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The Planner

in

is distributed to professional

meeting and event planners across

Canada

* A Mari Usque Ad Mare

this

issue

6 Turn Your Booth into a Captivating Story

Barry Siskind explains how good storytelling can help you stand out in a crowd of exhibitors.

Publisher’s Note

8 Make It Green

Learn how to live a greener life with a few simple “green thoughts”.

Information Overload

16 Get Hip to Haggling

Information Overload, as you know, is an increasing problem, in both the workplace and in general. Those who learn to deal with it effectively gain a major time and decision-making advantage which will continue to increase

From ancient marketplaces to modern living: Marilyn Lazar shares her tips on how to haggle to improve your event’s bottom line.

18 Destination Golden Horseshoe

Burlington, Mississauga and Niagara Falls, a closer look at some of the Golden Horseshoe destinations.

in the years to come. Information Overload occurs when you are trying to deal

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with more information than you are able to process in order to make sensible decisions. The result is that you either delay making decisions, or that you make the wrong ones.

A monthly digest to inform and enlighten meeting and event planners

P ublisher Michel Geoffroy, CMM mg@theplanner.ca E ditor Dana Gonciarz dgonciarz@theplanner.ca B usiness D evelopment M anager

Michael McAteer mmcateer@theplanner.ca

G raphic A rtist Matthew Riopel mriopel@theplanner.ca

It is now commonplace to be inundated with too many e-mails, reports and incoming messages to deal with them effectively. That’s why we believe The Planner has its place in today’s world. It’s a simple, easy to read, unpretentious magazine, which provides planners with the current, reliable information they require to handle day-to-day challenges. It’s not about perception or about lifestyle; it’s simply about providing you with relevant information.

S ales info@theplanner.ca C irculation circulation@theplanner.ca C ontributors Jyl Ashton Cunningham, Amber Jackson,

Marilyn Lazar, Patricia Lemus, Barry Siskind, Vittoria Wikston

A ddress

2105, de la Montagne, suite 100, Montreal, Québec H3G 1Z8 Telephone: (514) 849-6841 poste 315 Fax: (514) 284-2282 Your comments are appreciated: info@theplanner.ca

The Planner is published ten times a year. Poste-publication No. 40934013

*Canadian Coat of Arms motto “From sea to sea”

Each subject we choose to write about has a direct link to what planners do and the decisions they must make. We also choose to focus on the positive in the industry. As time is so limited for all of us, why waste it on the negative? As you know, we are open to your comments and suggestions, so please continue sending them to us. Michel Geoffroy, CMM

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Westjet Named Canada’s Most Attractive Employer Randstad Canada has named WestJet the 2012 Randstad Award winner for most attractive employer as chosen by Canadians.

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n voting for WestJet, over 7,000 Canadians said the company topped two of 10 attractiveness categories, with respondents perceiving WestJet as a company that offers a pleasant work atmosphere and interesting job content. WestJet also received very high scores on training opportunities. Unique to the Canadian market, the Randstad Award aims to reward and encourage best practices in building the best employer brands, as chosen by workers and job seekers in search of employment opportunities within Canada’s leading organizations. Based on polling con-

ducted by ICMA International in February and March of 2012, the top five award winners voted the most attractive companies to work for in Canada are: WestJet Airlines Ltd, ArcelorMittal, Pratt & Whitney Canada International Inc., IBM Canada. Tied for fifth place are Molson Coors Canada and Bombardier Inc. Along with identifying Canada’s most attractive employer, the survey also unveiled some insights into the changing demands and priorities of the Canadian worker. Some of the key findings from the study of top attractiveness factors include: long-term job security (65%), listed as the most important factor for Canadians when seeking an employer, followed by competitive salary and benefits (61%), a pleasant work atmosphere (54%), the financial health of the organization (45%) and career progression opportunities (36%).

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Heathrow Airport nightmares expected for Olympics British lawmakers have questioned Heathrow’s ability to cope with an influx of passengers during the London Olympics this summer, warning that long lines at immigration could force planes to sit on runways or even circle Europe’s busiest airport. Lawmakers met with Heathrow operator BAA Airports Ltd. and “did not leave the briefing confident” that Heathrow was ready to cope with huge numbers of arrivals around the Olympics in a “timely fashion.” The Games run from July 27 to Aug. 12. Last year, even without the crush of the Olympics, Britain’s former border chief relaxed some passport checks during the busy season just to handle the demand. Heathrow typically handles an average of 190,000 passengers arriving and departing each day, with 96.4 million in total in 2011. The day after the Games’ closing ceremony - Monday Aug.13 - is set to be the airport’s busiest yet, BAA estimates.

Air Canada Vacations Introduces “StormGuard” Reschedule your vacation before a storm becomes a hurricane Air Canada Vacations has launched StormGuard, a new way for Canadians to protect their vacations against hurricane season. Customers will now be able to reschedule their vacation before a storm becomes a hurricane. If the National Hurricane Center declares a tropical storm warning for a destination within three days (72 hours) of their scheduled departure, clients can rebook their vacation for any time before Apr. 30, 2013. StormGuard is available for $49 per adult and $35 per child aged two to 12 for all Air, Hotel & Transfer packages, hotel-only or aironly bookings to Mexico and the Caribbean made by Nov. 30, 2012 for travel from June 1 and completed by Nov. 30, 2012, excluding Mexico’s West Coast and Mexico City.

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Three top career-limiters “According to a report from philly.com, those sporting visible tattoos are struggling to get hired in face of stricter corporate dress codes,” reports The Huffington Post. “In short, clean-cut candidates with a traditional corporate appearance are more appealing to employers than those with visible body artwork.” A survey conducted by careerbuilder.com, showed similar results. After taking the pulse of HR managers, the job search site found that piercings, cited by 37% of hiring managers, are the top physical attribute that can limit a candidate’s career potential. Bad breath came in next, at 34%, with visible tattoos trailing not too far behind at 31%.

Beer loosing ground to wine drinkers

The taste for beer in this country has been waning over the past decade, as more people choose to buy wine, a report released recently suggests. Beer and liquor store agencies sold $20.3 billion worth of beer during the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011, up 2% from the previous year, Statistics Canada date show. While beer remains the alcoholic beverage of choice for Canadians, it is being challenged by increasing wine sales: By 2011, the market share for beer had declined to 45% from 52% in 2000. Beer sales amounted to 80.3 litres per person in 2011, down from 85.6 litres in the past decade. Per-capita data is based on Canadians aged 15 and older. Meanwhile, market share for wine accounted for 30% by 2011, up from 23% the previous decade. Wineries and liquor stores and their agencies sold $6.1 billion worth of wines during the fiscal year ending March 31, 2011, up 5% from the previous year. The volume of wine sales increased 3% to 470 million litres during the same period, with imported wine sales growth (4.8%) surpassing domestic wine sales growth (0.5%). From 2000 to 2011, the dollar sales of red wine almost tripled, up by an astonishing 181%.

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A Little Humour Goes A Long Way Putting your funny bone to work can help you fit in at the office, a new Accountemps survey suggests. Seventy-three per cent of CFOs said an employee’s sense of humour is important for fitting into the company’s corporate culture. Planners must deal with multiple corporate cultures and can use humour to defuse stress when unforeseen hitches arise behind the scene. Use it to show some personality and add levity to situations. However, bear in mind that the workplace is not a social setting, so display appropriate humour with discretion.

Diamond Jubilee, Olympic Games make London top destination place Home to the 2012 Summer Olympic Games and to the Diamond Jubilee celebration for Britain`s Queen Elizabeth, London is also the world`s top destination this year, according to an index released by global credit card company MasterCard. MasterCard’s ``Worldwide Index of Global Destination Cities`` predicted that London will see 16.9 million people arrive by air compared with a million less for second-place city Paris and air miles ahead of New York at 13th place with 7.6 million arrivals. The index also said that London, for the second year running, will attract the highest international visitor spending at US$21.2 million, just ahead of New York at US$19.4 million.

What young employees today are – and are not – looking for? Personal calls and e-mails non-negotiable

According to a new study from staffing firm Adecco Group North America, 23% of recent U.S. university graduates say they would not take a position where they couldn’t make or take personal phone calls and 20% would reject a place that didn’t let them check personal e-mail. The study, which surveyed more than 500 graduates aged 22 to 26, also found that newly minted graduates are short on patience and 33% said they would probably stay three years or less. If their salary were cut, two-thirds of respondents said they would quit. And nearly one-fifth (18%) said they would leave their job if they were assigned work that didn’t interest them. “With social media, this generation can see everything their peers are doing. So they feel like they have to move more often to keep up with where their friends and classmates are,” said Janette Marx, senior vice president of Adecco Group North America.

Lifestyle and money trump geography Topping the list are good health benefits (74%), job security (73%), opportunities for development (68%), work/life flexibility (66%) and high salary (61%). The new graduates also indicated their geographic flexibility: 73% said they would move to another city if they got a well-paying job, or had an offer from their dream employer (59%).

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trade shows

Turn Your Booth into a Captivating Story Once upon a time, everyone was a teller of tales. People told stories as they worked, to pass the time, or to pass along valuable information about their heritage. The art of storytelling evolved naturally because some people preferred telling tales of heroes, myths and legends while others preferred listening to them. 6

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oday, in our fast moving world, the need to tell stories is perhaps greater than ever. Stories allow the masses to connect with ideas and dreams. They give them an excuse to move away from the 140 character bite to become immersed in something greater than themselves while sparking their imagination and intellect to open the doors of possibilities. Stories involve many senses. The listener wants more than just seeing; they need to feel, taste, hear and smell. The more senses the story awakens, the stronger the listener’s interest. There are many places where a business storyteller can perform magic: movie theatres (product placements), television (commercials) or an exhibition (a careful blend of display hardware and well-prepared staff). Creating compelling stories is more than simple fabrication. It requires a thought out approach which, when executed properly, will make doing business easier. When a story is told in the context of your product or brand,

By Barry Siskind

it offers the customer a moment of entertainment. Here for a brief moment they can escape into another world, where they are the protagonist, and sense how your solutions might make a difference to them. Stories are not just for those exhibitors in a B to C situation. B to B exhibitors also need to ask what appeals to their customers and build a story that satisfies this focus.

Tips for the

Exhibition Storyteller Appropriate Select a story appropriate to the interests and demographics of the audience. Think about some of the themes that major brands have used in their storytelling: •

Sharing a beverage with friends

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trade shows

Participating in the adventure of a lifetime

Living a secret dream or ambition

Finding a satisfying lifestyle

Fulfilling a romantic fantasy

Eating like a gourmet

Being the recipient of praise from your boss and colleagues

These story themes are deliberately chosen to resonate with the specific desires and needs of the target audience.

Repetitive

Develop a solid opener

If you have ever read to a child, you know that repetition of key phrases, concepts or the rhythm of the prose is what keeps their interest. In the past, brand messages, logos and colours have been an excellent way of reinforcing what you want remembered. But take your storytelling one step further and ensure that repetition is included in your entire exhibition plan: your promotional efforts, signage and graphics, clothing, and most importantly, how well your staff brings the story to life.

Once you have introduced yourself to the attendee and engaged them in conversation, begin your story with an opener such as:

Build suspense You want stories that build up suspense and result in a good climax, preferably tales where characters speak for themselves rather than in straight narratives. This is where your crafting is crucial. Storytelling is difficult. It might make sense to hire a professional writer to do the job. However, if you chose to do it yourself, remember that the process may require lots of re-writes until it’s right. Don’t be discouraged, with each draft you can solicit feedback and then incorporate these comments and ask for more.

Animate your story Your story starts when your staff smile and make eye contact with a visitor. What happens next is crucial. When staff repeats, by rote, a story they have memorized, it often comes across as boring and insincere. This is where the role of rehearsal is so important. Encourage your staff to tell the story in their own words, and then have them tell it to a colleague over and over again until it becomes second nature.

“Let me tell you a story…”

• •

“It goes like this…” “It all began when…”

Pull it all together A well crafted and executed story will bring the attendee to a place where they’re hanging on every word to find out how the story ends. At this point, you move away from the story back to reality by saying something like: •

“Let me tell you what happens…”

“As you can well imagine…”

“Our story has a happy ending…”

At this moment you unfold your happy ending in a way that delivers the solution your attendee was always looking for. Using a well-crafted story lets you stand out in a crowd of exhibitors busy pitching their products and services. It engages the visitor on a deep level and leaves them satisfied that your solution will alleviate the concerns they may have. Barry Siskind is North America’s foremost trade and consumer show expert. Visit his Web site: www.siskindtraining.com or e-mail him at: barry@siskindtraining.com.

for

i n f o

your

How loud is too loud? The American Speech-Language Hearing Association offers these guidelines: “It’s too loud if you must raise your voice to be heard; if you have difficulty understanding someone who is an arm’s length

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away; if you have pain, rigging or buzzing in your ears after exposure to loud sounds; or if speech seems muffled or dull after noise exposure.”

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green thoughts

Collect Old

Batteries Old batteries are extremely toxic and should never be thrown into the trash can. Make sure you place them in the special bins provided in public places. Or better yet, use rechargeable batteries! What’s the future for batteries? Batteries power everything from watches and flashlights, to iPods, computers and a lot more. Inside a battery, there’s a lot going on – chemical reactions that release energy in the form of electricity. They use metals like cadmium, mercury, lead, nickel, zinc, or manganese. All of these are toxic and dangerous to the environment. Just one round mercury battery no bigger than a button will, if dumped in the natural environment, pollute more than one hundred gallons of water and a cubic meter of ground for fifty years. Used batteries can be recycled in specialized factories. Furnaces are heated to 2,192 degrees Fahrenheit to melt the batteries and recover their heavy metals, so that the metals can be reused. Ferromanganese, for example, can be reused in the making of faucets or taps as well as railroad rails. Zinc is reused in the making of guttering and antirust paints. When you recycle a battery, you’re not just avoiding pollution of the environment, but also preventing the squandering of expensive, non-renewable primary commodities. And planners, encourage your suppliers to do the same.

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Green Thoughts As you know there is a lot more to being green than simply recycling paper or paying $0.05 for plastic bags.

nstead of buying throwaway products, why not choose to buy the same thing but in reusable form? They create much less

used emits greenhouse gases). That’s a lot of damage and pollution for just a plate, wouldn’t you say? And then what happens? Few throwaway objects are recyclable. Once they are in the trash can, they contribute largely to the quantity of waste that has to be dealt with and hidden away. Our planet is not like a plastic plate or a paper napkin. It’s not disposable. There isn’t another one for us to use when we’ve ruined this one! So skip the disposable

waste and harm the planet less. Why so many throwaway items? Pens, tissues, wipes, cups, paper towels – we use them once and then off they go! Into the trash! How convenient! The manufacture of all theses products uses a lot of natural resources. Just one example: the manufacture of disposable plates uses trees (for paper plates) or petroleum (for plastic plates), plus water and energy needed to drive the machines – not to mention the energy to transport the products to the factory. Every stage contributes to deforestation (lots of trees are felled), to pollution of the water and air (factory discharges contain harmful substances), and global warming (the energy

whenever possible and buy reusable! Speaking of which… Sort your trash at home, the office and at events. Do you know that when you recycle your aluminium cans, you are helping to conserve nature and natural resources? The same goes for your plastic bottles (less petroleum used), your paper (fewer trees cut down), or steel cans (less iron ore dug out of the ground). Recycling uses less energy than manufacturing from scratch. How do you turn a heap of plastic bottles into a fleece jacket or wine bottles into a jam jar, or soda cans into a bicycle? By recycling. Sort what you throw away and RECYCLE, RECYCLE, RECYCLE! Another life awaits your recyclables.

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Buy Reusable:

Say ‘NO’ to Cigarettes Every year over twelve million acres of forest are used as fuel to dry tobacco. If any of your friends smoke and they aren’t bothered about the health risks, just tell them you want a planet that’s full of trees! Tobacco is a big consumer of trees! Trees, like all plants, help to make the atmosphere breathable because they absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. That’s why they are often nicknamed ‘the planet’s lungs.’ So cutting down forest to dry tobacco doesn’t just damage the lungs of smokers, it affects the earth’s own lungs and has consequences for the survival of the human species.

Forests: The world’s great storehouses because they contain so many insect, plant, and animal species; the tropical forests are great reserves of biodiversity. Some of these species could help us improve our agriculture (for example, by crossing cultivated species with wild species that have better disease resistance) or help us find new medicines (like a fungus in the Congo that may cure diabetes).

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REDUCE YOUR CARBON FOODPRINT Adopt a ‘closest to home’ buying policy

Mini Green Thoughts Carpooling

Today, in cities, most automobiles travel with just one person inside. That creates a lot of congestion on the highways and wasted fuel. Carpooling means joining with two or more people who are going to the same place. Or better yet, take public transportation!

It makes sense to favour food produced close to home. Of course,

Avoid Air-Conditioning

just because a food is locally produced doesn’t mean it’s good. But all things being equal – the product tastes good and it has been humanely and ethically produced – your food will automatically be fresher and more seasonal, and considerably less trauma will be inflicted on the environment in its transportation.

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he shorter the distance that food travels, the less energy is used, which helps reduce carbon emissions. By eating more local food, you can substantially reduce your carbon ‘foodprint’. As well, the money you spend on local food will support and encourage our native food producers, which strengthens communities and the economy, and helps build our selfsufficiency. The supermarkets’ policy of treating the planet like one big global shopping basket has created a bizarre situation where many of us eat little or no local or regional food, and surprisingly small quantities of nationally pro-

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duced food, even though we live in a rich and productive land and ought to be more or less self-sufficient. With the world’s population set to grow by 50% by 2050, and global warming and a shortage of oil putting pressure on the world’s ability to feed itself, this dependency on imported food looks increasingly reckless. There is something fundamentally unsound about relying on faceless producers in faraway places to keep us fed; these people owe us nothing. Instead, we need to make the country more resilient by buying more food that’s grown here, not flown or shipped here. Here’s a simple step: encourage stores where you buy your food to clearly indicate when it’s produced locally so it can be highlighted.

When its hot in summer, plug in your fan: it uses ten times less energy than air conditioning. Close blinds and shutters – another way that uses no energy at all to keep out the heat.

Let’s Get on Our Bikes

Bikes don’t pollute, aren’t noisy, take up little road space, and are good for your health. They’re ideal for short trips. So use a bike and encourage your parents to do the same. Or, try rollerblades! More Green Thoughts on page 17

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Ottawa Convention Centre Achieves AIPC Quality Standards Gold Certification

The Ottawa Convention Centre has achieved AIPC Quality Standards Gold Certification with the successful completion of an audit by the designated external auditor for AIPC (International Association of Congress Centres). The OCC joins a group of only 20 AIPC convention centres worldwide that have successfully achieved this level of international certification.

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he program standards identified and audited ten key areas, including Customer Service, Quality of Facilities and Operations, Employee Relations, Health, Safety, Security and Emergency Response, Financial Integrity, Community Relations, Environmental Responsibility, Industry Relations and Supplier Relations. Members who complete the audit process uniformly report that it not only serves to document their procedures but also enables them to clarify any shortcomings for corrective action. The process is also seen as being an excellent team-building exercise because it involves all management staff in a collaborative effort with a clear accomplishment at the end. “In times when competition amongst various

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centres and destinations is more intense than ever, the AIPC Quality Standards program is a valuable way for managers to ensure they are delivering quality – a form of documentation that serves many purposes, including the reassurance of clients”, said AICP President Edgar Hirt. Ottawa Convention Centre celebrated its first anniversary April 13, 2012 with 562 events taking place in its first year of operation, generating over $83 million in economic impact for the city of Ottawa. Ottawa Convention Centre is an agency of the government of Ontario. For further information, contact: Daniel Coates, Ottawa Convention Centre 613-688-8220 dcoates@ottawaconventioncentre.com

New Meeting Space in Calgary

The Calgary Marriott Hotel, adjacent to the Calgary Telus Convention Centre, has always been a premiere venue for the convention and meeting industry. But with client needs growing and changing, the hotel reconfigured and expanded its meeting space to over 8,000 square feet. The addition includes a new banquet and meeting room that can hold up to 150 people classroom style. It can be turned into two separate breakout areas. The boardrooms on the main floor provide more options for last minute meeting needs. In addition to expanding the meeting space, the hotel decor was upgraded. The new meeting rooms now have large windows, allowing more natural light into the space. According to Don Tomie, Director of Operations at the Calgary Marriot Hotel, “the windows, which are energy efficient with automatic window coverings, keep the cold and heat out but still allow guests to see outside without compromising the integrity of visual presentations.” This added natural light will increase productivity and energize event attendees. And with clients and planners demanding better technology access, the wireless bandwidth was increased significantly, providing a more streamlined and consistent level of service. For further information: www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/yycdt-calgary-marriott-downtown-hotel/

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Generation Y-ers have a taste for luxury goods Generation Y-ers may be having a tough time finding jobs but that isn’t stopping them from buying Lanvin bags and Burberry trench coats. Those born after 1983 are driving sales in Canada’s luxury sector, according to data on spending habits released recent by American Express Canada.

The data, collected between 2009 and 2011, found the Generation Y group has been the key force for luxury market growth in this country, boosting fashion spending by 33%

between 2009 and 2011, travel spending by 74% and fine dining spending by 102%. Online luxury fashion spending among Generation Y-ers leapt 53% year-over-year in 2011 from 15% year-over-year 2009, AmEx said. That compared with luxury spending among Generation X-ers (up 32% year-overyear in 2011 from 1% in 2009; Boomers, up 45% year-over-year in 2011 compared with 3% in 2009, and seniors, up 30% year-over -year in 2011 compared with 4% in 2009.)The Canadian luxury sector was less hit by the 2009 recession than other countries, falling 9% compared with 14% in the U.S.

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Many Hotels Have Jumped On the Hidden Fees Bandwagon First the airlines made headlines by charging for things that used to be free. Then it was the banks. And now, get ready: hotels are checking in on this fee frenzy. Tens of thousands of guaranteed customers, hundreds of hotels to choose from and dozens of hotel fees and added charges you may not know about are headed for your tab at the end of the trip. It has some travellers boiling even before they hit the beach. Some of the fees include use of the safe in the hotel room, resort fees even if you didn’t use the gym or pool, fees to receive a fax, and most outrageously: a daily parking fee when you don’t even have a car! And it’s happening to more and more travellers.

Free Attendee Internet Access at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre The Toronto Convention Centre (MTCC) recently announced that they will now be providing free wireless Internet access to event attendees. It is one of the many technological upgrades being addressed by the MTCC as they indergo a major renovation project to modernize the Centre and upgrade customer service. “The ability to provide suitable Internet access to event attendees, and still provide the high level of performance

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and reliability required by others on the network (such as event exhibitors) is a major challenge for all convention facilities and requires advanced technological infrastructure, network, and management,” stated Bill McDonaild, chief Information Officer at the MTCC. Access will be available to all attendees in public spaces and general areas outside of meeting rooms and exhibit halls.

A new study claims hotels are expected to collect a record high: $1.8 billion from extra fees and surcharges this year. That’s up $100 million since 2011. “I find people are extremely mad about the situation,” said Ian Ford. Ian Ford is a travel expert who has seen these fees at two-star hotels to luxury hotels. There’s quite a range of costly charges, such as: restocking fees ranging from $5 to $15 for just opening the mini bar, not even taking anything out, a bellman charge of $8 even if you carry your own luggage, a $3.95 energy charge for using the air conditioning and a $3.50 fee per coffee capsule you drink in your room. Several hotels are charging between $25 and $100 for luxury linens. Ask before you check in.

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U.S. Hotel Profit

Recovery Widespread in 2011 Profits for All “On average, hotels saw their profits increase by 12.7% in 2011. The good news is not isolated to a select few property categories, but rather, all hotel types were able to enjoy gains on the bottom-line,” said R. Mark Woodworth, president of PKF-HR. Resort hotels led the way with Net Operation Income (NOI) gain of 18.1%, followed by full-service hotels, which posted a 14.7 % increase in profits. “Not surprisingly, these two property types also achieved the greatest gains in average daily room rates (ADR) from 2010 to 2011,” Woodworth noted.

The U.S. lodging industry recovery may have Future Profits begun in 2010, but it wasn’t until 2011 that U.S. hotels will enjoy significant gains in revenue through 2015. occupancy levels will begin to exceed long-run averages in the improved prosperity was shared by near- Because most chain-scale categories, hotel managers will be able to implement ly all hotels in the country. In 2011, 80.5% of more aggressive pricing policies. Accordingly, future revenue growth be driven mostly by increases in ADR. As demonstrated by previthe properties that participated in the PKF will ous analyses, revenue gains that are driven by ADR growth are very Hospitality Research, LLC (PKF-HR) Trends® profitable. in the Hotel Industry annual survey enjoyed “The operating practices implemented in 2009 to cut costs during the of the recession appear to have continued through 2010 and an increase in total revenue, while nearly depths into 2011. If this continues, the combination of cost controls and profitthree-quarters (72.3%) of the participants able revenue growth will result in one of the most extraordinary periods of profit growth our firm has seen since the first survey was initiated in achieved growth in profits. 1937,” Woodworth concluded.

Other 2011 U.S. HOTEL OPERATING PERFORMANCE Average Change - 2010

to

Measure

2011 Annual Change

Occupancy

3.1%

ADR

3.9%

Rooms Revenue

7.1%

Food

5.2%

and

Beverage Revenue

Total Revenue

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6.2%

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hotel

We talked about the new party trend – divorce parties. And now ``Divorce Hotel” Coming Soon To Reality TV? For couples in a hurry to end their marriage, there is apparently a new option: a 48-hour, divorce weekend getaway at a high-end hotel. And

The Radisson Plaza Hotel Saskatchewan Welcomes Royals

the “Divorce Hotel” could be coming to American television.

The Divorce Hotel is the brainchild of Dutch entrepreneur Jim Halfens, who currently offers the all-inclusive quickie divorce service in six hotels in the Netherlands but wants to bring it to the U.K., Italy, Germany, as well as New York and Los Angeles. He is also apparently negotiating with two American television production companies to film Divorce Hotel (are you surprised?) as a reality show. According to the New York Times, it works like this: “Check in on Friday, married. Then, with the help of mediators and independent law-

yers, check out on Sunday, divorce papers in hand, all for a flat fee.” If a couple is accepted for the program, the fee ranges from $3,500 to $10,000, depending on how complicated the divorce happens to be. Halfens’ website explains that “we work with a fixed team of professionals, including: lawyers, real estate agents, civil-law notaries, tax lawyers and company valuators.” As divorce can take a huge emotional toll, the Divorce Hotel concept would be best suited to a relatively straightforward “friendly divorce” with few contested issues that could be settled during a weekend vacation. If the couple doesn’t see eye to over dividing up the marital assets or child custody, for example, they would have to go the traditional route, which could take months or even years and run up large legal bills. Moreover, U.S. laws differ from state to state about community property and other legal issues.

Hotel rates and deals reach highs Average daily hotel rates continued to climb in April, nearly reaching the pre-recession high of 2008, according to new data. North American hotel rates for business travellers jumped 9.3% in 2011, setting a new year-over-year growth record, reports Pegasus Solutions, a technology company that works with hotels. It was just three percentage points shy of rates paid in 2008. North American rates for leisure travel-

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The Radisson Plaza Hotel Saskatchewan played proud host to Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales and Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, on Tuesday May 23rd. An interesting happenstance... the visit coincided with the anniversary of the hotel’s official opening day 85 years earlier. The Prince was made aware of the anniversary and congratulated the team upon his departure. The hotel team was kept busy for weeks in advance preparing for the Royals. Canada’s Prime Minister, the Right Honourable Stephen Harper and his wife, Mrs. Harper as well as the country’s Governor General, His Excellency the Right Honourable David Johnston and his wife, Mrs. Johnston, were all visiting at the same time. The details and security required when hosting such a large delegation is very precise, and the entire team was proud to be part of it. In addition, Executive Chef Milton Rebello and his culinary team worked closely with the Prince’s butler preparing and serving their Royal Highness’ meal.

lers in April also rose year-over-year by 7.3% according to Mike Kistner, chief executive officer of Pegasus Solutions.

For additional information, contact: Marla at The Radisson Plaza Hotel Saskatchewan 306-337-4300

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industry news

Travel & Tourism ahead of Other Sectors in GDP contributions Tourism’s contribution to GDP is faster than most other sectors in the Americas. It will grow by 3.6% over the next ten years, a faster growth rate than mining (1.5%), Education (2%), chemicals (2.5%) and financial services (3.4%).

Travel & Tourism in the Americas contributes more to GDP than automotive manufacturing.

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he Travel & Tourism industry in the Americas region is three times the size of automotive manufacturing and roughly one-third larger than chemicals manufacturing and mining. This is according to new research from the World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC) sponsored by American Express. The research, undertaken by Oxford Economics, shows that the sector’s direct contribution to the Americas GDP is US$666 billion, which is more than three times the GDP of automotive manufacturing and one-third larger than the global

chemicals and mining industry. Travel & Tourism’s total contribution to GDP in the Americas was US$1.9 trillion in 2011, or 8.6% of total GDP. This compares to 6% for automotive and mining and 7% for chemicals. With 15 million direct employees in the Americas, Travel & Tourism is one of the leading employers in the region, surpassing the job creation of mining (2.5M), chemicals manufacturing (2.5M), automotive (4M) and financial services (10M). The new research also showed that Travel &

At the Americas Summit in the Riviera Maya, the research highlighted the importance of Travel & Tourism in Mexico in terms of generating income and GDP in economies. It shows that Travel & Tourism spending is more powerful than most other sectors. For example, in Mexico, every US$1 million spent on Travel & Tourism generates a further US$1.5 million to the economy as a whole and 66 jobs (compared to an average of 42 for all sectors). The industry generates more jobs than all other sectors considered - double that of the automotive industry, twenty times that of mining and six times that of the financial services sector. Source: World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC). Read the complete article “Travel & Tourism in the Americas Contributes More to GDP than Automotive Manufacturing” on the WTTC website.

n e w s

hotel

Pearson Perks for AmEx Cardholders: Platinumflashers get fast lane in T.O. American Express Canada is giving its premium cardholders more opportunities to get to the front of the security line at Toronto’s Pearsons International Airport.

American Express cardholders will also receive complimentary valet services, a 15% express daily parking discount and designated taxi and limousine lines.

Platinum cardholders will be able to skip more long security clearance queues by flashing their cards throughout terminals 1 and 3 as part of a marketing partnership announced Monday.

Access to premium lounges, including Air Canada Maple Leaf lounges, will continue for holders of premium American Express Cards. Consumers` Association of Canada president Bruce Cran doesn’t see any problem with the fast lanes for certain credit card holders.

``Select priority lanes are in place virtually in all airports around the world, `` said Pamela Griffith-Jones, chief marketing and commercial officer for the Greater Toronto Airport Authority.

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I don’t see this as anything ominous, quite the opposite; I’d say this is a demonstration of competitive practices,`` he said from Vancouver.

Volume 10, Issue 5


for your info

Is it a stroke? Recognizing the signs As people that often work in a group setting, planners should have basic medical know-how, such as how to recognize a stroke.

A

lthough stroke symptoms can be hard to identify, you can tell if someone is having a stroke by doing the simple STR test - an acronym for Smile, Talk, Raise and also the first three letters of the word “STRoke”. Ask the person to Smile, Talk (speak a sentence), and Raise both arms. If the person has trouble with any of these, call for help. Difficulty with these actions helps identify facial and arm weakness as well as speech problems, which often occur with strokes. Still, many people having a stroke may pass this test, so don’t let it prevent you from getting the person to the emergency room. A fuller list of symptoms of stroke includes sudden onset of any of the following: 1) numbness or weakness of the face, one arm, or one leg, 2) confusion or trouble speaking or understanding speech, 3) trouble seeing with one or both eyes, 4) difficulty walking, leg weakness or numbness, dizziness, or loss of coordination, 5) severe headache with no known cause. When in doubt, call 911 immediately. That daily to do list – not done by end of day While more than 60% of Canadians keep a daily “to do” list, only 10% say they accomplish all the tasks they set out to do. An international survey by LinkedIn found that unscheduled phone calls, emails and meetings are primary reasons planned tasks remain undone. Planners are already expert at expecting the unexpected when organizing events. Perhaps we should all plan on the unplanned when organizing our

www.theplanner.ca

workday. The survey found 51% of Canadians compile their lists on paper, while 45% use electronic devices. The remainder said they either kept mental notes or stacked files as reminders. Watch out for alcoholic drinks with artificial sweetened mixers: they can quickly make you intoxicated if consumed on an empty stomach. Such drinks leave the stomach faster than those made with sugary mixers, so the alcohol is absorbed into the blood more rapidly, according to an Australian study, in which young men drank vodka with “flat” carbonated mixers (diet or regular) after an overnight fast. Sugar, on the other hand, slows alcohol’s absorption. Carbonated noncaloric mixers, including club soda, may speed alcohol absorption even more, other research suggests. Just one mixed drink containing diet soda may be enough to raise your blood alcohol level beyond the legal limit. If you have a cell phone, add an ICE (In Case of Emergency) name and phone number in the contacts list, in addition to carrying standard identification and emergency information. If you are ever injured or otherwise disabled and are alone and unable to speak, emergency medical workers are likely to check your cell phone, besides searching through your wallet. If they see an ICE entry, they’ll know who to call – not only to let that person know what happened to you, but also to get your medical history. if you have a smart phone, you can download an ICE app – you fill in your contacts and important medical info – and place the icon prominently in the first group of your apps.

FBI Warns of Hotel Internet Dangers That hotel Internet connections are dicey at best is not surprising to those of us who travel frequently. In that respect, fresh warnings from the FBI about an uptick in hotel Internet-based malware is not a surprise. Here is the news, as written by Network World colleague Michael Cooney: “The FBI today warned travellers there has been an uptick in malicious software infecting laptops and other devices linked to hotel Internet connections. The FBI wasn’t specific about any particular hotel chain, nor the software involved but stated: ‘Recent analysis from the FBI and other government agencies demonstrates that malicious actors are targeting travellers abroad through pop-up windows while they are establishing an Internet connection in their hotel rooms.’ The FBI said typically travellers attempting to set up a hotel room Internet connection were presented with a pop-up window notifying the user to update a widely used software product. If the user clicked to accept and install the update, malicious software was installed on the laptop. The pop-up window appeared to be offering a routine update to a legitimate software product for which updates are frequently available.” Planners, use common sense and take simple precautions when on the road.

Rate of growth of Facebook audience, usage declines Facebook’s audience growth in the U.S. along with time spent on the site, is slowing, said the market researcher ComScore Inc. recently. The number of visitors rose 5% in April from a year earlier, down from 24% in the same month of 2011. The average time spent on the site by each visitor climbed by 16%, less than 23% increase a year earlier. Facebook, with more than 900 million members worldwide, gets about half of its revenue from the U.S. and Canada. Seven in 10 Americans using the internet in April visited Facebook, ComScore said. Slowing growth is to be “expected given Facebook’s current size and market penetration,” said Andrew Lipsman, a vice-president of industry analysis at ComScore. Shares of Facebook fell 0.4% to US$27 at the close in New York. The stock has declined 29% since it began trading on May 18 at US$38.

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budgeting

Get Hip to Haggling

By Marilyn Lazar

When we hear the word “haggle”, the image that comes to mind may be that of an ancient marketplace where the desperate hawked their wares. Or perhaps an exotic market where bargains are struck over souvenir purchases.

T

hink again. It happens every day and it’s a strategy that could improve your bottom line. A recent advertising campaign by a major Canadian bank about lower interest rates caught my attention but who wants to go through the hassle of switching banks? Guess what? My accounts are elsewhere, but I walked into my branch manager’s office, and was offered the same deal. I was fed up with my high monthly phone bills so I called my provider. A helpful sales representative found a newer, lower-cost plan that better suited my usage requirements. If I hadn’t called, I would never have known about it. When it came to renewing my gym membership, I mentioned that I had joined the facilities when the doors opened and felt put out by the sweet deals constantly offered to new members only. I was given a free month in return for my loyalty.

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Whether it’s “better bundling” rates or a discount for simply being a long-time customer, deals are out there to be had. The current wisdom is: You don’t ask - you don’t get. How does this apply to you? Many planners are independent operators, and as such, are small business owners who need sharpen the old entrepreneurial pencil. Whether it’s the supplies you use to run your office or the suppliers you choose to run your event, don’t be shy to strike a deal. Toronto planner Karen Garscadden puts it this way: “It depends on the nature of the event. For example, if it’s a charity function and I’ve trimmed my fees, I’ll honestly ask my vendors to do the same. Although, the truth is, I feel that my trusted, long-time vendors are already doing that for me. That being said, it never hurts to ask. “ Another approach is to think creatively. Sometimes it’s not the actual price but time,

logistics or bonus add-ons that can sweeten your deal. For example, my car dealer claimed that low profit margins left little leeway to lower prices. So they threw in accessories and service. I keep cash in pocket and they draw me back into their service department. Can this apply to event planning? You bet. “I believe that everybody deserves to make a profit, so I don’t squeeze too hard,” explains Garscadden. “But sometimes, it’s the type of situation where I can say, ‘Your truck’s already there. Can you just throw in a podium?’ This type of favour increases the value for me without hurting anybody.” Garscadden also describes the benefits of a bit of to and fro. After years in the business, I have built relationships with vendors. However, there is sometimes pressure from clients to put a contract out to bid. Most seasoned professionals will put it back to their preferred vendor to match a price.”

Volume 10, Issue 5


green thoughts

Young road warriors: skip paperwork, bring on the apps Millenials, (those under the age of 32) are the first generation to never know life without the internet. And because they are a growing proportion of the work force, the companies that employ them – as well as the hotels, airlines and travel-related businesses that serve them – are having to change the way they talk to them, work with them and sell to them . Business travel numbers for the so-called millenials were up more than 40% in 2011 from a year earlier, according to travel research firm D.K. Shifflet & Associates. Young workers ask more questions about the need for specific travel arrangements, such as why they are being told to book at one hotel as oppose to the other, or to fly a particular airline. “Younger business travelers are less apt to follow policy for the sake of policy,” noted Evan Konwiser, a travel technology entrepreneur. This is what Maria Chevalier, a corporate travel manager at HewlettPackard found after completing a six-month study about her company’s roughly 100, 000 business travelers. “With these younger generations, you have to communicate more frequently, but shorter,” she said. “You have to use different forms of communication.” Younger travellers are more willing to use new technology tools to manage their travel logistics by themselves, which benefits their employers. Millenials are more willing to use mobile apps and social media when they book a trip, check in and deliver feedback on their travel experiences. And – if you don’t have WiFi throughout the hotel, “this generation isn’t going to stay with you.”

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Green Innovation in Tourism Can Trigger Economic, Social and Environmental Benefits Tourism experts at The Rio + 20 event, recently held in Rio de Janeiro and co-hosted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) with the support of the Brazilian Ministry of Tourism and the UNWTO Affiliate Member CNC-SESC-SENAC, gathered 300 international tourism experts.

T

he event highlighted that shifts in tourism practices can produce major benefits, stimulating change towards greater sustainability within the tourism supply chain and other sectors. Presentations demonstrated that an increased focus on sustainability, in particular green innovation, can lead to more jobs and reduce environmental impacts, cutting costs and increasing competitive advantages for companies and destinations while enhancing the visitor experience. “Being green is often associated with increased costs for businesses. However, the essence of innovation is to identify least cost opportunities and solutions, decoupling tourism growth from resource use and environmental impacts and using resources more efficiently. Green innovation in tourism can improve existing

business models, leading to positive results to companies, customers, public authorities and local communities through job creation and better living conditions as well as the housing ecosystems” said Arab Hoballah, UNEP Chief of Sustainable Consumption and Production Branch. “The innovations we have seen today are concrete examples of how, with the appropriate investment, tourism can become even more profitable, labor-intensive and environmentally-friendly,” said Márcio Favilla, UNWTO Executive Director for Competitiveness, External Relations and Partnerships. “With one billion international tourists expected to travel in 2012, it is more important than ever that we support green innovation as a catalyst of tourism’s sustainable growth.”

Again Vancouver leads the way... Hold the anchovies and bring out the bankcard – a Vancouver restaurant is offering pizzas for $450 each.

Nader Hatami, the owner and founder of Steveston Pizza Co., has sold just one of

the pizzas, dubbed the C6, which features thermidor of lobster and black Alaska cod, with a side of Russian osetra caviar. Mr Hatami has also sold seven of his next most expensive creations: the C5, made with Icelandic scampi, smoked steelhead and lobster ratatouille, a bargain at $120. “Ì never thought I’d sell so many,” said Mr. Hatami. Both high-end pizzas have to be ordered a day in advance. “The idea was to make a culinary statement”, he said.

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d e s t i n at i o n g o l d e n h o r s e s h o e

Q&A B

urlington

If you were a planner, why would you want to take your group to Burlington? Chosen as Canada’s second best place to live (MoneySense Magazine 2012), Burlington offers a safe, clean and truly unforgettable location to host meetings. Nestled between the shores of Lake Ontario and the breathtaking beauty of the Niagara Escarpment, the city presents a vibrant and diverse community blessed with spectacular scenery. Burlington’s many attractions, amenities and special meeting venues will help memorable meetings that are truly beyond your expectations.

How do you view your geographic location as an advantage? Burlington is located in the hub of the Golden Horseshoe within an hour’s drive from three international airports and easily accessible off major highway (407, 403, QEW) along with direct access to Go and VIA rail service.

What are some of the seasonal activities and attractions? Burlington has an array of activities and attractions ideally suited for pre and post meeting freetime. Be it a guided tour of the Royal Botanical Gardens trails and nature sanctuaries, biking the waterfront trail, hiking or crosscountry skiing along the Bruce Trail, skating at Discovery Landing or tubing, Burlington’s natural beauty will inspire and engage your group. The downtown core offers historical walks, tours of the Burlington Art Centre, home to the world’s largest collection of Canadian contemporary ceramics, Joseph Brant Museum, live performances at the Burlington Performing Arts Centre, restaurants galore, outdoor patios and cafés, historic pubs, and hundreds of unique specialty shops.

What are some of the activities a group could participate in, teambuilding or otherwise? Enjoy a tour and tasting of Burlington’s microbrewery, prepare your own

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dinner in one of our teaching kitchens, challenge yourself at geocaching, frisbee, golf, bowling, rock climbing (indoor or outdoor), take a art workshop in one of our seven working guilds, roast your team mates at Club 54, try your luck at Mohawk Racetrack and OLG slots, or enjoy a wine tour and tasting.

Can you provide some fast facts for planners, number of hotel rooms, number of meeting rooms, conference and or convention centre info? •

Over 1,000 guest rooms in brand name hotels;

Burlington Convention Centre – 20,000 sq ft - 1800 participants;

Meeting spaces well suited for meetings between 150-200 participants;

Many unique venues located on the water, in conservation areas, botanical gardens, universities, arts centres, broadcast studios, observatories, historic homes, spiritual spaces and traditional all-inclusive hotels.

If you had to briefly describe what makes Burlington different, what would you say it is? Burlington offers memorable meetings in an unforgettable setting! Many of our meeting venues are destinations within themselves, offering more than just meeting space. The city is accessible, affordable and memorable and is currently offering up to $3,000 cash back to host in our backyard meetings/ events that include overnight stay. It is a beautiful city with lots of hidden gems, offering an array of unique venues, many with free parking!

If planners are interested in holding their activities in Burlington, who should they contact? Tourism Burlington – Linda Olimer – Marketing Coordinator – 905-634-5594, 1-877-499-9989, olimerl@burlington.ca

Volume 10, Issue 5


d e s t i n at i o n g o l d e n h o r s e s h o e

Q&A M

ississauga

By Jyl Ashton Cunningham, CMP

between June and September. During the colder months, enjoy the indoor entertainment that Mississauga is famous for. What are some of the activities a group could participate in, teambuilding or otherwise? Entertainment options are in abundance with several theatres, festivals and venues in the area, including Playdium, one of the main local attractions for teambuilding. Rent bicycles and tour the Lakeshore, hire Kim Gym, a private gym for personal training and team building; buy out The Brogue, the local Irish Pub and enjoy their hospitality and excellent food. Take in a play at the Mississauga Arts Centre, golf at Lionhead, jet ski on Lake Ontario or simply walk along the beautiful lakeshore and stop for light refreshments. Experience the Bread and Honey Festival in historic Streetsville. Go back in time to the original roller skates at Scooters Roller Palace! If you were a planner, why would you want to take your group to Mississauga? Mississauga is the closest suburb to Toronto without being too far. It is a vibrant city, with the only “resort” hotel in the area, the Delta Meadowvale, an oasis in the city. There are two “centres”: Mississauga Town Centre with the Living Arts Centre at its heart and Port Credit, a hidden gem right on Lake Ontario. The region has an excellent selection of fine dining and relaxed atmosphere restaurants and a myriad of major brand name hotels. How do you view your geographic location as an advantage? Mississauga incorporates five major GO Transit and Via lines, as well as Mississauga Transit, making it one of the most accessible cities outside Toronto. Parking is plentiful and reasonably priced around major attractions and by the lake. Toronto International Airport is in Mississauga, with Hamilton Airport just 25 minutes away and Billy Bishop Airport in downtown Toronto. Toronto and Niagara Falls are both easily accessible for day excursions. What are the traditionally high and low seasons and what are the advantages with each season? High seasons are September to December and February to June in terms of conference planning.

Can you provide some fast facts for planners, number of hotel rooms, number of meeting rooms, conference and or convention centre info? •

Over 9,000 guest rooms in more than 50 brand name and family hotels;

The International Centre, The Living Arts Entertainment and Convention Centre, Toronto Congress Centre for conventions and trade show space;

Meeting spaces well suited for meetings between 150-10,000 participants;

Modern or historic, green certified, open air, compact, whatever you need spacewise, Mississauga has it!

If you had to briefly describe what makes Mississauga different, what would you say it is? Mississauga has all of the benefits of Toronto without the downtown headaches. The city is clean yet vibrant, efficient without losing the personal touch and has an incredibly wide range of hotels, restaurants and entertainment facilities at a reasonable price. Mississauga is a year-round destination with over 450 parks and recreation areas, making it easy to forget you are in a major city. If planners are interested in holding their activities in Mississauga, who should they contact? Visit Mississauga.ca to explore all of the possibilities.

What are some of the seasonal activities and attractions? Summer by the Lake in Port Credit is idyllic, with one of the biggest jazz festivals in the region as well as many other outdoor activities

www.theplanner.ca

Jyl Ashton Cunningham CMP is a regular contributor to The Planner. She can be reached at info@jaacevents.com and welcomes your comments on her articles.

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d e s t i n at i o n g o l d e n h o r s e s h o e

By Vittoria Wikston, CMP

Niagara Falls, A Memorable Destination

If you were a planner, why would you want to take your group to Niagara Falls?

S

imple – guaranteed attendance! Polls

thrilling ride of the Whirlpool JetBoats into

indicate that planners who select

the Niagara River or the famous Niagara

Niagara Falls will likely have a higher

Helicopter ride are all “must dos”;

attendance rate over other locations.

Niagara Falls is on most people’s bucket list

Culture – the renowned Shaw Festival Theatre and the Oh Canada Eh? Dinner

of things to do and see, and when delegates

Threatre comes alive seasonally April to

learn that their next event location is Niagara

October;

Falls – early bird registration is successful and

40 Golf Courses.

If you had to briefly describe what makes Niagara Falls different, what would you say it is? We’re naturally inspired! Niagara Falls - a natural wonder that offers the perfect backdrop for successful meetings and conventions.

Other

companion programs are full.

Year-round Fun;

words to describe the city come just as naturally:

How do you view your geographic location as

Fallsview Casino & Entertainment Resort;

an advantage?

We’re naturally assessable – easy come – easy go!

60 minutes from Toronto, with four sur-

rounding airports.

(Toronto International,

Toronto City Centre, Hamilton, and Buffalo) What are the traditionally high and low seasons and what are the advantages with each season?

story-telling foot race. Since the region is known for its wineries and culinary trails –

hospitality

Exciting – casinos, live entertainment,

Fun – golf, spa, hiking, white water boating, teaming…

bicentennial, groups are encouraged to race back in time to 1812 through an interactive,

unsurpassed

amusement attractions, nightlife…

participate in, teambuilding or otherwise? Currently, in celebration of the War of 1812

venues and dedicated meeting spaces;

Greg Frewin Magician & Illusionist Show.

What are some of the activities a group could

Productive

Interesting – history, culture, live theatre…

Delicious – award winning wine region, celebrity chefs, famous restaurants;

May to October are traditionally seen as the

group wine blending is extremely different

busy season for meetings & events in Niagara

as well as shopping and cooking your own

Falls, with July – September being the busiest

dinner through our Iron Chef competitions.

tourist months. However, the winter beauty of

For those a little more daring – extreme trek-

Niagara Falls from November to March offer

king through the Niagara Glen bouldering to

If planners are interested in holding their

much to be desired.

the Niagara River has gained popularity as a

activities in Niagara Falls, who should they

“must do”.

contact?

Can you provide some fast facts for planners,

One simple call into Niagara Falls Tourism, and

number of hotel rooms, number of meeting

the Meetings and Convention Hospitality Team

rooms, conference and or convention centre

has you covered.

info?

and ensuring we deliver several meeting solu-

Married with attractive

rates and offerings from venues, planners can take the advantage of having an incredible event at incredible savings. The winter scene of the Falls themselves is simply breathtaking; couple that with a warming glass of the region’s famous icewine and some culinary treats and you have a heavenly match.

16,000 premium guest rooms;

What are some of the seasonal activities and

680,00 sq.ft. diverse & convention venues

attractions? •

Centre servicing up to 10,000 delegates;

Excitement - Maid of the Mist journey into the heart of the Horseshoe Falls, the heart-

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including the new Scotiabank Convention

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Beautiful – natural parks and gardens;

And of course Spectacular!

Understanding your needs

tions is our guarantee. www.niagarafallstourism.com Vittoria Wikston, CMP, Director Business Development vwikston@niagarafallstourism.com

90 Wineries; Volume 10, Issue 5


2012

g o l d e n

h o r s e s h o e

v e n u e

g u i d e

905

Golden Horseshoe Venue Guide As in previous years, we have assembled a venue guide of the Golden Horseshoe region to help you in your search for that ideal meeting space. Always a handy tool, the guide is a compilation of diverse locations equipped to host a wide range of events. While far from exhaustive, the list is a great starting point for an event planner trying to narrow down the options between Niagara Falls and Oshawa. We have omitted the Toronto area as it is featured in our 416 Venue Guide, but you will find here the listings from St. Catharines, Mississauga, Hamilton, Brampton and Burlington among others. For the ease of navigation, we have first grouped the venues by type (H=hotel, M=Multifunction, R=Restaurant) and then sorted them in the alphabetical order of the cities where they are located.

Loading dock

H

Parking

H

Storage

H

Ceiling height

H

Largest room (sq. ft.)

Type

Meeting rooms

Keep it! And if you need assistance, do let us know.

Courtyard by Marriott Brampton Contact: Adam Smyk, 905-460-3510, 90 Biscayne Crescent, Brampton, ON L6W 4S1 Email: asmyk@courtyardmarriottbrampton.com, Fax: 905-455-2700 Web: www.marriott.com/yyzbm Description: Elegantly decorated ballroom, state-of-the-art lighting and sound system. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-380 Classroom-230 Theatre-500

6

5,015

25’

Yes

Yes

No

Holiday Inn Toronto Brampton Hotel & Conference Centre Contact: Nasir Jamil, 905-799-6307, 30 Peel Centre Drive, Brampton, ON L6T 4G3 Email: sales@hisb.ca, Fax: 905-799-6323 Web: www.holidayinn.com/brampton Description: Located in the heart of Bramalea City Centre, close to Pearson International Airport. Pleasant meeting and event space, suitable for trade shows and exhibits. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-350 Classroom-200 Theatre-500

16

4,725

14’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Monte Carlo Inn Brampton Suites Contact: Customer Service, 905-453-5200, 877-453-9300 45 Coventry Road, Brampton, ON L6T 4V7 Email: customerservice@montecarloinns.com, Fax: 905-453-9500 Web: www.montecarloinns.com Description: Conveniently located in the heart of the Brampton Commercial District, close to Pearson International Airport, major highways, local restaurants, shopping districts and attractions. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-120 Classroom-80 Theatre-150

6

1,400

10’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Sheridan Residence & Conference Centre Contact: Chuck De Guzman, 905-874-4393, ext. 7652, 7897 McLaughlin Road, Brampton, ON L6Y 5H9 Email: ddu@stayrcc.com, Fax: 905-874-4394 Web: www.stayrcc.com/brampton Description: Facilities, services and accommodations to meet all conference needs at highly competitive prices. It is a year-round facility. Capacity: Reception-60 Banquet-40 Classroom-30 Theatre-40

3

2,100

Yes

Yes

Yes

Holiday Inn Burlington Hotel & Conference Centre Contact: Janice De Silva, 905-639-4443, 888-987-4888 3063 South Service Road., Burlington, ON L7N 3E9 Email: janice.desilva@whg.com, Fax: 905-333-4033 Web: www.hiburlington.ca Description: Recently renovated hotel with over 20, 000 sq. ft. of versatile function space with natural lighting and pillar free. Short walk to shopping and restaurants. Capacity: Reception-550 Banquet-400 Classroom-300 Theatre-550

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5,720

12’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

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Storage

Parking

Loading dock

g u i d e

Ceiling height

v e n u e

Largest room (sq. ft.)

h o r s e s h o e

Langdon Hall Country House Hotel & Spa Contact: Kate Mackay, 519-624-3203, 800-268-1898 1 Langdon Drive, Cambridge, ON N3H 4R8 Email: kmackay@langdonhall.ca, Fax: 519-624-3206 Web: www.langdonhall.ca Description: Relais & Châteaux offers a 200-acre property. Five-diamond, award winning restaurant and full service spa. For groups of 50 and smaller. Capacity: Reception-115 Banquet-70 Classroom-65 Theatre-70

8

1,300

12’

Yes

Yes

No

Clarion Hotel & Conference Centre Fort Erie Contact: Tracey Campbell, 905-871-8333, 888-269-5550 1485 Garrison Road, Fort Erie, ON L2A 1P8 Email: clarion.sales@cogeco.net, Fax: (905) 871-5411 Web: www.choicehotels.ca/CN965 Description: Over 7,000 sq. ft. of conference, meeting and banquet facilities. Free Parking. Free Wi-Fi. Professional event coordinators focused on your satisfaction. Capacity: Reception-260 Banquet-180 Classroom-100 Theatre-260

9

2,950

12’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Courtyard by Marriott Hamilton Contact: Marilyn Frame, 905-383-7772, ext 4004, 866-321-2211 1224 Upper James Street, Hamilton, ON L9C 3B1 Email: m.frame@concordhotels.com, Fax: 905-383-7895 Web: www.courtyardmarriott/yhmcy Description: Event facilities can accommodate meetings, conferences and weddings. 136 well appointed guestrooms for individual travellers or a larger group. An outdoor courtyard/waterfall is sure to impress. Highway access and central location. Capacity: Reception-240 Banquet-180 Classroom-100 Theatre-300

3

4,343

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Crowne Plaza Hotel Contact: Ana Olson, 905-308-3432, 150 King Street East, Hamilton, ON L8N 1B2 Email: ana.olson@concordhotels.com, Fax: 905-528-8638 Web: www.cphamilton.com Description: Fully-equipped meeting rooms with the latest audio-visual equipment available. Finelyappointed boardrooms and ballroom space for larger functions and conferences. Excellent location in downtown Hamilton. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-350 Classroom-300 Theatre-500

9

6,000

19’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Residence & Conference Centre Hamilton Contact: Patricia Alencar, 905-385-3200, 877-225-8664 245 Fennell Avenue West, Hamilton, ON L9C 7V7 Email: palencar@stayrcc.com, Fax: 905-385-2170 Web: http://www.stayrcc.com/default/profile/26/36/ Description: A variety of conference services and facilities. Comfortable, suite style accommodations and catering serivices. Located on the Hamilton Mountain. Flexible rates. Capacity: Reception-80 Banquet-60 Classroom-50 Theatre-100

4

1,660

9’

Yes

Yes

Sheraton Hamilton Hotel Contact: Sales, 905-529-5515, 116 King Street West, Hamilton, ON L8P 4V3 Email: sheratonhamilton@sheraton.com, Fax: 905-529-2609 Web: www.sheraton.com/hamilton Description: Nestled between Toronto and Niagara Falls, this is a great location for Southern Ontario explorations or for meetings and conventions. Capacity: Reception-600 Banquet-480 Classroom-320 Theatre-480

13

5,932

14’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Briars Resort and Conference Centre Contact: Janene Robinson, 905-722-3271, 800-465-2376 55 Hedge Road, RR 1, Jackson’s Point, ON L0E 1L0 Email: janene@briars.ca, Fax: 905-722-9698 Web: www.briars.ca Description: Located one hour north of Toronto, it has been a refuge of relaxation and hospitality for over 165 years. Includes a challenging 18-hole golf course, conference facilities, a full spa and recreation program. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-120 Classroom-90 Theatre-160

13

1,900

12’

Yes

Door access

Inn On the Twenty Contact: Grace McQuarrie/Sharon Grenier, 905-562-3581, 3836 Main Street, Jordan, ON L0R 1S0 Email: events@innonthetwenty.com, Fax: 905-562-5995 Web: www.innonthetwenty.com Description: Former sugar warehouse; the stylish decor that includes a notable art collection and tastefully selected antiques. Marvelous views over the Twenty Mile Creek from the restaurant and private banquet room. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-140 Classroom-40 Theatre-120

4

2,400

9’

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

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H

H

H

H

H

H

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Delta Markham Contact: Laura Boyden, 905-477-2010, 50 East Valhalla Drive, Markham, ON L0G 1M0 Email: sales@deltamarkham.com, Fax: 905-477-2026 Web: www.deltamarkham.com Description: The meeting space is well appointed and the staff attentive. Convenient access to downtown Toronto and 30 minutes from Pearson International Airport. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-250 Classroom-140 Theatre-300

9

3,000

11’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Hilton Suites Toronto/Markham Conference Centre & Spa Contact: Sales Department, 905-470-8500, x.2049, 800-668-8800 8500 Warden Avenue, Markham, ON L6G 1A5 Email: yyzap-salesadm@hilton.com, Fax: 905-415-7624 Web: www.torontomarkham.hilton.com Description: 45,000 sq. ft. of modern function space, meeting rooms with windows, pillar-free conference centre. A 4 diamond all-suite hotel. Only 30 minutes from Toronto Pearson International Airport and downtown Toronto. Capacity: Reception-1400 Banquet-1200 Classroom-720 Theatre-1400

27

14,040

22’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites Toronto-Markham Contact: Maria Papadakos, 905-307-3042, 800-387-3303 7095 Woodbine Avenue, Markham, ON L3R 1A3 Email: sales@markham.holiday-inn.com, Fax: 905-474-0312 Web: www.markham.holiday-inn.com Description: Offers conference facilities specializing in hosting corporate meetings. Featuring more than 17,000 sq. ft. of versatile meeting and banquet space. Capacity: Reception-650 Banquet-400 Classroom-200 Theatre-650

15

3,944

10’3»

Yes

Yes

Yes

Howard Johnson Hotel Toronto-Markham Contact: Bobbi Raponi, 905-479-5000, 877-703-4656 555 Cochrane Drive, Markham, ON L3R 8E3 Email: bobbir@hojomarkham.com, Fax: 905-479-1186 Web: www.hojomarkham.com Description: A small, intimate conference facility with full catering services and excellent room accommodations at reasonable prices. Capacity: Reception-70 Banquet-100 Classroom-50 Theatre-100

4

1,600

8’

Yes

Yes

Monte Carlo Inn Markham Contact: Dean Mavrakakis, 905-513-8100, 866-513-8100 8900 Woodbine Ave, Markham, ON L3R 5K6 Email: customerservice@montecarloinns.com, Fax: 905-513-9100 Web: www..montecarloinns.com Description: Designed to provide guests with the ultimate in luxury, comfort and value. Conveniently situated in the heart of the high-tech capital of Canada and close to three major highways. Capacity: Reception-100 Banquet-64 Classroom-70 Theatre-100

2

1,300

9’

Admiral Inn Mississauga Contact: Jordan Lulich, 905-403-9777, 2161 North Sheridan Way, Mississauga, ON L5K 1A3 Email: mississauga@admiralinn.com, Fax: 905-403-9779 Web: www.admiralinn.com Description: Over 4,300 sq. ft. of flexible meeting and convention space. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-80 Classroom-80 Theatre-150

4

2,350

12’

Yes

Yes

Delta Meadowvale Conference Resort and Spa Contact: K.W. Halen, 905-821-1981, 800-422-8238 6750 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 2L3 Email: kwhalen@deltahotels.com, Fax: 905-542-6742 Web: www.deltameadowvale.com Description: Recently renovated. Only 15 minutes from Pearson International Airport and 30 minutes from downtown Toronto. Major conference and recreational facilities all on the property. Capacity: Reception-900 Banquet-700 Classroom-460 Theatre-900

40

9,120

14’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Delta Toronto Airport West Contact: Debbie Hastings, 905-624-1144, 5444 Dixie Road, Mississauga, ON L4W 2L2 Email: dhastings@deltahotels.com, Fax: 905-206-5925 Web: www.deltahotels.com Description: Recently renovated guestrooms and conference space. Conveniently located in the heart of the airport district. Capacity: Reception-400 Banquet-260 Classroom-180 Theatre-350

21

3,024

11’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Venue Information

“We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” -Winston Churchill www.theplanner.ca

PLANNER 27

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Four Points by Sheraton Mississauga Meadowvale Contact: Shannon Hill, 905-858-2424, 2501 Argentia Road, Mississauga, ON L5N 4G8 Email: info@fourpointsmeadowvale.com, Fax: 905-821-9821 Web: www.fourpointsmeadowvale.com Description: Recently renovated guestrooms. Meeting space for 10 -100 people including state of the art boardrooms and traditional meeting rooms. Capacity: Reception-130 Banquet-110 Classroom-100 Theatre-130

11

1,800

10’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Glenerin Inn Contact: Faye Kotck, 905-828-6103 x 101, 1695 The Collegeway, Mississauga, ON L5L 3S7 Email: sales@glenerrininn.com, Fax: 905-828-0891 Web: www.glenerininn.com Description: All conference rooms have expansive windows opening onto surrounding woods or gardens for a relaxed environment in which to share ideas and and be creative. Capacity: Reception-130 Banquet-120 Classroom-80 Theatre-110

6

1,700

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Hilton Garden Inn Toronto Airport West/Mississauga/McCallion Ballroom Contact: Jennifer Garcia, 905-361-6300, 1870 Matheson Boulevard, Mississauga, ON L4W 0B3 Email: yyzmt-salesadm@hilton.com, Fax: 905-361-6305 Web: www.hiltonmccallionballroom.com Description: With attractive modern decor and complimentary business services, the hotel caters to the needs of both the business traveler and the leisure guest. Complimentary local calls and outdoor parking. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-200 Classroom-120 Theatre-300

1

3,080

9’

No

Yes

No

Hilton Garden Inn Toronto Mississauga Contact: Kushang Shah, 905-890-9110, 866-670-3064 100 Traders Boulevard East, Mississauga, ON L4Z 2H7 Email: kushang.shah@hilton.com, Fax: 905-890-9050 Web: www.hiltongardeninn.com Description: Located at Hurontario Street and Highway 401, easily accessible. Bright meeting rooms. Capacity: Reception-120 Banquet-100 Classroom-80 Theatre-120

4

1,300

10’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Hilton Toronto Airport Hotel & Suites Contact: Nicole Desjardins, CMP, 905-678-5424, 5875 Airport Road, Mississauga, ON L4V 1N1 Email: nicoledesjardins.young@hilton.com, Fax: 905-677-5073 Web: www.toronto-apt.hilton.com Description: Just 5 minutes by free shuttle from Pearson International Airport to the contemporary Hilton. 26 meeting rooms. Executive Lounge with bar service. Capacity: Reception-900 Banquet-600 Classroom-500 Theatre-900

26

10,000

18’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Holiday Inn Mississauga Toronto West Contact: Miranda Phillips, 905-890-5700, 877-307-6667 100 Britannia Road East, Mississauga, ON L4Z 2G1 Email: sales.hitw@whg.com, Fax: 905-568-0868 Web: www.hitorontowest.ca Description: Small meeting specialist centrally located in Mississauga’s Heartland Business District. Flexible, all-inclusive packages. Capacity: Reception-100 Banquet-80 Classroom-50 Theatre-100

3

1,206

10’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Novotel Toronto Mississauga Centre Contact: Mauricio Garcia, 905-803-6763, 3670 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, ON L5B 1P3 Email: mauricio.garcia@accor.com, Fax: 905-896-4029 Web: www.novotel-toronto-mississauga.com Description: One of the largest hotels in the heart of Mississauga, with over 11,000 sq. ft. of meeting space. All the attractions and amenities of a downtown property with proximity to the airport. Capacity: Reception-400 Banquet-280 Classroom-280 Theatre-400

10

4,332

14’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Sheraton Gateway Hotel Contact: Mike Evans, 905-405-2001, PO Box 3000, Toronto International Airport, Mississauga, ON L5P 1C4 Email: mike.evans@sheraton.com, Fax: 905-405-4933 Web: www.starwoodhotels.com/sheraton/torontoairport Description: The only hotel located in Toronto’s Pearson International Airport. Quiet, flexible function space, ideal for inbound welcome receptions as well as corporate meetings. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-200 Classroom-144 Theatre-300

28

2,631

12’11’’

Yes $

Door Access

Venue Information

Type H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

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Waterside Inn, The Contact: Toni Frankfurter, 905-891-5661, 15 Stavebank Road South, Mississauga, ON L5G 2T2 Email: tfrankfurter@watersideinn.ca, Fax: 905-891-6349 Web: www.watersideinn.ca Description: In the heart of Port Credit, one of Mississauga’s oldest and most affluent areas. Only 20 minutes to Pearson International Airport and 30 minutes to downtown Toronto. Capacity: Reception-450 Banquet-300 Classroom-300 Theatre-450

6

5,430

18’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Doubletree Fallsview Resort & Spa by Hilton Contact: Robert Orsini, 905-358-3817, 800-730-8609 6039 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3V6 Email: sales@niagarafallsdoubletree.com, Fax: 905-358-3680 Web: www.niagarafallsdoubletree.com Description: Full service resort hotel, AAA/CAA four-diamond award recipient. Unique relaxed Grand Lodge atmosphere. Ten event rooms for up to 295 persons. Capacity: Reception-296 Banquet-296 Classroom-225 Theatre-400

8

4,429

14’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Embassy Suites Hotel Contact: Shawna Boudreau, 905-356-3600, 800-420-6980 6700 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3W6 Email: sboudreau@fallsviewgroup.com, Fax: 905-356-0472 Web: www.embassysuitesniagara.com Description: 42 storeys above Niagara Falls, great location for any meeting, banquet or retreat. Over 10,500 sq. ft. of flexible meeting and banquet space, and two-room suites overlooking Niagara Falls. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-270 Classroom-240 Theatre-320

12

5,324

9’

Yes $

Yes

Fallsview Casino Resort Contact: Annette Bennitz, 905-371-7740, 888-222-3353 6380 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 7X5 Email: abennitz@fallsviewcasinoresort.com, Fax: Web: www.FallsviewCasinoResort.com Description: Everything you require for a successful, stimulating and special conference for 15 or 1,500 guests. Capacity: Reception-2500 Banquet-1250 Classroom-1500 Theatre-2500

8

28,025

17’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Great Wolf Lodge Contact: April Boudreau, 905-353-5612, 888-878-1818 3950 Victoria Avenue, Niagara Falls, ON L2E 7M8 Email: aboudreau@greatwolfniagara.com, Fax: 905-354-5588 Web: www.greatwolf.com Description: Can accomodate all corporate needs from an office meeting to a national conference. Complimentary team building activities, spa escapes, complete with their own themed waterpark. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-170 Classroom-150 Theatre-260

6

2,160

8’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Hilton Niagara Falls Contact: Mary Ann Quait, 905-354-7887, 6361 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3V9 Email: mary.ann.quait@niagarafallshilton.com, Fax: 905-374-6707 Web: www.niagarafalls.hilton.com Description: Overlooking the American and Canadian Falls, directly connected to the Niagara Fallsview Casino Resort and with more than 12,000 sq. ft. of meeting space and a large ballaroom. Capacity: Reception-625 Banquet-450 Classroom-450 Theatre-625

9

5,500

Yes

Yes $

Door Access

Marriott Gateway on the Falls Contact: Kathy McMurray, 905-374-3174, 800-493-5187 6755 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3W7 Email: sales@fallsview.com, Fax: 905-374-3715 Web: www.marriottgatewayonthefalls.com Description: Four-Diamond hotel with 40,000 sq. ft. of meeting space and 405 rooms in 32-storey building overlooking the Falls. Facing the Scotiabank Convention Centre; within walking distance to Fallsview Casino and major attractions. Capacity: Reception-1400 Banquet-700 Classroom-450 Theatre-1000

26

8,470

14’6”

Yes

Yes $

Yes 7 am 3 pm

Marriott Niagara Falls Fallsview Hotel & Spa Contact: Kathy McMurray, 905-374-3174, 800-493-5187 6740 Fallsview Boulevard, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3W6 Email: sales@fallsview.com, Fax: 905-374-3715 Web: www.niagarafallsmarriott.com Description: AAA Four Diamond, five star luxury hotel overlooking the Falls; steps away from Scotiabank Convention Centre; within walking distance to Fallsview Casino and other local attractions. Capacity: Reception-320 Banquet-200 Classroom-140 Theatre-260

9

3,160

10’

Yes

Yes $

Yes 7 am 3 pm

Venue Information

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PLANNER 29

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14,190

Hilton Garden Inn Niagara-on-the-Lake Contact: Michelle Barillaro or Candice Leblanc, 905-984-4200, 866-777-9877 500 York Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: michellebarillaro@hilton.com, Fax: 905-984-4364 Web: www.niagaraonthelake.hgi.com Description: Beautiful and flexible meeting space in the heart of wine country. Direct access to outdoors. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-200 Classroom-140 Theatre-250

4

3,080

Pillar and Post (Vintage Hotels) Contact: Sales Office, 905-468-2123, 888-669-5566 48 John St., PO Box 1011, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: salesinquiry@vintage-hotels.com, Fax: 905-468-8646 Web: www.vintage-hotels.com Description: The Pillar and Post’s 100 Fountain Spa is a 13,000 sq. ft. spa paradise. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-216 Classroom-100 Theatre-250

11

Prince of Wales (Vintage Hotels) Contact: Sales, 905-468-2195, 888-669-5566 6 Picton Street, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: salesinquiry@vintage-hotels.com, Fax: 905-468-8646 Web: www.vintage-hotels.com Description: Located in the heart of Niagara-on-the-Lake, it is an oasis of Victorian elegance filled with 21st century comforts. The hotel was named in honour of the future king’s George V royal visit in 1901. Capacity: Reception-90 Banquet-80 Classroom-60 Theatre-90

Yes

Yes $

Yes

12’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

2,926

10’

Yes

Yes

Yes

7

1,363

10’

No

Yes

Yes

Queen’s Landing (Vintage Hotels) Contact: Sales Office, 905-468-2195, 888-669-5566 155 Byron Street, Box 1180, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: salesinquiry@vintage-hotels.com, Fax: 905-468-8646 Web: www.vintage-hotels.com Description: Spectacular Georgian-style mansion on the banks of the Niagara River, perfect for everything - from family vacations to high-level corporate gatherings. Capacity: Reception-400 Banquet-300 Classroom-250 Theatre-420

20

4,756

10’

Yes

Yes

Yes

White Oaks Conference Resort & Spa Contact: Julie Lepp, 905-704-5638, 253 Taylor Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: jlepp@whiteoakresort.com, Fax: 905-704-5616 Web: www.whiteoaksresort.com Description: Canada’s only Resort Hotel and Spa to be recognized as a member of the prestigious IACC. Amphitheatre with data port at each seat. Euro-design 8-hour chairs, exclusive to White Oaks. Capacity: Reception-750 Banquet-580 Classroom-450 Theatre-825

23

6,042

16’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Holiday Inn & Suites Oakville @ Bronte Contact: Johanna Redmond, 905-847-1000, 800-880-3188 2525 Wyecroft Road, Oakville, ON L6L 6P8 Email: whg7201s@whg.com, Fax: 905-847-0032 Web: www.hioakvillebronte.ca Description: In picturesque Oakville half way between Toronto and Niagara Falls. Over 7,000 sq. ft. of meeting space and 144 guestrooms. Adjacent to the Oakville Conference Centre with an additional 20,000 sq. ft. meeting space. Complimentary parking. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-200 Classroom-90 Theatre-200

10

1,700

12’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Monte Carlo Inn Oakville Suites Contact: José Altuna, 905-849-9500, 877-849-9500 374 South Service Road East, Oakville, ON L6J 2X6 Email: customerservice@montecarloinns.com, Fax: 905-849-6405 Web: www.montecarloinns.com Description: Close to Oakville’s beautiful waterfront; well-appointed rooms. Capacity: Reception-75 Banquet-75 Classroom-50 Theatre-100

4

1,300

8’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Venue Information

Type H

H

H

H

H

H

H

H

Ceiling height

Loading dock

20

Parking

Sheraton On The Falls Contact: Sales Department, 905-374-4445, 888-234-8410 5875 Falls Avenue, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3K7 Email: sales@niagarafallshotels.com, Fax: Web: www.sheratononthefalls.com Description: Cornerstone of the 20 acre Falls Avenue Entertainment Complex located within steps of Niagara Falls in the heart of Niagara’s premier Falls View district. Capacity: Reception-1800 Banquet-1440 Classroom-1200 Theatre-1200

Storage

Largest room (sq. ft.)

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more, and become more, you are a leader.” -John Quincy Adams 30

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Sheraton Parkway Toronto North Hotel Contact: Monique Dennison, 905-882-3101, 800-668-0101 600 Highway 7 East, Richmond Hill, ON L4B 1B2 Email: moniquedennison@sheratonparkway.com, Fax: 905-882-3100 Web: www.sheratonparkway.com Description: 30,000 sq. ft. of recently renovated function space, just off Highway 404, north of Highway 401. Capacity: Reception-1500 Banquet-1000 Classroom-600 Theatre-1200

30

10,030

16.5’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Four Points By Sheraton St Catharines Niagara Suites Contact: Elizabeth Simpson, 905-984-8484, x.1819, 877-848-3782 3530 Schmon Parkway, St Catharines, ON L2V 4Y6 Email: elizabeth.simpson@fourpointsstcatharines.com, Fax: 905-984-6691 Web: www.fourpoints.com/stcatharines Description: In the heart of the Niagara Region, surrounded by world class wineries and renowned golf courses. The only all suites Four Points by Sheraton with 11,000 sq. ft. of function space with natural light. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-250 Classroom-180 Theatre-400

10

3,350

12’

Yes

Yes

Holiday Inn and Suites Parkway Convention Centre Contact: Adrian Nitsopoulos, 905-688-2324, 877-688-2324 327 Ontario St, St Catharines, ON L2R 5L3 Email: adrian@heartofniagarahotels.com, Fax: 905-684-6432 Web: www.holidayinn.com/hotels/us/en/st.-catharines/ycmsa/hoteldetail Description: State of the art audio-visual equipment and multi-use staging, all mobile and customizable. 4,000 sq. ft. of fully enclosed, picturesque glass atrium surrounding its rooms. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-200 Classroom-130 Theatre-300

9

3,168

10’3”

Yes

Yes

Yes

Hilton Garden Inn Toronto Vaughan Contact: Alexis Edgar, 905-660-4700, 888-269-4115 3201 Highway 7 West, Vaughan, ON L4K 5Z7 Email: alexis.edgar@hilton.com, Fax: 905-660-4300 Web: www.torontovaughan.stayhgi.com Description: Offers state of the art light and sound. Located next to great team building attractions, close to all major highways and Toronto Pearson International Airport. Capacity: Reception-700 Banquet-600 Classroom-325 Theatre-800

7

8,000

20’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Homewood Suites by Hilton Toronto Vaughan Contact: Caroline Palo, 905-760-1660, 618 Applewood Crescent, Vaughan, ON L4K 4B4 Email: yyzvg.ds@hilton.com, Fax: 905-760-1663 Web: www.torontovaughan.homewoodsuites.com Description: Modern design of the York Ballroom accommodates corporate groups up to 75 people and weddings up to 150. Complimentary wired/wireless internet access and access to 24 hour business centre. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-120 Classroom-90 Theatre-200

1

2,160

18’

No

Yes

Door Access

SpringHill Suites by Marriott Toronto Vaughan Contact: Mark Jones, 905-760-9960, 612 Applewood Crescent, Vaughan, ON L4K 4B4 Email: mjones@springhillsuitesvaughan.com, Fax: 905-760-9907 Web: www.springhillsuitesvaughan.com Description: Vaughan’s newest hotel with suites 25% larger than regular guest rooms. Microwave, minifridge, iPod docking station and CAT 6 highspeed internet access are standard features. Free breakfast daily. Free parking. Bar Lounge on site. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-240 Classroom-170 Theatre-270

10

3,100

11’

Yes

Yes

No

Ancaster Mill Contact: Kevin Marshall, 905-648-1827, 548 Old Dundas Road, Ancaster, ON L9G 3J4 Email: kevin@ancastermill.com, Fax: 905-648-1098 Web: www.ancasteroldmill.com Description: Offering a relaxed country setting close to the city. As an added feature, walking trails are available through the woods for attendees to use for a revitalizing break. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-250 Classroom-120 Theatre-225

6

3,600

12’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Lionhead Golf and Country Club Contact: John Dickie, 905-455-8400, 8525 Mississauga Road, Brampton, ON L6Y 0C1 Email: sales@kaneffgolf.com, Fax: 905-455-5815 Web: www.golflionhead.com Description: Offers two top-ranked, award-winning golf courses, the Legends and its sister, the Masters. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-400 Classroom-144 Theatre-500

13

2,450

25’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

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PLANNER 31

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Pearson Convention Centre Contact: Fernando Branco, 905-494-0444, 2638 Steeles Avenue East, Brampton, ON L6T 3L7 Email: nancy@pearsonconvention.com, Fax: 905-494-0344 Web: www.pearsonconventioncenter.com Description: Fully equipped with state-of-the art-technology. Flexible meeting and event spaces. Close to all major highways and amenities. Capacity: Reception-2363 Banquet-1883 Classroom-1020 Theatre-2529

10

24,485

Yes

Yes

Yes

Speranza Banquet Hall Ltd Contact: Sevelino Carnevale, 905-793-3458, 510 Deerhurst Drive, # A, Brampton, ON L6T 5H9 Email: info@speranzahall.ca, Fax: 905-793-9301 Web: www.speranzahall.ca Description: Each of the three enchanting ballrooms creates an elegant and warm ambiance featuring beautiful European chandeliers, marble dance floors and Roman-inspired architecture and artwork. Capacity: Reception-2000 Banquet-2000 Classroom-1000 Theatre-2000

3

Yes

Yes

Yes

Atrium Conference Centre & Restaurants Contact: Juna Schibert-Mulé, 905-319-0499, 5420 North Service Road, Burlington, ON L7L6C7 Email: info@atriumbc.cca, Fax: 905-319-1266 Web: www.atriumbc.ca Description: From gala affairs to racy fundraisers, banquets guaranteed to be the highlight of any conference. Unique style of French service. Capacity: Reception-450 Banquet-175 Classroom-75 Theatre-300

2

5,165

15’

Yes

Yes

Burlington Art Centre Contact: Ian Ross, 905-632-7796 x 306, 1333 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON L7S 1A9 Email: info@BurlingtonArtCentre.on.ca, Fax: 905-632-0278 Web: www.burlingtonartcentre.on.ca Description: Beautiful open plan and adaptable space adjacent to Lake Ontario and the Boardwalk. Exhibits can be integrated into events. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-180 Classroom-80 Theatre-200

6

25’

Yes

Yes $

Door access

Burlington Convention Centre Contact: Luis Azevedo, 905-319-0319, 1120 Burloak Drive, Burlington, ON L7L 6P8 Email: luis@burlingtonconventioncentre.ca, Fax: 905-319-3989 Web: www.burlingtonconventioncentre.com Description: An incomparable combination of contemporary elegance and state-of-the art technology backed by a spirit of first-class hospitality, gourmet cuisine and French-style service. Capacity: Reception-1200 Banquet-800 Classroom-600 Theatre-1200

5

12,300

15’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Royal Ambassador Event Centre Contact: Stella Stalteri, 905-584-6868, 15430 Innis Lake Road, Caledon, ON L7C 2Z1 Email: stella@royalambassador.ca, Fax: 905-584-0101 Web: http://www.theroyalambassador.com/ Description: Less than 30 minutes from Toronto, a beautifully-appointed facility set within the most tranquil surroundings. Beautiful lake views. Capacity: Reception-550 Banquet-530 Classroom-300 Theatre-950

7

7,770

16.5’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Venetian Banquet and Hospitality Centre Contact: Joseph Mete, 905-660-1110, 219 Romina Drive, Concord, ON L4K 4V3 Email: joem@thevenetian.ca, Fax: 905-660-1113 Web: www.thevenetian.ca Description: Artistically designed function space with interesting architectural features. Expandable meeting/banquet room to accommodate all group sizes. Close to the airport and major highways. Capacity: Reception-1200 Banquet-800 Classroom-600 Theatre-800

4

Yes

Yes

Yes

Copetown Woods Golf Club Contact: Nicky Noel, 905-627-9268 x 24, 877-267-3696 1430 Concession 2 West, Copetown, ON L0R 1J0 Email: nnoel@copetownwoods.com, Fax: 905-627-8815 Web: www.copetownwoods.com Description: Championship golf course and premiere facility catering to all events. Experience the old school charm of the Victorian clubhouse with all modern amenities. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-200 Classroom-150 Theatre-150

4

2,500

14’

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

Type M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

“If everything seems under control, you’re not going fast enough.” -Mario Andretti 32

PLANNER

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M

M

M

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M

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M

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M

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Ceiling height

M

h o r s e s h o e

Largest room (sq. ft.)

Type

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

Casablanca Winery Inn & Spa Contact: Lori Alexander, 905-309-7171, 4 Windward Drive, Grimsby, ON L3M 4E8 Email: sales@casablancawineryinn.com, Fax: 905-309-2327 Web: www.casablancawineryinn.com Description: Boutique Inn overlooking Lake Ontario with over 9,000 sq. ft. of conference and meeting space, private dining rooms, ballrooms and a chapel. For groups from 2 to 300 people. Capacity: Reception-400 Banquet-300 Classroom-170 Theatre-400

9

4,644

Yes

Yes

Yes

Art Gallery of Hamilton Contact: Jodie Fauman/ Allison Aulenback, 905-527-6610, ext. 234/ext. 277, 123 King Street West, Hamilton, ON L8P 4S8 Email: jodie@artgalleryofhamilton.com events@artgalleryofhamilton.com, Fax: 905-577-6940 Web: www.artgalleryofhamilton.com Description: Beautiful surroundings and excellent facilities with flexibility for client to choose own vendors and suppliers. Capacity: Reception-235 Banquet-200 Classroom-100 Theatre-235

4

3,260

40’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Carmen’s Banquet Hall Contact: Justin Mencfeld, 905-383-4100, 1520 Stonechurch Road East, Hamilton, ON L8W 3P9 Email: info@carmens.com, Fax: 905-574-1480 Web: www.carmens.com Description: Luxurious and award-winning venue. Complete decor selection with chair covers, centrepieces and more. Executive chef Martin Kaneve prepares tantalizing cuisine. Capacity: Reception-1350 Banquet-1150 Classroom-800 Theatre-1600

5

14,500

26’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Copps Coliseum Contact: John Elder, 905-546-3076, 101 York Boulevard, Hamilton, ON L8R 3L4 Email: john.elder@hamilton.ca, Fax: 905-546-3483 Web: www.hecfi.ca Description: Variety of space options designed to accommodate a broad range of meeting sizes and functional needs. Capacity: Reception-3000 Banquet-2000 Classroom-2000 Theatre-3000

4

117,000

65’

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Hamilton Convention Centre Contact: Anne Cousins, 905-546-3071, 1 Summers Lane, Hamilton, ON L8P 4Y2 Email: conventioncentre@hamilton.ca, Fax: 905-522-3380 Web: www.hecfi.ca Description: Total exhibition space of 40,000 sq ft. in a self-contained facility. Excellent location in the heart of Hamilton, close to the Hamilton International airport, with adjacent hotels. Capacity: Reception-1350 Banquet-1350 Classroom-1350 Theatre-1541

18

19,662

25’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Liuna Station Banquet Centre Contact: Nadia Petrella, 905-525-2410, ext.241, 866-525-2410 360 James Street North, Hamilton, ON L8L 1H5 Email: liunastation@liunastation.com, Fax: 905-525-4013 Web: www.liunaevents.com Description: Impressive executive boardroom and meeting rooms. Internet access, data ports and teleconferencing facilities. Other equipment also available. Centrally located with free secure parking. Capacity: Reception-800 Banquet-800 Classroom-500 Theatre-800

3

7,761

1018’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Olympia Catering and Banquet Centre Contact: Carmell Ippolito, 905-312-6951, 1162 Barton Street East, Hamilton, ON L8H 2V6 Email: carm@grandolympia.ca, Fax: 905-312-9963 Web: www.olympiabanquets.ca Description: Red carpet service by polished and highly trained staff. Recently renovated property providing all required services in-house. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-400 Classroom-300 Theatre-550

2

4,200

18’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Renaissance Catering & Special Events Centre Contact: Domenic De Angelis, 905-560-2500, 2289 Barton Street East, Hamilton, ON L8E 2W8 Email: info@renaissancehall.com, Fax: 905-560-7155 Web: www.renaissancehall.com Description: Three beautifully decorated banquet ballrooms. Specializing in succulent European dishes prepared fresh from scratch. Conveniently located minutes from the QEW and New Red Hill Expressway. Capacity: Reception-800 Banquet-700 Classroom-350 Theatre-1000

4

13,000

14’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Venue Information

www.theplanner.ca

PLANNER 33

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Parking

Loading dock

g u i d e

Storage

v e n u e

Ceiling height

h o r s e s h o e s

Largest room (sq. ft.)

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

Royal Botanical Gardens Contact: Pamela Bowen, 905-527-1158, ext. 273, 680 Plains Road West, Hamilton/Burlington, ON L7T 4H4 Email: rentals@rbg.ca, Fax: 905-577-0375 Web: www.rbg.ca Description: Host indoor and outdoor functions in one of southern Ontario’s most idyllic settings in a year-round facility. Several garden options during the summer. Capacity: Reception-450 Banquet-450 Classroom-300 Theatre-450

9

5,400

Yes

Yes

Door access

Kingbridge Conference Centre & Institute Contact: Sales, 905-833-6512, 12750 Jane Street, King City, ON L7B 1A3 Email: sales@kingbridgecentre.com, Fax: 905-833-0762 Web: www.kingbridgecentre.com Description: Located minutes north of Toronto on 114 rolling acres, an IACC property designed especially for meetings and conferences. Beautiful, creative meeting space and gardens. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-200 Classroom-140 Theatre-350

44

3,329

10’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Tannery Event Centre Contact: Kristen Smith, 519-744-1555, 800-667-0833 151 Charles Street West, Kitchener, ON N2G 1H6 Email: ksmith@bingemans.com, Fax: 519-744-1985 Web: www.bingemans.com/catering/venues/the_tannery.php Description: Located in the technological hub of Kitchener’s Tannery District. Revitalized from a robust mill to a contemporary event setting. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-180 Classroom-160 Theatre-250

1

3,600

22’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Angus Glen Golf Club And Conference Centre Contact: Chantal Headrick, 905-887-0090 x 251, 10080 Kennedy Road, Markham, ON L6C 1N9 Email: cheadrick@angusglen.com, Fax: 905-887-9424 Web: www.angusglen.com Description: Some of the most beautiful event rooms in the 905 region. The Great Hall features stained glass overhead lighting and vaulted ceilings. Capacity: Reception-1200 Banquet-500 Classroom-400 Theatre-600

8

50’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Markham Museum Contact: Enzo Greco, 905-294-4576, 9350 Markham Road, Markham, ON L3P 3J3 Email: mwright@markham.ca, Fax: 905-294-4590 Web: www.markhammuseum.ca Description: Four beautifuly preserved indoor/outdoor facilities on 25 acres of parkland. Great facility for a corporate meeting, barbecue, wedding, birthday or family get-together. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-175 Classroom-100 Theatre-200

1

4,000

20’

Yes

Yes

No

Air Combat Zone Contact: Steve Bigg, 905-602-4775, 5170 Dixie Road, Suite 101, Mississauga, ON L4W 1E3 Email: sbigg@aircombatzone.com, Fax: 905-602-5501 Web: www.aircombatzone.com Description: For something different, try incredibly realistic flight simulators and pre-mission training combined with our versatile meeting and catering facilities. Capacity: Reception-60 Banquet-28 Classroom-20 Theatre-20

476

10’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Grand Metropolitan of Mississauga Contact: Sales, 905-624-4009, 5165 Dixie Road, Mississauga, ON L4W 4G1 Email: info@grandmetropolitan.ca, Fax: 905-624-4931 Web: www.grandmetropolitan.ca Description: Reception facility boasting two newly redesigned ballrooms, elegantly appointed with panoramic windows, and luxurious decor. Capacity: Reception-650 Banquet-650 Classroom-250 Theatre-600

2

30’

Yes

Yes

Door access

International Centre Contact: Lee-Anne Leckie, 905-677-6131 ext. 116, 800-567-1199 6900 Airport Road, Mississauga, ON L4V 1E8 Email: info@internationalcentre.com, Fax: 905-677-3089 Web: www.internationalcentre.com Description: A 500,000 sq. ft. trade and consumer show facility and conference centre including a 17,000 sq. ft. ballroom divisible into a total of 8 sections. Capacity: Reception-3700 Banquet-1700 Classroom-1200 Theatre-2500

30

100,000

23 35’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

Type M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” -Peter Ducker 34

PLANNER

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Volume 10, Issue 5


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M

M

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M

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M

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Ceiling height

M

h o r s e s h o e

Largest room (sq. ft.)

Type

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

Living Arts Centre Contact: Anne Parker, 905-306-6015, 4141 Living Arts Drive, Mississauga, ON L5B 4B8 Email: anne.parker@livingarts.on.ca, Fax: 905-306-6120 Web: www.livingartscentre.ca Description: Conveniently located minutes form Pearson International Airport, this multi-purpose venue offers 210,000 sq.ft. of theatre, meeting room and exhibit space. Complimentary underground parking is available. Capacity: Reception-500 Banquet-370 Classroom-0 Theatre-500

22

7,220

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mississauga Convention Centre Contact: Cliff Silveira, 905-564-1920, 75 Derry Road West, Mississauga, ON L5W 1G3 Email: cliff@mississaugaconvention.com, Fax: 905-564-2399 Web: www.mississaugaconvention.com Description: 30,000 sq.ft of meeting and exhibit space. Ground level flooring, direct entry loading docks; pillar and obstruction free. Capacity: Reception-2200 Banquet-2080 Classroom-1090 Theatre-2400

6

255,000

20’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mississauga Grand Banquet & Convention centre Contact: Sam Stratigeas, 905-501-0043, 35 Brunel Road, Mississauga, ON L4Z 3E8 Email: sales@mississaugagrand.com, Fax: 905-501-0310 Web: www.mississaugagrand.com Description: Convenient location at Hurontario and Highway 401. Parking for 600 cars, within walking distance of three major hotels. Less than 10 minutes from Pearson International Airport. Capacity: Reception-600 Banquet-500 Classroom-200 Theatre-800

3

14,000

17’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Playdium Contact: Pamela Kerr, 905-273-4810 x 294, 99 Rathburn Road West, Mississauga, ON L5B 4C1 Email: pkerr@playdium.com, Fax: 905-273-4222 Web: www.playdium.com Description: Experience the ultimate adventure at Playdium. Live out your fantasies on a variety of arcade games, redemption games, batting cages, go-karts, mini golf and a fully-licensed restaurant. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-150 Classroom-80 Theatre-200

3

7,000

20’

Yes

Yes

Red Rose Convention Centre Contact: Rui Dias, 905-565-6650, 1233 Derry Road East, Mississauga, ON L5T 1B6 Email: rui@redroseconventioncentre.com, Fax: 905-362-0441 Web: www.redroseconventioncentre.com Description: Elegant design and decor combined with state-of-the-art technology and a commitment to high quality and service. Capacity: Reception-1800 Banquet-1200 Classroom-700 Theatre-1800

5

12,655

Yes

Yes

Yes

Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum Contact: Cathy McSevney, 905-679-4183, 9280 Airport Road, Mount Hope, ON L0R 1W0 Email: catering@warplane.com, Fax: 905-679-4186 Web: www.warplane.com Description: The experience begins the moment you arrive at this fabulous museum facility. Imagine holding a corporate event with vintage aircraft as your backdrop! Capacity: Reception-1400 Banquet-1400 Classroom-1400 Theatre-1400

4

30,000

25.5’

Yes

Door access

Scotiabank Convention Centre Contact: Sales, 905-357-6222, 888-997-6222 6815 Stanley Avenue, Niagara Falls, ON L2G 3Y9 Email: sales@fallsconventions.com, Fax: 905-357-6212 Web: www.fallsconventions.com Description: Recently opened and designed to LEED Silver; 280,000 sq. ft. convention centre located in the Fallsview Tourist District, 5 minute walk to 3,500 hotel rooms and attractions. Capacity: Reception-7000 Banquet-6000 Classroom-5000 Theatre-7000

18

82,000

30’

Yes

Château des Charmes Contact: Erin Hughes, 905-262-4219, ext.27 1025 York Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1P0 Email: erinh@chateaudescharmes.com, Fax: 905-262-5548 Web: www.chateaudescharmes.com Description: Elegant and intimate spaces for small or large events, both indoors and outdoors under a semi-permanent tent with interlocking floor. Custom events, wine education and team building activities available. Capacity: Reception-125 Banquet-125 Classroom-0 Theatre-0

4

1500

12’

Yes

Door Access

Venue Information

www.theplanner.ca

PLANNER 35

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Parking

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h o r s e s h o e s

Largest room (sq. ft.)

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

Hillebrand Winery Contact: Kelly Shannon, 905-468-6504, 888-609-4442 1249 Niagara Stone Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: groups@hillebrand.com, Fax: 905-468-1920 Web: www.hillebrand.com Description: Wine Country destination for groups of all sizes. Locally inspired cuisine prepared by Executive Chef Frank Dodd paired with Hillebrand’s premium wines. Capacity: Reception-125 Banquet-125 Classroom-0 Theatre-0

3

15’

Yes

Door Access

Inniskillin Wines Contact: Visitor Experience Manager, Sales, 905-468-8056, 888-466-4754 1499 Line 3, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: corporateevents@inniskillin.com, Fax: 905-468-5355 Web: www.inniskillin.com Description: Winery tours, private lunches and exclusive dinners staged throughout the estate and vineyard located along the picturesque Niagara parkway. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-80 Classroom-0 Theatre-0

4

Yes

Door access

Jackson-Triggs Niagara Estate Winery Contact: Visitor Experience Manager, Sales, 905-468-8056, 2145 Regional Road 55, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: corporateevents@jacksontriggswinery.com, Fax: 905-468-4673 Web: www.jacksontriggswinery.com Description: Ideal venue for groups up to 250 people year round with larger programs available in the summer in our 500 seat outdoor amphitheatre and adjacent vineyard marquee. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-48 Classroom-0 Theatre-500

4

Yes

Door access

Peller Estates Winery Contact: Kelly Shannon, 905-468-6504, 888-609-4442 290 John Street East, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: kelly.shannon@peller.com, Fax: 905-468-1920 Web: www.peller.com Description: Experience the art of wine and food pairing with wine from Peller Estates Private Reserves and seasonal cuisine prepared by Chef Jason Parson. Offers private rooms overlooking the vineyards or authentic wine cellar for dining. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-180 Classroom-0 Theatre-0

3

15’

Yes

Yes

Pillitteri Estates Winery Contact: Sharlene Platakis, 905-468-3147, x.250, 1696 Niagara Stone Road, RR # 2, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: winery@pillitteri.com, Fax: 905-468-0389 Web: www.pillitteri.com Description: Offering personalized winery tours and tastings, and unique varities of Icewines. Capacity: Reception-60 Banquet-60 Classroom-60 Theatre-60

1

1,200

8’

Yes

Yes

Stonechurch Vineyards Contact: Hank Hunse, 905-935-3535, 1242 Irvine Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: hhunse@stonechurch.com, Fax: 905-646-8892 Web: www.stonechurch.com Description: Provides a beautiful and affordable location to host your holiday celebration for staff and clients. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-100 Classroom-0 Theatre-0

2

1,800

14’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stratus Vineyards Contact: Hayley Bishop, 905-468-1806, 866-468-1806 2059 Niagara Stone Road, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON L0S 1J0 Email: hayleybishop@stratuswines.com, Fax: 905-468-0847 Web: www.stratuswines.com Description: Premium, artisanal wine-making practices, sustainability and focus on design. Events at Stratus synergize dynamic chefs, eco-chic spaces and celebrated wines into memorable moments. Capacity: Reception-120 Banquet-50 Classroom-60 Theatre-70

4

2,160

17’

Yes

Yes

Harbour Lighthouse Banquet and Conference Centre Contact: Anna Christiansen, 905-827-1315, 2340 Ontario Street, Oakville, ON L6L 6P7 Email: anna@harbourbanquet.ca, Fax: 905-827-6582 Web: www.harbourbanquet.ca Description: Situated at Bronte Marina with fabulous lake views. Patio open during summer months. Bright, open plan atmosphere and flexible meeting space. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-250 Classroom-155 Theatre-350

6

3,680

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

Type M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

“Leaders don’t create followers, they create more leaders.” -Tom Peter 36

PLANNER

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Volume 10, Issue 5


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M

M

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Largest room (sq. ft.)

Type

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

Oakville Conference Centre Contact: Zorka Kosic, 905-618-7510, 2515 Wyecroft Road, Oakville, ON L6L 6P8 Email: events@oakvilleconference.com, Fax: 905-847-0032 Web: www.oakvilleconference.com Description: Conveniently located banquet facility, the largest on Oakville, midway between Toronto and Niagara Falls. Capacity: Reception-1200 Banquet-825 Classroom-450 Theatre-1050

7

10,740

12’

Yes

Yes

Door Access

Operating Engineers Banquet Hall and Conference Centre Contact: Michelle Dawson, 905-465-4358, 2245 Speers Road, Oakville, ON L6L 6X8 Email: mdawson@oebanquet.com, Fax: 905-465-4345 Web: www.oebanquet.com Description: State of the art meeting rooms at competitive rates. Professionally designed in an abundance of natural light. Easy highway access. Close to hotels and Go train. Capacity: Reception-450 Banquet-500 Classroom-384 Theatre-700

3

8,300

18’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Otello’s Banquet Hall Contact: Remo Iaquinto, 905-849-6416, 2273 Royal Windsor Drive, Oakville, ON L6J 7X8 Email: office@otellos.com, Fax: 905-849-5816 Web: www.otellos.com Description: Close to QEW and 401/403. Pleasant decor, excellent food and service. Main ballroom divides for smaller groups or separate meeting/dining areas. Capacity: Reception-250 Banquet-250 Classroom-150 Theatre-300

3

3,564

12’

Yes

Yes

Door access

Octaviens Banquet Halls and conference Center Contact: Carol Cavallari, 905-434-1444, 559 Bloor Street West, Oshawa, ON L1J 5Y6 Email: carol@octaviens.ca, Fax: 905-436-2327 Web: www.octaviens.ca Description: Unique octagonal shape for each equal-sized room, with panaramic floor to ceiling windows. Free parking, LCD hook-ups, retractable screen and sound system. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-275 Classroom-175 Theatre-400

2

4,000

17’

Yes

Door Access

Hernder Estate Wines Contact: Angel Fuscerruli, 905-684-3300, 1607 8th Avenue, St Catharines, ON L2R 6P7 Email: angel@hernder.com, Fax: Web: www.hernder.com Description: Offers an excellent selection of fine VQA wines, as well as an outstanding array of foods. An outstanding Canadian winery site. Capacity: Reception-350 Banquet-300 Classroom-0 Theatre-350

2

Yes

Yes

Door access

Rockway Glen Golf Course & Estate Winery Contact: Shelley Traver, 905-641-1030, 877-ROCKWAY 3290 Ninth Street, St Catharines, ON L2R 6P7 Email: straver@rockwayglen.com, Fax: 905-641-2031 Web: www.rockwayglen.com Description: Golf course with winery onsite, suitable for weddings, special and corporate events. Capacity: Reception-300 Banquet-200 Classroom-150 Theatre-225

2

2,500

12’

Yes

Yes

Liuna Gardens Banquet Centre Contact: Robert Visca, 905-643-3117, 866-331-3875 526 Winona Road North, Stoney Creek, ON L8E 5E9 Email: liunagardens@liunagardens.com, Fax: 905-643-4478 Web: www.liunagardens.com Description: Destination of choice for all corporate events. Liuna Gardens located mid-way between Fort Eric and Toronto, just minutes away from Hamilton and St. Catharines, it’s ideal for bringing people together from far and wide. Capacity: Reception-600 Banquet-400 Classroom-200 Theatre-400

3

Yes

Yes

Yes

Cineplex Odeon Contact: Corporate Sales Manager, 416-323-6600, 1-800-313-4461 1303 Yonge St, Toronto, ON M4T 2Y9 Email: corporatesales@cineplex.com, Fax: 416-323-6616 Web: www.cineplex.com Description: Ideal to showcase products/services. Make a lasting impression with employees, suppliers, customers and media in a customized space. Unmatched selection of cinema space in the 905 region. Capacity: Reception-0 Banquet-0 Classroom-0 Theatre-449

17

Yes

Door Access

Venue Information

“It’s better to fail in originality, than succeed in imitation.” -Herman Melville www.theplanner.ca

PLANNER 37

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Storage

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g u i d e

Ceiling height

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Largest room (sq. ft.)

h o r s e s h o e s

Canada’s Wonderland Contact: Jason Vandenberg, 905-832-7495, 9580 Jane Street, Vaughan, ON L6A 1S6 Email: jason.vandenberg@canadaswonderland.com, Fax: 905-832-7499 Web: www.canadaswonderland.com Description: Unmatched venue for team-building and entertainment. Rediscover the kid within whilst mixing business with pleasure. Seasonal outdoor activities. Capacity: Reception-1500 Banquet-1500 Classroom-800 Theatre-1000

2

Yes

Yes $

Yes

Chateau Le Jardin Conference & Event Centre Contact: Sandro Calcagno, 905-851-2200, 800-533-3009 8440 Highway 27, Vaughan, ON L4L 1A5 Email: sandro@lejardin.com, Fax: 905-851-2292 Web: www.lejardin.com Description: Award-winning, French-inspired decor. Large foyers with 30 ft. ceilings, beautifully detailed two-way fireplace and walkouts to courtyard space. Ten minutes from Pearson International Airport. Over 600 complimentary ground level parking spots. Capacity: Reception-1800 Banquet-1300 Classroom-700 Theatre-1800

13

12,000

26’

Yes

Yes

Yes

La Primavera Hospitality & Convention Centre Contact: Joseph Carnovale, 905-265-8100, ext. 29, 77 Woodstream Boulevard, Vaughan, ON L4L 7Y6 Email: josephc@laprimavera.ca, Fax: 905-265-8101 Web: www.laprimavera.ca Description: Over 15,000 sq. ft. of meeting and exhibit space 14 km from Pearson International Airport. Customization includes hall size, lighting, audio-visual systems, menu options for corporate function. Capacity: Reception-1100 Banquet-900 Classroom-540 Theatre-1060

6

15,400

20’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Toscana Banquet and Conference Centre Contact: Sales, 905-660-5200, 3201 Highway # 7 West, Vaughan, ON L4K 5Z7 Email: info@toscanabanquethall.com, Fax: 905-660-4300 Web: www.toscanabanquethall.ca Description: Attached to the Hilton Garden Inn® Toronto/Vaughan. Spacious facility offering over 10,000 sq. ft. of banquet and meeting space for 20 to 850 guests. Award winning cuisine team. Capacity: Reception-800 Banquet-600 Classroom-500 Theatre-850

7

8,000

22’

Yes

Paramount Contact: Kostas Marmaras, 905-326-3000, 222 Rowntree Dairy Road, Woodbridge, ON L4L 9T2 Email: costas.m@bypeterandpauls.com, Fax: 905-326-3500 Web: www.bypeterandpauls.com Description: From large tradeshows and conferences to meetings and workshops. Strategically located 15 minutes from Pearson International Airport and easy access to all major highways. Capacity: Reception-1737 Banquet-1400 Classroom-1137 Theatre-1650

2

16,896

25’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Spencers Contact: Leanne Chiancone, 905-6337494 1340 Lakeshore Road, Burlington, ON L7S 1B1 Email: leanne@spencersatthewaterfront.com, Fax: 905-356-5419 Web: www. spencersatthewaterfront.com Description: Panoramic views of Burlington Bay and Lake Ontario. Weather-friendly 125-seat patio overlooks a summer pond and winter ice rink. Floor-to-ceiling windows throughout. Relaxing interior decor. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-100 Classroom-20 Theatre-40

1

1,200

30’

No

Yes $

Door access

Old Barber House Restaurant Contact: Victor Petrovski, 905-858-7570, 5155 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, ON L5M 2L9 Email: oldbarberhouse@yahoo.com, Fax: Web: www.oldbarberhouse.com Description: Established in 1984 by the owner’s father, the same rich family tradition and passions are continued. Private meeting rooms are available and can accommodate 10 to 150 guests. Capacity: Reception-200 Banquet-150 Classroom-100 Theatre-200

1

1,800

16’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Casa Mia Ristorante Contact: Domenic Mollica, 905-356-5410, 3518 Portage Road, Niagara Falls, ON L2J 2K4 Email: dominic@casamiaristorante.com, Fax: 905-356-5419 Web: www.casamiaristorante.com Description: Sleek urban trattoria, delicious Italian cuisine. Complimentary shuttle service to and from Niagara Falls hotels and casinos. Capacity: Reception-150 Banquet-100 Classroom-20 Theatre-40

1

1,500

13’

Yes

Yes

Yes

Venue Information

Type M

M

M

M

M

R

R

R

38

g o l d e n

Meeting rooms

2012

PLANNER

The

Volume 10, Issue 5


Vol. 10 No. 5  

Included: The 905 Golden Horseshoe Venue Guide

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