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EXPLORE HIKING, BIKING AND RIDING TRAILS Alleghany, Bath, Craig, Highland Counties


Virginia’s Western Highlands

Located in the Central Appalachians, Virginia’s Western Highlands is home to one of the healthiest, most biologically diverse forests in the world. These forests shelter cool headwater streams that deliver clean water to larger rivers, and eventually to millions of people in the East. Black bear, bobcat, brook trout, and neotropical migratory songbirds thrive here, along with rare and unusual plants. For generations, people have forged deep connections with these lands and waters, whether seeking outdoor recreation and spiritual rejuvenation, or livelihoods from forestry and agriculture.

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Be Prepared

For your comfort and enjoyment, please be prepared before you leave the trailhead: • Always carry and drink plenty of water. Do not assume water from streams and springs is clean for drinking. • Wear closed-toed shoes with good ankle support and traction. • Wear layered clothing suitable for the season. Higher elevations result in lower temperatures. Weather changes quickly in the mountains. Thunderstorms are common on summer afternoons. • Take precautions against ticks such as tucking long pants into socks. Check yourself thoroughly upon return. • Wear blaze orange during hunting season, mainly October - December. • For you and your pet’s safety, keep pets leashed at all times. • Pack it in, pack it out. Keep the wilderness pristine for others to enjoy. • Stay on the trail. Shortcuts cause harm to the environment. • Be Bear Aware in case of an encounter. You are unlikely to encounter a bear, but if you do, stay calm, DO NOT run, make yourself big and loud.

BLUE GRASS 250

220

MONTEREY MCDOWELL

HIGHLAND COUNTY

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COUNTY BATH

WARM OF SPRINGS

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HOT SPRINGS 629

220

ALLEGHANY COUNTY

CLIFTON FORGE 64

COVINGTON

MILLBORO

42

LEXINGTON

220

18

311

PAINT BANK NEW CASTLE

311

CRAIG COUNTY

APPALACHIAN TRAIL

81

311

42

BEDFORD 419

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SALEM ROANOKE


Alleghany Highlands The name “Alleghany” is derived from a Native American word meaning ‘endless’: a fitting description for the great mountain chain which forms the county’s western border. The Alleghany Highlands has a well-deserved reputation as a playground for outdoor enthusiasts. The area is a natural paradise nestled in the Allegheny Mountains of Western Virginia and has numerous recreation opportunities for all. Four-fifths of the area is forested full of beautiful hardwoods. The Alleghany Highlands has over 100 miles of trails, multiple rivers & lakes and many accessible parks that are waiting to be explored. The George Washington and Jefferson National Forests, Gathright Wildlife Management area, Lake Moomaw, Douthat State Park and many clear mountain streams & rivers provide some of the best hunting, fishing, hiking, biking and wildlife viewing in the eastern United States. Try out some of these trails to see the natural beauty of the Alleghany Highlands. Once you make your way off the trail, you can unwind in one of our two downtown districts for great food and hospitality. www.alleghanyhighlandstrails.com

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Alleghany Highlands The Jackson River Scenic Trail Distance: 14.4 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy

This trail is over the old C&O railroad bed. The surface is smooth crushed gravel and mostly flat. The trail is marked with stainless steel trail markers every half mile and spans 14.4 miles. It is perfect for the whole family and is wheelchair accessible. Directions:

From I-64, take Exit 16A towards Covington onto US-60W/220N (Madison St.), follow 220N for 4.2 miles and turn left onto Dressler Dr. The Intervale Trailhead is located immediately on your left.

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Lake Moomaw 687

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640

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220

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220

TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST BOAT LANDING

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Alleghany Highlands The Heron Run Trail – Douthat State Park Distance: .73 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy

This relatively flat 1.8 mile loop around the lake includes the Heron Run Trail, the YCC trail and a short portion of the Blue Suck Falls trail. Excellent hiking for the whole family. Keep an eye out for bald eagles alongside fisherman and for smaller critters along the water’s edge. Directions:

From Interstate 64 and Interstate 81 North of Lexington: Follow I-81 south to exit 56 and exit 191 onto I-64 west (signed, Clifton Forge). Follow I-64 west to exit 27, turn right on to route 629. The park entrance is four miles farther; guest registration is another two miles. Register at the green-roofed building on the right.

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629

629

629

TRAIL ROADS 0

0.125

0.25

0.5 Miles

STREAMS FOREST

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Alleghany Highlands

0

0.125 0.25

Eastern National Children’s Forest Trail Distance: .3 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy

An easy .3 Mile hike through trees that were planted in 1971 by over 1,000 children after a wildfire burned over 1,176 acres on the site. Directions:

Children’s Forest Trail is located in the National Children’s Forest off FDR 351. From Covington take State Route 18 South eight miles. Turn left on to Route 613. Follow 613 to end and turn right on FDR 351. The Trailhead is on the left behind the Children’s Forest Monument Area.

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612

0.5


5 Miles

613

Children’s Forest 35

1

351 C

TRAIL FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Hazel Run Trail Fairmount Park Trail Clifton Forge, VA

37.830

Alleghany Highlands -79.825

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Distance: .7 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy

37.820 37.805

37.810

37.815

From I-64, Exit 27, take Route 60 West into Clifton Forge. Hazel Run is accessed by entering Booker T. Washington Park. The trailhead is at the north end of the park. From I-64 headed east, take Exit 24 and head east on Route 60 East towards Clifton Forge. Booker T. Washington Park is located past A Street on the North side of Main Street (Route 60).

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A short .7-mile hike starting in Booker T. Washington Park and extending to Richmond Ave. Fairmont Park Trail branches off Hazels Run Trail and extends to Madison Avenue and provides access to Linden Park. Great for hiking or mountain bikes providing connectivity to downtown Clifton Forge.


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220

TRAIL FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Alleghany Highlands Rich Hole Wilderness Trail

Distance: 11.8 miles Trail Difficulty: Difficult A local favorite because of the great view, so bring a camera. It is a 5.9-mile hike or mountain bike ride one-way to the top of Brushy Mountain and is steep and rocky in places. Not recommended for children under 7. Directions:

Rich Hole Trail is located in the Rich Hole Wilderness Area in eastern Alleghany County. Take Longdale Furnace exit and go east on U.S. Route 60. Turn left onto FDR 108 and continue to the parking area or continue east on U.S. Route 60 to Rich Hole parking area on the left.

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60

64

Rich Hole Wilderness Area

TRAIL FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Bath County

photo by Bill Crabtree

photo by Byron Jorjorian

With 86% of its landscape still covered in mountain forest, 170,000 acres of George Washington National Forest, and 9,000 acres of unspoiled ridge top owned by The Nature Conservancy, outdoor enthusiasts delight in Bath County’s breathtaking mountain vistas; pristine waters of the Jackson and Cowpasture Rivers for kayaking, fishing and fly fishing, the serene Lake Moomaw; the miles of protected hiking, cycling, and horseback trails, George Washington National Forest, and Virginia’s Western Highland trails; as well as home to the beloved, pleasantly rustic Douthat State Park. 540 square miles of verdant forests and fertile farm lands add to Bath County’s rich topography. Both road and mountain biking are also popular activities, as the winding roads and rugged mountains offer the cycling enthusiast a variety of experiences. Bath County owns the distinction of a vast outdoor playground, while blending extraordinary appeal in its charming inns, cabins, and lodging. Fresh and innovative restaurants rejuvenate weary bodies after outdoor experiences, while fire pits and our remarkable show of stars in our deliberate dark sky defines your mountain backdrop.

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Bath County Bear Loop Trail Distance: 3.5 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy

This wide, relatively flat 3.5 mile loop delivers vistas across the Allegheny Plateau of West Virginia and toward the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. Interpretive signs tell the story of forest history and current management through the use of controlled burning. This Nature Conservancy trail blends accessibility, incredible views and one of the best picnic spots in the county. Directions:

From Hot Springs,take 220 South to Rt. 606; follow signs to airport. Trail is just left of entrance to Ingalls Field airport at end of State Route 703.

703

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TRAIL

George Washington National Forest

FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Bath County Blue Suck Falls

Douthat State Park

Distance: 3 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Difficult This can be a 3-mile hike out and back to the falls or 3-miles one-way to reach the Tuscarora trail and thus, varies in difficulty. After about 1.5 miles, the blue-blazed, rocky trial reaches Blue Suck Falls, which get their name from the Appalachian term for a whirlpool or “suck.� At higher elevations beyond the falls, the trail features several overlooks of the Allegheny Mountains, and after a series of switchbacks, arrives at the yellow-blazed Tuscarora Overlook Trail and other trail connections within the Park or the adjacent national forest. Grab the full park trail map when you check-in for endless connections. Directions:

Trail starts from the Discovery Center parking area in the Camp Carson Picnic Area at Douthat State Park

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629

TRAIL ROADS STREAMS

photo by Kent Mason

FOREST

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Bath County Bolar Loop Trail Lake Moomaw

Distance: 2.1 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate

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Starting across the road from the beach area parking lot, walk around the wooden gate and follow a dirt road for a short distance to access the trailhead.

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This 2.1 mile moderate loop is a central connector to several other trails on Bolar Mountain and a variety of routes of different lengths are possible. Strictly following this blue-blazed loop leads to two scenic overlooks, Grouse Point and Islands, both with benches and panoramic views of Lake Moomaw. Several white-blazed spur trails lead from this loop to different access points in the Recreation Area.


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Lake Moomaw BOLAR LOOP TRAIL TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Bath County Cobbler Mountain/Muddy Run/Jackson River Gorge Trail Circuit Distance: 5.1 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate

Begin this 5.1-mile moderate circuit by following the blue-blazed, single-track trail up a short climb to the ridge of Cobbler Mountain, then ascend to a wooden bridge crossing Chimney Run at 0.7 miles. Continue for 1.3 miles as the trail winds along the bottom of Cobbler Mountain, passes through a small field with views of Warwickton and then along a wetland area before descending to the intersection of the blue blazed Muddy Run Trail. Turn left on the Muddy Run Trail and after 0.1 miles, cross a small wooded footbridge over Muddy Run. After another 0.2 miles, cross the Jackson River on the large suspension bridge and then turn left on the Jackson River Gorge Trail as it follows Jackson River downstream towards Warwickton. After 1.8 miles, turn left at the mansion onto the gravel road that crosses a low water bridge over the river and continues back towards the Recreation Area entrance. Continue to follow Hidden Valley Road for 1.0 miles, past the campground entrance, and arrive back at the parking area. Directions:

Begin at the Cobbler Mountain Trail parking area located at the shale pit near the southern entrance to the Recreation Area.

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241

River Loop

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621

FEATURED TRAIL TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Bath County Ingalls Overlook Trail Distance: 2.4 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate

This 1.2-mile trail (2.4 miles roundtrip) begins at the Dan Ingalls Overlook on State Route 39. Interpretive signs along the first mile provide an excellent introduction to Warm Springs Mountain and the region’s natural history. The trail then climbs a series of scenic rock formations with views of Shenandoah Mountain and the Cowpasture River valley before looping back to the main trail and returning to the overlook. Directions:

Begin at the Dan Ingalls Overlook on Route 39 just east of Warm Springs.

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Overlook

39

TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Craig County Craig County offers a rich historical heritage, a smalltown country atmosphere, and rolling mountain vistas. After the county was created in 1851, the frontier village of New Castle became the county seat and remains the only incorporated town. Agriculture, timber, mining, healing spring resorts, and a CCC camp contributed to prosperity from 1880 to the early 1900’s. An active historical society currently works to preserve local history and landmarks in the county. With over 112,000 acres of National Forest land, recreational opportunities include hunting, birding, fishing, camping, horse-back riding, ATV trails, and worldclass hiking. McAfee Knob and Dragon’s Tooth are right across the Roanoke County line and thirteen miles of the Appalachian Trail weave through our southeast corner. Virginia Scenic Byways Rt. 42, Rt. 311, and Rt. 615 are some of the prettiest roads in the Highlands. Conveniently located between the Roanoke Valley and the West Virginia border, Craig County is a short distance from I-81 and I-64 and is within a day’s drive of most of the East Coast.

photo by Kent Mason

photo by Hazel Beeler

Your next adventure is just around the bend in Craig County! Relax in one of our unique lodging venues, tour Historic Downtown New Castle, view over 30 barn quilts on our mapped trail, and dine on farm-raised bison in Paint Bank.

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photo by Kent Mason

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Craig County Fenwick Mines Trails

Fenwick Mines Day Use Area on the George Washington & Jefferson National Forests has two nearly level trails with easy access to restrooms, picnic shelter and fishing pond. Fenwick Wetlands Trail Distance: 1 mile Trail Difficulty: Easy Hike through a hardwood forest, an Appalachian swamp and a marsh. Hikers may see deer, grouse, turkeys, wood ducks, mallards, beavers, warblers, newts, salamanders, fish, insects and a variety of wildflowers, shrubs, and trees. Fenwick Nature Trail Distance: 1 mile Trail Difficulty: Easy Trail descends gradually along the old railroad bed, shaded by oak, cherry, birch and hemlock trees, before returning along Mill Creek. An overlook along the way provides a nice view of a small waterfall. Wildflowers are abundant during Spring. Directions:

From New Castle, VA, follow Rt. 615 (Craig Creek Rd.) for 5 miles. Turn left on Rt. 611 (Peaceful Valley Rd.). Continue Âź mile and turn right onto Rt. 685 (Fenwick Mines Rd.). Follow signs to Fenwick Mines Recreation Area.

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TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Craig County Ferrier Trail & Lick Branch Trails Distance: 3 miles, 2 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate Ferrier Trail is a moderate hike offering views of Craig Creek Valley and Potts Mountain and intersects Lick Branch trail after 3 miles. Take Lick Branch trail to loop back to start of Ferrier (the last 1.5 miles being on the FS road) or continue up Ferrier about 2 more miles to intersect with North Mountain Trail. During rainy weather, both Ferrier and Lick Branch have numerous creek crossings. Directions:

In New Castle, from Rt. 311 turn right onto Main Street. Go 2 blocks and turn right onto Rt. 616 (Court Street). This then becomes Little Cuba Lane. Continue approximately 1 mile, turn right onto Rt. 690 (Maggie Maw Lane). At End of State Maintenance sign, take the right fork – the Ferrier Trail comes in on the left. Continue another 1.5 miles to the Lick Branch Trail trailhead and parking.

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New Castle

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TRAIL ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Craig County North Mountain Trail Distance: 13 miles Trail Difficulty: Difficult This difficult trail follows the ridge of North Mountain for approximately 13 miles with some nice views of both Catawba and Craig Creek Valleys. Three 1.5 mile trails (from Wildlife Road) climb the north face of the mountain to the ridge. By accessing one of these trails, various out and back or loop hikes can be done.

New Castle

311

Directions:

From New Castle, follow Rt. 311 south approximately 7 miles, then turn left onto Forest Service Road #224 (Wildlife Road). Parking is currently available at both the Deer and Grouse trailheads.

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FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Craig County Hanging Rock Trail Distance: 1 mile Trail Difficulty: Easy Hanging Rock Trail is the only designated trail in the Shawvers Run Wilderness. Nestled in the northwest corner of Craig County, this wilderness area is a remote and wild landscape. The trail, however, is rated as an easy one-mile round trip from the parking area to the overlook and back. It’s perfect for sunset viewing and offers beautiful views to the west of Peters Mountain and the valleys below. On a clear day you can see McAfee’s Knob to the southeast. Directions:

From New Castle, follow Rt. 311 north to the top of Potts Mountain. Turn right onto Potts Mountain East (FS road #177-1) and go about 3 miles to trailhead parking on the left.

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ROADS STREAMS FOREST 0.25

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Appalachian Trail Access Points Craig County offers several points of access to the famous Appalachian Trail. At any of these points you may choose to hike either north or south on the trail. Different sections provide different levels of difficulty and varying mileage. Some have shelters for camping and some have spur trails that can lead to beautiful overlooks and/or points of interest such as: Dragons Tooth, Kelly Knob, the Keffer Oak, and The Audie Murphy Monument. Miller Cove/Trout Creek area

From New Castle take Rt. 311 7.2 miles south to Rt. 621 (Upper Craigs Creek Rd.). Turn right on Rt. 621 and go 2.8 miles to Rt. 620 (Miller Cove Road). Turn left on Rt. 620 and go 1.1 miles to trailhead parking on the right.

Lee Hollow/Brush Mountain area

From New Castle take Rt. 311 7.2 miles south to Rt.621 (Upper Craigs Creek Rd.). Turn right on Rt.621 and go 6.2 miles to the trail crossing / parking on the right.

Route 42/Level Green/Sinking Creek area

From New Castle take Rt.42 (Cumberland Gap Rd.) for approximately 21 miles to the trail crossing/limited parking on the left. Additional parking can be found by turning left onto Rt.629 (Lugar Hill Rd.), just prior to the crossing on Rt.42. Go a short distance on Rt. 629 then take a right on Rt. 630 (Northside Rd.), after crossing a small bridge, parking is on the left.

Johns Creek Mountain/Rocky Gap area

From New Castle take Rt. 311 5 miles north to Rt. 658 (Johns Creek Rd.) on the left. After 4.7 miles, stay to the left on Johns Creek Rd. which becomes Rt. 632. Continue on Rt. 632 for 14.5 miles to Rt. 601 (Rocky Gap Trail, one-lane gravel road) just before the Captain Historical Marker. Follow Rt. 601 2.2 miles to the top of Johns Creek Mt. where the AT crosses. Limited parking.

NOTE: A great resource for detailed information and maps can be found on the Appalachian Trail Conservancy’s website at appalachiantrail.org

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Highland County Highland County is the northern gateway to Virginia’s Western Highlands. Home to the headwaters of the James and Potomac rivers, it is one of the least populated counties east of the Mississippi River. Its high average elevation is key to the success of the local maple syrup industry, which culminates each year in its longstanding Maple Festival. Known for its breathtaking beauty and rural charm, Highland is characterized by unspoiled forests, pristine waterways and open farmland. Due to the abundance of clean mountain spring water, trout can be caught yearround in the county’s streams, and at hatcheries like the Virginia Trout Company.

photo by Todd Frye

photo by Crystal Waybright

Beyond the natural wonders, Highland County holds a tight-knit community made up of a mix of native farm families and new residents drawn to the high quality of life. It is perfect for those seeking solitude and a refreshing sense of freedom. Come shop, hike, bike, explore, and make yourself a part of our unique mountain culture!

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photo by Amy Middleton

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Highland County Shenandoah Mountain Trail

Directions:

From the parking lot, walk north and gently uphill on the yellow-blazed trail through mature forests and mountain views to your east and west. After approximately two miles, the trail intersects Road Hollow Trail. Keep to the left on Shenandoah Mountain Trail. After one half mile, you will enter the Ramsey’s Draft Wilderness Area with a camping area to your right. A short distance later, you will take a right onto Jerry’s Run Trail, which will descend toward the creek and to Jerry’s Run, and the Sexton Cabin camping site. This is the turn-around point. Follow the same trail back to the parking lot.

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Distance: 6 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy The Shenandoah Mountain Trail is located at the top of Shenandoah Mountain on Rt. 250 along the border of Highland and Augusta Counties. The entire trek—part of the Great Eastern Trail—is one of the premier longdistance ridge-top hikes in Virginia. It stretches across the ridge of Shenandoah Mountain and offers more than 50 miles of high-elevation, backcountry paradise. This shorter loop starts at the stone steps near the bathrooms and is yellow-blazed. It is a great option for families and offers outstanding birding opportunities, especially for neo-tropical migratory songbirds.


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Highland County McDowell Battlefield Trail Distance: 2.6 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate The McDowell Battlefield Trail leads to the top of Sitlington Hill and the core of the McDowell Battlefield. The Battle of McDowell, fought on May 8, 1862, was the first victory of General “Stonewall” Jackson’s Valley Campaign. The trailhead is a small gravel parking area with interpretive signs just off the highway approximately one mile from the top of Bullpasture Mountain east of McDowell. Virginia Civil War Trails Markers invite you to follow in the footsteps of the Confederate soldiers of Jackson’s army. The 1.3 mile steady incline offers interpretive information along the way up to the heart of the battlefield. Atop the summit, you can visualize the advance of Union soldiers up both sides and enjoy the views before heading back the way you came. Hikers are encouraged to visit the Highland County Museum (540-396-4478, www. highlandcountyhistory.com) in McDowell before their hike.

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654

250


250

TRAIL FOREST SERVICE ROADS ROADS STREAMS FOREST

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Highland County Locust Spring Run & Buck Run Trail Distance: 6 miles Trail Difficulty: Moderate to Difficult With some of the most diverse scenery in the Virginias, Laurel Fork is home to beaver dams, old growth forests, a variety of bird species, and wetlands. Secluded on the border of Virginia and West Virginia at 4,000 feet, the Laurel Fork area can be a break from those hot summer days at lower altitudes. Start down the Locust Spring Run Trail, which is located at the Locust Springs Picnic Area. This trail will wind through old growth forest for 1.2 miles before arriving at the Buck Run Connector Trail intersection. Continue right to remain on Locust Spring Run Trail. Follow the trail approximately 2.5 miles to the intersection of Laurel Fork Trail. Turn left at the river and continue downstream a short distance to Buck Run Trail. Stay on the railroad grade, as this becomes Buck Run trail. Cross the run in 1.5 miles, then cross back in another 200 yards. Turn left after crossing the run – a rock cairn marks the spot. The trail makes several switchbacks as it climbs the mountain. After the last switchback stay right where the trail now follows an old forest service road. In 0.9 miles from the last switchback, you will pass a wetland area on the right, then continue through a red spruce stand before reaching the intersection of the Buck Run Connector Trail. Turn right on the Buck Run Trail and in 0.4 miles arrive at FR142. Turn left for the remaining 30 yards to the Locust Spring Picnic area and hike start point. Directions:

Follow Route 250 west into West Virginia. Turn right onto West Virginia Route 28 at the sign for the Locust Springs Picnic Area. Turn left onto FR60 and travel 0.3 miles. Turn right onto FR142 and travel 0.2 miles before arriving at Locust Springs Picnic Area.

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Highland County Paddy Knob Trail Distance: 0.5 to 7 miles Trail Difficulty: Easy to Moderate Paddy Knob is an easy hike that straddles 84 Virginia and West Virginia and 3 counties (Bath and Highland in Virginia, Pocohontas in West Virginia). The old lookout tower is gone, represented by 4 foundation stones, but the area is encircled by several trails—the simplest of which circles the site and ends up back on top. Scenic vistas are blocked by trees but can be glimpsed in the winter. According to the VA Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Paddy Knob is best known among birders for housing unusual breeding species in Virginia, such as mourning warbler, yellow-bellied sapsucker, and black-billed cuckoo. Other breeding birds within these forests include dark-eyed junco, cedar waxwing, veery, American redstart, and black-throated blue and black-throated green warblers. Ruffed grouse and wild turkey are numerous throughout. In the fall, migrant raptors, such as broadwinged hawks, can be seen flying overhead in numbers. 46 VAWESTERNHIGHLANDS.COM

55

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84

FEATURED TRAIL OTHER TRAILS ROADS STREAMS GEORGE WASHINGTON NATIONAL FOREST MONOGAHELA NATIONAL FOREST

Directions:

Take Rt 220 south 4 miles out of Monterey to Vanderpool, Rt 84 . Turn right. Continue 10 miles to West Virginia border. Just over the mountaintop, look for a sign that says “Rimel Cooperative Wildlife Management Area.” Turn left there, on FR 55. Continue 3.5 miles to Paddy Knob. An overgrown jeep trail is to your left. If you are unsure of the first one, continue to the road marked with a yellow topped pole, and walk back along that. The site of the old tower is less than 1/8 mile away, but there are trails surrounding the site. Directions to extend the hike: From the old tower site, walk back to the jeep trail. Walk back towards Rt 84 (slightly downhill), and you will see a trail through the woods to your right, which heads back towards the tower site. Follow it, and you will circle the knob and end up back at the open area. Total hike: ¾ mile. For a longer 7 mile hike, park at Rt 84 and walk the 3.5 miles into the site and back. VAWESTERNHIGHLANDS.COM 47


To Request Additional Trail Maps, Area Maps, and other Visitors Services Contact: Alleghany Highlands Chamber of Commerce and Tourism

Douthat State Park

www.dcr.virginia.gov douthat@dcr.virginia.gov www.visitalleghanyhighlands.com 14239 Douthat State Park Road info@visitalleghanyhighlands.com Millboro, VA 24460 540-862-8100 110 Mall Rd, Covington, VA 24426 The Nature Conservancy 540-962-2178 www.nature.org/Virginia 420 Forestry Road County of Bath Tourism Hot Springs, VA 24445 www.DiscoverBath.com 540-839-3599 65 Courthouse Hill Road Warm Springs, VA 24484 George Washington & 540-839-7202

Jefferson National Forests www.fs.fed.us/r8/gwj

www.visitcraigcountyva.com craigcountytourism@gmail.com 303 Main Street, P.O. Box 308 New Castle, VA 24127 540-864-5010

Warm Springs and James River Districts

Highland County Chamber of Commerce

Eastern Divide Ranger District

www.highlandcounty.org director@highlandcounty.org P.O. Box 223 Monterey, VA 24465 540-468-2550

422 Forestry Road Hot Springs, VA 24445 540-839-2521

110 Southpark Drive Blacksburg, VA 24060 540-552-4641

photo by Michael Bedwell

Craig County Tourism Commission

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Virginia's Western Highlands Trail Guide  

Hiking, biking and riding in Alleghany, Bath, Craig and Highland Counties in Virginia's Western Highlands.

Virginia's Western Highlands Trail Guide  

Hiking, biking and riding in Alleghany, Bath, Craig and Highland Counties in Virginia's Western Highlands.

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