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Classic Boat

30YEARS

NOVEMBER 2017

1987-2017

T H E W O R L D’ S M O S T B E A U T I F U L B O A T S 350th/30 year logo.indd 6

Cruising schooner

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MODERN CLASSICS Boats for sail!

Workboat once owned by a king

TOM CUNLIFFE How to read a lines plan ADMIRAL’S CUP Yachts that won in ‘63

BUNKTIME READING Best books of 2017

Boyd’s 12-Metres

SAVING A HISTORIC DINGHY

International 14

NEWPORT GOES WILD

J-Class Worlds

www.classicboat.co.uk

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AMERICA’S CUP


Designed specifically for short-handed sailing

“Winner Transat Race” “Winner Newport-Bermuda Race” To discuss owning one of these beautiful yachts please contact: Info@ahreid.com • +44 7585 428989 • www.classicyachts.se Further information online @ Classicboat homepage


ROB PEAKE, EDITOR

THE FUTURE AND THE PAST This summer the Classic Boat team has been sailing in Cornwall, Palma, the Broads, Long Island, Copenhagen, Barcelona and a few other places in between. The boats have ranged from a Beetle Cat to a J-Class to a Falmouth Working Boat. To travel far and wide, and find such passion for our subject in each place, is cheering and only bodes well for the future of classic boating. But things are never straightforward. On page 64, we interview Mike Atfield, who has retired as the last traditional wooden boat builder in Salcombe, Devon. Other skilled Salcombe builders will do you proud if you want a wooden boat, but covering the cost of waterside premises in a popular holiday town, by building new boats in timber, is not easy. The Spirit of Tradition scene, as we show in this issue, is thriving. But let’s never forget that builders of new wooden boats, be they modern or traditional, need all the support we can give them. COVER PHOTO: NIC COMPTON

ISSUE No 352

classicboat.co.uk Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ EDITORIAL Editor Rob Peake +44 (0)207 349 3755 rob.peake@classicboat.co.uk Associate Editor Steffan Meyric Hughes +44 (0)207 349 3758 steffan@classicboat.co.uk Senior Art Editor Peter Smith +44 (0)207 349 3756 peter.smith@classicboat.co.uk Senior Sub Editor Henry Giles +44 (0)207 349 3708 henry.giles@classicboat.co.uk Publishing Consultant Martin Nott ADVERTISING James Davenport +44 (0)207 349 3736 james.davenport@chelseamagazines.com Hugo Segrave +44 (0)207 349 3794 hugo.segrave@chelseamagazines.com Advertisement Production Allpointsmedia +44 (0)1202 472781 allpointsmedia.co.uk Published Monthly ISSN: 0950 3315 USA US$12.50 Canada C$11.95 Australia A$11.95

COVER STORY

4 . CRUISING SCHOONER No6 Texel has come a long way since her days as a Dutch pilot schooner 12 . MONACO CLASSIC WEEK Vintage yachts and motorboats COVER STORY

14 . J-CLASS WORLDS The Js return to their spiritual home 16 . 8-METRE WORLDS Heavy weather action in Norway 22 . SOUTHAMPTON SHOW Small boats and more at the boat show COVER STORY

Managing Director Paul Dobson Deputy Managing Director Steve Ross Commercial Director Vicki Gavin Publisher Simon Temlett Digital Manager James Dobson

28 . ADMIRAL’S CUP 1963 Clarion of Wight and Outlaw today COVER STORY

Subscription and back issues

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Classic Boat is part of the Chelsea Marine Magazines family, along with our other monthly titles SAILING TODAY AWARDS Best boats, kit & cruising grounds revealed

CONTENTS 44

CRUISING

28

47

A D M I R A L ‘S C U P

SPIRIT OF TRADITION

47 . SPIRIT OF TRADITION New Spirit 52D and a snapshot of the full range of today’s modern classics COVER STORY

60 . HOW TO READ LINES PLANS Tom Cunliffe on this useful skill 64 . MIKE ATFIELD We meet the Salcombe boatbuilder

52

COVER STORY

66 . NAUTICAL BOOKS Our pick of 2017’s most salty reads COVER STORY

70 . DAVID BOYD’S 12-METRES Part 2 of our history of the designer COVER STORY

98 . INTERNATIONAL 14 Saving a historic dinghy

60 BEST BOOKS OF 2017

HOW TO READ PLANS

The performance sailing magazine

70

SCHOONER

66

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ANNIVERSARY 1947-2017

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FOREIGN CRUISING

Caribbean cruising

BOAT TESTS

LOOK BACK

Laura Dekker

Oceanis Yacht 62: Beneteau's new flagship Mojito: perfect pocket cruiser

A voyage of self-discovery SEAMANSHIP

Atlantic weather

HOME WATERS

Taking command

Plot your winter bluewater escape

Newbie skipper explores the West Country PAUL HEINEY

House training a novice crewmember

WINCHES

Get a handle on the latest models available

EVENT REVIEW

Fastnet flyers Highlights from the record breaking offshore race

Little and large

COVERV5.indd 1

IAIN PERCY LOOKS AHEAD TO 2017’S GLOBAL EVENT

INSIGHT

Tom Cunliffe

How to deal with unwelcome stowaways

Life goes on in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma Gull's Eye guide to Nanny Cay in the BVI

IN DEPTH

Is global warming causing extreme weather?

2018 GEAR

What's new for the upcoming season 19/09/2017 17:31

For adventurous cruising sailors

INTERVIEW

Dee Caffari Gearing up for the Volvo Ocean Race

TECHNIQUE

Startline tactics DESIGN UPDATE

SPECIAL REPORT

Foiling Nacra 17

Cowes Week

All the action from across the fleets PLUS Fast40+ and White Group winners

with Ben Saxton

ALEX THOMSON

ON TEST: S1 RACE

PERFECT FINISH

TICKET OFFER

Swapping Hugo Boss for a family cruise in the Caribbean

The new singlehanded high performance cat

Guide to paints, varnishes and modern alternatives

Save on Southampton Boat Show entry

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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She transported wartime spies, she was a royal yacht and now, owned by an Italian count, she cruises out of Italy and Menorca. Not bad for a one-time Dutch pilot schooner WORDS AND PICTURES NIC COMPTON

FLYING DUTCHMAN


NO6 TEXEL

T

he view from Thira, on the Greek island of Santorini, is one of the most photographed in the world. And no wonder. From 980ft up, you look out over the spectacular seven-mile-wide caldera, a ring of islands formed by a volcanic eruption 3,600 years ago, which is said to have provided the inspiration for the Atlantis story. The sea here is up to 600ft deep and its rich blue contrasts spectacularly with the whitewashed houses tumbling down the hillside above. So timeless is the scene, it’s not hard to imagine the Minoan ships depicted in the island’s ancient frescoes paddling across the bay in a ceremonial procession. Yet, when I visited the island in July and looked south past the Akrotiri peninsula, I saw something quite different. There, silhouetted against the horizon, was a gaff schooner, with dramatically raked masts and a distinctive clipper bow – the kind of vessel you might expect to see sailing off the east coast of America. As the ship sailed across the caldera past Thira, past the mock pirate ships and liners crammed with tourists, she looked as if she came from a different species, like a sea petrel gliding through a flock of pigeons. Even the tourists seemed to notice the difference, and soon dozens of mobile phones were pointing in her direction, though few of their operators would have known they were looking at a historic Dutch pilot schooner which was used to carry spies during World War II, was once owned by King Farouk I of Egypt, and is now owned by an Italian count descended from three Venetian doges. All of that would have passed them by, as they smiled for pictures of themselves with a pretty black-and-white boat in the background. For No6 Texel does have a unique and interesting history. Built at the Piet Smit shipyard in Rotterdam in 1917-21, she was designed to stay out in all weathers and guide ships around Holland’s tricky North Sea coast. Some 37 loodsschoeners (literally, ‘pilot schooners’) were built between 1870 and 1920 and served the six coastal districts under the command of the Nederlandse Loodswezen, the Dutch pilot association. Originally built of wood and later steel, their design is said to have been inspired by Baltimore Clippers, and certainly their jaunty

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

Above, l-r: a clinker dinghy was built to hang off stern davits; brass binnacle dates from the 1930s; rudder angle indicator atop the steering box Facing page: Texel sails across the Santorini caldera, seen from Thira

rig and salty lines bear an obvious resemblance to their American cousins. At 92ft (28m) long, No6 was one of the larger pilot schooners built, and for the first few years of her life was posted along a 50-mile stretch of coast between the port of Ijmuiden and the island of Texel, just north of Amsterdam. It was a tough existence for the crews of these ships, who had to stay at sea for days on end, enduring a combination of deep monotony mixed with extreme danger when the weather got bad. The pilotage rules stipulated that pilot ships had to stay at sea until a Force 8, by which time it was usually too dangerous to head back into harbour and all they could do was to head out to sea and wait for the gale to blow itself out. Life became a little easier in the mid-1920s when five pilot boats, including No6 Texel, were turned into motorschoeners with the addition of engines. Fitted with a two-cylinder Kromhout engine, in 1925 Texel was posted further south in the Vlissingen & De Schelde district, where she guided ships into the Hook of Holland under the name M4 or No4. So far, so workmanlike, and the names reflect the ship’s functional role, despite her undoubtedly romantic appearance. All that was to change in 1933, when Texel was bought by American cotton millionaire George McFadden for 27,000 Guilders (about £200,000 in today’s money). McFadden was still a young man, fresh out of college, when he inherited the family fortune in 1931 and immediately opted out of the cotton business to pursue his passion for archaeology. He worked at several sites in Greece and Cyprus throughout the 1930s and 40s, funding fieldwork out of his own pocket and eventually donating a grand house in Cyprus to the local community. In 1934, he used some of his inheritance to buy Texel and had her fitted out as a luxury yacht at the Damen Schelde naval yard in Vlissingen, using 16th century wooden panelling recovered from a local crypt. In a clear break with her working boat past, the schooner was painted white and renamed Samothrace, after a small island in the Aegean where the Sanctuary of the Great Gods was built in ancient times. Even then, the schooner made a stunning sight sailing among the Greek islands, as one eyewitness report from 1939 suggests: “As if conjured up by Thucydides’ story,


NO6 TEXEL there came into harbour and anchored close by the loveliest yacht that any one ever saw. She was an iron schooner close on 100 feet long, with strongly raked masts and two square-sail yards on the fore… “We were shown over the ship, not without pride. She had been fitted out in the most expensive and elegant manner; her saloon, for example, had been finished in 16th-century Dutch oak panelling, with linenfold shutters over the port-lights…” (Source: The First Mate’s Log by RG Collingwood.) It was during McFadden’s ownership that Texel enjoyed a brief career in the secret service. After the Italian invasion of Cyprus in 1941, McFadden joined the US navy and was based for a while in Cairo working with the Marine Section of the Office of Strategic Studies (the precursor to the CIA). The OSS chartered Texel to carry supplies and personnel from Alexandria to Cyprus, although they soon realised that this fancy yacht was far too noticeable for such a covert operation and switched to less obtrusive boats, such as the local caiques. McFadden himself seems to have come in for some flack, as he carried on entertaining guests aboard Texel, apparently unaware there was a war raging, earning himself the nickname ‘Daffy’. McFadden eventually drowned off Cyprus when a dinghy he was sailing capsized while, so the story goes, he was ‘under the influence’. His body was never found. By then, Texel had already embarked on the next phase of her transformation from North Sea workboat to Mediterranean luxury yacht. In 1947, she was bought by King Farouk I of Egypt, the so-called ‘playboy king’, who renamed her Feid el Bihar (Lord of the Seas). In keeping with her new status as a royal yacht, she was fitted with elaborately carved panels, gold-plated bath taps and four ‘harem bunks’ in the main cabin. In this guise, she was to be found in many of the fashionable resorts on the west coast of Italy, such as Porto Santo Stefano, Portoferraio and Capri, even featuring in Italian films of the period. Farouk’s decadent lifestyle eventually caught up with him, however, and he was deposed in 1952. The disgraced ex-king was taken to Italy, where he had been granted asylum, on board the royal yacht El Mahroussa, a 430ft (131m) motoryacht built in 1863. According to a contemporary news report, on arrival in Capri, Farouk

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

Below, left to right: lowering the mainsail; attention to detail on the new winches; period details; the original windlass; at anchor in the Aegean Sea; an ingenious tensioning system for the foresail clew. Facing page: the yard for the new square sail (not hoisted here) can be seen; it has helped take the boat transatlantic in recent years

transferred 40 cases of liquor, the gold ship’s bell of the El Mahroussa and some personal belongings to Texel – along with his second wife and their infant son – before sending the much larger yacht back to Alexandria. His first home after being deposed, then, was the former pilot schooner-turned-archaeological-hostelturned-luxury-yacht. In truth, Texel was probably rather small for an ex-king and his retinue, and Farouk soon passed her on to his captain, who renamed her Maria II. He in turn sold her to an Italian naval officer from Genoa, who owned her for only two years before selling her to the Agusta family (under the guise of their company Naval Ricuperi Srl) in 1955. They fitted a new pair of Deutz engines, to replace the six-cylinder MAN engines fitted by McFadden in 1938, and gave the yacht her sixth name: Rosetta I. The Agusta family kept her for 28 years, based in Genoa, before passing her on to a Norwegian owner in 1983, who in turn renamed her Sonia Maria. And so it was that one day in 2001, Andrea Doná dalle Rose – an Italian count who can trace his family lineage back to three Venetian doges – happened to notice this unusual yacht moored up in the harbour at Porto Santo Stefano. “It was all painted white, like Moby Dick!” he remembers. “Somebody told me it was for sale, but the owner didn’t allow anyone on board. So I started chatting to him. The first day I said: ‘You have a nice boat,’ and he said: ‘Thank you.’ The second day, the same. Then the third day, he said: ‘Would you like to come on board?’, and I said: ‘Thank you.’ He said: ‘Are you interested in the boat?’ and I said: ‘Yes.’” After several months of courtship, Andrea eventually persuaded the Norwegian to part with what had become little more than a floating holiday home. One of Andrea’s first decisions was to return the schooner back to her original name – which according to the 1934-35 Lloyd’s Register was simply No4 (the name given to her in 1925). And so for the first few years of Andrea’s ownership, Texel was known as No4. It wasn’t until further research revealed her previous name that she reverted to No6 – or No6 Texel, as written on her original mainsail. It soon became apparent that the boat hadn’t been


No6 TEXEL LOA

92ft 0in (28.3m) LWL

78ft 8in (24m) BEAM

20ft 8in (6.3m) SAIL AREA

2,850sq ft (265m2)


NO6 TEXEL

sailed for many years (“some people like their coffee in the sun more than a fresh breeze…” as a previous skipper put it). After a couple of disastrous cruises, the vessel was taken to yards in Italy and then Palma de Mallorca, before Andrea decided to embark on a full restoration at the Atollvic Shipyard near Vigo, in northwest Spain. A perfectionist by nature, Andrea tends to become closely involved with any project he’s working on, and so it was with Texel. As the yacht was gutted and every inch of the hull checked and rechecked, her owner flew in once a month from Rome to Santiago de Compostela to check progress on his beloved yacht. “Every month the plane was full of pilgrims,” he says. “They asked me: ‘Are you here for the mystic experience?’ And I answered: ‘In a certain sense…’” In the end, most of the underwater hull was replaced (using welded panels rather than the original riveted method) while above the waterline it was stripped off and faired. The interior was reconfigured by Dutch yacht designer Gerard Dijkstra, and most of the lavish furniture created by McFadden in the 1930s and Farouk in the 1950s was taken out and replaced with an airy, yet still traditional-looking, accommodation. The deckhouse, which had been extended to include two guest cabins, was shortened to just aft of the main mast, and various modern conveniences – davits for two tenders, air conditioning, watermaker – were fitted. The bermudan rig, probably acquired sometime in the 1960s,

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

Above, l-r: Andrea Doná dalle Rose and partner Simona Gambini in the comfortable new saloon; Texel has all the navigation toys you would expect on a 21st-century yacht Below: Accommodation and deck plan of a 1920s Dutch pilot schooner. Note tenders in the same location as Texel’s modern tenders

was dumped and replaced with an exact copy of her original gaff rig, courtesy of Marijke de Jong at Cadhead. And, for the first time in more than 70 years, her hull was painted black and the No6 stitched onto her mainsail, in a positive reaffirmation of her workboat heritage. “In the end, we changed everything,” says Andrea. “It’s like an old palace; you can’t just have one toilet, and you must have two dinghies, so you have to compromise. It’s completely different now from when Farouk had her.” It’s certainly a dramatic change to the yacht depicted in photos taken just 13 years ago, and the purist in me was initially affronted that so much of the old interior had been removed. But the more I read about King Farouk, the more I understood the impulse to get rid of his imprint on the boat and make a fresh start. Also there’s no denying the current interior is supremely comfortable and easy on the eye. When a yacht has a past as rich and varied as Texel, you have to decide which bits of history to include and which to leave out. There’s no doubt in my mind that the old Dutch pilots would be much more at ease in Andrea’s boat than the one either McFadden or Farouk created. It is not just for appearance’s sake. Since her restoration in 2007-8, Texel has crossed the Atlantic four times, when she put her new square sail to good use – a sure sign of a serious ocean voyager. Meanwhile, Andrea and partner Simona have sailed extensively around the Mediterranean and the Caribbean, with their 80 per cent Galician crew. For Andrea, the yacht is a distraction from his work, running a textiles and fashion business whose brands include Hugo Boss and (until recently) Valentino. “It’s a never-ending story,” he says. “Every year there’s something more. When I’m cruising, I enjoy the cruise but I’m always thinking about what else needs to be done. But it doesn’t matter; it’s nice for me.” It could have been a disaster, this Dutch pilot/ American tycoon/Arab king/Venetian count mash-up, but what is really remarkable about Texel is how authentic she feels – regardless of her amazing, mixedup history. It’s a testament to Andrea’s vision that he has overcome the burden of the yacht’s past to create something that feels both genuine – something those old Dutch pilots would recognise – and yet somehow timeless. And that is something to be proud of.


JS1 Svea Hoek Design congratulates the owners and crew of JH1 Lionheart for winning all major J Class regattas and trophies this year: the America’s Cup J Class event in Bermuda; the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta overall trophy; the inaugural J Class World Championships and the Kohler Cup for best overall performing J in 2017. Both J8 Topaz and JS1 Svea have also been winning races this year, so a big thank you to all owners and crews from the Hoek Design team!

J8 Topaz

JH1 Lionheart

For more information please visit www.hoekdesign.com or contact: +31 (0)299 372 853 - info@hoekdesign.com


Logbook Out and about

Monaco marvels PHOTOGRAPHS BY STUDIO BORLENGHI The 13th ‘Monaco Classic Week – La Belle Classe’ took place in September with 150 yachts, dinghies and motorboats enjoying events on the water and ashore, courtesy of the Yacht Club de Monaco. As a special tribute to Carlo Riva, who died in April, Riva motorboats and members of Carlo’s family gathered on the water in front of a tarpaulin on which was written ‘Grazie Carlo’. Turquoise balloons, a colour forever associated with the brand, were released. Among other highlights were 90th anniversary celebrations for Creole, Xarifa and Trinakria, which made a stunning entrance into Port Hercule on the Saturday to thunderous cheers all round the quay. The overall winner was gaff cutter Viola of 1908. The Blue Peter and Elena of London also won concours prizes. It wasn’t all about the big boats. John Fildes of Albatross Marine in the UK won the motorboat prize for his aluminium A-Series Albatross speedboat, powered by a Coventry Climax engine.

1

1 The 15-Metre Mariska dominated

racing 2 The crew of Tuiga

3 Tribute was paid to Carlo Riva, who died earlier this year

4 Monaco YC has a healthy fleet of International 12s 5 Start line action for the big boats

2

3


Motorboat concours winner John Fildes, and wife Charlotte, of Albatross Marine in the UK

4

5

13


J-Class Worlds PHOTOGRAPH Onne van der Wal Thousands stood along Newport harbour shores and watched on spectator boats as the J-Class returned to its spiritual home in August, for the first ever J-Class Worlds. The Js raced for the America’s Cup from Newport in the 1930s and history repeated itself in 2017 as the modern-day Js Lionheart and Hanuman battled for the top spot. Eighty years previously, the same two designs had gone head to head in the last America’s Cup raced in Js. Lionheart is a modern-day equivalent of one of the designs drawn for the all-conquering Ranger, which won at Newport in 1937, while Hanuman is a modern-day equivalent of Endeavour II. Lionheart, originally designed by Starling Burgess and Olin Stephens, was optimised by Hoek Design and launched in 2011. Those watching in Newport were treated to a spectacle as good as any in the J-Class’ extraordinary history, with six yachts – Hanuman, Lionheart, Ranger, Svea, Topaz, and Velsheda – competing over five days of racing for the world title and the season-long points trophy, the Kohler Cup. As ever in the J fleet, thanks to its effective modern handicapping system, competition was tight, with frequent lead changes throughout on Narragansett Bay. Lionheart, with her owner helming, won the title by three points ahead of Hanuman, but the final leaderboard showed seven points between first and third place and only a 13-point difference from top to bottom. Ranger, the 2003 replica of the Burgess/ Stephens original, was third overall. The win topped a great summer for Hoek, after Lionheart won the overall prize in the America’s Cup Superyacht Regatta and the special America’s Cup J-Class Regatta, held in Bermuda as part of the America’s Cup celebrations in June. The wins meant Lionheart also won the Kohler Trophy for the J-Class season.


1

1 From left, Carron II, Luna

2

3

4

5

and Wanda

2 Sira, dismasted 3 Luna and, below her, Wanda 4 Anne Sophie (Bjarne Aas 1938) 5 Close racing in challenging conditions at the mouth of the Oslo Fjord

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


8-Metre Worlds in Norway

Wild ride TEXT RON VALENT PHOTOGRAPHS JAMES ROBINSON TAYLOR The International Rule may be 110 years old, but in the Baltic the Metre boat scene is booming, with newly restored and newly built yachts joining the fleet regularly. The 8-Metre Worlds on the island of Hankø in the Oslo Fjord, in August, was a glowing testimonial to the Baltic movement and the durability of the Rule. The event was buoyed by the presence of King Harald of Norway, who celebrated his 80th birthday by competing in his Johan Anker-designed Sira. Showing the International 8-Metre Association’s honorary life president no respect on the water were crews from England, Scotland, Canada, Australia, Austria, Finland, Germany, Holland, Sweden, Switzerland and a strong contingent from Norway. An 8-Metre World Championship offers four cups to fight for: the First Rule Cup for yachts designed before 1920 or fitted with a gaff rig; the Neptune Trophy for yachts designed before 1960, whose rig and deckware are still period correct (wooden spars, Dacron sails and no self-tailing winches); the Sira Cup for yachts designed before 1960, but with modern rigs, hardware and sails; and the International 8-Metre Cup, for which all Eights with a valid rating certificate are eligible. In theory, any boat could win this cup, but in reality modern (wing-keeled) boats are so much faster that they are unbeatable. This year the British-owned Miss U was the only real modern yacht in Hankø, so the outcome of the series was almost decided before racing began. But Avia Willment and her young crew on Miss U had to fight for it. They got a scare on day one, as they came up against experienced crews on Sira Class yachts Pandora, Wanda, Bangalore, If, Luna and Sira, which fought for every inch of the course. Miss U scored a third, a first and then a second place. In the end, as the Miss U crew got into the groove and as winds picked up, they delivered six first places in a row. In the Sira and Neptune classes, the winners emerged only in the final moments of the regatta. Racing was very close, with five or six yachts often crossing the finish line within seconds of each other. The Eights sail an ‘up and down’ – first a leg to windward, 6

8

then dead downwind and twice around, so the finish is under spinnaker. In Hankø it was a daily occurrence to see two boats surfing neck-and-neck to the finish, both about to cheer their success, when a third or even fourth boat would suddenly catch a wave and surge past them to victory. It made for an exciting week as the lead overall changed almost each race. The final day saw challenging conditions and 14 yachts opted to remain in port. So races 9 and 10 turned into real cliffhangers.

7

9

The suspense turned to drama when in the final race both Silja from Finland and King Harald’s Sira lost their masts, luckily both without any injuries to their crews. The Sira class winner was the Austrian Pandora. The First Rule Cup went to the photogenic, schooner-rigged Elfe II, owned by German Andi Lochbrunner. The Neptune Trophy went to Carron II from Switzerland. If there had been a prize for the boat that came the furthest to participate, it would have gone to Anker-designed Varg.

6 Presentation to the King of Norway on his 80th birthday 7 Avia Willment and the Miss U team with the Coppa d’Italia 8 Team Wanda, third overall 9 Queen Sonja of Norway handing the Neptune Trophy to Carron II

Australian owner Kraig Carlstrom transported the boat all the way from Tasmania after a major seven-year rebuild/restoration. Aside from Miss U, the British contingent was made up of Helen (Mylne, 1936), skippered by 30-year-old Lara Crisp, Athena (Tore Holm, 1939) and Saskia (Fife, 1930).

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

17


Tell Tales

Classic Boat’s address: Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London, SW3 3TQ cb@classicboat.co.uk Follow the Classic Boat team on Twitter and Facebook

OBITUARY

Meade Gougeon 1938-2017 Epoxy pioneer Meade A Gougeon died peacefully at home in Bay City, Michigan, in August, surrounded by his family. He is known today as one of the three founding fathers of the use of epoxy glue in the build and repair of wooden boats. The other two were Jan (deceased) and Joel. They formed the company known today as Gougeon Brothers Inc in 1969, starting to use the miracle adhesive on the DN-Class iceboats. By 1973, their small boat shop in Bay City, Michigan, was the biggest builder of iceboats in the USA. A year later in 1974, they sold the iceboat part of the business to focus on C/O GOUGEON BROTHERS INC

epoxy and the building of ‘soft-water’ boats. Perhaps the best-known of these was the 35ft (11m) trimaran Adagio. She was the first large, all-epoxy bonded and sealed boat in the world, built with no traditional fasteners in just six months with brother Jan. She is still sailing, and won the Bayview Mackinack Race earlier this year, testament to epoxy’s

Meade was a keen multihull sailor,

on Boat Construction remains a

longevity. These days, Gougeon

ice-boater and cyclist. He is survived

classic text, but more than anything,

Brothers Industries is best known for

by his wife of 46 years, Janet, 10

Meade and his two brothers will be

its WEST System and Pro-Set

children (7 by adoption) and 14

remembered for providing boatbuilders

epoxies.

grandchildren. The Gougeon Brothers

with the best product since varnish.

Thames sailing barges in the capital The bascules of the world-famous Tower Bridge in central London opened at noon on 16 September to let through a fleet of a dozen sailing barges, led by Gladys, a wooden barge built in 1901. James Hamilton was there to capture the magnificent sight, the second Thames Sailing Barge Parade, an event incorporated within the established 'Totally Thames' festival that takes place annually during the month of September. They travelled as far up as London Bridge, holding their position for half an hour to

JAMES HAMILTON

allow people to see them before sailing

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

back out through Tower Bridge and into the estuary and beyond. Due to financial pressures, it has now been decided that the Thames Festival will run biennially. The next event will be held in September 2019.


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UP TO

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Classic wins Cowes Week DAVID BOYD

COWES CLASSICS 170 small boats go racing

His unknown influence on Fife MODERN CLASSIC

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RIVER COLNE, ESSEX

Maria and Edme clear up in the workboats The Colne Smack and Barge Race on 2 September started late (because of tides) and with no wind. But soon the wind picked up and the fleet sailed from Bateman’s Tower at Brightlingsea, out to Colne Bar, then Bench Head and back to the start. The smack race was won by CK 21 Maria, which also won the Bob Harman Memorial Trophy for coming first overall. First in the Barges was Edme which also came third overall (see story below) and was awarded the CSPS Barge Cup and the Golden Cockerel. James Hamilton JAMES HAMILTON

GREAT RIVER RACE

London's other marathon

Edme 1898

One of the capital's great annual spectacles took place on 8 September, when more than 330 craft took to the water to race from the Docklands, east of the city, upriver to Ham, in the far western, leafy suburbs. It's a rowing race for everyone from serious competitors to charity fundraisers in costume, and has a staggering array of boats, from the popular types like the St Ayles Skiffs, to coracles and gondolas. The race was first held in 1988 and used to run downriver from Ham to Docklands. It changed direction in 2009, a move that was so popular with competitors and spectators (over 20,000 at the finish alone) that it has been adopted as the regular format. These days, well over 300 boats carry around 2,400 competitors, racing the 21.6-mile course for 35 trophies. East Sussex boatbuilder Ryan Kearley and Essex boatbuilder Brian Kennell were among those on the water. Ryan, rowing the triple-sculled, 26ft (8m) traditional Thames skiff Gecko (built by Ben Fowler), said: "If you go too fast, you end up missing most of it!" belonged to the same syndicate for 25 years, based in St Osyth, and regularly wins races, most recently the Colne Smack and Barge Race (above). She’s never had an engine and is rigged as she was in 1898.

New BBC series on classic boats Edme (above) will feature in a new television series Britain Afloat, which is set to run every Saturday night on BBC2 at MERVYN MAGGS

8pm, until 4 November. The series "explores the regional distinctiveness of boat design and the floating way of life". As we went to press, it was due to start on 30 September. The other boats covered are the coracle, the narrow boat, the punt, the Mersey sailing boats and the rowing eight. CB writer Dick Durham is interviewed in the barge episode.

20

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

JAMES HAMILTON

The 1898 wooden Thames Sailing Barge Edme has


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MARIQUITA

Year: 1911 Designer: William Fife III Builder: W. Fife & Son, Fairlie Type: First International Rule 19 Metre Length: 38.10 metres Beam: 5.30 metres Sail area: 6,171 sq ft upwind Keel: 36 ton of lead

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TELL TALES

The Wooden Boatbuilders Trade Association stand

SOUTHAMPTON BOAT SHOW

Classic display Britain’s biggest boat show, which took place in September on the Southampton waterfront, was blessed with late-summer sun, and only a few showers. For lovers

The new Duchy 35 from Cockwells, designed by Andrew Wolstenholme, with the Duchy 21 picnic launch, based on an old Cornish harbour launch, alongside

of beauty and tradition, the main attraction was the Wooden Boatbuilders Trade Association (WBTA) stand, where annually boatbuilders of small hand-built craft congregate to show their wares – and it seemed this year that the stand, while more compact than in some previous years, was particularly busy with new boats. The WBTA stand is more than just a celebration of wood and craftsmanship though – it is a reminder of a different take on the whole business of sailing – a take that has a lot to do with relaxed, easy fun on the water. Among the seasoned builders at the show, a newcomer was Simon Hawksley, a former oil industry employee who followed a dream and enrolled at the Boat Building Academy in Dorset, producing a stunning Donzi speedboat. More on the boat in a future issue of CB. Meanwhile, in the marina were Rustler with its popular 37, Henley Sales and Charter with an electric river dayboat, Cornish Crabbers with boats from 19-26ft, Swallow Yachts with a BayRaider 20 and BayCruiser 23, Saffier with a handful of its similarly-sized and very sleek new Duchy 35 from Cockwells, a pocket-sized semidisplacement superyacht designed with Andrew Wolstenholme and finished to the highest standard. Lastly, Spirit Yachts gave a fascinating presentation on its forthcoming 111ft wooden sloop – more to come on this too.

Clockwise from top left: Orcadian boatbuilder Ian Richardson’s newest boat, looking great with a nearly all-paint finish; this open Thames launch, built in 1915, was restored by Michael Dennett, who marks 60 years of boatbuilding this year; a few sleek SoT weekend-sized yachts from Dutch builder Saffier were on show; Bembridge man Ben Coombes spent a decade in apprenticeship with his grandfather learning to build small boats, and is pictured with a Bembridge Scow (granddad built 200!), built of ash timbers, IoW oak, and planking of mahogany and Canadian spruce: £9,000 inc rig. Left: the appearance below decks on the Spirit 111 is space age, with swooping, converging curves

22

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEFFAN MEYRIC HUGHES

yachts and Tofinou with its popular 8. A highlight was the


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TELL TALES

Alberta skipper Robin Page

Aboard the winning smack Alberta Inset: Hallowe'en

Chasing CK476 Ethel Alice

MERSEA WEEK, ESSEX

Smack attacks in Essex Sydney sailor Martin van der Wal sailed in this year's Mersea Week at the

My Alice

end of August, aboard the engineless 36ft (11m) West Solent One Design Hallowe'en, sailed by Adrian Mulville, son of sailing author Frank Mulville. Adrian has spent three decades restoring the yacht since he found and

Thames barge Kitty

rescued her. Adrian and Martin were in the 'Fast Classic' division and had to contend with, at times, more tide than wind, crowded moorings, and the ever-present possibility of a 'smack attack' by the 11-strong smack fleet.

with a fistful of smacks stealing your air from behind. Despite being spanked in more races than not, we snatched second place from our closest rival Kismet, a 48ft (14.6m) Fife gaff cutter. First place had already been stitched up by the sharply sailed Holman-designed 32ft (9.8m) Stiletto. Skinny water, limpid skies, big tides, engineless boat, fluky air, mixed fleet, Mersea Week: classic!" Alberta won the smack class.

24

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

ALL PHOTOS EMILY HARRIS

Martin says: "This includes, but is not limited to, being at a mark with slow-turning smacks dwarfing you on every hand and running downwind


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Credit: Patrick Squire

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NATIONAL HISTORIC SHIPS UK

New course for ship conservators National Historic Ships UK has launched a new distancelearning course aimed at those involved in historic vessel

Q&A

NEWS

conservation – boatbuilders, shipwrights and museum staff. It’s an online-based, distance-learning course that can be completed in anything between six months and three years, and costs £3,100, payable in instalments (£2,850 with the 'early-bird discount'). Applications must be submitted by of applicants should be eligible for the discount. The qualification, for successful students, is a certificate in Historic Vessel Conservation, governed by National Historic Ships.

Apply at nationalhistoricships.org.uk.

COURTESY OF MARTHA COOLIDGE

31 November this year for a January 2018 start. The first wave

Yacht stylist Martha Coolidge You own the 6-M Jill. What do you

Tradition boat. I would have been

love about the 6s?

happy to show Olin the drawings, but

I’ve come to realise I don’t actually

he couldn’t have cared less. He never

like cruising. I much prefer racing. Big

drew the interior of Bolero or Dorade.

Release date for Donald Crowhurst film

boat sailing is just not for me! And

The yard craftsmen refined the rough

the 6-M is such an obvious only-

arrangement during the build. Today

meant-to-race boat, related to the 12s

it’s more about comfort afloat, so

The long-awaited release date for The Mercy, the new

and the 8s and just a little bit over-

people pay more attention.

film about Donald Crowhurst’s ill-fated campaign in

powered, and it’s also a boat on which

the 1968/9 Golden Globe Race, has been announced

Olin Stephens, who I knew, honed his

Will we one day see a Martha

as 9 February 2018. Colin Firth (The King's Speech),

skills. Mine is one of the few that he

Coolidge Design yacht?

seen here on the right, plays Donald, with Rachel

actually drew himself, pencil to paper.

I would love that! My education is in

Weisz (About a Boy) as his wife Clare.

I showed him the drawing and he

architecture and art history, not naval

said: “Oh yes, that was me!” This

architecture. Mind you, my son

summer I am campaigning an Atlantic,

designed a boat when he was 12, so

a glassfibre design by Starling

maybe I should look over his

Goddard's legacy lives on

Burgess. It’s not as powerful as the

shoulder…

sailors and women. The only job I can

What are your total refit no-no’s?

Our article on the EISCA

do on the 6 is to helm it. And I need

Handling new systems without

auction last month failed

to be in very good shape. I need to

intentionality. A good boat has

to recognise the central

work out. The Atlantic is a bit easier.

integrity on every level. I want to see

THE MERCY

EISCA AUCTION

6-M, so it’s more available to junior

role of David Goddard

that in the smallest details.

(right), who founded the

You were a Chief Lighting Technician

International Sailing Craft

in Hollywood. Is the importance of

What is it that you enjoy about

Association and the

lighting forgotten on board?

designing for boats?

Exeter Maritime Museum.

You Europeans coined the phrase

I mostly enjoy the physical act of

Mr Goddard, who died in 2015, was responsible for

‘gaffer’, but over here we are known

drawing by hand. That’s where I’m

amassing the unique collection of ethnic boats in the

as CLTs. Yes, in whatever I’ve done

happiest. And problem solving.

auction. In 1996, Exeter Maritime Museum was forced to

since my film days, I’ve thought about

close due to lack of funds, but much of Mr Goddard's

lighting more than most. And

Your favourite yacht designer?

collection has now found a new home in Shanghai. We

because most of the work I do is

I’d have to say Olin Stephens. He had

apologise for any upset caused.

custom, I often design the actual light

zero sentimentality for his career and

fixtures, cast or machined, which I

he loved whatever new technology

really enjoy. Plus, I have really poor

was being brought to the sport. I

eyesight so if things aren’t lit properly

found that very inspiring. A lot of my

it’s a disaster!

generation grew up sailing on our

WORD OF THE MONTH

Catenary “A length of cable used to form the centre part of a long tow, where it helps withstand any sudden stress .” A Dictionary of Sailing, FH Burgess (1961)

grandparents' Concordias and there’s Is interior design overlooked in

a sentimental attachment to those

classic boats generally?

boats, but when I started really

One of the big projects I did was a

looking at boats around me, they

Sparkman & Stephens Spirit of

were S&Ss. CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

27


1963 ADMIRAL’S CUP

TEAM MATES AFLOAT They inspired a generation of yachtsmen with a famous win in the fourth Admiral’s Cup. Today, they’re still doing what they were designed to do – race! STORY NIGEL SHARP

Clarion of Wight, launched in Cowes on 6 April, 1963, went on to win the Admiral’s Cup that summer

BEKEN OF COWES

28

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


Outlaw, launched in Cowes on 6 April, 1963, also went on to win the Admiral’s Cup that summer!

BEKEN OF COWES

O

n 6 April, 1963, two new boats were launched in Cowes, both with the same purpose in mind: to win the Admiral’s Cup. Outlaw was launched at Souter’s, while around 25 minutes later and less than half a mile downstream, Clarion of Wight was launched at Lallow’s. They were part of a new crop of boats built specifically to win the cup, which in 1963 had taken place just three times, but which was having a galvanising effect on yacht racing internationally. The Admiral’s Cup series comprised the Channel Race, two inshore races during Cowes Week and then the Fastnet Race. Each nation’s team was made up of three yachts. The inaugural Admiral’s Cup in 1957 had been won by Great Britain, which retained it in 1959, but lost to the USA in 1961. British yachtsmen were determined to win it back and so it was that in 1963, no fewer than 14 yachts, more than half purpose-built, including Outlaw and Clarion of Wight, took part in the British trials. The Illingworth and Primrose-designed Outlaw was built for newspaper proprietor Sir Max Aitken and Robert Lowein, and the Sparkman & Stephens Clarion for industrialists Dennis Miller and Derek Boyer, and both boats showed early promise. Two months later Yachting World reported that “after weeks of anxiety for the owners”, the British team would be Outlaw, Clarion and Ron Amey’s Noryema III. They were up against France, Sweden, Germany, Holland and the USA. Britain was in last place after the Channel Race, but did better in the inshore Britannia Cup to move up to third overall. In the third race, the New York YC Cup, Clarion was first, with Outlaw and Noryema second and third. The British were now second overall. So it was all to play for in the triple-scoring Fastnet Race, but things started badly for the two Cowes-built British boats. Outlaw broke her gooseneck and she crossed the start line under headsails alone, while the crew effected a repair; and Clarion (on starboard tack) had a collision with the French Primevere (on port but claiming water). Both lodged a protest and carried on racing. British luck endured: Outlaw finished seventh after her gooseneck repair held, Noryema was ninth after winning her protest, and Clarion was declared the overall winner of the 127-boat Fastnet fleet. Britain had won back the Admiral’s Cup. I was just nine years old at the time and the three yachts’ names have been etched in my mind ever since. It was a thrill when recently I got the chance to sail on two of them, Clarion and Outlaw, both well looked after and still being raced, but neither in their home waters. The last Admiral’s Cup was in 2003, however Cup fever is high in Australia, where there is a major regatta in Sydney in December marking the Australians’ first win in the event, 50 years ago. Perhaps it’s the perfect time to look back at two historic British yachts...

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

29


1963 ADMIRAL’S CUP

OUTLAW “Outlaw is an extreme lightweight Class I ocean racer of an advanced type,” Yachting Monthly reported in April 1963. “She has so many unusual and well-thought-out features that she could claim to be the Yacht of the Year.” The 1in (25mm) thick hull was made up of eight layers of Honduras mahogany veneer “criss-crossed in various directions, only the outer layer being laid fore and aft above the waterline and finished for varnishing,” but the centreline components, floors, frames and deck beams were also laminated. This was considered to be fairly revolutionary at the time, with Yachting Monthly declaring that she was “believed to be the biggest cold moulded boat in the world”. She had a Perkins 4107 36hp diesel engine with a slightly offset two-bladed propeller which was, apparently, “designed specially”. The two most striking features of Outlaw’s appearance were (and still are) her reverse sheer and the position of the steering wheel at the forward end of the cockpit. Yachting Monthly pointed out that this would allow the helmsman to “have more shelter with less motion and be able to speak through the bulkhead portlight to either the navigator or skipper,” and that “the battery of sheet winches and the team of heaving and view-spoiling winch-winders which go with them will be able to heave and wind with the minimum of social friction”.

Facing page: Outlaw racing at Cannes. Inset, from top left: distinctive coachroof; looking aft, the surviving companionway to the left, galley to the right; mainsheet track with Tufnol block; saloon

REVOLUTIONARY DESIGN But perhaps her most revolutionary feature was hidden from view. It was thought, by Yachting Monthly at least, that with her flat run aft and her short keel, she might “start a violent yaw one way or the other” when sailing downwind in a good breeze and sea. “To counteract this the designers have introduced… a 6ft 9in laminated wooden centreboard in a trunk in the middle of the counter.” Fresh from her Admiral’s Cup success and also having won the 1963 RORC Class 1 Championships, the following January Outlaw was exhibited at the London Boat Show – which was sponsored by Aitken’s Express newspaper in its early days – and in May of that year she was sold to the English Grains Company. In the 1965 Fastnet Race she was dismasted when, according to Yachting World, “a spinnaker guy parted, allowing the boom to crash onto the forestay. She partially broached and when the main sheet was let go to the extent that the main boom came against the lower shroud, the mast gave up the unequal struggle.” The following year she was sold to GR Fuller, who owned Deacon’s Boatyard on the Hamble, and there followed two more Solent-based owners – Brigadier Philip Wakeham OBE and Bernard Bullough – before Bob and Ann Fewtrell bought her in 1975. They took her to the Caribbean and back, but in 1978 they laid her up at Shepards Wharf in Cowes and put her on the market. In 1982, Mike Horsley – who had recently started his own business selling leather goods in the UK – was 30

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

keen to buy a boat in which to go cruising. “What I really wanted was an S&S yawl,” he told me, “but even in those days they were expensive. Then I saw an advertisement for this Class I ocean racer called Outlaw. I didn’t really know anything about her but when I looked into her I realised she had quite an interesting past.” Mike asked his father – who was the classic yacht broker Malcolm Horsley – to survey Outlaw for him. Having been virtually abandoned for a few years, she wasn’t in great condition. Water had been allowed to lie in various places on deck, partly because she had been badly chocked up and also because scuppers and limber holes were blocked by leaves. But Mike was confident that she had been built with good quality materials and his father was able to highlight all her problems to the extent that Mike knew from the start what needed doing (and has never had any unpleasant surprises regarding her condition since). So he put down a deposit on her and set to work to get her back in good condition. “I was very lucky because at Shepards Wharf there were some really good craftsmen,” said Mike, “including an engineer and an electrician, and a really good shipwright called Adrian Stone – all the artisans I needed to do the work.” The main job carried out by Stone was the renewal of the coachroof – which Yachting Monthly had described in 1963 as “like a broad, shallow edition of one of Mr Souter’s moulded dinghies” – but to the same design and so retaining the slightly strangelooking spaces each side of its aft end, which were originally for liferaft stowage but now provide surfaces for instruments, vents and portlights. The Fewtrells had painted her topsides red and, although Mike was keen to restore the varnished finish, when they were burnt off he found that “there were too many scars to do that”, so she was painted white.

EX-PAT LIFE

OUTLAW LOA

48ft 9ins (14.85m) LWL

39ft (11.8m) BEAM

13ft (3.9m) DRAUGHT

8ft 2in (2.5m) DISP

15 tonnes

About 18 months after he first saw her, and after a cross-Channel shake-down voyage in “quite nasty” weather, Mike and a crew set off across the Bay of Biscay. Over the next few years, while still running his UK business, Mike kept Outlaw in Lisbon, Gibraltar and the Balearics – making further improvements to her and cruising her along the way – before arriving in Antibes in October 1989 at which time he began to work for his father. For a couple of years he was heavily involved with both businesses but, soon after Malcolm died suddenly in 1991, Mike took over the brokerage business full time. Over the following years he began to specialise in selling classic boats and still does so today, although in 2005 he sold his business to Nick Edmiston, for whom he has worked ever since. Since he arrived in Antibes, Mike has used Outlaw less and less for cruising, and more and more for racing: in fact these days delivery voyages to and from regattas are the nearest he gets to cruising. Until 2003 Outlaw’s


JAMES ROBINSON TAYLOR

NIGEL SHARP


MEMBER OF THE ROBBE & BERKING FAMILY

VA R U N A

NJORD

( e x W H I T E H E AT H E R ) 1909 A. R I C H A R D S O N 12 M R G A F F C U T T E R LOA: 18.02m

B E A M : 3.48m

D R A F T : 2.28m

P R I C E : 375.000€

1918 J O H A N N A N K E R 8 M R LOA: 13.80m

WOLKUSE

B E A M : 1.98m

DRAFT:

1.60m

D R A F T : 1.75m

P R I C E : 150.000€

THULA

1908 I N T E R N AT I O N A L S O N D E R C L A S S LOA: 10.40m

B E A M : 2.39m

72‘ R O YA L H U I S M A N K E T C H 1985 P R I C E : 95.000€

LOA: 21.90m

BEAM:

+ 4 9 ( 0 ) 4 6 1 3 1 8 0 3 0 6 5 | B A U M + K O E N I G @ C L A S S I C - YA C H T S . D E

5.00m

DRAFT:

2.90m

P R I C E : 890.000€

| W W W. C L A S S I C - YA C H T S . C O M


NIGEL SHARP

1963 ADMIRAL’S CUP

home port was Antibes – where Mike still lives – but then he moved her to Cannes which he describes as “a very classic-friendly port”. The aft centreboard had already been removed when Mike bought Outlaw, but its casing is still there, blanked off at the bottom with a copper plate. During his period of ownership he has gradually made various other changes and improvements to the boat, including new spars in the early 1990s. Those which came with the boat (the original boom and the mast that replaced the one that was lost in the 1965 Fastnet) had roller reefing. Mike soon converted to slab reefing, but with external reefing lines which “wasn’t particularly pretty” and so he decided on new spars. Sparlight, which had made the original spars and still had the drawings, had been taken over by Proctor’s. Mike was keen to go with them, even though the transport costs, as well as his desire for original-looking stainless steel fittings which would have to be specially made, and for gold anodising to maintain the 1960s look, would make the spars much more expensive than they would have been from a French spar company. “But I had just sold Mariette for the first time and was feeling quite flush,” he said, “and I did end up getting exactly what I wanted.”

IMPROVEMENTS Outlaw had two companionways – adjacent to each other fore and aft, but offset to port and starboard – but Mike replaced the port sliding hatch with a hinged Goiot hatch and removed its ladder. Down below, the main change is in the aft cabin, where a heads compartment has made way for a double berth. He’s created extra stowage by removing a pilot berth from the saloon. The remaining heads compartment forward retains the original fold-down sink of the type fitted in British Rail’s first class carriages of the time. The 36hp Perkins has been replaced with a smaller 60hp Lombardini unit, with a folding prop, improving performance under sail and power. Among many other

Above, l-r: bringing in the spinnaker; the British Rail wash basin

improvements, Mike has renewed the toerail, replaced many galvanised deck fittings with stainless steel, and made Outlaw “more Mediterranean friendly” by fitting opening windows in the forward face of the coachroof, where there was plain Plexiglas before. “The refit has been going on for 33 years!” he said. When I joined Outlaw at Cannes Régates Royales, we had light rain and a good breeze. For most of the race I sat out of the way on the aft deck – where, facing forward with my feet in front of me, the reverse sheer was particularly noticeable as it threatened to topple me over backwards! – and watched Mike and his long-standing crew sail the boat calmly, efficiently and with gentle humour. There was almost too much wind for the number one genoa, but we stuck with it on the upwind legs. However, when we saw a black cloud approaching, the crew prepared the staysail and the running backstays which oppose the inner forestay loads: “The quickest way to change headsails without being bare headed,” Mike said later. That cloud came to nothing but during the latter part of the race the wind direction changed radically, from southeast all the way to the north. Outlaw was fourth overall at the end of the regatta, level on points with the third-placed 1969 S&S sloop Maria Giovanna II but beaten by the tie-break procedure. Later Mike and I discussed Outlaw’s sailing characteristics and I was interested to ask him about the “violent yaw” which, in 1963, Yachting Monthly thought she might have without her centreboard. I could see she was “twitchy” downwind that day, even in a flat sea. Mike told me about a feeder race in strong winds from Monaco to Cannes some years ago: “There was a big following sea and quite a strong wind. It was really exhausting and by the end of it my shoulders were extremely sore.” But he added: “Outlaw is amazing in big seas, she just slides off the waves. She is a very comfortable boat at sea.” CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

33


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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


1963 ADMIRAL’S CUP

NIGEL SHARP

CLARION OF WIGHT

C

larion of Wight was the first British Admiral’s Cup boat to be designed by non-British designers and proved to be Sparkman & Stephens’ first really successful boat designed to the RORC rule. Unlike Outlaw, she was traditionally built of mahogany planking – apart from the garboards and adjacent three planks which were teak – on oak frames. In 1966 she was bought by Sir Maurice Laing, who altered her underwater profile by converting the rudder on the trailing edge of the keel to a trim tab and fitting a new skeg-hung rudder further aft, in keeping with the changing trends of the time. He also replaced the tiller with wheel steering. It is said that Ted Heath had his first offshore race aboard Clarion around this time, before ordering his first Morning Cloud. In 1970 Laing sold Clarion to Dr R O’Hanlon who kept her in Dun Laoghaire and the following year she made her second Admiral’s Cup appearance, this time as part of the Irish team, which finished 11th out of 15 teams.

Above: the wheel is original, but the winches have been upgraded since 1963

From 1975 little is known of her history – although she may have been based in the Isle of Man in the 1980s – until 1992 when she was bought by Brian and Yvonne Turner. The Turners brought her back to good order during the 20 years of their ownership, including, in 2007, putting in a new plywood subdeck with teak laid over the top. They raced her offshore extensively including the Ostend-Heligoland race, the Millennium Round Ireland Race (in which she was first in class), at least one Fastnet and the Great Yarmouth to Terschelling race, which she won overall. By then it was 2012 and a Frenchman, Thierry Lebeaux, was looking for a classic boat. He owned a van der Stadt 40 (12.1m) foot steel sloop – “very heavy with too much sail, and very difficult to handle” – having previously owned two smaller GRP modern boats. He spotted Clarion of Wight in a Sandeman Yachts advertisement in Classic Boat. When he and wife Jane went to Ipswich to see her, broker Barney Sandeman CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

35


NIGEL SHARP

1963 ADMIRAL’S CUP

Clockwise from top left: plenty of room in Clarion’s cockpit; saloon; backstay tensioner; owner Thierry at the chart table

satisfied Jane that Clarion would make a great cruising boat. The deal was done. But later, he had further words with Thierry: “Barney told me that I would have a problem with the boat. This got me worried and I thought I would have liked to know this before I signed, but then he told me what the problem would be. He said that wherever I took her, it was likely that someone would tell me that they knew her, that they had sailed against her, or even on her.” Sure enough Barney’s words proved to be true right from the start: initially in Brighton (Thierry’s very first port of call on Clarion) where a man on a nearby boat knew her; and then at Kamaret Yacht Services in Camaret where Thierry planned to get all necessary work done on her, where the proprietor, Yves Lecouteur, told him that he had raced against Clarion on his father’s boat many years ago. “He is as much in love with Clarion as I am, except he is doing the work and I am paying his bills,” said Thierry. Clarion effectively has two home ports – Plymouth and Les Sables-d’Olonne – not least because Thierry currently works in England and Jane is British, and they cruise with their three children when their jobs allow them to. “Jane likes the boat very much and she likes to steer as well, which she never did with our other boats.” says Thierry. “She finds Clarion very balanced and very easy to steer.” Although Jane isn’t herself interested in 36

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

CLARION OF WIGHT LOA

43ft 6in (13.26m) LWL

30ft 0in (9.1m) BEAM

10ft 11in (3.33m) DRAUGHT

6ft 9in (2.57m) DISP

10 tonnes

racing, Thierry says she is “very supportive” of him when he races. In 2015 when Clarion was on her way to Dartmouth for the start of the Classic Channel Regatta (a race to Paimpol via St Peter Port), the Perkins diesel engine broke down and she called in to Camaret. The engine had been installed in 1968 when it replaced the original Coventry Victor 2-cylinder 14hp petrol engine and “it had done its time and decided to stop,” said Thierry, “and the guy from Perkins who came to look at it said it was never going to start again.” So Thierry had a new Volvo 40hp engine installed, but Clarion was in such good condition when he bought her that he has had to do very little else to her. I enjoyed a cracking sail with Thierry and his crew on Clarion in the second race at Dartmouth Classics in July. There was a fresh southwesterly breeze and the 15-boat fleet included another winning British Admiral’s Cupper, the 1971 Cervantes IV. We finished 6th but were 5th on handicap, one better than they’d had in the morning race, and the following day Clarion was 4th, and finished the regatta 5th overall. A couple of days later Clarion started the Plymouth-La Rochelle race in which she came 3rd overall, and Thierry was particularly pleased to tell me later about the Classique des Sables race at the end of the month. “We were first by less than a minute on corrected time,” he said. “My first win with the boat.”


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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

37


Saleroom BONHAMS

NMM

Nelson’s seat of yearning BY DAVE SELBY

icons – Nahlin (now CHARLES MILLER LTD

BONHAMS

Dyson) and Tommy

Albatross vs Bentley tow-car

Lipton’s Shamrock

“The acceleration to maximum speed is of sportscar order,”

– and one unknown

raved The Motor magazine when its hacks got hold of a

motor launch/

car-engined Albatross sportsboat on test in the 1950s and

commuter craft

towed it around the country behind a Bentley MkVI. The now

owned by Sir James

CHARLES MILLER LTD

Solent scenes

More than 1,000 photos depicting Solent yachting in its 1930s

defunct magazine also commended the aluminium boat’s “high standard of workmanship and outstandingly stable design”, judging it: “A very sound investment.” That last statement came into focus when an Albatross MkIII

heyday have come on to the market from the collection of a

and Bentley MkVI both crossed the block at a recent Bonhams

prominent yachting historian.

classic car auction at Beaulieu. The circa 1958 Albatross, now

The time capsule of Kirk of Cowes’ work covers everything from

38

BONHAMS

Period images of two

BONHAMS

As Nelson contemplated his fate on the eve of the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805, perhaps some of his thoughts turned to home as he pondered the coming day in the comfort of his favourite leather armchair. The mahogany bergère in his cabin on HMS Victory was no ordinary chair, but a love token given to him by his mistress, Lady Emma Hamilton. Now known simply as “the Emma”, the mahogany bergère is regarded by collectors as one of the more important of Nelson’s personal artefacts. Nelson and Emma were among the first ‘modern’ celebrities, for even in his lifetime ‘fans’ craved personal mementoes. Yet, while locks of his hair abound, there is only one Emma chair. Purchased shortly after Nelson’s death by Sir Francis Laforey, captain of Spartiate at Trafalgar, the chair’s history and provenance is well recorded. It was sold, with an asking price of £200, in 1920, and in 1980 for £1,320 at Christie’s in London. When it comes up at Bonhams’ next London marine sale on 18 October it is expected to make £30,000-50,000 – but may fetch a great deal more.

fitted with a Ford 1600 GT cross-flow engine, and in need of

dinghy racing to J-Class and America’s Cup interest, motor

further re-commissioning, would have cost around £550 when

launches and steam yachts, in neatly themed lots of 100 or so

new. It made £3,320. The MkVI Bentley, which would have cost

photos, each keenly estimated at £150-250. Charles Miller Ltd’s

just over £4,000 new, made £48,500. Decide for yourself which

next London marine sale is on 7 November.

represents better value and fun.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


Fox's M&B Classic Boat half page.qxp_Layout 1 21/08/2017 14:35 Page 1

The complete refit service for all classic yachts At Fox’s Marina & Boatyard, our team is a great mix of experienced, cruising/racing sailors and time served engineers and craftsmen. We have multiple, inhouse departments including a sprayshop, workshops for both modern composite and traditional shipwrighting, rigging, stainless fabrication, marine engineering and electronics. If you own a classic motor or sailing yacht, we have the experience, technical expertise and facilities to offer you a complete refit and repair solution. SERVICE PARTNER TO THE 2017–2019 OYSTER WORLD RALLY

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ÂŽ

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

assic Boats_November.indd 1

28/09/2017 10:15


Objects of desire OIL ON WATER If you move quickly, you can catch these paintings, and many more of a nautical nature, at the Royal Society of Marine Artists’ annual exhibition, open at the Mall Galleries, London, until 14 October. These two are by former winner of the show’s Classic Boat prize, Sheena Bevis-White, the image below being based on the cover of CB340. Before the Race (right) is in oil, 63cmx 67cm. Price £1,150

rsma-web.co.uk sheenabevis-white.co.uk

HULL-SCRAPER This hull-cleaning tool is hardly the kind of glamorous objet you’re used to on this page, but it is remarkably useful for those who have no cause to lift out once a season. Suffice to say, it scrapes your hull clean. The foam head has buoyancy enough to press the cleaning blades upwards, saving any tedious hard work. Price £79.99

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HUMIDOR

“Who wants a humidor on a yacht?” Frank Sinatra and Celeste Holm might

SHOT GLASSES

have sung in ‘High Society’. How

When thirsty crew are calling for the

wrong they’d be. The Symphony

hard stuff, reach for this leather case by

humidor provides the requisite

exclusive gunmaker William Evans,

constant humidity for your smokes,

containing eight shot glasses. Available

and it comes lined in brass pipes, for

in-store only on St James’s Street,

the hell of it. Price €3,140 (c£2,771)

London. Price £485

bocadolobo.com

williamevans.com CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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Specialist classic boat brokers: Expertise, advice, storage, charter +44 (0) 1491 578870

www.hscboats.co.uk

50 years of building and designing

Brion Rieff Boat Builders Inc. 76 Flye Point Rd. Brooklin Maine 04616 Tel. 207 359 4455 42

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

www.rieffboats.net


Adrian Morgan

CHARLOTTE WATTERS

CRAFTSMANSHIP

Getting over the bar What kind of cruising person have you become?

D

o you worry more about whether the harbour has wifi than if it has water? Does your crew on sighting land cry for joy, hold up a phone and exclaim: “I’ve got three bars” and start thumbing out texts to friends telling them, presumably, they’re on a boat and have just managed to get a signal? On leaping ashore do they enter the nearest internet café, or head for the shower block (or one of those three bars)? What kind of cruising person have you become? Have I become? Two boats, one a modern French production yacht, the other a 1946 McGruer sloop, provoked some intriguing comparisons over a three-week holiday in the Western Isles. In the old days it was the three ‘sh’s (sh*t, shower, shave) now it’s wifi, water and: “Where’s the nearest cash machine?” It proved an amusing insight into the priorities of modern cruising: two journalists and a photographer,

“Now it is wifi, water and: ‘Where’s the nearest cash machine?’”

reunited after a decade or so. If we were to write the story the headline might read, ‘Three Go Cruising in the Western Isles in Search of 3G’ – oh, and water and diesel, and occasionally a cash machine, and a shower once a day, and pontoon berth if at all possible, as she tended to range around her anchor. Besides, pontoons have water, and, of course, electricity (and wifi). It meant also not having to pump up the rubber dinghy which has first to be dragged like a deflated baby elephant from the depths of a cockpit locker containing all the ‘essential’ paraphernalia of the modern cruising boat: viz. barbecue, outboard motor, electric cable, hose-pipe, sundry spares as well as the usual mooring warps and fenders (with socks), oars, pump, sail cover, buckets, brushes etc. How the world of cruising has changed since Sally, my little Laurent Giles sloop, was launched in 1937. For the better? In many ways, yes. I cannot conceive of drawing lines across soggy tidal graphs in an Almanac the size of a small bible to find height over a bar at 3am when a chart plotter will give me the information instantly. It is quite simply safer, and probably more accurate than extrapolating from secondary ports, adding time differences and all the other RYA shore-based stuff that’s okay on a classroom desk under a bank of strip lights but quite another matter at the tiny chart table of a small wooden sloop, at an angle, in a big sea, at night. Adlard Coles, Blondie Hasler and all those hardy, chainsmoking ex-Naval navigators in the immediate post-war era – surely the great age of seat-of-the-pants yacht navigation – might have enjoyed it hugely after four years of dodging E-boats in the Channel, or landing SBS agents on the rocky shores of Brittany, but not me. And no hot water on tap for Adlard and chums, as we had during those days perambulating between Oban and Tobermory, Colonsay, Staff, Jura and Islay. What luxury! But it did mean filling the tanks every two days, especially when one of the taps was left dripping (it might have been me). As an aside, why do modern boats have wasteful mixer taps when all you need to wash your teeth is a splash of cold, best delivered by a foot pump. And why if you have hot water and a shower on board, the mad rush for the toilet block – to save water? The second week found the writer as third mate on the McGruer cruiser-racer competing in West Highland Week; not 1937, but ten years or so later, although not much seemed to have changed. Standing headroom, but then Kelana is 30ft on the waterline, and a lot more when she wets those wonderful overhangs. Hot water from a kettle, not a tap; a clinker pram dinghy on the coachroof, launched or retrieved in minutes using the main halyard, and mooring buoys not pontoons. Wifi was welcome at times. But when the light of the paraffin lamps brought out the warmth of the old mahogany, we were back in 1946, which is where, secretly, those who buy modern production boats would all like to be. CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

43


FOR THE WORK OF MARTYN MACKRILL, VISIT MARTYNMACKRILL.CO.UK OR MESSUM’S GALLERY, MAYFAIR, LONDON. MESSUMS.COM

Son of a marine engineer and grandson of a trawlerman, MARTYN MACKRILL is Honorary Painter to the Royal Thames Yacht Club and was official painter for the Royal Yacht Squadron’s bicentenary. His depictions of classic boats, from clinker rowing boats to Edwardian schooners, have made him one of the most sought-after marine artists and his work is part of major collections worldwide. He and wife Bryony sail the restored 1910 gaff cutter Nightfall (CB328).

44

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


NEW SERIES

BOSUN’S BAG PRACTICAL TIPS FOR THE TRADITIONAL BOATER WORDS TOM CUNLIFFE ORIGINAL DRAWING MARTYN MACKRILL

MAST RAKE Mast rake is a critical area where aesthetics balance pragmatism. It can vary between such extremes as the mid-19th-century American pilot schooner with very little backstaying but enormous rake to make up for it, and an Essex smack’s topmast bowsed forward in anticipation of lots of topsail sheet to pull it back into column. Too much tip aft can generate weather helm. In practice, however, a boat is tossed around so much at sea that, so long as rake is kept within reason, other considerations may prove equally important. How much rake any original boat needs is best discovered by examining old photographs. A useful example is the polemasted Bristol Channel pilot cutter. She carries no backstays. Instead, she has ‘swifters’ that run from abaft the lower shrouds up to the jib halyard blocks. These give the stick all the support it needs and allow the jib luff to be set up drum-tight against them. For the arrangement to work, the mast must have some rake so as to open up the angles aloft. Without it, support disappears, the setup doesn’t function and dismasting can be the result. If the rake is right, the rig is rock-solid and you get a great-looking boat as a spin-off.

BOOM ANGLE Traditional rigs invariably had mainsails cut so that the boom was well down at the gooseneck, sweeping up to the clew. For a yacht with low freeboard, this not only pleases the eye, it stops the sail from rolling into the water downwind and allows extra scope for heaving down on the clew when closehauled to control twist in a sail with no kicker. Anyone more worried about health and safety than style and performance will stuff the boom way up and parallel to the deck like a white charter boat. Too many craft are spoiled like this, sailing around with the main sagging like a barn door with the top hinge off. Time was when any sailmaker supplying such a horror would have been clapped in the town stocks so that every urchin who knew what a boat was meant to look like could pelt him with the leftovers of Sunday lunch.

OFFSET PROPS Any pure sailing boat built without an auxiliary engine in mind almost certainly has too fine a run to accept a centrally sited engine and stern gear. The result, if a motor is subsequently fitted, will be an offset propeller. Some offset props result in handling that is the stuff of nightmares, but if thoughtfully installed by people who know their business, some side propellers at least ought to conform to certain

rules. One boat I used to sail was an archetypal case in point. Her habits with little way on were predictable, but I learned about the dynamics only after a few years of what are best described as varied results. The boat drew eight feet and had a right-handed propeller under her port quarter, sited a few feet forward of a noble, full-length rudder. As we all know, a right-hand prop running in reverse shows a natural tendency to throw the stern to port. This is because it chucks out wash to starboard. With what amounted to a wall of boat sitting on the prop’s starboard side at slow speeds, however, the prop’s efforts to cartwheel to port were in vain. Its wash hit the near-vertical planking and bounced out to port instead. There was nowhere else for it to go. As it came gushing out, the stern was tossed in the opposite direction and the boat spun accordingly. Starboard-side-to was a joy for her. By ‘backing and filling’ ahead and astern with the rudder hard over to port all the time, she would turn in just a few feet more than her overall length. It was marvellous. I only discovered the interesting bit years later when I found myself careering into the dreaded port-side-to berth without the option and the wind behind me. In desperation, I threw her into astern at four knots and, behold, she snuggled her stern in to port like a Bavaria 37. It seemed unbelievable until I worked out what happened. At that speed, the prop wash never hit the boat at all, it just spiralled off the prop and did what it had wanted to all along. Ever after, when I had to come port-side-to, I arrived at a velocity which terrified the onlookers, but which I knew was my only hope. Thank goodness the gearbox never let me down.

BULL ROPES All boats moored or anchored in tidal waters suffer from blowing over the ground tackle when the breeze sets in against the stream. Spoon-bowed yachts lose paint off their topsides and I’ve seen all sorts of lash-ups with fenders that never quite seem to work. A plumb-stemmed boat suffers even more. She hardly has to move before she’s into the buoy or graunching ahead with her anchor chain chewing the planking above and below the waterline. The sorry owners of modern yachts can do little about this misery, but many of us classic boaters are privileged to carry bowsprits, and the bowsprit holds the answer. Hang a single block from the end of the spar. Run a line out to it from the foredeck and attach the lower end to the mooring buoy or the anchor chain. Heave the line fairly short, depending on bowsprit length, so that when the boat runs over her anchor, instead of the cable clattering down the topsides from the bow roller, it is guided silently out of trouble from the bowsprit end. In heavy conditions, the topmast forestay may find itself ‘doing a good job’, in which case set up the runners to stop the rig nodding like the heads of a tennis crowd.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

45


STANLEY & THOMAS BROKERAGE

CLASSIC WOODEN BOAT BUILDERS, RESTORATION, REPAIRS,

REFURBISHMENT, ENGINEERING & BROKERAGE SPECIALISTS

SPRUCE GOOSE A stunning 30’ Triple Cockpit Hacker-Craft built 1991 by the Hacker Boat Co., New York. Newly renovated. A highly sought after twin engine model with V8 small block Chevrolets, 350 cubic inch. Serviced 2017. Borg Warner gearboxes, Holley Marine 4 barrel carburetors. Seats 7. Inventory and photographs on file. Trailer included. Location: Windsor, UK. Guide: £150,000

Mobile:07799-654113 Tel: 01753-833166

sarah.woolley@stanleyandthomas.co.uk www.stanleyandthomas.co.uk Tom Jones Boatyard, Riverside Walk, Romney Lock, Windsor, Berkshire SL4 6HU

Nomansland Too

Morgan Giles Monaco 38 ft Motor Yacht 1968

Lying UK

£70,000

Francis Morgan Giles was nothing if not versatile. Not only did he design beautiful and successful boats over a wide spectrum, he was a first class boat builder, seaman and racing helmsman. This single chine hull twin engined motor yacht was one of more than a thousand yachts built at his Teignmouth yard, which he set up in the 1920s and was noted for the high quality of construction and craftsmanship. Coming up for her half century this boat is currently with knowledgeable owners and is seriously for sale.

33 High Street, Poole BH15 1AB, England. Tel: + 44 (0)1202 330077 email: info@sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk

46

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk


SPIRIT OF TRADITION

Reinventing traditions All the looks and modern performance with none of the headaches! We look at the grand sweep of Spirit of Tradition boats on the market today... WORDS BY STEFFAN MEYRIC HUGHES twin rudders, fold-down swim platforms and other modern

simple to define, but nearly infinite in variety. They

fixtures and fittings. These days they range in size from simple

are yachts built today that combine, in varying

dayboats and trailer-sailers from the likes of Churchouse

proportions, new and old design ideas and build.

Boats (known for the Drascombe range), to small cruising

Typically, this will mean a yacht that might be built in glass or

yachts like GRP Folkboats and the famous Cornish Crabber

cold-moulded, with traditional appearance above the

range, to some of the largest superyachts in the world,

waterline (or at least with a strong hint of tradition), while the

including the modern-day J-Class. And they’re here to stay:

underwater profile will be more modern.

like the new Mini, the Fiat 500, the London Routemaster and

It is an attempt to combine the best of both worlds: a

many more examples, they reflect a need for a strong

beautiful craft that will require little maintenance, will perhaps

iconography in a world that is drifting ever further from

sail faster and be easier to handle. The variation comes not

traditional form and function. Our list over the next few pages

only from the build method, but from the balance of

aims to show the full range of what is on offer in 2017.

modernity with tradition. Some SoT yachts retain long keels

First, though, we look at the latest arrival from Spirit

and are built of wood (albeit to a modern method), whereas

Yachts. Oui Fling is, in Spirit Yachts founder Sean McMillan’s

some are creations in foam sandwich or even carbon, with

own words, perhaps the ultimate modern classic...

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

EMILY HARRIS

Y

achts that belong to the ‘spirit of tradition’ are

47


SPIRIT OF TRADITION

Bit on the side Is she the ultimate modern classic? Spirit Yachts founder Sean McMillan thinks she could be PHOTOGRAPHS EMILY HARRIS

Spirit Yachts in Ipswich has now built 66 boats, but founder Sean McMillan says perhaps the latest, a newly designed 52D called Oui Fling, best captures the idea of a ‘modern classic’. The boat was the star of the regatta at Panerai British Classic Week in July, where her racy lines and bare deck attracted onlookers aplenty. The ‘oohs’ and ‘aahs’ would have been all the louder if they’d seen down below to the yacht’s stripped back interior, something McMillan, too, has

48

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


The stripped back interior showing the carbon keel blade that comes right through the boat to the deck

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

49


SPIRIT OF TRADITION

taken great delight in: “There is a glorious moment in the

Above: Oui Fling

boat, your rudder is only acting as a trim tab on the keel,

build of any wooden yacht when the finished hull is rolled

in action off

rather than as a foil in it own right. When you combine

over, but the interior is not yet fitted.

Cowes for

that with a super-light construction it is a pretty

Panerai British

seductive combination.”

“At this stage, the purity of the core structure of the boat is seen for the first, but regrettably the last time, as

Classic Week

Weight saving came through the lack of an interior

the interior starts to break up the space. I have thought

(“The owner said he doesn’t ever want to sleep on the

more times than I can remember that it would be

boat, he barely wants to go down below,” says McMillan),

wonderful to build a yacht with no interior so the beauty of

as well as carbon fittings throughout including a carbon

the hull can be appreciated and celebrated in its own right.

keelblade (made by Eeles Boatbuilders in Brightlingsea),

You can imagine our enthusiasm when we were

not uncommon in modern grand prix racing but a

commissioned to build a Spirit 52 as a totally maxed-out

departure for the modern classic world.

race boat – without carrying the weight of any interior!” Oui Fling, coming in at a mere 6,750kg, was second overall in the highly competitive fleet at Panerai British Classic Week, among her conquests McMillan’s own Spirit

Power winches mean she’s ‘a doddle’ to sail and the word is that Oui Fling should be seen at Solent and Med regattas next year. McMillan is a strong supporter of the classic racing

52, Flight of Ufford, a similar design but almost two tonnes

scene and says: “It is extremely healthy and probably the

heavier. “But I think we gave her a decent scare!” he says.

only growing racing scene in the world. In the classics

The boat owes something to Metre boat design up top,

people see a way of going racing in a boat that isn’t going

albeit beamier, but with a shallow body and deep fin keel

to lose its value, unlike the latest grand prix race boat, and

with spade rudder below the waterline, she embodies the

it also has a certain visual charm.”

idea of the modern classic. “The inspiration has been the heritage of long, low,

Pointing out that racing was the reason many of today’s classic yachts were built, McMillan says: “If you look at a lot

easily driven, beautiful boats. What Mick Newman [Spirit

of the boats we revere now as classics, many of them had

Yacht co-founder, who died nine years ago] and I did when

an early history in racing and then maybe were adapted to

we first started was to get rid of the long keel.

be cruiser-racers.

“Don’t be a slave to the long keel when it’s an obsolete

“That original motivation for these boats is what we’ve

shape and form. With fin and bulb and a spade rudder,

tapped into with the 52D. We were designing an out and

you can get a perfectly balanced boat. On a long-keeled

out race boat, with no apologies, made to fit into a certain genre of racing, in this case the classic regatta scene. “It’s an exciting thing to have done and I think it’s taken

“Don’t be a slave to the long keel when it is an obsolete form”

the classic boat movement forward. We are doing it in a way that some people will not approve of and that is a shame. I don’t think anything like that should be pickled in aspic. If you’re building something new, it’s perfectly valid to maintain the aesthetic and the grace, but also embrace the 21st century.”

50

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


Cruise the West Coast of Scotland... on our Dunkirk Little Ship ‘CHICO”

Built in Fife in 1932 to a G L Watson design, Chico has comfortable accommodation for six guests. Cruises available in the Clyde area or from Oban, with flexible dates and duration. See www.motoryachtchico.co.uk or phone 07885 456855 for further details

Den Phillips 2018 Calendars

CLASSIC YACHT CALENDAR

EAST COAST CALENDAR

Columbia replica of historic fishing schooner at Antigua Classics.

Sunset sail on the River Blackwater in Maldon.

Den is producing two calendars again, it’s the 30th year for her stunning East Coast featuring images of Traditional and Classic boats and seascapes from her native East Coast. The Classic Yacht Calendar, in its 17th year features breathtaking images from Antigua Classics and the Les Voiles de St Tropez. Greetings Cards also available. CALENDARS: Prices remain the same as 2015! (A3) £17+£4.50 postage UK. Available for Companies at competitive prices, with overprinting company logo for your clients, please contact Den for costs, and postage outside UK.

DEN PHILLIPS PHOTOGRAPHS - The Old Pump House Studio, 6 Head Street, Goldhanger, Maldon, Essex, CM9 8AY, UK. Tel: 01621 788471 • Mobile: 07957 856242 • www.DenPhillipsPhotos.com • Email: Den@DenPhillipsPhotos.com CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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SPIRIT OF TRADITION

Fairlie 55 After years of restoring some of the most famous yachts in the world – particularly the creations of William Fife III – a new Spirit of Tradition yacht from designer Paul Spooner and boatbuilder Duncan Walker of Fairlie Yachts, was always going to be a looker. The Fairlie 55 is among the loveliest of all SoT yachts and when we tested her back in 2012, she lived up to her looks. Uncluttered decks, a well-sorted rig, a fast, modern underbody and a low cabin trunk for good helming visibility (as well as those good looks), add up to the ideal compromise for a high-end SoT yacht in this size bracket. She’s as fast as a modern yacht; just much, much nicer to own. Price c£1m, fairlieyachts.com

Buyer’s guide Not long ago, the label Spirit of Tradition usually meant a trailer-sailer or a millionaire’s yacht in the Caribbean or Med. These days, the market’s gaps have been filled and there is a modern traditional boat out there for everyone

EMILY HARRIS

Shrimper 21 The original Roger Dongray-designed Cornish Shrimper, which started production in the late 1970s, has since established a successful genre – the 19ft trailer-gaffer. More than 1,100 boats have been sold. This, the 21, is just 2ft (61cm) longer, but gives a lot more volume below and a cockpit to seat four to six. Both are GRP-built weekenders, but if overnighting on the Shrimper 19 could be equated to camping, the 21 is perhaps more ‘glamping’! Like the 19, this is a centreboarder with a transom-hung rudder, however at 1.4 tonnes, it is still trailable with the right car. After decades of development, both Shrimpers are well set-up and easy to sail. Outboard version £33,600, cornishcrabbers.co.uk

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


Truly Classic 127 This is either at, or near to, the pinnacle of her type these days. The Truly Classic 127, Atalanta, is from the drawing board of Hoek Design, built in aluminium and boasting workmanship of the highest quality. Under sail she’s as stable as a cruise liner and nearly as fast; this is a boat that will exceed 15 knots without breaking sweat, and all in real comfort. Unlike most superyachts, this one actually looks like a sailing boat too. Below decks, the TC127 boasts a standard of living that rivals a luxury holiday home. £POA, claasenyachts.com

GARY BLAKE

C/O TOFINOU

RICK TOMLINSON

Tofinou 7

Bristol 27

This elegant 23ft (7m) dayboat was modelled on a 1928

Win Cnoops of Star Yachts in Bristol has teamed up with

wooden original and was, to our knowledge, the world’s first

leading semi-displacement maestro designer Andrew

big hit in SoT dayboats of this sort. The Tofinou 7 established

Wolstenholme to create a new breed of open and cabin

a recipe that has been much-repeated, not least in the rest of

motor-cruisers that echo gentlemen’s motor-cruisers from

the Tofinou range, which consists of more modern looking

before the war but provide the ease of ownership and good

craft, but which would still count as being part of the Spirit of

estuary and coastal (or better) capability necessary for

Tradition. As for the Tofinou 7 itself, more than 250 have been

today’s ambitious owner. You’ll know if you read our piece on

built. The hull is GRP, with lots of wood fit-out, and the

his new 16 and 32-footers last month how good these boats

centreboard makes her popular with day cruisers who can

are but for sheer drop-dead appeal, nothing has yet beaten

beach her with the board up. She’s easy to manage solo and a

this, the strip-planked Bristol 27. She’s primarily a river boat,

useful 10hp inboard diesel completes the picture.

but she’ll take you to sea – and she sips diesel.

Price €57,000, keyyachting.com

Price £145,000, staryachts.co.uk

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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SPIRIT OF TRADITION

W-76

The W boats, the brainchild of American yachtsman Donald Tofias, were in on the SoT thing early, with the build of two identical yachts for match-racing. They are raced hard to this day, and the experience of sailing past a J-Class in a regatta is, at one stroke, a lesson in what an SoT boat like this is all about. The brand has become known for the W-76, which over the years has won Tofias an armful of Panerai watches at various regattas. Other Ws followed, like the 46, and most recently, the 22, which we sailed last year.

Romilly

54

C/O COCKWELLS

NIC COMPTON

EMILLY HARRIS BENJAMIN MENDLOWITZ

Price $4.5m, w-class.com

Duchy 21

Nigel Irens is famous for cutting-edge boats like B&Q, but his

The Duchy 27, an Andrew Wolstenholme semi-planing design

29ft (9m) Roxanne in 1994 and the 22ft (6.7m) Romilly a year

built by Cockwells, has always been a boat to lust after. She’s

later were arguably as revolutionary, creating a new sort of

barely traditional in the usual meaning, but her salty,

design. They are characterised by a lug yawl rig on carbon

pugnacious, timeless workboat look and sheer capability is

masts, blazing speed and a clean look that, while traditional,

enough to set the heart racing. Cockwells recently expanded

is less derivative than any previous Spirit of Tradition boat.

the Duchy range with the 35. They also offer the 21, a picnic

With her shallow, easily-driven hull, big cockpit and those

boat par excellence, modelled on an old Cornish harbour

light masts, the Romilly makes a great dayboat for a large

launch. Twin canopies can give her interior complete

gaggle of family and friends, or more adventurous coastal

protection and the range of extras includes everything you

cruising for one to four. A full-length tent makes a cosy

could need for the perfect day out with friends, from a

overnight space, with two more in the cabin. Shallow draught

custom, built-in hamper to fridge and stereo. It’s the humble

means she can take the bottom and trails easily.

old harbour launch reinvented to give happiness today.

Price €48,975, romilly.nl

Price £33,000, cockwells.co.uk

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


New Design Restoration Reconfiguration Rig Design Race Optimization Project Management

YACHT DESIGNERS & NAVAL ARCHITECTS

Conceptual and full production drawings. Designers of the Fairlie Yachts Range.

Specializing in Classic and Spirit of Tradition Yachts. Paul Spooner Design Ltd

01794 328 174

Romsey, Hampshire

enquiries@psdesign.uk.com

SO51 6BN

paulspoonerdesign.com

170614_PSDesign_Advert_v2.indd 1

22/06/2017 12:29

Uncompromising quality, whatever your project Fairlie’s 21st century yachts recall the beauty of Fife’s famous sheer lines, keeping faith with the details of his intimate accommodations and exquisitely detailed deck joinery, these contemporary boats make no compromise on aesthetics. A single log of mahogany is selected for each yacht, ensuring a colour match and continuity of grain which few can equal. Fairlie embrace modern concepts and materials, producing results that the master would love to have had at his fingertips. Their perfectly balanced hulls of today are more athletic than their predecessors, they deliver swift passage times and exciting race performance.

Modern Classics from 45 to 110 feet www.fairlieyachts.com FAIRLIE YACHTING LTD, PORT HAMBLE, SOUTHAMPTON, SO31 4NN. +44 (0)23 8045 6336 DUNCAN@FAIRLIEYACHTS.COM

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

55


Davey & Company

www.davey.co.uk

Established 1885

FOR SALE

Martinez Studio

gardner-quarter-page.indd 1

British Made

15/12/2016 08:09

ZE EA REND, Award winning classic yacht for sale. Dupped as “Hit ler s Yach t ” sh e is a real piece of her it age. Bui l t in 1938 for the Ger man Kr ieg smar i n e an d taken by th e Br it ish allies sh e ha s sailed the Ocean . After an ext en siv e reb u ild sh e is ready to mak e her deb u t ba c k in th e classic yach t scen e. With her sleek eleg an t line s sh e sa i l s nicely in ev en th e st r on g e s t we a th e r . Find o ut mor e?: FAC EB OOK /ZEEAREND YACHT

m ail: dec. em ile@g m a il. c o m p h o n e : +32 (0)4 7 2 7 3 7 9 0 5

Bu i l d e r Ye a r T yp e L.o.a. Be a m Draft to n n a g e

Burmester 1938 windfall 17.00 m 3.40 m 2.30 m 1 7 , 3 0 t on n e s

En gi n e yanmar 65 HP Flag Belgium L o c a ti o n O s t en d B e l g i u m a c c o m o d a ti o n 6 beds As k i n g € 18 5 . 0 0 0 , 0 0

YACHT REFIT AND RESTORATION Computer designed panel system teak decks Bespoke cabinet and furniture making • Traditional boat-building

- Secure storage and transport of boats and shipping containers -

Carrer Can Roselló 6ª. Pol. Son Oms, 07199 Palma de Mallorca, Islas Baleares, Spain info@oceanrefit.com +34 646 002 561

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

www.oceanrefit.com +34 971 730 042


SPIRIT OF TRADITION

Pen-Hir A revivalist school of thought in France in the early 1980s bemoaned the increasing specialisation of racing dinghies and sought to design and build dinghies and dayboats of the old mould, boats that could be rowed as well as sailed, or take an outboard, with something stretched over the boom for nights under the stars. Enter Francois Vivier, whose boats could be built to plan or kit, or ordered from a professional boatbuilder. Pen-Hir is a later boat from Vivier, a 24-footer (7.5m) with decent accommodation, good looks, trailability and a serious turn of speed. She’s been designed with a nod to the handy, fast American knockabouts of the early 20th century, from the likes of Alden and Crowninshield, although she’s beamier, and the workboats of the designer’s Brittany. Simplicity is the key: no diesel, no winches and no through-hull fittings. Home build: €35-40,000 (c2,200 hours). Yard build: €100,000.

MERVYN MAGGS

EMILLY HARRIS VIVIER C/O FRANCOIS

vivierboats.com

Rustler 33

Norfolk Gypsy

When you go to a designer like Stephen Jones and say: “It’s

Over the years, a few Spirit of Tradition niches have emerged

got to look good and sail well…we don’t care about headroom,”

and the most numerous type, by far, is quite a specific

you know you’re going to get something tasty. The GRP Rustler

formula: a small, heavy, seagoing, centreboard cabin yacht of

33 was first launched in 2012. Most SoT yachts borrow from

around 19/20ft (c6m) for four to sail or two to overnight, built

pre-war (particularly 1930s) design. The R33 owes its origins

in GRP with an easily-managed gaff rig, and towable, if you

to post-war Metre yachts, with a retroussé counter stern,

have the right car. The best-selling of these by far is the

square-oval portlights and gentle sheer. It results in one of the

Cornish Shrimper, but countless others have entered the fray.

most subtly original and beautiful yachts of recent years. Add

This one, the Norfolk Gypsy, is “built to a standard, not a

to that modern, dinghy-like performance, build quality and a

price”, sturdily and smartly put together, with glacial

competitive price, and you have the ideal weekender. She’s a

depreciation a balm to that high initial price. More than 140

great reminder that a yacht is, ultimately, a wonderful toy.

have been built since the 1980s.

Price £114,500, rustleryachts.co.uk

Price £45,750, neilthompsonboats.co.uk

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

57


C/O JEREMY ROGERS

SPIRIT OF TRADITION

Drascombe Lugger

Is she a Spirit of Tradition yacht? Perhaps she wasn’t built as

The humble Drascombe Lugger, first built in 1965, has sold

one, but it’s true that at her launch in 1970, she balanced

more than all the other boats on this list: a lot more – 2,000

traditional hull characteristics with what was then a very

and counting. The 19-footer (5.8m) was designed by John

modern underbody of fin keel and skeg-hung rudder. She sold

Watkins to be light, commodious and seaworthy. These days

well from the start and has gone onto become a legend: fast,

built in GRP by Churchouse Boats, she’s perhaps the perfect

sweet-lined, tolerably commodious for her era and her

family boat, of a size to take six adults, beachable with a

reputation for seaworthiness was cemented after surviving

plate-up draught of just 10in (25cm) and rigged with a safe,

the notorious 1979 Fastnet. She’ll win around the cans and

boomless gunter yawl set-up. At less than 400kg, you can trail

cruise around the world. The 32 is still built today in GRP by

a Lugger with an ordinary car. Plenty of built-in buoyancy

the same family, the Rogers, in Lymington.

completes this capable open boat for river, lake or sea.

Price £189,000, jeremyrogers.co.uk

Price £17,500, drascombe.co.uk

FIRST LIGHT BOATWORKS

Contessa 32

58

First Light 26

Botin 22

The First Light 26 (a 36 and 24 also exist) from Cape Cod

The latest launch from Brooklin Boat Yard in Maine is Toroa, a

builder First Light Boatworks will appeal to anyone with an

22m cruiser/racer designed by Botin Partners of Spain. A

eye for a pretty, utility-style runabout that goes like stink. At

single layer of cedar strip planking half an inch thick became

26ft (8m), it looks the part (with or without sprayhood) with

the mould, followed by a layer of carbon, foam, then carbon.

workboat styling, wooden clinker topsides and your choice of

The wooden deck beams were laid up with a layer of carbon

layout. The Suzuki 140hp outboard (mounted inside the

in them and the deck itself was constructed of a thin layer of

hinged engine box visible) gives 30 knots flat out, with a

V-matched plywood (to appear as a painted wooden deck

20-knot cruising speed and draught of 2ft 2in (66cm) or just

from below), followed by carbon, foam, and thin teak decking.

1ft 3in (38cm) with the motor tilted, which makes her very

Pushing the envelope of modern construction and design in a

beachable. Add a swim platform and space for 12, at a push,

community of boat builders rooted in the traditional, this is

and you can see why she won a 2017 Classic Boat Award.

the very outer point of the Spirit of Tradition.

Price from $135,000, firstlightboatworks.com

Price $POA brooklinboatyard.com

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


Untitled-1 1

26/09/2017 14:40:27

BEN HARRIS & CO Wooden boat building in Cornwall Newbuild, Restoration, Repair

Tel: +44 (0)1206 302863 Tel: +44 (0)1206 302863 Email: lawrencesails@btconnect.com Email: lawrencesails@btconnect.com “Proud to have been chosen as the sailmaker for “Mink”

“Mink”, Herreshoff Buzzards Bay 25, 1914, sailing off Mystic, USA

ita G ith in re at

“what a beauty”

Pr Ma id de e B Prr Min G with iidta ad re ei e B nin wat r

Rob Masons “Myfanwy” 1897

www.benharrisboats.co.uk info@benharrisboats.co.uk tel: 07570 780 864 CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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G. L. W ATSO N Martins Building Wat er Street Liverpool L2 3SX UK T: +44 (151) 6018080 F: +44 (151) 6018070

www.glwat son.com

This drawing is the property of G.L. Watson & Co. Ltd. It may not be used in any other contract or project.It must bereturnedtoG.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.immediatelyupon request and any electronic versions deleted. The receipt and acceptance of thisdrawingimpliesthat theseconditionsasstatedareaccepted. This drawing, its contents and any information received with it may not be copied nor disclosedtoany3rdpartywithout expresswrittenpermissionof G.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.

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eeing a yacht in the flesh and sailing her in a wide variety of conditions is enough to tell an experienced mariner a lot about her character. When the only information available is a photo and a lines plan, things can be very different. The image gives a general impression, but it’s the plan that really dishes the dirt. These days, the classic lines plan has fallen into disuse for most amateurs. The reason is simple. In contrast to the average craft designed before World War II, the hull shapes of today’s production cruising yachts are unsophisticated, delivering good performance in fair weather by virtue of a relatively low wetted area, a clean run, a deep fin keel and a spade rudder. The lines plan of such a boat is of scant interest compared with the drawings of the deep-bodied, CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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HOW TO READ LINES PLANS three-dimensional types of yesterday. A profile drawing is generally all that is offered, because a lines plan would do little to improve on it. Before this revolution took place, sailing magazines rarely hit the news stands without at least one lines plan of a new boat. Studied with an educated eye, these revealed a great deal. They were pored over in yacht club bars, scrutinised on kitchen tables by yachtsmen home from the office, and generally assessed for the nature of the vessels about which they spoke so fluently. Today, the lines plan is largely the domain of the classic yacht or working boat, yet many users of the vessels we love have not had the benefit of exposure to these wonderful documents from childhood, as had our fathers and grandfathers. Unveiling the enigma in a few words is not easy, but the apparent complexity of a lines plan is easier to understand if seen in the light of its historical predecessor, the half model. Half models have been around since long before designers first began drawing yachts. While naval architects were drafting lines plans back into the 19th century, half models were used until the Great War as the primary arbiter of the form of a new vessel to be built in what one might describe as ‘vernacular’ yards. The builder and his client, perhaps a pilot or a fisherman, would discuss the shape each thought best, the builder would produce a half model and they would meet again to reopen negotiations. Assuming the first ‘take’ failed to satisfy, further models would be produced, or the original modified until both parties were satisfied. I can personally testify to the success of this method. When my small, 40ft pilot cutter Westernman was designed by Nigel Irens in 1995, she started her life as a

“Few can visualise the threedimensional implications of a yacht’s sections from a twodimensional body plan”

Previous spread: GL Watson’s lines plans for the Royal Yacht Britannia; and a 3D graphic of the different elements (below)

Sections

CAD DRAWINGS BY PAUL SPOONER DESIGN

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Buttocks

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

sketch on a paper napkin in the public bar of a waterfront pub. Irens, fully equipped with computerassisted design software (CAD) and all the rest, insisted on building a model first so we could really see what she looked like. How right he proved to be. We made a second one, then got to work refining bulwarks and other details, creating a fine-looking vessel that ate the wind out of most opposition. The CAD came at the end. Traditionally, once the model was finalised, the vital shape of the boat was extracted from it. The essence of this consists of the side-on profile and what are generally called ‘sections’. These define the curving form of the boat from deck level down to the keel at regular stations along her length, taking in slack forward areas, wineglass midships sections and long runs to counter, transom or double-ended sterns. They were deduced either by sawing the model vertically across at rightangles to its flat back face so that it was divided into a number of sections, or by marking where the saw cuts would have been and lifting the shape of the sections by a process of accurate measurement called ‘taking off the lines’. This system worked surprisingly well because, at model size at least, the hull was known to be ‘fair’. You could see this with your own eyes. Sometimes, ‘shadow’ sections (full-size mock-ups) were erected before the final building began. If whippy battens were run around these, any minor discrepancies induced by problems of scale or the ‘lifting process’ were revealed. They could be dealt with by eye before committing expensive, well-seasoned timber to the saw. When a vessel is designed on paper, the draft may start with a sheer line and a general hull profile, but it is those magic sections which make up the critical forms that are chalked, full-size, on the loft floor for laying out the frames. On the lines drawing, the sections are conventionally shown fanning out from bow to amidships on the right-hand side of the section plan (the ‘body plan’) and from amidships to the stern on the left side. It is theoretically possible to build from them alone, but to proceed down such a path without any further checking could be considered reckless. Paper is a wonderful tool and a skilled draftsman can perform marvels on it. Dr Harrison Butler, one of the masters of design, insisted on paper of an extraordinary quality before he would even begin, lest any movement in the actual substrate generate the tiniest distortion in his lines. In the final analysis, however, few can visualise all the three-dimensional implications of a yacht’s sections from a two-dimensional body plan. It is, therefore, also both wise and conventional to fill in certain details of the vessel in a plan view (from above)


HOW TO READ LINES PLANS

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Status Notes Date Approved Preliminary

G. L. W ATSO N Martins Building Wat er Street Liverpool L2 3SX UK T: +44 (151) 6018080 F: +44 (151) 6018070

www.glwat son.com

This drawing is the property of G.L. Watson & Co. Ltd. It may not be used in any other contract or project.It must bereturnedtoG.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.immediatelyupon request and any electronic versions deleted. The receipt and acceptance of thisdrawingimpliesthat theseconditionsasstatedareaccepted. This drawing, its contents and any information received with it may not be copied nor disclosedtoany3rdpartywithout expresswrittenpermissionof G.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.

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and in profile (from the side). By noting the points at which each succeeding section cuts a predetermined line horizontal to the load waterline on the design ‘grid’, it is possible to plot a line scribed around the half hull which is equivalent to a slice cut horizontally through the model. A number of these so-called ‘waterlines’ are constructed, and while the architect’s main concern is that they should fall into a series of sweet curves without bumps or hollows to disturb water flow, the observant sailor can usually draw further conclusions from their shape. The ‘buttock lines’ complete the picture of the vessel. They represent vertical slices parallel to the centreline, providing a further check on fairness in the body plan. Their form can be as revealing as the waterlines. While producing a similar dissertation many years ago for the Yachtsman magazine, I reasoned that a set of visual aids would be a great help, and asked the Boat Building School at Falmouth College to make a run of half models for us to cut up. Such material extravagance is anathema to post-financial-crisis thinking, but, happily, something similar can be achieved today using CAD. Master of CAD is naval architect Paul Spooner, who came riding into the breach with a series of creations around a generic classic yacht shape. These can be related to the lines plan of the GL Watson Royal Yacht Britannia, designed in 1893 and reproduced here by kind permission of GL Watson and Co Ltd. A lines plan works for any shape of boat, from a smack built on the beach with a half model to a yacht of Britannia’s sophistication from the board of an acknowledged master. Reading lines is an unceasing pleasure because they are greater than the sum of the data they represent. Like the boats they describe, they have aesthetic qualities and the more one looks at them, the more enlightened one becomes. In time, picking up the essence of a fine yacht from a sheet of paper is no longer a matter of analysis. It develops into the thrill of discovering a creation of three-dimensional art.

Project

Status Preliminary

Date

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Client Approval Date Approved

G. L. W ATSO N Martins Building Wat er Street Liverpool L2 3SX UK T: +44 (151) 6018080 F: +44 (151) 6018070

www.glwat son.com

This drawing is the property of G.L. Watson & Co. Ltd. It may not be used in any other contract or project.It must bereturnedtoG.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.immediatelyupon request and any electronic versions deleted. The receipt and acceptance of thisdrawingimpliesthat theseconditionsasstatedareaccepted. This drawing, its contents and any information received with it may not be copied nor disclosedtoany3rdpartywithout expresswrittenpermissionof G.L.Watson& Co.Ltd.

SECTIONS The CAD opposite shows what would happen if a half model were sawn across just as it might have been in real life 100 years ago. The body plan of the yacht indicates relatively full sections forward with plenty of reserve buoyancy in the overhang, promising a sea-kindly ease of motion that resists pitching, and a dry foredeck. The midships section shows a powerful turn of the bilge which, at this scale of yacht, will confer huge sail-carrying ability to augment the deep ballast keel, while the ‘hollow’ (concave) sections of the run actually begin forward of amidships, encouraging the cleanest of wakes from this mighty yacht described by Uffa Fox as: “Handsome is as handsome does.” WATERLINES The waterlines are the easiest part of a lines plan to understand and can offer the ‘key of the door’ to a neophyte yacht connoisseur. As one would expect from the board of a designer of GL Watson’s calibre, Britannia’s waterlines, seen here at the lower part of the illustration, run fair from stem to stern, with no suggestion of a distortion anywhere. As is often the case, the entry appears far finer in this view than it does to the non-specialist eye looking at the body plan. Notice the way the lower waterlines, the ones which begin well aft, lie virtually on top of one another for much of their length, denoting the dead-drop of the keel. In way of the quarter, the upper waterlines seem to suggest that the beam in the aft part will not balance the entry. This is deceptive, with reassurance readily to hand by reference to the underwater sections and the buttocks, as they sweep sweetly into the perfect counter stern. BUTTOCKS The buttock nearest the centreline of a yacht often reveals some strange influences, particularly in the area of deepest draught. It does so here. This is no cause for alarm, however, as it reflects the almost vertical sides of the lower part of the keel. Further up towards the load waterline, the truth is revealed. The vertical lines on the profile drawing which represent the sections tie the buttocks in to them. Following each buttock line from bow to stern shows, in Britannia’s case, a balanced hull with the easiest of runs off aft where the critical wake is generated. A less refined design often suffers from sharp turns in the buttocks aft, promising uneven water flow and a slow boat. In Britannia’s case, the water will run away to the stern so easily that it will be positively anxious to leave. CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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MIKE ATFIELD

Salute to a boatbuilder Salcombe’s last traditional boatbuilder has retired, ending a tradition in the Devon town that goes back generations STORY ROB PEAKE PHOTO NIC COMPTON

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I

t was a very British affair. A fleet of largely open boats travelling slowly together up Salcombe Harbour – in the driving rain. At a certain point opposite the town, above the wind and torrential downpour, horns and sirens could be heard tooting their respect. Sheltered on the quay, one man stood quietly, a mixture of pride and surprise on his face, memories flooding back of the boats he’d built over a five-decade career – a career that those in the town’s maritime community wanted to acknowledge. “It was lovely and quite humbling,” says Mike Atfield afterwards, at a reception in Salcombe Yacht Club. “You never think, when you’re doing your job in a little shed down in the town, that you’re making an impact on anything.” When Atfield closed the doors of his Island Street workshop for the last time in July, he also did so on a tradition of wooden boatbuilding in the town going back generations, to the days when early 19th century Salcombe shipwrights built fruit schooners for voyages around the world. An Atfield creation is a more modest thing – more likely a rowing boat, a launch or one of the Salcombe yawl fleet – but no less handsome. The remarkable success of his career is defined in one comment he makes: “From 1974 to when I retired, I only had one day when I never had a boat to build.” That was in 1991. The next day someone walked in and commissioned a new yawl. Atfield was born in Yorkshire, the son of a steel worker and a housekeeper who moved to Salcombe for work. Atfield left school aged 15 and got a five-year apprenticeship at Edgar Cove Boatbuilder in Island Street, Salcombe. “It was a very different sort of place back then,” Atfield recalls of his early days in the town. “There were five boatyards in Island Street alone. People would retire here and they would always seem to have a wooden launch, a tender and a yawl. So there was a lot of work.” Edgar Cove’s was the biggest yard in the area (by that time run by Cove’s son Edward) and won contracts with the Admiralty and RNLI, not that Atfield saw much of that work. “I spent several years just building pram dinghies, one after the other. I always wanted to build a rowing boat, something with a stem. You’d go and see the boss and ask: ‘What next?’ and he’d say: ‘Another pram!’ One day I went in and said: ‘What now, another pram?’ He said: ‘No, you can build a rowing boat now.’ The reverse psychology worked!” Being an apprentice in those days involved paying your dues. “At the end of my first week I came home and said: ‘I’m not going back there.’ You were the lowest of the low. Then someone else would come in and you’d move up one,” Atfield recalls. “But it gave you a really good foundation. There were always boats on the go. It’s a shame there aren’t many yards around now where you can be an apprentice in the same way.” Atfield set up on his own aged 21, in 1974. His first

commission was a 16ft (4.9m) launch, then an 11ft (3.4m) tender, then the first of what became 30 Salcombe yawls. “I enjoyed talking to the owner and finding out what they wanted – starting with nothing and building it up from there. The other day we had a customer come in saying having his boat built, all those years ago, was one of the best experiences of his life. He compared having a boat built to buying a Maserati, where you just go to the garage and buy the finished product. To have something built for you is a more fulfilling experience.” Everything was done traditionally in the Atfield yard: “[Yacht designer] Ian Howlett once said to me: ‘There’s a lot to be said for a pencil!’ When you draw it out, you get a feel for it, more than you do on a computer screen.” And Atfield recalls advice passed on by Edward Cove on valuing ‘the eye’ as much as any other tool in the box: “You’ve measured it but it still looks wrong. Then you odds things a bit here and there and it starts to look as if it was meant to be.” The yard was very much a two-person show, Jean joining him in the seven-day-a-week routine as ‘chief painter and varnisher’, not her husband’s favourite task. Salcombe regatta fortnight would often see them work most of the night to ensure boats could sail again the next day. They were surprised in 2011 when they were given notice that ‘a member of the royal family’ had expressed a wish to visit them. “I thought it must be a wind up,” Atfield recalls. The visitor turned out to be Prince Charles, who with the Duchess of Cornwall arrived one morning and spent some time chatting about sustainability of timber supplies. The Prince was complimentary, too, of Atfield’s cannon carriages, which he made for Britannia Royal Naval College and HMS Excellent in Portsmouth. He and Jean suffered a personal tragedy nine years ago when their son Nick, then aged 31, was killed in an accident as he helped unload a fishing boat alongside the fish quay. He was a popular man in the town and his death shook the Salcombe community. Today, Atfield says: “Nick would never have taken on the yard – working with the fishing fleets of Salcombe and Dartmouth was his first love. “There are still people in Salcombe who can build wooden boats, but building a boat is a long-term thing. Over the same time you can probably get a better income doing repairs and restorations. I have always said to young people that they have to build one boat, so people can see their work, then the work will follow. People still want traditional boats.” Atfield’s final tally, he reckons, is 128, including 30 Salcombe yawls. Rare things. Those who have one know they keep their value. Atfield may have been operating in a different sphere to some of the big name builders of the classic world, but those in that rainy parade down Salcombe Harbour knew they were saluting a master craftsman.

“From 1974 to when I retired, I only had one day when I never had a boat to build”

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BOOKS THE BEST FROM 2017 More cracking reads for your already groaning bookshelves...

Sir John Franklin’s Erebus and Terror Expedition: Lost and Found GILLIAN HUTCHINSON This book is an accompaniment to an utterly gripping exhibition at the National Maritime Museum Greenwich, which runs until 5 January, 2018, on Franklin’s ill-fated expedition in 1845 to find the North West Passage. The story is wellknown: both Franklin’s ships, Erebus and Terror, disappeared in the ice with the loss of 129 men, but exactly what happened to them remained a mystery. The ships were only found in 2014 and 2016, revealing more about how the men may have met their

to life through paintings and

Tales from the Captain’s Log: From Captain Cook to Charles Darwin, Blackbeard and Nelson, accounts of great events at sea from those who were there

photographs, as well as an accessible

A faithful reproduction of letters, journals, log entries, diaries and other first hand accounts of

text. Both wrecks are in excellent

nautical events in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries – transcribed for slightly easier reading – to

condition, preserved by the cold

make an engrossing and handsome volume. The source material is all stored in the National

water, Erebus only 11 metres below

Archives at Kew in west London and most of it has rarely seen the light of day. A modern day

the surface and Terror with intact

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panes of glass, 48 metres down.

£25 Bloomsbury

deaths. This is an undemanding softback book that brings the story

£18.99 Bloomsbury

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


WELL WORTH A READ

Last Voyages NICHOLAS GRAY

Solo Around Cape Horn

The stories behind the

EDWARD ALLCARD

fatal last voyages of 11

Characteristically

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£9.99 Fernhurst

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The Impractical Boat Owner

Quality Time?

DAVE SELBY

A welcome re-run of

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The Piper Calls the Tune: The life and legacy of David Boyd, yacht designer

Crab’s Odyssey

BY EUAN ROSS

PENNY MINNEY

Shetland’s Open Boat Days

Scotman Boyd started his career working with Wm Fife III and ended

Young friends sail from

CHARLIE SIMPSON

up almost as famous himself, drawing two post-war British America’s

Malta to Istanbul in an

First-hand narratives

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open boat in the 1950s.

telling of when

its 50th anniversary last year. Ross’ biography is first rate and his text is

Atmospheric memoir of

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open boat fishermen.

£14.99 Amazon

£10.50 Taniwha Press

£13.99 Shetland Times

A New History of Yachting MIKE BENDER In the words of Tom Cunliffe, who writes the foreword, this new 440-page account of our favoured hobby is a “thumping good read”. Bender takes the tale from its very stirrings to the modern day, bringing in all manner of influences from the development of motorways to changes in technology and politics. Notably, from 1880 onwards, he avoids a focus on racing and includes the everyday cruising yachtsman in a small boat, who sailed for pleasure. £30 Boydell Press

MIKE PEYTON

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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BOOKS

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Barefoot Navigator JACK LAGAN

Into the Southern Ocean

How to navigate using

ANDREW HALCROW

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Waypoints: Seascapes and Stories of Scotland’s West Coast

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birds and more.

round the world.

Beautifully written accounts of sea journeys honouring different craft,

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mostly traditional, including an Orkney yole, a Stella and a South Coast One Design, each one interwoven with a re-telling of a traditional tale about the sea. Former Isle of Lewis coastguard Ian Stephen has created a lyrical and gentle commentary on the nautical past and present. £18.99 Bloomsbury

The Cape Horners’ Club

A Wild Call

ADRIAN FLANAGAN

Thought-provoking

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£18.99 Bloomsbury

£11.99 Fernhurst

MARTYN MURRAY

JAM or how I learned to love the RIB BY JAMES ROBINSON TAYLOR Regular Classic Boat readers will know the photos of James Robinson Taylor well. The popular American photographer, who lives in Florence, has taken some of the iconic images of the great classic yachts over the past three decades. This, his first book, takes us around the race course, with photos of yachts old and modern at each part. It’s an aesthetic delight, printed on thick matt paper and with James giving a humorous insight into the photographer’s lot. €48 jrtphoto.com

Herreshoff – American Masterpieces

Restoring a Dunkirk Little Ship: Caronia SS70

The Sea Devil An epic WW1 tale of

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photography.

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


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Charting the Oceans

Young America

PETER WHITFIELD

Second installment

From the British

on how to model the

Library’s collection of

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the ‘island’ of California.

of instructional photos.

Classic Boat writer and photographer Nigel

£14.99 British Library

$75 Sea Watch Books

The Boats I’ve Loved CHUCK PAINE

A History of Whisstock’s Boatyard

A charming, personal

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Sea Charts of the British Isles

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Off the Deep End: A History of Madness at Sea

The story of the fabulous Lady

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charts and surveys

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McMurtrie. Deservedly lavish.

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Classic Boats

EDWARD J. TOSTI

Sharp offers 180 of his own photos of classic boats afloat today, with brief and authoritative text accompanying each. Nigel has shot the boats on his travels far and wide. From a newly built Thames skiff to the Big Class. £14.99 Amberley

Donald Campbell 300+ A Speed Odyssey DAVID DE LARA De Lara has dedicated his life to chronicling the Campbell story and here, with a poignant foreword by Gina Campbell, he has amassed fascinating behind the scenes photos, many of them previously unseen in colour, including a moment-by-moment retelling of the fatal crash on Coniston. £30 The History Press

Three Men & A Boat: portrait of a classic Thames launch

JOHN BLAKE

£25 Middle Thames Publications CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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DAVID BOYD JR COLLECTION

DAVID BOYD

David Boyd’s first major commission under his own name was the 61ft yawl Zigeuner, launched in 1935

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


DAVID BOYD

DAVID BOYD

THE ROBERTSON YEARS America’s Cup success proved elusive, but contrary to public perception, the designer’s post-war years were his most successful, as we learn in the second, concluding part of our Boyd appraisal WORDS EUAN ROSS

D

avid Boyd reported for duty at Alexander Robertson and Sons’ yard in November 1929 at a fine starting salary of £5 per week, no doubt justified by the competition for his services. However, after an initial burst of activity on a backlog of work, it became obvious that, in terms of new orders, the forecast for the entire shipbuilding industry on the Clyde was not encouraging. Prospects in ‘luxury’ yacht building may have been less bleak, but they were by no means heartening. With so many wonderful designers then at the peak of their powers, any young pretender would have been lucky to pick up such work, even if he was known to be a disciple of Fife. In this difficult environment, Boyd’s impatience for new commissions led him to enter design competitions. His first successful submission, for a substantial 35ft (10.7m) LWL ketch, was published in 1931. The following year, he submitted a 55ft (16.8m) RORC rating cutter to the seminal Royal Corinthian Design Competition of 1932. On the work front, Boyd developed into a valued professional rapport with James Barnett when Robertson's won its first contract for a Watson Lifeboat in 1934. Barnett remained a true friend and valued mentor through the difficult aftermath of the America’s Cup Challenges. James Rennie Barnett is perhaps a less familiar name among yachtsmen today than some of the other Scottish ‘greats’, since his wonderful portfolio lies under the radar, or more precisely under the GL Watson and Co name. Robertson’s built a total of 28 GL Watson designs by Barnett, so the design office was well known to the yard and Robertson’s in turn was a respected contractor who could be trusted to deliver a boat that floated to her marks.

David Boyd’s first major commission under his own name was the 61ft (16.8m) yawl Zigeuner of 1935. His initial in-house design work at Sandbank had been attributed to Alexander. Now, Boyd made the semantically significant transition from ‘draftsman’ to ‘designer’, and with this came overdue design credits. The new yacht was well received by the cognoscenti at her launch that spring. On her first visit to the Solent, Zigeuner was slipped for a scrub at Nicholson’s in Gosport. The great Charles E Nicholson phoned his son John “in a state of pleasure and excitement” and demanded that the boy should come down to the yard immediately to admire the boat there and then. Zigeuner established the Boyd/ Robertson combination as a potent formula for ‘design and build’ on the Clyde. But market trends were shifting gradually to favour the new generation of more utilitarian RORC cruiserracers pioneered by Laurent Giles & Partners. There was less emphasis on elegance and fine craftsmanship – Robertson’s stock in trade. Consequently, for Boyd the highlight of the pre-war years was a relatively small and simple racing yacht. Circe was launched in 1937 and took the yachting world by storm. She was twice winner of the Seawanhaka Cup. Later, after the war, she was far above any other 6-M on the Solent. Subsequently, Circe’s reputation made Boyd the go-to designer for 6-M yachts in Britain during the post-war years. David Boyd may have been perpetually busy at his place of work, but he generally made time for his other interests; although later, during the Sceptre campaign, he lamented that he “hardly had the time to lift a gun”. The taciturn designer was renowned locally as an excellent shot and for many years maintained his own rough CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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DAVID BOYD

DAVID BOYD JR COLLECTION

“Zigeuner established the Boyd/Robertson combination as a potent formula for ‘design and build’ on the Clyde”

Above: the Boyd family sailing its 6-Metre Alana at the Hunters Quay Regatta in 1947

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shoot at the head of the Holy Loch. Only the most passionate wildfowlers aspire to the electrifying modus operandi of the ‘gunning punter’. David Boyd was up for the challenge. He designed and built a punt gun and a punt to carry it. There was a strong connection between the sports of sailing and wildfowling in the old days, as described by writers from Dixon Kemp to Keith Shackleton. Yachting books from the turn of the century often contained sections on building punts, and extolled the vicarious pleasures of stalking ducks among the reedbeds in the early morning mists of quiet backwaters. Boyd spent the war years of 1939-45 supervising the build of fast, prefabricated warships to standard designs for the Admiralty. There wasn’t much new conceptual design work but there were endless detailed design problems to solve. Pleasure craft were mothballed or requisitioned and the sport of yachting put on indefinite hold. Many Clyde yachtsmen took their small-boat skills and local knowledge to war in the coastal defence vessels of the Royal Navy and the RNVR. The conflict brought a halt to most new yacht work through to 1946. This long ‘dry spell’ without a major design commission was bracketed by two unbuilt David Boyd designs, both rather beautiful: Caledonia – an elegant 12-Metre design proposal of 1938, later published in Uffa Fox’s Thoughts on Yachts and Yachting, and a successful Yachting World competition entry for a slim 30ft (9.1m) dayboat in 1946. In 1947, work again began to materialise; Circe was still the top boat on the Solent,

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

so there were orders for new 6-Metres. In this optimistic but difficult economic environment, the Robertson family sought to re-establish its business as a ‘centre of excellence’. David Boyd became a director of the firm in 1947. That year, he acquired the 6-Metre Alana. In the immediate post-war period there were good numbers of keenly sailed Metre boats on the Clyde. At the 1947 Hunters Quay Regatta, there were 10 yachts entered in the 6-Metre class (including Boyd’s newly launched sister-ships, Marletta and Thistle) and nine in the ‘ex-6-Metres’ – mainly older Sixes, some of which sailed with handicaps. This latter fleet included the Boyds' Alana (ex-Priscilla II drawn by Boyd in 1929 during his Fife incumbency), the Lorimers' Suzette (ex-Lucille, a 1928 Fife design also likely drafted by Boyd, but built by McGruer) and McGruer’s Tystie (Ex-Saskia III, a 1935 Mylne design built by the Bute Slip Dock). Vorsa (Mylne 1931) was sailed by Tom S Black, the Greenock sailmaker whose son John ran Mackenzie of Sandbank, the local sail loft. So a real battle of the yards, then, but not in boats ostensibly designed or built in-house, and revealingly fought in the second division. Clearly, a new state-of-theart Six was beyond the means of the middle-class. The early post-war years were perhaps Boyd’s most successful period as a designer. His 6-Metres were among the very best in the world and all were quick to a degree, so too were his designs to the new IYRU 5.5-Metre class and the quirky and rather wonderful Windermere 17s.


DAVID BOYD ARCHIVE

DAVID BOYD

Top: an 8-Metre proposal, 1966. Above: Boyd and Olin Stephens, 1958. Right: James Rennie Barnett, MD of DAVID BOYD ARCHIVE

GL Watson Ltd. Far right: winning entry for a 1946 competition, in Boyd’s successful post-war years CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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DAVID BOYD Left: 55ft RORC rating cutter, submitted to the Royal Corinthian Design Competition

DAVID BOYD JR COLLECTION

BOYD FAMILY PERMISSION

of 1932

Above: cutaway drawing of Sceptre by James McAuley. Above right: the launch of Sceptre in 1958. was drawn by Boyd to race in the 1964 America’s Cup

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

DAVID BOYD ARCHIVE

Right: Sovereign


DAVID BOYD

“Nothing of this scale and technical complexity had been attempted in Britain since World War II”

Above: Titia at the 1954 Olympics in Vancouver, Canada

While Boyd would doubtless have welcomed more orders, it seemed that he could do no wrong and his boats just became better and better. It wasn’t just racing yachts; Boyd applied his design skills to all manner of powered craft. Skadi, an innovative, transom-sterned 46-footer (14m) to his design, was built by JW Miller and Sons of St Monans in Fife in 1956. He had previously produced the plans for Eilean Shuna, a 76ft (23.2m) seine-net trawler for the east coast yard of JG Forbes back in 1947. Skadi was built to a yacht finish for John Clark of Clarks Shoes and registered as a bona fide fishing boat in Oban. David Boyd achieved his boyhood dream in 1957 when he was one of four British designers invited to submit proposals for a new 12-Metre to challenge for the America’s Cup. Nothing of this scale and technical complexity had been attempted in Britain since the Second World War, but the recent success of Boyd’s offshore 12-tonner Bagheera in successive Giraglia regattas in Italian waters, and the dominant performance of Titia in the USA, after she won the Seawanhaka Cup for Canada the previous year, were grounds for optimism. The work included two sets of lines at the outset and grew to encompass design innovations, new marine products and specialised equipment. In order to cope with the demands of this commission, Boyd secured the services of gregarious polymath James McAuley. With Sceptre, the two men created a masterpiece of integrated product design. But the radical hull form option, which had prevailed in the test tank, was a disappointment. Interviewed by Iain McAllister in his retirement, Boyd

conceded that he always favoured his more conservative alternative, which was well-developed and embodied 30 years of careful design progression. In 1968, after extensive tank-testing, he redesigned the underbody for Eric Maxwell, but the rebuild was shelved. In the aftermath of the Sceptre challenge, Boyd reflected on what went wrong; he studied the work of his US contemporaries and every aspect of Columbia’s successful campaign. There was also some comfort in the fact that, even as the Sceptre debacle unfolded, Stug Perry had taken his 1955 6-Metre Royal Thames to Le Havre and beaten the best of Olin Stephens’ crop to win the One Ton Cup. Boyd recovered quickly from the setbacks of the Sceptre campaign, mainly because it soon became apparent that his recent hard-won 12-Metre experience was now a priceless asset. At the same time, he assumed greater responsibility for the overall management of Robertson’s Yard as managing director. Then, over the winter of 1961-62, he began preparatory work on a new America’s Cup yacht for Tony Boyden. In sharp contrast to 1957, he now had access to the latest technologies and the time and money to develop and refine his ideas for this second challenge. Boyd visited New York regularly over a period of 18 months to tank-test his evolving design ideas at the Stephens test tank. Sovereign was the final set of challenger lines to be tested in the USA before access was denied to competing designers from overseas. Allan Murray, the Stephens Institute director, said that, “David Boyd’s model testing was very good, an equal in many ways to the wonderful work done here two years ago by Alan Payne of CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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Above: Rustler 24, based on the Piper OD, the hull by Boyd, the deck and rig by Rustler. Above, right: Piper ODs at Holy Loch. Below: Sunburst

to 1977. The class celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2017 and is in robust health. In 2006, Adrian Jones of Rustler Yachts still had faith in the old Boyd design. “The Piper hull is as pretty as it gets and fitted our vision.” Adrian has built another 50 of these sweet little boats. Boyd drew two 8-Metre designs at the behest of the Robertson’s Board in 1966 and 1969. The plan was to series-produce this type of boat as a one design in glassfibre. The first design was an elegant long-ended yacht epitomising the classics of the class, but with separate keel and rudder and a long, low coachroof. The second was snub-ended, like the generation of Metre boats we class as ‘Moderns’ today. This iteration had an ‘Intrepid-style’ underbody and a low ‘Etchells-type’ coachroof. Both variations are gorgeous. Boyd’s final design was Victorious in 1977, a daysailer in wood by McGruers on the Gareloch. Her lines show that David had kept up with contemporary Metre boat trends. Was Boyd a great designer? In evaluating the man’s career, we have to consider the environment in which he sought commissions. When he left Fairlie, the golden age of yachting on the Clyde was coming to a close. Beautiful yachts were still being conceived; but the specialised marine industries, which had grown up to cater for a wealthy and leisured elite, struggled through the 1930s and failed to recover in the aftermath of World War II. Post-war austerity and currency controls lingered into the 1960s, as American industry raced ahead, cherry-picking the best scientific minds and capitalising on the opportunities of burgeoning consumer markets. In these circumstances, it is remarkable that for 20 years from 1938 to 1958, an inspired designer working on his own in Scotland could match, and sometimes better, the mighty USA in the red-hot International 6-Metre class. So yes, while David Boyd was perhaps not one of the ‘greats’ in the global pantheon of naval architecture, he was indeed a great designer.

Australia.” Sadly, the 1964 Challenge was perhaps an even greater disappointment for Boyd than his first attempt with Sceptre. But, as in 1958, Boyd received many letters of support from people in the marine industry who understood the complexities of America’s Cup campaigns in a way that contrasted sharply with the tabloid press. And he also received a heartfelt ‘mea culpa’ letter from hapless skipper Peter Scott. Boyd moved on from this heartbreak but, even today with the benefit of hindsight, it is difficult to credit quite how the Sovereign challenge could have misfired on so many levels. The 8-Metre cruiser-racer Sunburst built in 1966 benefited from both Boyd’s tank testing and the practical lessons of the 12-Metre campaigns. She was big for the class, being almost 2ft (0.6m) longer and slightly wider and heavier than Debbie, the last of the McGruer boats. Sunburst ‘killed’ the class and also signalled the end of wooden boatbuilding at Robertson’s. In 1965, after years of insolvency, Robertson’s Yard was acquired by Peter Fairley and his associates. After a protracted handover, David Boyd retired from the firm. The handover coincided with a shift to glassfibre construction and the gestation of the Piper One Design daysailer. More than 50 Pipers were built over the period

BARNEY SANDEMAN

built in 1966

EUAN ROSS

RUSTLER YACHTS

DAVID BOYD

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

The Piper Calls the Tune, the Life and Legacy of David Boyd, Yacht Designer, by Euan Ross, published to mark the 50th anniversary of the Piper OD in 2016, is available at £14.99 from Amazon


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NAVAL STYLE In the days before ‘technical’ foul-weather gear, I discovered a jacket of some calibre ILLUSTRATION CLAUDIA MYATT

I

f you are one of those heroes who sail all winter you’ll have invested heavily to keep warm and dry. By comparison with what passed for foul-weather gear as recently as the early 1970s, today’s kit is far from cheap, but, unlike some of its forebears, it really does the job. There’s a catch, though, for classic boaters. When we’re talking yachts, we squeeze the wallet dry in the quest for authenticity: sailmakers cut panels the same width as the standard bolt of navy cotton canvas, ropes look like hemp even though they’re polyester, traditional anchors take precedence over lighter, more effective alternatives, and wooden blocks with ‘rest-and-be-thankful’ bearings lord it over friction-free wonders that cost far less. We may opt to ignore the fact, but deck hardware has come a long way since the Second World War. So has sailors’ outfitting, yet, like the fisherman’s anchor, the best of traditional sailing clothing can still deliver some gratifying results. For day racing in the Caribbean or the Med, we’ve only to turn the hands out in navy shorts and white shirts or white overalls and we’re sorted. Even if the pants get soaked at the weather mark, today’s wearer will sleep dry in their bunk as the overnight washing machines go about their stealthy business deep in the forepeak. That said, it’s a long time since I saw a helmsman looking as dapper as Charles Nicholson in the 1930 Beken photograph of him steering a big-class yacht with Britannia under his lee. He sports duck trousers, a reefer jacket, a stiff collar, a tie and a white-topped yachting cap as the quarter wave sizzles over his immaculate deck shoes. In a contemporary image, Sir Philip Hunloke is similarly attired helming Britannia. Sir Philip, the King’s sailing master, is up to his waist in heavy water as he stands in the lee scuppers. The skipper sits coolly to windward with brass buttons giving away the professional, while the rest of the gents cluster around in various stages of general shock and awe. One, who presents the appearance of being fatigued or well into his third cocktail, is sporting an oilskin coat. Others huddle on a fore-and-aft bench modelling an assortment of what must then have passed as quality foul-weather gear. Among them is the unmistakable figure of Brooke Heckstall Smith, the gentleman journalist, secretary of the International

Yacht Racing Union and sailor of enormous influence, sometimes affectionately referred to in Cowes as ‘Bookstall Smith’. His texts on how to run a serious yacht were standard works that are still referred to by captains who want to get things right. No attempt was made at uniform among the ‘quality’. Only the paid crew wore standard Guernseys bearing the yacht’s name. Whether appropriate to the yacht’s period or not, there’s no arguing with the fact that modern foul-weather gear is any sane person’s choice on a filthy night down-Channel. Back in the 60s and 70s, this wasn’t an option because it wasn’t there. Disposable income was thin in those days, so we tended to make do with what someone else had left on the boat or cobble up a suit from the local fisherman’s outfitter. In this respect I was lucky. In 1967 I was in the eastern States working as a deckhand on a schooner. The season was well advanced, the evenings were growing cold and I needed a warm coat. My skipper was an elderly ex-Grand Banks doryman whose heart of gold was camouflaged by an exterior of 70-grit sandpaper. I still follow the advice he gave me. He advised: “Forget about them fancy clothing stores. Get your ass down to the Army and Navy outlet a block back from the front. Tell ’em I sent you for a US navy pea jacket. And don’t take no substitute for the real thing.” The outlet store reeked of mothballs and dust. It was hung from floor to vaulted ceiling with combat jackets, forage caps, bandoliers and racks of highly polished boots. They were all used, but the price tags were encouraging so I pressed on. A pea jacket is a sort of heavy-duty, dark-blue reefer, double-breasted with a deep collar that would turn heavy machine-gun fire when snapped into the ‘up’ position. The characteristic buttons are black with a fouled-anchor symbol. It is quilt lined and the woollen cloth is so tightly woven that it keeps out just about anything. I picked an XXL that looked as if it had only been worn by a single titled owner. It fitted, with plenty of room inside for more pullovers and, best of all, it looked great too. It cost me seven US dollars out of my weekly pay of 90. Eight years later I still had it. When my wife and I were faced with a late-season passage from the Caribbean to the UK via Nova Scotia, funds were tight so we decided to take our chance on the


old coat rather than blow what cash we had on new oilskins. Back then, they’d probably have leaked anyway. We only had the one, but since we were unlikely to be on deck at the same time except to reef the mainsail or change the bowsprit jibs, we could ‘hot-coat’ it. So we did. As I came below to the joys of my warm bunk, I’d strip it off and hand it to my wife. It was a bit big for her, but she favours the multi-layered approach to keeping warm. The coat handled the extra sweaters bountifully, so there were no complaints. It must be said that by the time we reached Ireland it was more than a little salty, but, being pure wool, it kept us warm just as wet fleece keeps a million sheep cosy on winter moors the world over. We were too mean to send that pea jacket to the dry-cleaners as it richly deserved, so it hung in a shed until the early 1980s until I discovered it, green all over from the mould that my poor maintenance had encouraged. I binned it with a tear, then went out to buy another. Genuine US navy coats were hard to find in the UK before the internet came along. Now, a Google search will net one with change from 70 quid. I have two. One stays at home for ‘smart’ while the older unit lives on board and is still my preferred foul-weather gear for anything but the wettest scenario. It’s snug, warm and it looks so much more appropriate than some crackly, high-vis outfit that flashes in the dark. Another item of classic gear I once employed to augment the Yankee jacket in the wet was a full-length black oilskin I found hanging on the wheelhouse door of a dredger. It had been there for years. Nobody claimed it, so I liberated it for the cause. It smelt like a herring factory but it was stout and 100 per cent waterproof. Rubber buttons

fastened into a sort of fly front and it became established on my old pilot cutter where all hands called it ‘The Crow’. The Crow was also useful for diverting deck leaks. The boat specialised in these, so the coat was in demand. Once I found my mate deeply asleep beneath it. A North-Sea gale was blowing at the time. The Crow was working well and his bunk was bone dry. When I shook him for our watch he was deeply unconscious and had removed a set of teeth I had always assumed to be his own, so his face showed a shrunken mien. For a fearful moment I thought him dead until he opened one eye and demanded a cup of tea. I grabbed The Crow, slipped it on and clambered into the cockpit where it immediately fielded a bandit green sea. Sadly, The Crow passed beyond my ken when I sold the pilot cutter. Doubtless it was dumped by some misguided individual who failed to recognise its sterling qualities. When the chips are down, I am now left with no choice but to struggle into my modern ‘Cape Horn Specials – dark grey’. On all other occasions, I choose the comfortable pea jacket. My wife, turning a blind eye to the cost, now wears her own.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

79


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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

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Getting afloat WENDY MAY

Hard-weather packet Maurice Griffiths is these days best known for his excellent ‘plywood box’ yacht, the Eventide, plans for which sold to homebuilders in countless numbers during the post-war British sailing boom. Either that, or his famous book on East Coast cruising, Magic of the Swatchways. He did also, however, draw many traditional yachts, and Wendy May is a beautiful example of that. She’s pitch pine on oak, built in 1936 by the Welsh yard of Williams and Parkinson, and gaff cutter rigged. Her commissioning owner wanted an easy-to-handle boat capable of anything – “a hard-weather packet” in his own words. It would seem that’s exactly what he got, as the current owner’s experience has borne out. She’s 26ft (7.9m) in length, with a cosy, traditional four-berth layout below decks, sitting headroom on the saloon berths, and 5ft 9in under the gullwing skylight – enough to don trousers! Dick Durham, a writer for Classic Boat, is selling Wendy May because he has bought a centre-board gaffer to keep on a drying mooring. Dick has written about Wendy May in CB326 and CB349.

Lying East Coast. Asking £13,500. Tel: +44 (0)1905 356482, classicyachtbrokerage.co.uk

BOB AYLOTT

GLEN MARGARET

Garden find – last of a class A couple of years ago, boatbuilder Tim Loftus restored a 25ft Alfred Mylne-designed Glen Class yacht built in 1950 – Glendhu – and we were awed by how elegant and glamorous these yachts are. Tim has since moved to Ullapool in northern of all the Glen Classes – Glen Margaret, also built in 1950. So if you want a Tim Loftus-restored Glen Class, then you’re in luck, as he’s ready to have another go. Another advantage

TIM LOFTUS

Scotland and found – in a garden – the last unaccounted for

of the Glen Class (besides the looks and the history) is that they have an active – and extremely competitive – racing scene. Most of the 19 built are still racing, and ownermaintained. This one’s in better nick than the photo suggests. “We will be able to save most of her centreline except the deadwood,” says Tim. “Eighty per cent of the planking and framing is fine, although a re-fasten is in order. The deck and coachroof will be replaced, but the original spars will serve

Lying Ullapool, Scotland. Cost £30,000 – £40,000. Tel: +44 7795 118651, boatbuildertim@hotmail.com

TIM LOFTUS

again.”

See boats for sale at classicboat.co.uk/type/buy-a-boat CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

81


BOATS FOR SALE

Boats for sale Looking to sell your boat? Reach over 50,000 readers each month

To advertise call James Davenport +44 (0) 20 7349 3793 or email james.davenport@chelseamagazines.com

Copy Deadline for next issue is 19/10/2017

40 FT. 1962 CURTIS & PAPE T.S. CRUISER

Burma Teak hull & deck. Grown oak frames, copper fastened. Twin BMC Commodore diesels, refurbished and very economical. Extensive inventory, much new electronics, Typical Curtis & Pape “Built by the best - with the best” In commission Clyde, owner retiring, being sold with everything. Sea trials available up to 11th October 2017 after that she goes into the shed for the winter. Full details and contact. www.arranroseforsale.co.uk Very keen seller so price now reduced from £79,500 NOW DOWN TO £69,500

ELEGANT 42FT GENTLEMAN YACHT

Elegant 42ft gentleman yacht of 1940, by Devries Amsterdam, impeccably maintained and equipped. Very comfortable, ideal for coastal cruises and moorings, and for the river. New engines. Photos, details and contacts on www.fitzy.be €198,000

DUNKIRK LITTLE SHIP 1939 - 41’x12’x3’ - Carvel Built, Pitch Pine on Oak. Single Perkins Sabre M92 Diesel engine . Extensive inventory for both offshore and inshore cruising. Currently completed extensive 3year 75k+ re-fit and ready to entertain up to 12 guests in her midships open saloon and aft deck. Two berth crew cabin and galley forward. Reasonable offers considered. Contact David Fox on 077895 34945 (Mob) or 01967 402236 E-mail : kilcambfoxs@yahoo.co.uk

PURBROOK HERON 23’ 1964 ROSSITERS.

Surveyed 2017. Yanmar 10HP. Sleeps 2, New Heads. - Anchor Winch, Depth Sounder, Garmin Plotter, VHF - ashore Lymington. Was £6950.00 reduced to £6295.00. ONO. T: 01590 681357/622993. M: 07802511170.

buy two month get one free online & print Looking to sell your boat? Reach over 50,000 readers each month plus 25k web visitors

There are two styles of Boats for Sales ad to choose from and with our special offer, if you buy two months, your third month will be FREE. Pick the style which suits your requirements and email: james.davenport@chelseamagazines.com with your text and image or call +44 (0) 20 7349 3794. Dont miss out, the deadline for the next issue is 19/10/2017

SAMPLE STYLE A GOLANT GAFFER

No. 8. Excellent 2 berth coastal cruiser, built 1999. Length 18’ 9” Beam 7’ Draft 2’ 9” long keel, designed by Roger Dongray. Yanmar GM 10 regularly serviced. Very attractive boat lovingly maintained, Lying Fowey. £12,000 ono. Email: name@classicboat.co.uk 0000 11111111

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

STYLE A. 5cm x 2 columns. Either 160 words or 80 words plus colour photograph. £275 Plus VAT Including Online

SAMPLE STYLE B

CUTTER

Built 1991, mahogany & epoxy hull similar to GRP, 1930’s spars & fittings, beautifully maintained. Visit www.idclark.force9.co.uk for photos and specification. £25,750 Contact 00000 111111

STYLE B. 5cm x 1 colums. Either 55 words or 30 words plus colour photograph. £155 Plus VAT Including Online


BROKERAGE

Brokerage

To advertise call James Davenport +44 (0) 20 7349 3793 or email james.davenport@chelseamagazines.com Copy Deadline for next issue is 19/10/2017

2 Southford Road, Dartmouth, South Devon TQ6 9QS Tel/Fax: (01803) 833899 – info@woodenships.co.uk – www.woodenships.co.uk

Laurent Giles Vertue No.6 built by Harry Kimber in 1939. Original low coachroof design of which only a handful were built, exceptionally pretty little yachts. In present ownership for over 30 years, major rebuild in last year with new garboards, oak floors, keel bolts, engine refurb and complete cosmetic refit. Now a very smart and sound example ready to be launched. Devon £22,500

42’ Luke Powell Gaff cutter launched in 1999, the second of Lukes boats that he designed and built. Larch on oak all bronze screw fastened. 8 berths with 2012 Vetus 42hp diesel. Code of Practice ticket until recently, could be reinstated easily. A superb looking boat with a graceful sheer, easily managed by 2, in good sound condition. Cornwall £165,000

42’ converted MFV built in Devon in 1959. Bought out of fishing in 2007, new larger wheelhouse, new gunnels and a raised foredeck fitted for accommodation. 2 large double berths with a heads, small galley in the wheelhouse. 2014 Volvo Penta 170hp with new shaft and prop gives 9 knots. Covered aft deck perfect for entertaining. Big strong boat with nice lines. Devon £25,000

38’8 Payne Clark Bermudan ketch, built by W.M. King and Sons in 1925. All Teak hull with solid Iroko deck, Perkins M35 diesel. 7 berths in total. A very fine pedigree yacht, well cared for in present 28 year ownership. Extensively cruised, much of it single handed. Notoriously fast and comfortable at sea, a very fine and elegant yacht. Devon £39,500

Windermere 19 built on the lake in 1928. The only remaining example of this 19’ waterline class. Recent major rebuild including new deck and complete new rig. Very pretty and easy to sail single handed with her modern rig. Outboard engine on a side bracket, comes with a custom road trailer. Chance to acquire what is now a unique piece of yachting history. Devon £25,000

17’ launch built by Nick Smith in 2016 on the lines of a Clovelly Picarooner from north Devon, a traditional local fishing boat. Only launched once since her build. Large beam with lots of freeboard making her a safe and stiff boat at sea. Bukh 10hp diesel. Comes with all over cover and custom road trailer. Complete package in ‘as new’ condition. Devon £25,000

Laurent Giles Peter Duck ketch built by Porter and Haylett in 1969. Iroko on oak hull with a teak on ply deck. Beta 37.5hp diesel. Major refit in previous ownership. Well maintained and used regularly, fully equipped with everything you would ever need. A smart and honest example of this spacious and comfortable yacht with huge internal volume. Devon £13,500

45’ Gaff cutter built on Pilot Cutter lines and launched in 2012. A clever adaptation of the traditional design making her ideal for modern sailing with an elegant doghouse for shelter and slightly higher topsides giving a spacious interior with 10 berths. All bronze fastened larch on oak frames. Immaculate build and a stunning yacht, tried and tested over many voyages. Sussex £255,000

Another fascinating selection of traditional and classic yachts only from Wooden Ships. Call for true descriptions, genuine honest values and a service from people who know their boats.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

83


BROKERAGE

CLASSIC YACHT BROKERAGE CELEBRATING 25 YEARS AS LEADING INTERNATIONAL YACHT BROKERS

68ft. SUPER PRESIDENT MOTOR-YACHT J Francis Jones design, built 1973, Dagless Ltd. Wisbech for K B Pickles. Iroko hull, teak decks. Eight guests in four ensuites cabins, plus crew. Pair 350hp Volvo Penta Diesels. Refurbished quality vessel, ideal for exploring the Med. £220,000

Lying: Crotia £15,000

35ft. BERMUDIAN CRUISER/RACER James McGruer design, built 1952 Lloyds 100A1, Bute Dock Co. Port Bannatyne for Ian Muirhead. Mahogany hull, alloy spars, recent sails. Four berths. 25hp Beta Diesel. No expense spared ownership. Seriously for sale. £28,500

40ft. VINTAGE CRUISER/RACER William Brighton designed & built, Gt. Yarmouth in 1886 for day racing. Yellow-pine hull. Six berths in three cabins. 40hp Watermota Engine. Gaff or Bermudian rig. Good inventory. Rare survivor. Current 55 year ownership.

Lying: Chichester Harbour £27,500

41ft. DUNKIRK LITTLE SHIP Former Watson Class R N Lifeboat built 1932, Groves & Gutteridge, Cowes. Motor-yacht conversion in 1973. Six berths in traditional interior. Pair 47hp Ford Parsons diesels. One of only nineteen RNLI lifeboats which served at Dunkirk.

Lying: Chichester Harbour £45,000

41ft. INTERNATIONAL 30 SQUARE METRE Knud Riemers design, built 1989 Jansson & Zarin, Sweden. Moulded GRP hull, teak decks. Proctor Spars, extensive sail wardrobe. Four berths. Yard trolley. 10hp Tohatsu Aux. Full racing condition, 15 knots recorded!

Lying West Country £75,000

38ft. INTERNATIONAL 30 SQUARE METRE Henry Rasmussen design, built 1929 Abeking & Rasmussen, Germany. Mahogany hull, teak decks. Fully restored. New rig 2015, recent sails. Road trailer. 5hp Tohatsu Aux. Class certified for racing Europe & Scandinavia.

Lying: Medway £27,000

31ft. GOLDEN HIND BERMUDIAN CUTTER Maurice Griffiths design, built 2013, Golden Hind Marine for Mark Urry. Exceptional, high specification, last example from the original GRP moulds. Teak interior with five berths. 27hp Yanmar 3GM Diesel. Good inventory. Virtually new yacht. Lying: Brittany

25ft. GAFF CUTTER Maurice Griffiths design, built 1963, Williams & Parkinson, Deganwy for Cmdr. R G Wynne-Edwards. Pitch-pine hull, teak brightwork and interior. 15hp Vetus Diesel. Well built. Recent sails. Featured Classic Boat August 2015.

Lying: South Coast £13,500

Lying: East Coast

www.classicyachtbrokerage.co.uk

SALES OFFICE: 01905 356482 • 07949 095075 • info@classicyachtbrokerage.co.uk • FIND US ON ALL SOCIAL MEDIA

www.mjlewisboatsales.com Downs Road Boatyard, Maldon, Essex. CM9 5HG

Tel: 01621 859373

84

Email: info@mjlewisboasales.com

30m Barge £100k

60ft Schooner IRO £100k

15m Gaff Ketch £65k

44ft Smack £55k

85ft Thames Sailing Barge IRO £55k

30ft CC Pilot Cutter £79k

30ft FShepherd Classic IRO £30k

33ft Butler Gaff Cutter £55k

29ft Falmouth Quay Punt IRO £39k

35ft JFrancis Jones M’Sailor £25k

28ft Twister £20k

36ft Scottish Fyfie £35k

28ft Sussex One Design £16k

23ft Dauntless £6k

25ft Vertue £9.5k

24ft CC Gaff Cutter £9k

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


BROKERAGE

Brokerage listing

C L A S S I C A N D V I N TAG E YAC H T S We hope that you enjoy our selection of vintage and classic sailing yachts. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you require any further information on any of the yachts featured here. 45 ft Sparkman & Stephens Yawl

2010

70 ft Sparkman & Stephens Int 12 M

1938

68 ft Clinton Crane Int 12 M

1937

THEODORA is a modern interpretation of a classic S&S design. She retains the same classic lines but the construction method, systems and rigging make her an immensely strong and torsion resistant yacht. Built at Ian Franklin Boat Builders Ltd of Christchurch, NZ from Kauri timber in a triple layered construction. Kauri is considered a superb timber for building the hulls and decks of boats because of its resistance to rot. This is a stunning rendition from such a strong pedigree; S&S at the height of their powers – and in our view defines modern classic in a way that is unmatched by other claimants.

NORTHERN LIGHT’s pedigree is hard to question – a pre War 12 Metre from the board of Sparkman & Stephens; her beauty is effortless and so is her charm. She has all the power of a 12 but is somehow less brutal than the later boats yet arguably just as potent. She has been a survivor throughout her 77 years but most dramatically when she was rescued from the bottom of Lake Michigan in 1984. She spent 2 winters there being put back together before being sailed to Newport in 1986. She is USCG Certified for 13 passengers and 3 crew.

The America’s Cup Class 12 Metre, GLEAM was built in 1937, a time when rare mahoganies were hand selected and craftsmanship was at an all time high. More than just a 12 Metre, GLEAM is hailed by yachtsmen as the grande dame of the fleet, having been painstakingly restored and maintained by the same owner for more than 30 years. GLEAM has her original fully appointed interior offering comfort for all guests with ample seating, a galley and an enclosed private head. She has never stopped winning races since she was built and often beats the new classic 12s.

$750,000 VAT Unpaid

$650,000 VAT unpaid

$650,000 VAT unpaid

Lying Australia

60 ft Alfred Mylne Ketch

1929

Alfred Mylne was one of the most successful yacht designers of his generation. Apprenticed to G L Watson and close friend of William Fife III; his design philosophy was that of grace, pace and space. Adhering to this philosophy – and a typical gentleman’s cruising yacht of her time with her spoon bow and elegant counter MINGARY has recently undergone a major restoration bringing her very much to the form of her original existence as an exquisite family yacht -spacious enough for comfortable cruising yet handy enough not to require crew.

€620,000

Lying Germany

For further information please contact: +44 (0)1202 330077 info@sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk

Lying USA

61 ft John Alden Yawl

Lying USA

1940

38 ft Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter Replica 2011

Alden’s designs were influential in generating interest in offshore sailing - IRONDEQUOIT II is a powerful, easily driven yacht and fast passage maker. She has flush decks forward and a small house aft, with a comfortable cockpit well aft. In recent years she has done well in the Antigua Classic Yacht Regatta, Regates Royales in Cannes and Les Voiles de St Tropez. In her current ownership she has once again proven herself as a superb family cruiser – gifted as she is with Alden combination of graceful good looks, easy handling and good sea keeping.

EDITH GRAY was built by John Raymond-Barker of RB Boatbuilding Ltd, Bristol in 2011 and was designed along the lines of the smaller transom stern pilot cutters – inspiration was taken from 1887 BREEZE as well as DIARCHY of 1901. EDITH GRAY has already proven herself to be extremely fast when raced in the pilot cutter fleet often taking first in class and she has that magic blend of function and simple beauty. She seems to hit a “sweet spot” - at 38 ft she can be sailed short-handed yet she can accommodate 7 persons with berths to spare - her build quality is impressive both in structure and detail.

€480,000

Lying Spain

£220,000

Lying UK

Our classic and vintage yachts & motor yachts are available to view at:

33 High Street, Poole, Dorset BH15 1AB United Kingdom

– www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk –

MEMBER OF THE ABYA

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

85


Craftsmanship Yard News

Edited by Steffan Meyric Hughes: +44 (0)207 349 3758 Email: steffan@classicboat.co.uk

DAWLISH, DEVON

Burnett boat nearly done As retirement boatbuilding projects go, this one is way beyond the norm. We reported last year on Mike Ludgrove’s huge project to build a 54ft (17m) bermudan cutter yacht to a design by the late Ed Burnett. The decade-long project is now nearly finished, waiting just for upholstery and sails; launch should be in spring next year. The spec is second to none: the deck and everything above it is in Burma teak salvaged from a 19th-century cotton mill near Mumbai. “It came in 8m [26ft] lengths and is the oiliest teak I've ever encountered,” said Mike. The lead for the 13.5-ton keel came from the roof of Exeter Cathedral. The 28-tonne, long-keel, carvel yacht, in glassed Douglas fir planking, has mahogany frames, an iroko keelson and a Douglas fir rig. Mike, 62, aims to spend a year chartering Helena, then a season sailing with disadvantaged youths, something Mike benefited from in his own youth. After MATT AUSTIN

that, Mike and his wife will sail in the wake of Odysseus in the Med, then around the world.

NORTH NORFOLK

New home for Neil Thompson After 17 years inland at Glandford, Norfolk, Neil Thompson Boats is moving to Wells-next-the-Sea. “It’s a sad move, but our new office has a sea view!” Richenda Thompson told Classic Boat. The new site will give the family company a more visible coastal location. Neil Thompson Boats builds the beautiful Norfolk range of GRP classic dinghies, dayboats and small yachts: the 13ft (4m) Urchin, 17ft (5.2m) Oyster (and motor derivative, the Explorer), 20ft (6.1m) Gypsy and 25ft (7.6m) Smuggler. More recently, it has become a Honda outboard dealership too. The spiritual home of its boats is Blakeney Harbour nearby.

“It’s a sad move, but our new office has a sea view!"

MALLOW, CO CORK, IRELAND

Alan Buchanan 'Spartan' in GRP Bill Trafford, who won the ‘Spirit of Tradition under 40ft’ category in our last awards, is at it again. Bill, AKA Alchemy Marine, turns end-of-life GRP hulls with beautiful shapes but often unattractive cabin trunks, into spectacular, small, spirit-oftradition yachts. Most of these hulls from the 60s and 70s are built to a quality rarely produced today, and Bill's ‘water to wine’ treatment is a cheaper option than a new, spirit-oftradition yacht – not to mention a nice way of saving on landfill!

SHMH

The latest project is for a GRP version of an Alan Buchanan-

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CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

designed Coleen, a 1950s yacht similar to the Spartan. The donor boat, which Bill bought on Ebay, is an Elizabethan 29.


WOODBRIDGE, SUFFOLK

Sailing Dunkirk little ship re-launched A good number of sailing vessels took part in Operation Dynamo in 1940, but not many of the size and ilk of the 30ft (9.1m) Kentish smack yacht Cachalot. Now she’s been re-launched, after an owner-led, decade-long restoration on the banks of the River Deben, at Tidemill Yacht Harbour. She was built in Folkestone, Kent in 1898 and has, like so many boats her age, a history of illustrious owners and periods of neglect, including time spent cruising in Scotland’s western isles and in the Mediterranean. Current owner Steve Yates fell in love with the boat (particularly her counter stern) in 2005. After a year sailing on the East Coast and planning a programme of winter maintenance, she almost sank at her berth in January 2006. Rot was discovered in the arch board and beamshelf. She had also suffered from over-enthusiastic re-fastening of the planks. It was clear, by May 2007, that Cachalot was a serious project and in the end, she needed a new ply deck, 90 per cent new planking (in larch), new sternpost, stem, rudder, bowsprit, bulwarks and replacement or sistering of most of her frames. The Yanmar diesel has been reconditioned and some of the old teak deck has been used to make new boards for the sole and cockpit. Fitting her out internally is planned for 2018. She also still needs a new suit of sails. Living in Derbyshire, Steve Yates and wife Beverley Daley-Yates, both OGA members, bought a camper van and lived by their project every summer. Read more at cachalot.org.uk. TONY PICKERING

MAINE, USA

JP Morgan-style tender Artisan Boatworks recently launched its new tender for a super yacht that is still in build. The superyacht owes much to a series of sleek steam yachts, all named Corsair, that belonged to financier JP Morgan. They mostly had graceful period tenders from the board of Nat G Herreshoff, and the drawings for HMCo Hull 381 C/O THE DORY SHOP

(one of four original Corsair tenders) were the starting point for designer Matt Smith. The design spec called for low draught (for storage on the mothership), classic looks, 24ft (7.3m) max length, two cockpits, and a canopy for shelter. The build of this new tender has a plywood bottom and strip-planked sides. Equipment includes a bowthruster, bronzeand-canvas awning and a vintage-style horizontal “steering

LUNENBURG, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA

two crewmen and 12 passengers at 20 knots-plus, with a

A century of dory-building in a World Heritage Site

Yanmar 110hp diesel.

The Dory Shop celebrated 100 years of building dories this year,

bar”. Artisan's Alec Brainerd describes her as having “the elegance of a Newport yacht of the gilded age". She can take

with a lineage that stretches back, unbroken, to providing dories Classic motor launch on sea trial

for the great cod schooners in the dying days of sail. The yard is

C/O ARTISAN BOATWORKS

picture postcard perfect, which is fitting as the port of Lunenburg is a UNESCO world heritage site. It still builds dories and variants in the time-honoured fashion, from grown frames and tradtional planking and fastenings, from 8ft (2.4m) upwards, for sail and power as well as, of course, oars. It also runs two-week workshops, where customers learn to build one of these iconic little boats. The yard has, over the years, built quite a variety of boats besides, including two cabin cruising schooners.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

87


MARINE DIRECTORY

Marine Directory

To advertise call James Davenport +44 (0) 20 7349 3793 or email james.davenport@chelseamagazines.com Copy Deadline for next issue is 19/10/2017

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We put X-Yachts' TRICKS new XP 33 GREAT LAKES 3 3DOWNWIND 1134 TOvsTHE through her VOYAGERisk reward; Mark paces How to get the best looks at real race Rushall scenarios 29/07/2013 16:52 spinnaker

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Wet cell, AGM and – on the test benchgel

AUGUST 2013

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BANE OR BOON?

Paul & Rachel Chandler love new technology

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May 2013

No 194

INTERVIEW

The fastest sailor on cold toes and in the world pizza

BOAT ON TEST

Jeanneau’s nippy new 41DS is designed to be fun for two

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Pull-out guide to Pwllheli, in Snowdon’s shadow

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Luftwaffe yacht

RISING the Deben STAR Down

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New Zealand wins the Louis Vuitton Cup

2013

OCTOBER 2013

WARTIME WINDFALL

AMERICA'S CUP

P Classic Boat assic Boat Cl S SEPTEMBER

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RISING STAR

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From Wales to Skye on the whisky trail

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Tug on the heartstrings New life for Dunkirk veteran

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Tug on the heart New life for Dunkir stringsWIN! sailing k vetera Turkish nfour WARTIME WINDFALL

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18/03/2013

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89


CRAFTSMANSHIP NIELSEN BOATYARD

YARD VISIT: DOLPHIN QUAY BOATYARD

A LICK OF PAINT AND A REBUILD We visit Mr Modest, Tim Gilmore, in a lovely corner of Chichester Harbour WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHS STEFFAN MEYRIC HUGHES

I

f you met Tim Gilmore, you might think him typical of the

but as we talk, the extent of work carried out emerges. For Keeps,

boatbuilder breed: low-key, modest and thoughtful. In fact,

for example, Tim was ready to pass by without a word, then

Tim’s working life began as a technical buyer for Rolls Royce,

mentioned when asked that he did some refinishing work. That, in

so his switch to the low-tech, high-tolerance engineering

turn, transpired to be a cockpit rebuild and much else besides.

needed in the restoration of wooden boats, at the tail end of the

Withy was a re-powering job from combustion to electric, not to

80s, was a big change. After working at Coombes in Bosham (“it

mention a serious re-build in 1999. A look at Tim’s website reveals a

was like heaven - the first time I enjoyed going to work”), Tim set up

roll call of no fewer than 78 boats he has worked on, many of them

on his own in 1996 at the idyllic Dolphin Quay nearby. Meanwhile,

complete re-builds; there are many more unlisted.

Coombes shut down in the never-ending war of the waterfront

vintage, style and size, one American, one British. The American

Quay, which was redeveloped for new housing, and came to the

yacht is Josephine of Hamble, a wooden S&S36, forerunner of the

very picturesque Birdham Pool Marina, owned by Castle Marinas, in

GRP Swan 36s. Her shape may have sprung from the board of the

a corner of Chichester Harbour.

great Olin Stephens, but she was built in Britain, by Moody’s in 1965.

When we visit, the sun is out and there are various boats shored

The British yacht is the 38ft sloop Volante of Ville, built by Camper

up on the hard around Tim’s shed. These include Keeps, a very

& Nicholson in 1960 to an in-house design. Both are traditionally

unusual-looking Fred Parker-designed, 28ft (8.5m) all-teak sailing

built, long-keeled cruising yachts with bermudan sloop rigs.

sloop, clearly post-war but date of build unknown; Withy, a 26ft

90

Inside the shed is a very arresting sight: two yachts of similar

between boats and housing. In 2012, Tim departed from Dolphin

Tim tries his lick-of-paint line again, but a quick trip up the

(7.9m) sailing sloop built before the war by Elkins of Christchurch

ladder to see both boats in pieces quickly rumbles him. The work to

with a lifting cabin top; and the striking Lapwing, a very old

Volante, in particular, has been serious and remedial. Tim and his

(probably 19th-century) working boat yacht of about 30ft (9m),

team of three have taken out the original, and very corroded, mast

similar to a bawley in style. Afloat, we see Annaleigh, a 12-Ton,

step, a large complicated structure, essentially an additional riveted

post-war Hillyard and Calumet, an early 90s McMillan sloop in strip

steel keelson with load-spreading floors, and replaced it with a new

plank. Between them is Talisman, Tim’s own project boat – a Bates

welded one from template, in galvanised steel. The next job will be

Starcraft, double-diagonal motor cruiser of 25ft (7.6m), built in 1957.

recaulking below the waterline where the splines have failed. Planks

At first, Tim tries claiming that all he’s done is add a lick of paint,

below the waterline are usually caulked to allow movement.

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


CRAFTSMANSHIP

Above: Birdham Pool Marina

Main picture: Josephine and Volante, insert: Tim Gilmore

The splining treatment is usually reserved for the planks above water, which move less, and where a smoother finish for paint adhesion is wanted. The plan is to run a small circular saw with a re-profiled vee section to the blade along the seams, removing the failed splines and creating new seams for the caulking. Outside, we bump into a very happy customer of Tim’s called Graham Johnston, who invites us aboard his exquisite 23ft (7m) yacht Hunters Moon, afloat on the marina. She was designed and built by Feltham’s of Portsmouth in 1953, to the type known as a ‘Feltham Yawl’, a yacht version of a popular fishing boat hull it built in numbers. She’s rigged as her name suggests, with a bermudan main, gaff mizzen and tabernacle mast. The Baby Blake loo once graced the heads of a flying boat in East African Airways. Graham rescued Hunters Moon and had her restored in the mid-90s by Julian Dyer, and Tim has looked after the boat since then, including renewing most exterior woodwork. “Boatbuilding processes might be repetitive, but no two boats are the same,” says Tim as we sit for coffee in the sun on his new deck that overlooks the marina. Behind us, a row of new houses (they follow Tim everywhere) has sprung up. The handsome brick walls have been topped with cheap, wooden fencing panels so their residents never have to see the boatyard. “You get down in the dumps when there’s no work, but the next job is – still – such a buzz. The other thing is the smell of fresh varnish and paint!”

Top to bottom: Graham Johnston and Tim (blue jacket) stand beside Hunters Moon; the bawley-like Lapwing; Malthus, an all-wooden Drascombe Lugger, built in varnished plywood and refinished at the yard

See woodenboatsforever.co.uk and castlemarinas.co.uk. CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

91


CRAFTSMANSHIP

Boatbuilder’s Notes ADVICE

1

Bore from both sides

2

BY ROBIN GATES A sharp centre bit is an excellent tool for boring a shallow large-diameter hole, with a point to locate the bit dead centre and a spur which neatly circumscribes the hole in advance of the cutting edge. However, special care is needed when a hole passes right through, if the bit is not to emerge like a bulldozer

3

through a brick wall.

4

One solution is to clamp the work to a sacrificial backing piece, to support surface fibres on the exit side, but this is not always convenient – if boring the hole for a pipe or wiring to pass through a bulkhead, for example, represented here by a 1in (25mm) hole in a 19mm board. Providing you can access both sides of the hole, bore from one side until the point of the bit is just ROBIN GATES

showing on the exit side. Then switch sides

1 Begin boring from one side 2 The point showing on the exit 3 Centre the bit on the second side 4 A crisp result

with the brace and bit, using the small exit hole to locate the point, and finish the job from the second side. Separated by the spur, the last of the wood is extracted on the point as smart as a button, leaving crisp edges all round.

Razee ‘ship’ plane This style of plane with the rear end cut

Razee and standard

away is a razee or ‘ship’ plane, named after

jack planes and (insert)

the practice of slicing off a warship’s

the EMIR trademark

elevated quarter-deck and forecastle to make a vaisseau rasé with less top weight and better sailing qualities. For the shipwright the benefit lies in lowering the rear handle so that thrust is applied closer to the timber and from more directly behind the blade. The cutaway also makes it lighter, so less tiring in the heavy work of planing timber down to rough dimensions. This 14in (35.5cm) razee jack plane from the Bermondsey, London, factory of Friedrich Emmerich, bears the EMIR trademark, which woodworkers of a certain the 1950s and 1960s EMIR tools and benches were standard issue for technical schools, where the razee jack was better known as the ‘technical’ or ‘sunk handle’ jack.

92

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

ROBIN GATES

age may recognise from their school days. In


Boatbuilder’s TraditionalNotes Tool

JUNIOR HACKSAW STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS

blade, and 50 per cent more weight

Clockwise from

surface on plywood – even without a

ROBIN GATES

which promotes a smooth action.

above: Eclipse

backing piece.

Replacing the blade is easy with

670 and 14J

These saws were part of a wide

It is natural to think of woodworking

the 670. The handle rotates to release

Junior hacksaws;

range of specialist hand and machine

tools when the building of a wooden

a threaded spigot so that tension on

changing blades

tools made by James Neill &

boat is proposed, but there will be

the blade is eased gradually.

with the 670;

Company at the Composite Steel

custom-bent

Works in Sheffield, and originals

frame of a 14J

marked Made in England are of good

metalwork too. If wire cutters or tin

However, with the 14J you have to

snips won’t cut it, and a full-size

compress the frame to release the

hacksaw frame is too big to gain

blade, which may have painful

quality. The 670, a craftsman’s saw,

access, an Eclipse Junior hacksaw will

consequences if it slips.

was soon phased out in favour of the

often solve the problem. Cutting metal with metal is always a battle of hardness, but for aluminium, brass, copper, or mild steel

Ideally, locate the far end of the

general purpose 14J, but is the more

frame in a notch on the bench and

user-friendly of the two and worth

push from the handle end.

finding. That said, you can bend the

Besides metals these saws also cut

frame of the 14J to clear obstructions

up to about 1/2in (13mm) thick, this

plastics and wood. The 32tpi (teeth

such as you might encounter in an

little saw proves both tougher and

per inch) blade cuts a fine kerf

engine bay – so buy both!

more precise than ‘junior’ and ‘hack’

rivalling the finest dovetail saw for

would suggest.

joints, and it leaves a very tidy

NEXT MONTH: Panel raising plane

Sawing metal is an art in itself, especially sawing tubing, where you need a sympathetic grip to avoid deforming the work and a fine tooth pattern to obviate judder. Originally there were two models, the No 670 with steel bar frame and turned beech handle, and the 14J with frame and handle bent from one piece of steel rod – a reliable little tool even if it does look like a paper clip. They take identical 6in (15.2cm) pinned blades but the 670 has about /2in (13mm) more depth behind the

1

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

93


Letters LETTER OF THE MONTH SUPPORTED BY OLD PULTENEY WHISKY

Magic of an oil lamp We enjoy Tom Cunliffe’s writing in your magazine very much and his column extolling the benefits of a simple oil lamp struck a chord. We have owned two modern boats (two Moodys – perfect for the family) and now in our retirement a wooden boat (a clinker Folkboat built in Poland), and on each have insisted on an oil lamp as illumination each evening at anchor. To be sitting in the cabin with that glow, just in conversation or with a book to pass the quiet time before bed, is a magical experience. Stanley and Maureen Parkes, via email

Nurturing a classic Your article by Olle Neckman (October issue, ‘Sternpost’) about his Jac M Iversen motorboat, Maria, underlines one aspect of owning an old wooden boat that is often overlooked. The longer you keep her and the more work you need to do to her, the greater the enjoyment and appreciation of her whims. People often decry classic yacht ownership for the apparent ‘hard work’ it involves (and wouldn’t they roll their eyes at all the varnish work needed for a boat like Maria?), but that misses the point. The more CLAUDIA MYATT

you put into it, the more you get out of it. To nurture a classic boat through another few decades of life afloat really is, as Olle Neckman says, a lifetime’s joy. Peter Waldroop, Edinburgh

Any more Harris Brothers boats? Following your articles on Anne Marie, readers might be interested to know that the late John Leather, the boatbuilder and yachting historian, served his apprenticeship with Harris Brothers and was brought up in the town of Rowhedge. He finished his mother’s book after she died, Salt Water Village, a good read for anyone interested in Harris Bros. John once said to me, of my boat, Iolaire: “Mr Street, you must remember that Iolaire was a cheap boat built on spec by a good fishboat builder!” The Harris family sold the yard to

Do you know Maeve?

Rowhedge Ironworks at the outbreak

I first crewed on Maeve in 1952 as a 10-year-old, and

of the First World War. I think there

continued to do so until about 1964, when her then owner,

may be a few other old Harris-built

Graham Parsons of Westbury, Wilts, sold her to a young

boats still afloat.

couple with a baby who sailed her to the West Indies. Built

In 1975 we sailed Iolaire, engineless,

as a gaff cutter for Solent sailing, she had been converted

up the Colne River to the old Harris

to bermudan rig pre-war and was moored at Moody’s. She

yard. We dried out along the wall right

was 48ft from bowsprit to counter stern and a wet boat to

where she had been built.

sail. I believe that she may have returned to the UK and

Don Street, via email

would love to know more about her, if she is still extant. John Morris, via email

94

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017


LETTERS Send your letters (and any replies, please) to: Classic Boat, Jubilee House, 2 Jubilee Place, London SW3 3TQ email: cb@classicboat.co.uk

The original Lively Lady A few weeks ago we were rowing up Portsmouth harbour on our weekly outing in a 1930s four-oared clinker Solent Galley, when we saw Lively Lady being towed across the harbour. It got me thinking of my Aunt Mona Cambridge, née Bishop (above), who was the original Lively Lady, after whom the boat was named. Why ‘lively’? She was nicknamed ‘Beans’ because she was always so full of beans! She married Jack Cambridge, an Army engineer, who ended-up as Chief Inspector of Railways in British Raj India. This involved visiting various Indian princes in the

Dunkirk – which version is best?

company of the Mountbattens. Mona and Lady

Having seen both the 2017 and the 1958 film versions of the Dunkirk story, I

Mountbatten wanted to meet the Indian princesses who

am in no doubt as to which is the better. The 1958 film stars Richard

were in purdah and they formed what they called Lady

Attenborough and John Mills and gives a much better historical account of

Mountbatten’s Purdah Club to facilitate this. Mona led a

the events leading up to the evacuation, as well as the evacuation itself.

very colourful and energetic life blessed with a huge

There is much more coverage of the process of requisitioning a whole

outgoing personality and a razor-sharp mind – she was

range of craft at their Thames berths. Many were owner-skippered and the

still paying for her gin out of her bridge winnings well

film covers their route to Dunkirk via Sheerness and Ramsgate – and of

into her nineties.

course the ferrying of soldiers from shallow water to ships waiting

Uncle Jack was planning to sail Lively Lady back to the UK with a colleague, after having her built in India,

further offshore. So for those of your readers actually interested in the Little Ships, the

where she was initially to be called Blue Wave. However,

1958 film is the one to watch. This summer’s massively hyped blockbuster

he and the colleague fell out and so he brought her

no doubt appeals to a modern day audience impressed by noise, gratuitous

home on the deck of a liner and named her after his wife

human suffering and dramatic scenes lacking feasibility.

instead. For a number of years he sailed her out of

Peter Broadbent, via email

Yarmouth IOW, from where as a boy I sailed on her. Eventually Uncle Jack decided to sell her and tried to get my father to buy her. Father’s retort was: “I don’t want that slow old thing.” He ordered a McGruer cruiser-racer to be built by Feltham’s in Bath Square, Old Portsmouth, instead. After Uncle Jack had sold her to Sir Alec Rose, he bought a smaller glassfibre cruiser, which he named Little Lady, and would get someone to crew him over to the River Seine each summer. He would then disappear into the French canals for a month or two, tying up to commercial barges and inviting the bargees on board for STUART COOK

a whisky or two. On one occasion, the story goes, a barge skipper kindly filled his water tank with red wine – for a while he had red wine coming out of his taps! Both wonderfully strong British Raj characters. I can as she raises her glass of gin with a loud “Cheerio”. Truly

Do you know this boat?

a very Lively Lady.

Do any of your readers recognise the design of this 20ft dayboat and know

Bill Bishop, Havant, Hants

what the original rig was? The boat has a carvel planked pine hull and an

Editor replies: Lively Lady is being restored by the Hayling

iron keel. It is pre-World War II but the year of construction is unknown. The

Yacht Company on Hayling Island in time for the 50th

bowsprit is thought to be original and there are running backstays. Any

anniversary in 2018 of Sir Alec arriving back in Portsmouth.

assistance would be much appreciated.

still visualise Aunt Mona always dressed up to the nines

Stuart Cook, Abbots Leigh, West Sussex CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

95


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Sternpost Saving No1, Hope Clare McComb had to be yachting historian and detective to save a historic dinghy

98

CLASSIC BOAT NOVEMBER 2017

CLARE MCCOMB

I

had been looking for Hope for over a decade. She is listed No1 in the International 14 book, build date just before the First World War; I knew she had been designed by Linton Hope, and built by Jac M Iversen and his brother-in-law, my grandfather, for EG Martin. I had the family archives and newspaper clippings, but not the boat. Then a tip-off from Jane Shaddick, Morgan Giles family archivist, located Hope at Lowestoft, stored in a polytunnel, part of a big collection. Hurrah! After a positive response, I waited for a callback, as ecstasy turned to agony. The news was the collection was to be disbanded and probably auctioned, leaving Hope up for grabs, for anyone to buy. Of course there were family consultations, and also discussions with classic boat specialist Adrian Stone, the safest hands I know if you want a vessel properly conserved. I cannot stress enough my gratitude to the National Small Boat Register, through the National Maritime Museum Cornwall; they already had Hope listed with photographs, but recent images were provided for me and much practical advice. Through the National Small Boat Register I received a letter from the one-time secretary of the Maritime Trust, now the Maritime Heritage Trust, saying the usual transfer agreements would have specified the Marine Trust must be given first refusal. But was there paperwork to prove it? That became the big search. Stuart Tyler at the Devon Archives bent over backwards. Yes they had possible catalogue listings and would check for me. Eventually the vital papers were not there, but that simply meant we must look harder elsewhere. Amazingly the National Small Boat Register did come up with documentation proving Hope was not allowed to be sold off, and we all felt that there was light at the end of the polytunnel. So, imagine the shock when, late

Main photo: Hope continues her journey at Lowestoft marina, en route to Cowes. Inset: Jac M Iversen

“The vital papers were not there, but that simply meant we must look harder elsewhere”

on the day before the auction, Hope appeared as listed. Now, once again anyone could bid for her. There was talk of foreign buyers, American, Far and Middle Eastern… I also spoke to the auctioneer (staying determinedly on the phone until he was free) to plead Hope’s case. He had another look at the document and agreed she needed to be removed from the list. An 11th hour reprieve. So the auction went ahead without Hope, and I watched that fantastic collection being sold off in real time, even Ivy Morgan Giles’ Solitaire. Does anyone have an idea where Solitaire is now? The Maritime Heritage Trust were unaware that one of the MH fleet (others included Cutty Sark, Brixham smack Provident, Gipsy Moth IV) was caught up in the auction. The chairman, David Morgan, wrote to the liquidators that the trust wished to exercise its “right to reacquire title to the vessel” and that was that. By the time you read this, Kingswell Transport’s lorry will have arrived in Lowestoft to carry Hope to the Cowes Classic Boat Museum, along with the Uffa Fox Flying 10 and Flying 12 that the museum bought in the auction. Thanks to chairman Mark McNeill and his team, this will be Hope’s new home, and what could be more fitting? Adrian Stone is going to write and oversee her conservation management plan, so watch this space. But she has no rig, and no sails. Tony Must, the manager of the Lowestoft marina searched for me, and couldn’t find them. He even photographed the mast slot, in case the mast was up in Eyemouth. He locked the ‘portables’ in his store to give me peace of mind. Saving Hope means I owe many people heartfelt thanks. Now, through the Cowes museum, she may sail again. But what about the other boats that were auctioned on 26 July, with or without their masts and sails? What on earth is happening to them now?


“ PA Z I E N Z A” 6 0 F T J a c k L a u re n t G il e s B e r m u d a n Cu t t e r 195 6 Laurent Giles identified PAZIENZA as a ‘good example of a comfortable shorthanded cruising boat with a fi rst class performance under power yet able to take part successfully in ocean races.’ “Yachting World” in 1957 described her as ‘a large cutter into which a great deal of thought has been given to comfort and convenience.’ Giles achieved a seamless transition between traditional and modern styling - PAZIENZA with her handsome sheers and understated English good looks was nominated as one of the most beautiful boats in France. The current owner and family have successfully cruised and raced in Europe and the Caribbean and PAZIENZA is just one of those boats that once seen – she will always stay with you! Lying UK | €695,000

For further information please contact: +44 (0)1202 330077 info@sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk

Our classic and vintage yachts & motor yachts are available to view at:

33 High Street, Poole, Dorset BH15 1AB United Kingdom

– www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk –

MEMBER OF THE ABYA


w


Beautiful Breads over them, pressing the edges together to seal. Roll the dough out again, fold in half and roll out once more. If the figs are not evenly distributed, repeat the process but be careful not to mush them up completely. 5 Shape the dough into a ball, cover and leave to prove at room temperature for 1 hour. 6 Give the dough a single fold, cover and leave to prove for another 2 hours, or until almost doubled in size. 7 Dust a proving basket well with flour. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and shape to fit the basket. Place the dough seam-side up in the basket, cover and leave to prove at room temperature for 1 hour. 8 Heat the oven to 230°C (Gas Mark 8, 450°F) with a baking stone or baking sheet in place. Turn the dough out onto a peel and slide it onto the baking stone. Bake for 10 minutes, then turn the oven down to 200°C (Gas Mark 6, 400°F) and bake for a further 20 minutes, checking halfway through that it is not browning too quickly.

FOUGASSE Makes: 2 or 3 loaves For the pre-ferment: • 300g (2 cups plus 2 tbsp) white bread flour • 275g (1 cup plus 2 tbsp) water • 1 tsp fresh yeast For the dough: • 350g (2½ cups) white bread flour • 250g (1 cup plus 1 tbsp) water • Scant ½ tsp fresh yeast • 50g (3½ tbsp) olive oil • 1 tsp fine table salt 1 Mix the pre-ferment ingredients together, cover and leave at room temperature for 12 hours overnight, or until bubbling vigorously. 2 Add the dough ingredients to the preferment and knead (“work to an even consistency” is probably a better term, as it’s so sloppy) until you have a smooth, silky, stretchy dough that is very soft but no

longer sticky. You may find that this dough is easier to make using a stand mixer with a dough hook. 3 Cover the dough and give it a series of single folds after 30, 60 and 90 minutes, then leave to rise for a further 2½–3½ hours, or until it’s puffed up and has huge bubbles coming to the surface. 4 Dust the work surface well with flour and using an oiled dough scraper, turn the dough out carefully, trying not to knock out too many of the bubbles you have (well, the yeast has) worked hard to make. Divide the dough into 2 or 3 equal-size pieces, gently rounding each piece into a ball, then roll one piece out to an oval about 1.5cm (⅝in) thick. 5 Using your dough scraper, cut 3 or 4 angled slots either side of the middle of the dough to make a leaf-like pattern (see photo) and open these out slightly. Repeat

the rolling and cutting with the remaining dough. Cover and leave to prove for 1 hour. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 250°C (Gas Mark 9, 480°F), or as high as it will go, with baking stones or baking sheets in place. 6 Using a well-floured peel, slide each fougasse onto a baking stone, then immediately turn the oven down to 220°C (Gas Mark 7, 425°F). Bake for 10–15 minutes until golden. Per 100g Calories 389, Fat 8.1g, Saturates 1.3g, Carbohydrates 66g, Sugars 0g, Protein 12g, Salt 0.70g • Recipes and images extracted from Slow Dough real Bread by Chris Young Copyright ˝ Watkins Media Limited 2016 Text copyright ˝ Chris Young 2016 Photography copyright ˝ Watkins Media Limited 2016

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Beautiful Breads

COTTAGE LOAF Makes: 1 loaf (serves 10–12) • 325ml (1 ⅓ cups) warm water (or according to bread mix packet instructions) • 500g (1lb 2oz) packet white bread mix • 1 tsp salt • Strong white flour, for dusting 1 Pour the water into the bread pan. (For a good-shaped cottage loaf, the dough needs to be firm enough for the bottom round to support the top piece without sagging, so you may not need to add all the water.) Sprinkle over the bread mix, covering the water completely. Close the lid, set the machine to “Dough” and press Start. 2 Meanwhile, grease or flour two baking sheets and set aside. When the dough is ready, remove it from the machine, knock it back on a lightly floured surface, then cut off one third of the dough. Shape each portion into plump balls and place each

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one on a baking sheet. Cover and leave to rise in a warm place until doubled in size. 3 Preheat the oven to 220°C (Gas Mark 7, 425°F). Gently flatten the balls of dough and carefully place the smaller ball on top of the larger one. Gently push the floured handle of a wooden spoon down through the centre of the dough to join the two pieces together, then slightly enlarge the hole with your fingers. Leave to rest for 5–10 minutes. 4 Dissolve the salt in 1 tablespoon of hot water, then lightly brush over the loaf and dust with a little flour. Using a sharp knife, make slashes around the top and base of the bread. 5 Bake for about 30–35 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown and sounds hollow when tapped underneath. Transfer to a wire rack to cool. 6 Give the dough a single fold, cover and leave to prove for another 2 hours, or until almost doubled in size.

7 Dust a proving basket well with flour. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and shape to fit the basket. Place the dough seam-side up in the basket, cover and leave to prove at room temperature for 1 hour. 8 Heat the oven to 230°C (Gas Mark 8, 450°F) with a baking stone or baking sheet in place. Turn the dough out onto a peel and slide it onto the baking stone. Bake for 10 minutes, then turn the oven down to 200°C (Gas Mark 6, 400°F) and bake for a further 20 minutes, checking halfway through that it is not browning too quickly. • Recipes and images extracted from I Love My Bread Machine by Anne Sheasaby Copyright @ Watkins Media Ltd 2009, 2017 Text Copyright @ Anne Sheasaby 2009, 2017 Photography copyright @ Watkins Media Ltd 2009, 2017


• Reprinted from The Main Street Vegan Academy Cookbook (BenBella Books, 2017)

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Delicious Desserts

CRISP MOCHA PEANUT BUTTER BARS Makes: 16 Bars For the fudge • 235ml (1 cup) coconut oil • 100g (1 cup) unsweetened cocoa powder • 380g (½ cup + 2 tbsp) maple syrup • 75g (¼ cup) agave nectar • 3 tsp coffee extract • 2 tsp vanilla extract • 1 tsp sea salt • 25g (1 cup) crisp rice cereal For the peanut butter drizzle • 2 tbsp coconut oil • 60g (¼ cup) peanut butter • 4 tsp maple syrup

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To make the fudge: 1 Line an 8-inch square brownie pan with two pieces of parchment paper, one going each way. 2 In a small saucepan, gently melt the coconut oil over low heat (in summer it may be liquid already and you can skip this step). 3 Then whisk in the cocoa powder, maple syrup, agave, extracts, and salt. Once the mixture is smooth, remove the pan from the heat and stir in the crisp rice cereal. 4 Pour the mixture into the prepared pan, smooth out the top, and then freeze for 10 to 15 minutes, until the chocolate is solid. To make the peanut butter drizzle: 1 In a small saucepan, gently melt the coconut oil over low heat. Whisk in the peanut butter and maple syrup. Scoop the drizzle into a zip-top plastic bag and seal.

2 Remove the fudge from the freezer. Lift the parchment paper up and out of the pan and transfer to a cutting board. Cut the fudge into 2-inch squares and place the bars on a plate. 3 Snip a tiny hole in the corner of the plastic bag and drizzle the peanut butter mixture onto the bars (you can also try drizzling it with a spoon, if desired). Return the bars to the freezer until the peanut butter drizzle is solid, about 5 minutes. The bars will melt slightly at room temperature, so serve them straight from the freezer or fridge. Per 100g Calories 576, Fat 47g, Saturates 37g, Carbohydrates 29g, Sugars 18g, Protein 6.5g, Salt 0.24g


Delicious Desserts

PEAR TART Serves: 4 • • • • • •

1 batch piecrust (see below) 3 Bosc pears (or similar) Flour, for dusting 2 tbsp light brown sugar Orange zest Freshly ground black pepper (optional)

1 Wrap the prepared piecrust dough in plastic wrap and allow it to rest in the refrigerator for at least an hour. Preheat the oven to 180°C (Gas Mark 4, 350°F). 2 When ready to bake, cut the pears in half lengthwise without peeling them, core them, then cut them into very thin slices. It will be easier if you place the pear halves flat on a work surface and firmly hold the two sides between your thumb and index finger, so that the slices stay intact while they are being cut. 3 Roll out the piecrust on a floured work surface and place in a rectangular tart mold (the one I used was 14-by-4 inches, with a removable bottom), then pinch the edges of the dough with your fingers to create a kind of decoration and pierce the bottom with the tines of a fork.

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4 Arrange the pear slices on the pastry, laying them down so that they overlap slightly, almost forming a fan shape. 5 Sprinkle with brown sugar and a bit of orange zest. Finish off with a sprinkling of pepper (if you like the taste) and bake until the pears take on a pretty caramelized color. This should take around 35 minutes. 6 Sometimes, I replace ½ cup of the flour for the piecrust with the same amount of finely ground almonds. For the piecrust Makes: 19 inch piecrust • 320g (2 ²⁄₃ cups) cake flour, plus more for dusting • Pinch salt • 65g (⅓ cup) sugar • 165g (¾ cup) cold vegan sunflower oil butter • 2-4 tsp ice water or chilled soy milk 1 Sift the flour together with the salt onto a work surface and mix in the sugar. Place the cold butter in the center and mix it into the flour mixture, kneading with your fingertips, using quick movements so that it doesn’t get too warm, until you have a mixture that resembles bread crumbs.

2 Mix in as much ice water as needed to bring the mixture together into a dough. Form into a ball and refrigerate it, wrapped in plastic wrap, for at least an hour. After an hour, you can roll it out with a lightly floured rolling pin for use, or it can be frozen. To get a savory crust, just leave out the sugar. Per 100g Calories 333, Fat 15g, Saturates 2.8g, Carbohydrates 44g, Sugars 14g, Protein 4.2g, Salt 0.50g

• Recipes and images from Vegano Italiano by Rosalba Gioffré, £20.00, published by Countryman Press, an imprint of W.W. Norton & Company Ltd.


CRISP MOCHA PEANUT BUTTER BARS Chef Shoshana Frishberg-Izzo, VLCE, Washington

Chocolate, peanut butter, and coffee are an unbeatable flavor trio, each bringing forth the nuances of the others. This is the quintessential rich dessert, deserving to be served on a china plate with Mozart in the background and shared with your favorite people on earth. Makes: 16 Bars For the fudge • 1 cup coconut oil • 1 cup unsweetened cocoa powder • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons maple syrup • ¼ cup agave nectar • 3 teaspoons coffee extract • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract • 1 teaspoon sea salt • 1 cup crisp rice cereal For the peanut butter drizzle • 2 tablespoons coconut oil • ¼ cup peanut butter • 4 teaspoons maple syrup To Make the Fudge: 1 Line an 8-inch square brownie pan with two pieces of parchment paper, one going each way.

BLUEBERRY CRUMBLE

2 In a small saucepan, gently melt the coconut 1oil over low heat (in summer it Serves: may be liquid already and you can skip this step). • 450g (4 ½ cups) fresh blueberries or blackberries 3 Then • 1 tbspwhisk lemon in the juice cocoa powder, maple syrup, • 1 tspagave, lemonextracts, zest and salt. Once the mixture • 3 tbspismaple smooth, syrup remove the pan from the heat • 1 tbsp and potato stir in the or crisp tapioca ricestarch cereal. • 135g (1 ⅓ cup) gluten-free rolled oats • 4 Pour 1 serving the mixture (34g) Vanilla into the Vega® prepared Essentials or pan, smooth (35g) Vanilla out theVega® top, and Clean* then Protein freeze for 10 to30g • 15 minutes, (¼ cup) until pumpkin the chocolate seeds is solid. • 30g (¼ cup) sunflower seeds To1 Make • tbsp chia theseeds Peanut Butter Drizzle • 80ml (⅓ : cup) coconut oil 1 In • Pinch a small seasaucepan, salt gently melt the coconut oil over low heat. Whisk in the peanut 1 Preheat butter the oven and maple to 190°C syrup. (GasScoop Mark 5, the drizzle into a zip-top plastic bag and seal. 375°F). 2 In Remove a baking thedish, fudge combine from thethe freezer. blueberries, Lift the parchment lemon juice, lemon paper zest, up maple and outsyrup of the and pan andortransfer potato tapiocato starch. a cutting Mix together. board. Cut the fudge into 2-inch squares and place the bars on a plate. 112

3 In a food processor, pulse the sunflower seeds and pumpkin seeds until they become finely chopped. 4 In a separate bowl combine the seed mixture, oats, chia seeds, Vega® powder, salt and coconut oil, mix together with hands until the mixture becomes moist and crumbly. 5 Place the oat mixture on top of the blueberries in the baking dish, until the entire top is covered with the crumble mixture. 6 Place 3 Snip aintiny thehole oveninfor the40corner minutes of the or until plastic the crumble bag and starts drizzle to brown. the peanut Let it cool butter for mixture 10-15 minutes onto the and bars enjoy (you oncan its also own try or with adrizzling scoop of it with coconut a spoon, ice cream. if desired). Return the bars to the freezer until the peanut butter drizzle is solid, about 5 minutes. The Per bars100g will melt slightly at room temperature, Calories Fatstraight 16g, Saturates 9.7g, so serve249, them from the freezer or Carbohydrates 20g, Sugars 7.8g, Protein 4.9g, fridge. Salt 0.14g • Recipes and images supplied by : Vega® Per 100g www.myvega.co.uk

Calories 370, Fat 21g, Saturates 17g, Carbohydrates 39g, Sugars 37g, Protein 2.9g, Salt 0.09g


MASHED POTATOES

SHALLOTS

IDEA 1: Potato pancakes HOW? Mix well seasoned, smooth mashed potato with a splash of non-dairy milk and some plain flour to make soft dough. Flatten balls of the mixture into thick patties and dust with a little extra flour before frying in hot, non-dairy spread until golden on both sides. This makes for a delicious snack with salsa, or as an accompaniment to a main meal.

IDEA 1: Quick pickled shallots HOW? Peel and thickly slice raw shallots and sprinkle them with sea salt. Pack into sterilised jars with a few cloves, mustard seeds and onion seeds and fill the jars to the top with vinegar. Seal and leave for a week to enhance the flavour.

IDEA 2: Cheese, leek and potato pie HOW? Mix mashed potatoes with some sautéed leeks, grated non-dairy cheese and a spoonful of mustard. Line a shallow pie dish with ready rolled pastry, fill with the potato mixture and top with a pastry lid. Bake in a hot oven until golden and crispy. IDEA 3: Gnocchi HOW? Mix smooth, lump-free mash with enough plain flour to make stiff dough. Roll into long, 1-inch wide ropes and cut into short dumplings. Make indentations in the top of each with the back of a fork and boil in salted water until they rise to the surface. Drain and serve with dairy-free pesto, or use in the Aubergine Gratin recipe from this issue (page 50).

IDEA 2: Crispy shallots HOW? Try peeling and finely slicing your shallots before frying them in a couple of centimetres of hot oil until crispy and golden brown. Drain on kitchen paper and allow to cool completely before storing in an air tight container for up to a week. Use to top salads, soups and curries. IDEA 3: Béarnaise sauce HOW? Try blitzing silken tofu with some Dijon mustard, white wine vinegar, and plenty of seasoning to make a smooth sauce. Stir through finely chopped shallots and fresh tarragon to create a super easy take on the classic French sauce.

PIZZA DOUGH WHOLEGRAIN MUSTARD IDEA 1: Maple mustard salad dressing HOW? In a clean jam jar, mix together 100ml olive oil, 3 tbsp cider vinegar, 3 tbsp maple syrup, 2 tbsp wholegrain mustard, 1 crushed garlic clove, the juice of half a lemon and some seasoning. Replace the lid and keep in the fridge. Shake well before serving.

Make the most of your leftover ingredients with these recipe ideas

IDEA 2: Creamy mustard sauce HOW? Sauté some finely diced onion and garlic in a pan until softened. Add 200 ml non-dairy cream and 2 tbsp wholegrain mustard and stir to combine. Season well and serve with your favourite seitan. IDEA 3: Mustard mash HOW? Mash potato is a crowd-pleaser. Try jazzing up your mash by folding in some sautéed leeks and a big dollop of wholegrain mustard. It’s sure to have your friends and family asking you for your secret ingredient.

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IDEA 1: Garlic dough balls HOW? Roll the raw dough into walnut sized balls. Arrange in a baking dish and brush with garlic non-dairy butter. Bake in a very hot oven for 10-15 minutes and serve hot, with extra garlic butter to dip into.

IDEA 2: Inside out pizzas HOW? Take lemon sized balls of dough and flatten slightly. Place a spoonful of tomato sauce and some grated non-dairy cheese in the centre, plus any of your favourite pizza toppings. Bring the edges of the dough up and around the filling to encase it completely and flatten slightly once again. Bake in a hot oven for 15 minutes, or until puffy and golden. IDEA 3: Olive grissini HOW? Finely chop a couple of handfuls of your favourite olives and knead them into the dough until evenly distributed. Using small portions of dough, roll out long, very slim breadstick shapes using your hands and plenty of flour to dust the dough. Lay the grissini on a floured baking sheet, sprinkle generously with sea salt and cook in a very hot oven for 15-20 minutes, or until golden and crispy. Serve with olive oil and balsamic vinegar, or hummus for dipping.

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