey.” UNH and BC have only met once previously this season, in Dur-

TYLER MCDERMOTT/STAFF

Sophomore Brittany Skudder (22) and the women’s hockey team will be chasing a spot in the Hockey East tournament when they face off against Boston College in a two-game series this weekend. ham on Nov. 28, 2010. The Eagles ended up winning 3-1, outshooting the Wildcats 40-13 for the game. UNH needs to improve offensively for the results to change this time. While Lindsey Minton started

that game, McCloskey confirmed that Kayley Herman will at least start Saturday’s game. Last Saturday at Vermont, Herman recorded a 27-save shutout as the Wildcats won 2-0.

19

While there are things to take away from the first meeting of these two teams, McCloskey knows that UNH normally does well against the Eagles. “I think we have always played

BC pretty tough,” he said. The team usually known for playing its best in the Whittemore Center looked very mortal at home this season. The Wildcats had only lost five regular-season home games over the three previous seasons, but they have a 7-8 home record this season. It is important to remember, however, that the past rosters looked very different than they do today. Strong offensive players such as Kelly Paton and Micaela Long have graduated, and the scoring is more spread out this season amongst a number of players instead of just a few. To say UNH’s season has seen some highs and lows would be an understatement. After stringing together seven wins in a row early in the season, the Wildcats immediately hit a slump, losing eight games in a row right after that from Nov. 7 to Dec. 9. McCloskey doesn’t want to pay attention to the streaks, and he’s not keeping it in the back of his mind. “Streaks don’t matter unless you’re in them,” he said. “The end of the day, the record is what it is.” Puck drops at 2 p.m. for both games.

TRACK & FIELD

Wildcats set to compete in AE Indoor Championships STAFF REPORT THE NEW HAMPSHIRE

The University of New Hampshire men’s and women’s indoor track & field teams will compete in the America East Indoor Track & Field Championship this Friday and Saturday, Feb. 18-19, at Boston University’s Track & Tennis Center. The women’s squad finished third at the 2010 America East Championship, and was picked fourth in the preseason poll. The Wildcats can expect solid finishes from seniors Rita Ciambra and Camille Quarles. Ciambra, who boasts the top mark in the conference this season in the pole vault at 13 feet, 1.75 inches, won the event at both the 2008 and 2009 America East championships. Quarles is currently the No. 2 qualifier in the triple jump

with a mark of 39-11.25, a leap that set a new school record Feb. 11 at the Track & Tennis Center. The men’s team was selected fifth in the preseason coaches’ poll after a fourth-place showing at the conference championship in 2010. The Wildcats will look for points from sophomore high jumpers Matthew Guarente and Jason Guarente. Matthew set the conference’s top mark of the season when he cleared a height of 6-8.25. Meanwhile, Jason ranks fifth with a season-best leap of 6-6. In the throws, senior Paul DeTurk ranks second in the conference in the weight throw, while sophomore Cameron Lyle checks in at No. 3 in both the weight throw and shot put. For more information, visit the championship central page at AmericaEast.com.

TYLER MCDERMOTT/STAFF

The UNH track & field teams hosted a non-scoring tri-meet with Vermont and Maine last weekend, and will travel to Boston University for the America East Indoor Track & Field Championship this weekend.


Detroit first baseman Miguel Cabrera was all smiles after being arrested for DUI early Thursday morning.

sports

Friday

February 18, 2011

The New Hampshire

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Wildcats struggle to find basket, drop second straight STAFF REPORT Junior forward Denise Beliveau registered eight points and seven rebounds, but the University of New Hampshire women’s basketball team fell to the University of Vermont, 58-47,

Thursday evening at Patrick Gymnasium. The loss drops the Wildcats to 8-18 overall and 5-9 in America East play, while the Catamounts improve to 5-22 and 5-9 in conference action. Beliveau was named the America East Player of the Game for UNH, rounding out the contest

FROM THE BULLPEN

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

What do we expect from our athletes?

After slump, ‘Cats on brink of tourney

After injuries, senior Herman has returned to form

THE NEW HAMPSHIRE

Vermont 58 UNH 47

By SAMER KALAF STAFF WRITER

W

hen you go to the Whittemore Center and root for your UNH Wildcats, what do you want from them? Do you want a couple goals and assists? Do you want a win? Or do you want something more than that? Also, what about the other way around? Do athletes expect certain things from fans? Are the sides supposed to meet some kind of expectations? After talking to Mike Sislo, captain of the men’s hockey team, I was able to get answers to some of these questions, but they weren’t the answers I expected. Sislo said that he doesn’t have any expectations for Wildcat fans, but that’s because they’ve always been so supportive of the teams. He knows, however, that the sentiment is not the same for the fans about the players. “The fans have expectations of us, and they should,” Sislo said. Matt Campanale, UNH’s senior alternate captain, thinks the fans have some kind of responsibilities, but they’re always good at fulfilling them. “I expect the fans to be pretty involved in the games,” Campanale said. He mentioned how it gives the team an “extra jump,” and used the example of the UNH-Maine games on Feb. 4-5, describing them as “wild.” Sislo knows how fortunate he is to play at a college with high attendance at the hockey games. It’s KALAF continued on page 18

with two steals and a block. She has earned player of the game honors in four straight games, including five of the last six contests. Lauren Buschmann took home player of the game honors for UVM, tallying a game-high 23 points and 11 rebounds. She finished the contest 7-for-15 from the floor and 9-for-12 from the charity stripe.

Cari Reed added a team-best nine points and two blocks. Kelley Flynn chipped in with eight points, while Jill McDonald compiled six points and six boards in the loss. UNH is now tied for sixth in the conference with the Catamounts (both at 5-9 in conference), with each team beating the other once on the season.

UNH heads into final weekend with playoff berth on the line

By HA HOANG CONTRIBUTING WRITER

By SAMER KALAF STAFF WRITER

Although the UNH women’s hockey team’s record has seemed like an anomaly compared to past seasons, the Wildcats are still in the hunt for a spot in the Hockey East Tournament. As they sit with a 14-15-1 record right now, UNH will be able to decide their own fate as they play a home-and-home weekend series this Saturday and Sunday against Boston College with Sunday’s game at the Whittemore Center being the Wildcats’ regular-season game. Right now, the Wildcats sit in sixth place in the Hockey East standings with a 7-12 record. They PLAYOFFS continued on page 19

UNH won the previous matchup, 63-57, in overtime in Durham on Jan. 17. The Wildcats return to action for their final home contest of the season against the University of Maine Wednesday, Feb. 23 at Lundholm Gymnasium. Game time is 7:00 p.m.

COURTESY PHOTO/SCOTT SLINGSBY

Senior goalie Kayley Herman and the UNH women’s hockey team have rebounded from losing ten of eleven games earlier this season, and now can clinch a tournament berth this weekend against BC.

Ask any student athlete, and they’ll tell you that injuries during a season are part of playing a sport. For senior goalie Kayley Herman, being injured has been a big frustration for her. Coming into her senior season, Herman had compiled a 51-13-9 record with 14 shutouts to got along with a .918 save percentage, all of which are ranked high on UNH’s all-time women’s hockey leaderboard, along with numerous other accolades. These were statistics that Herman had hoped to improve upon this season, until learning that she needed surgery four games in. “Having surgery was tough,” Herman said. “There wasn’t much I could do to speed up the recovery HERMAN continued on page 18

MEN’S HOCKEY

‘Cats look to rebound in “must-win” series Begin home stretch with two-game tilt vs. Catamounts in Burlington By ZACK COX SPORTS EDITOR

After riding high following a weekend sweep of Maine in one of their best weekends of the year, the Wildcats of the UNH men’s hockey team were dropped brutally back to earth with their worst weekend performance of the year, losing two straight games for the first time all season against a powerful Merrimack squad. “What you don’t want to have

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL (8-18, 5-9)

SCORE 58 47 CARD VERMONT

UNH

Thursday, Burlington, Vt.

happen, happened last weekend,” UNH head coach Dick Umile said. “You don’t want to lose two.” The Wildcats now hope to right their ship this weekend when they take on the University of Vermont in a two-game series at Gutterson Fieldhouse. The Catamounts come in ranked eight in Hockey East with a 5-12-4 conference record (7-16-5 overall) but have been impressive in the last four games, including blowout wins over Providence (7-1) and HOCKEY continued on page 19

IN THIS ISSUE -The track & field teams will compete in the AE championship meet this weekend. Page 19

TYLER MCDERMOTT/STAFF

Jeff Silengo and the Wildcats look to repeat their five-goal effort of Dec. 5 against Vermont goalie Rob Madore this weekend.

STAT DAY of the

14

The UNH men’s basketball team has allowed fewer than 70 points in 14 straight games this season, the longest active streak in the America East.


Issue 32