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00 mitch crowder registered architect leed ap selected work


01 institutional design united states federal courthouse salt lake city | utah thomas phifer and partners federal office building san juan | puerto rico thomas phifer and partners 222 south street office tower san francisco | california thomas phifer and partners new york law school new york | new york smithgroup jjr

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hospitality design

quirk hotel charlottesville | virginia architecturefirm

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residential design

9th street SE washington, d.c. architecturefirm one clinton - residential tower and brooklyn heights public library brooklyn | new york marvel architects pierterrace - brooklyn bridge park pier 6 rfp residential towers brooklyn | new york marvel architects

04 urban design

port authority new york | new york harvard graduate school of design urban grafting caserma montebello milan | italy harvard graduate school of design


united states federal courthouse

salt lake city | utah thomas phifer and partners lead designer tom phifer partner in charge steve dayton project architect mitch crowder project designer ina ko project designer robert chan architect of record naylor wentworth lund 2008 - 2012 (completed 2014)

The 322,996sm courthouse is designed as a simple cube based on an 1.8 meter grid. The grid originates in plan, but is most evident on the building’s exterior where aluminum fins are placed at 300mm modules. The fin profiles vary in size and shape and are articulated to recognize the sun’s interaction with different facades. The screen covers the building as a Japanese screen that subtly displaying the interior functions to the exterior. Private areas read with more opacity and open to more public/transparent areas.

exterior screen courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners


west main public entry courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

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southeast corner at parking garage entry trellis courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

west elevation courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners


screen detail courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

northeast cover pool courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

west entry reflection pool courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

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The building’s entry is on an asymmetrical east-west axis through a large stainless steel and glass clad portal. This portal leads to a triple height lobby where the occupant is introduced to a material palette of wood, glass and steel. A wood wall to the north and a cylindrical ceremonial stair to the west lock into their intended positions in the grid and inform occupants of the four square plan.

entry stair in lobby courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners


The courtrooms are placed at each corner of the four square plan and are composed of wood and glass walls. Transparency and security were of great concern to the client; however, the design intent was to break from the standard courtroom typology and allow light to penetrate into the space. This move not only involved a lengthy process of client education, but also required engineering studies with acoustics and day lighting.

typical courtroom courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

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west entry portal courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners


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federal office building

san juan | puerto rico thomas phifer and partners lead designer tom phifer design director steve dayton project architect mitch crowder project architect eric ho project designer brad kingsley interior architect fxfowle 2010 - 2011

west elevation above employee entry courtyard (T) exterior screen weaving perforated metal screen (B.L) aerial west elevation employee parking structure (B.R) courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

This office complex for an undisclosed client houses a 22,405sm office building, 13,845sm parking structure, a 1368sm daycare facility as well as on-site surface parking in the Hato Rey district of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The building’s overall appearance and form is derived from various studies and client requirements. The shrouded appearance of the cantilevered structure is a product of the client’s necessity to remain anonymous to the surrounding community. The screened facade also provides an opportunity to address the environmental issues that tend to affect a large glass facade in the Caribbean.


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The building’s plan configuration pays homage to Old San Juan’s density and its utilization of interior courtyards to provide appropriate day lighting and natural ventilation for the hot and humid climate. Since the building program primarily looks inward, we saw these courtyards as an opportunity to connect the occupant to nature with varying types of gardens that would reflect the variety of natural landscapes found in Puerto Rico.

contextual diagram old city courtyards vs new building courtyards

site plan proposed schematic design layout


The program of the site and office building requires a unique entry sequence, which is atypical of most office buildings. The employee entrance is to be obscured from the public, allowing the workers to maintain their desired level of privacy from pedestrians and building visitors. The public enters the site through a large grove of existing mahogany trees to the north. The building’s low profile slowly appears, hovering over a large pool of water. Occupants enter the building’s interior through a small lobby flanked to the west by a courtyard that penetrates through the building, framing the sky.

office floor plan (B.L.) employee entry garden (T.R) public entry pools under cantilever (B.R) courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners

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The views to the outside of the building are skewed by an undulated screen composed of weaving perforated aluminum strips. This exterior treatment was necessary to blur the vision of the building’s interior, allowing the building’s inner workings to remain anonymous to the general public. We worked closely with our environmental engineers on the proportions of the space between the screen and the glass curtain wall, and on the rhythm of the weaving pattern for maximum benefits.

exterior screen 3 meter zone used to indirectly light work environment courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners


typical office bay section sun study of 15 meter open office bay width

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222 Second Street

san francisco | california thomas phifer and partners lead designer tom phifer project architect steve dayton project designer mitch crowder gensler (architect of record) 2008 (completed 2016)

Designed for Tishman Speyer, this 450,000sf tower is located in the Financial District of San Francisco. The main design challenge was reinterpreting the traditional tiered tower model required by the City. We envisioned the tiered tower as an asymmetric stacking of volumes. Sizes and shifts required a careful analysis of portion, while maintaining the floor square footage set by city code and the developer. To create visual appeal to the exterior skin, various options were studied of modest shifts similar to the overall massing studies. The final outcome is a simple read of a building that skews the reflection of its context in hopes to minimize the mass of its body. The tower’s fine texture of black glass and stainless steel diminishes its brutal mass to an intricately woven garment. With Thomas Phifer as the design lead, the project was completed in 2016 by Gensler.

site plan first floor private tower lobby to the east is separated by a tiered water feature that connects to a cafe and an organic public gathering area_perimeter wall of the lobby opens to pedestrian traffic with large portals

exterior elevations shingled glass units reverse direction as shifting volumes stack


lobby howard street public cafe opens to the street with oversized, sliding entry portals that blur the building’s threshold courtesy of dBox

tower howard and second street (R) lobby howard street (L) courtesy of Thomas Phifer and Partners and dBox

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plan detail

curtain wall option 3 courtesy of dBox

axon

plan detail

wall section

curtain wall option 4 courtesy of dBox

axon

wall section


plan detail

curtain wall option 1 courtesy of dBox

axon

plan detail

wall section

axon

wall section

curtain wall option 2 selected option for final schematic design courtesy of dBox

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final construction curtain wall detail view (L) final construction building view (R) courtesy of hientges


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new york law school

new york | new york smithgroup jjr lead designer douglas dalhkemper principal in charge su sie lim project manager cynthia bowden douglas gehley project architect lorena zelmer project designer mitch crowder project designer kevin johnson project designer hazel go 2005-2007 (completed 2009)

leonard street elevation construction document drawing (L) enlarged elevations and wall sections construction document drawing leonard street (M) curtain wall section details construction document drawing leonard street (R)

This 190,062sf addition of New York Law School was completed in 2009 and is located adjacent to the existing facility in Tribeca. The building is comprised of a three level library, seminar classrooms, and an interior and exterior rooftop lounge complimented by a student and faculty cafeteria. This highly activated facade not only provides a space for communication within the building, but also communicates the internal program of a law school to the surrounding urban context. The building radiates through the community as it never did before.


leonard street and west broadway courtesy of smithgroup jjr

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The main focus of the design team was to create a building where the design of collaborative space was just as critical as the design of classroom space. A constant discourse is part of the foundation of a law student’s education and success. The architecture of a law school should anticipate for this discourse with the design communal areas outside the classroom. Wide public corridors adjacent a large floating glass wall, house circulation and informal lounge spaces for such activities to occur.

public stair at exterior wall (TL) public lobby and stair (TR) main circulation spine with adjacent collaborative areas (BR) photos courtesy of SmithGroup


evening birdseye looking south courtesy of smithgroup jjr

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Quirk Hotel

Charlottesville, VA ARCHITECTUREFIRM client quirk, llc partner in charge danny macnelly project lead/manager mitch crowder project architect katherine treppendahl interior designer patrick gegen 2017 - present

bird's eye view of hotel from southeast (L) hotel main entrance (R) courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM

Quirk Charlottesville is the second location for the Quirk Hotel, a boutique art hotel. The 100,000 gsf, 80-room hotel is comprised of a contemporary art gallery, guest lounges, restaurants, event spaces, and a rooftop with panoramic views of the surrounding foothills. In addition, the project includes the renovation of two historical houses that are included in the hotel program. This project is currently in construction and scheduled for a December 2019 completion.


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Rooftop Terrace

Commerce Street Art Gallery Screening Room Lobby

Hotel Entrance West Main Street

north-south axon cutting through lobby with guestrooms above (L) hotel lobby render (R) courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM


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Rooftop Restaurant

Rooftop Terrace

Ballrooms

Commerce Street Art Gallery

Restaurant Hotel Entrance

Dining Terrace Coffee Shop Whisky Lounge

north-south axon cutting through restaurant with guestrooms above (L) hotel dining terrace render (R) courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM

West Main Street


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typical guestroom render (L) rooftop terrace/restaurant render (R) courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM


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construction photo hotel lobby (L) construction photo hotel main entrance (R)


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construction photo dining terrace (L) construction photo art gallery entrance (R)


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9th Street SE

ARCHITECTUREFIRM partnered with District Quarters for the design and development of this 22 unit - 20,000 SF condominium building in southeast D.C. blocks from Eastern Market. The design of the white brick building takes its curved wall and bay language from the sorrounding row homes.

Washington D.C. architecturefirm client district quarters partner in charge adam ruffin project lead/manager mitch crowder project designer katherine treppendahl 2019 - present

This project is currently in design and scheduled to begin construction in 2020.

Covered parking space

Alley

Roof Terrace 50’-0” above grade

New street tree

Roof over penthouse 60’-0” above grade

10’x20’ bicycle parking

9th Street SE

Mechanical yard 6’x10’ trash & recycling enclosure

Garden at ground level

detail of rendered elevation (L) schematic site plan (R) courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM

Proposed Site Pla n ARCHITECTUREFIRM

4 17 9 t h S t r e e t S E C o n d o m i n i u m s


rendering looking northwest from 9th street courtesy of ARCHITECTUREFIRM

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1 clinton

Marvel Architects was awarded the contract to design and construct a 400,000gsf residential condo tower with Hudson Companies in September 2014. The RFP included the design of the core and shell of the luxury residential tower in addition to the shell of the Brooklyn Heights Public Library housed on the ground floor of the building. The design of the exterior of the building is a study of classical portions of the golden triangle that form a simplistic grid of limestone and bronze panels. The vertical rhythm of the 2, 3 and 4 floor stacking plays with the over all scale of the building and how it relates to surrounding downtown Brooklyn towers and the small residential scale of Brooklyn Heights. The triangular site allows for various readings of the grid and it's shifting portions.

brooklyn heights library and residential tower brooklyn | new york marvel architects client hudson companies principal in charge jonathan marvel partner in charge lissa so project lead/manager mitch crowder project designer wook kang project designer teo quintana 2014 - 2017 (completion 2020)

1. BELT

2. GRID

The design of the library facade breaks down the scale of the tower grid to a finer grain composed of transparent and opaque panels. The existing mid-century designed library, known for it's dark spaces, will be replaced with a light-filled library that interacts with the surrounding street life of Brooklyn Heights and Downtown Brooklyn.

3. RHYTHM

4. BOOK

5. LAYERING


bird's eye over cadman plaza looking south courtesy of kilograph

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tillary street looking south - library and residential entry courtesy of kilograph


cadman plaza west library facade courtesy of kilograph

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tillary street looking south towards library and residential entrance courtesy of the corcoran group | hudson companies


bird's eye looking towards downtown brooklyn courtesy of kilograph

dusk over cadman plaza looking south courtesy of the corcoran group | hudson companies

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pierterrace

In partnership with Arup, Marvel Architects' approach to the design of two residential towers on Pier Six in Brooklyn Bridge Park explores the concept of the 'living building' for multi-family residential design. Mechanical systems and engineered facades respond to climatic shifts from day to night or season to season. The market rate and affordable towers actively engage with the landscape, while programmatically connecting the park to surrounding neighborhoods. The design and engineering of the buildings strive to connect the occupant to the growing ecological landscape of the 21st century city.

brooklyn bridge park pier 6 rfp brooklyn | new york marvel architects | arup client toll brothers principal in charge jonathan marvel partner in charge guido hartray project architect/manager mitch crowder project designer teo quintana 2014

morning

afternoon

evening


furman street courtesy of Marvel Architects

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site plan - ground floor


P

Living Wall + Salmander Pool

Ground Floor Program

Extend the Park

Park

Residents Gym

Bus Shelter

Public

Lobby

Lobby Shop

Shop

Shop

Residents Amenity

Engage the Elements

PierTerrace Principles:

Wind and Salt Tolerant Vegetation

Extend the Park Rainwater Collection for Brooklyn Bridge Park Irrigation

Bioswale Rain Garden

Common Terrace

Connect to Nature

Retail Lobby

| Pier 6 Development RFP Response Permeable Paving Speed Table

Amenity

315

315

130’

76

Bioswale Rain Garden

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New Playground Entry Point

’x1

Common Terrace

76

102

30

’x1

76’x

0’

76

13 76’x

55’

1

’x 0’

13

’x

76

0’

13

155

30

155

155 ’

0 13 ’x

0 13 ’x

76

Maximize Floor Area

’x1

76’x

76

Engage the Elements

130’

30

’x1

76

315

76

315 130’

76’x

Toll Brothers City Living | Fifth Avenue Committee | Marvel Architects | Arup

site plan - program axon

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market rate tower detail view photos courtesy of Marvel Architects


PierTerrace West

Perform

The 20 degrees northeast tilt of the building results in maximum solar irradiation on the south wall allowing for natural lighting and passive solar heating through direct sunlight during the winter; however, solar irradiation must be controlled during the summer in order to reduce the solar heat gain and cooling load.

Operable window

The following key factors have been developed with respect to thermal control, solar gain control, weather resistance, building energy use, daylighting performance, and occupants’ comfort, which consequently have influenced the design of the project:

Trombe wall

South, East, West Facades: •

Absorbs sunlight all day Radiates heat all night

Trombe walls throughout the facade decrease the glazing to opaque ratio and therefore yields a better performing envelope as well as supporting the passive heating strategies

6’-0” deep balconies act as overhanging geometry providing window shading in order to block the relatively higher summer sunlight from entering the building

A further level of performance has been added to the facade design by employing an operable vertical exterior shading system that can fold to allow maximum direct solar radiation during the winter and unfold to completely block direct solar radiation from occupied space during peak summer conditions

properties resulting in a greater connection with the outside to increase the well-being of

Operable solar shade High performance hybrid heat pump

occupants

Local sub-riser

Alternative glass types in conjunction with external shading devices to produce effective SHGC

Supplies apartment heat pump stack

Daylighting allows the perimeter lighting to be dimmed and thereby reduce lighting energy. Reducing lighting and plug loads has a dual benefit, since the wasted lighting energy that would normally be converted to heat within the space also reduces the cooling load in the summer

2 stage heating & cooling nd

Heat pump provides hot & cold air

Insulation behind the trombe walls and double-paned, gas-filled glazing with low-e coating in a

1st stage radient heating

unitized window-wall system reduces the amount of heating and cooling energy loss. •

Reduces energy use Reduces draft Improves comfort

Unitized, thermally broken, window-wall system with structurally glazed insulated glass units reduces energy loss through the framing

Well-insulated slab edges mitigate condensation risk and the resulting damage to interior finishes while improving occupant comfort

North Facade: The fully-glazed north facade without an exterior shading system allows for diffuse daylight and a clear view to the outdoors. The unitized window-wall system with some operable windows for natural ventilation will be a homogeneous system used on all facades.

Facade Systems Diagram PierTerrace West Toll Brothers City Living | Fifth Avenue Committee | Marvel Architects | Arup

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market rate condo unit photos courtesy of Marvel Architects

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affordable tower detail view photos courtesy of Marvel Architects


Perform PierTerrace East Façade systems and passive strategies incorporated in the envelope design of PierTerrace East include: •

Increasing the wall to window ratio in order to achieve a high R-value and to reduce the solar heat gain through the wall

Stick-built construction with emphasis on air tightness to reduce energy loss through the façade

Metal cladding panels in a rain screen application covering all facades of the East Tower will

Trombe wall

Absorbs sunlight all day Radiates heat all night

perform as a pressure equalized weather-resistant barrier. Additionally, the rain screen system has been designed with a light weight back-up structure and metal panels to reduce the load imposed on the primary building structure. •

Local sub-riser

Punched recessed windows and terraces will have a shading effect during the summer and

Supplies apartment heat pump stack

reduce solar heat gain while still allowing direct solar radiation during the winter •

Each rental unit will have a trombe wall feature to help lower heating load during winter and

High performance hybrid heat pump

assist via stack effect to vent out the hot air during summer

2nd stage heating & cooling

Heat pump provides hot & cold air

1 stage radient heating st

Reduces energy use Reduces draft Improves comfort

Facade Systems Diagram PierTerrace East Toll Brothers City Living | Fifth Avenue Committee | Marvel Architects | Arup

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affordable apartment unit photos courtesy of Marvel Architects

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Toll Brothers and Fifth Avenue Committee (FAC) is p

will include a 29-story mixed-use condominium cont

affordable rental tower containing 135 units, with re

The team’s proposed development will be built in a

Development Guidelines provided in the RFP, and th above grade with all mechanical systems, amenity

incorporate two buildings, the market rate condomi

ground floor retail that will connect with Brooklyn Br

gross square feet, with 237,348 net sellable squar

from pier 6 park courtesy of Marvel Architects


furman street courtesy of Marvel Architects

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port authority

new york | new york elements of urban design studio in collaboration with Greg Boccacci instructor felipe correa harvard university graduate school of design fall 2012

A new social media campus forms in a linear east-west direction, anchored by the NY Times building. The campus is composed of a mixture public and private program with campus program highlighted within a composition of community amenities and reconfigured mass transit nodes. The existing ramps of the Port Authority Terminal remain as site relics and alternative public green space. Using the campus as a programmatic device, the project investigates the role of large scale transportation infrastructure within today's urban context and adaptability to the metropolitan grid of New York City. By the re scaling of infrastructure, the campus rethinks the role of the city block as a spine of integrated public and private function - building and open space that recreates an entry point to Manhattan.

bird's eye views from the hudson and the ny times building a multi-layered park is created linking times square to the hudson


Public Pier

Ferry Terminal

Campus / Residential Tower / Bus Terminal Station

longitudinal section perspective urban park with subway entrance and multiple bus terminals (OT) ground level plan urban park terminates at new ferry terminal southern loop of campus for start-up venture companies mixed with public amenities (OB)

Subway Station

Campus / Residential Tower / Bus Terminal Station

Campus / Residential Tower / Bus Terminal Station

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two tunnels - one terminal

axon multi-layer infrastructure of lincoln tunnel, the number 7 subway line and the revised bus terminal locations and underground circulation

one tunnel - one terminal

one tunnel - multiple (smaller) terminals

bus terminals connections to the city

bus terminals interior connectivity

site diagrams mass transportation overlay (TL) pedestrian experience from hudson (TM) new urban park with southern park loop site diagrams existing port authority bus terminal and ramp configuration (BL) new bus terminal locations in relation to ferry and subway


city block

subway station (pink) bus terminal (yellow)

google campus - silicon valley - collaborative space shown in pink

new public spine exposed subway station

massing

F.A.R. = 5

massing reconfigured

massing highlighted

apple campus - silicon valley - collaborative space shown in pink

google campus - new york city - collaborative space shown in pink

multiple city blocks reconfigured

F.A.R. = 5

site block diagram reconfigured city block (T) program diagrams google program layout comparison of new york city and silicon valley - urban versus suburban (M and B)

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section perspective tower section at exposed number 7 subway line (B) tower spine as connector of residential and campus program tower plans alternate plan options for private/public compositions (T)

perspective looking east towards campus through public park at the ny times building


section perspective tower section at bus terminal looking west through the public spine to the hudson river

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00 mitch crowder registered architect leed ap contact D.C. 1601 Argonne Place NW Unit 110 Washington, D.C. 20009 VA 3206 Park Ave Richmond, VA 23221 202.494.5676 crowder.mitch@gmail.com

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