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TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION................................................................................... 3 FLIGHTPLANNING................................................................................4 PREFLIGHT..........................................................................................7 ENGINESTART................................................................................... 12 TAKEOFF/CLIMB................................................................................ 14 ENROUTE..........................................................................................19 DESCENT/APPROACH....................................................................... 21 LANDING............................................................................................23 APPENDIX: PLATE1:..............................................................FLIGHTPLAN /NAVLOG PLATE2:............................................................ GOODWAYFLIGHTPLAN PLATE3:................................................ KTEXDEPARTUREPROCEDURE PLATE4:........................................................... KSLCILS34RAPPROACH

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INTRODUCTION

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elcome to x-scenery.com's tutorial flight for the MU-2 Marquise for x-plane. This tutorial is a step-by-step guide, designed to get you familiar with the basic operation of this wonderful yet challenging aircraft. This tutorial is NOT designed to teach you how to fly under instrument flight rules (IFR), but rather how to conduct IFR operations in the MU-2. We will be conducting a short flight of about 1.25 hours between Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX) in Colorado, U.S. and Salt Lake City (KSLC) in neighboring Utah, U.S. We will conduct our flight using appropriate departure, enroute and arrival procedures. Along the way, we'll cover the operating steps, procedures and nuances of operating the MU-2 effectively and efficiently from start up to shut down. All the required charts for this flight are included in the appendix . You are free to set your own time of day and weather in x-plane or use the automatic weather in xplane's weather setting screen. Unlike the free-turbine engines found on most KingAirs, the MU-2 has a fixed-turbine engine, which necessitates that the props be at flat pitch when starting the engines. The pilot of the MU-2 below forgot that small point and will have to unfeather the props before engine start.

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FLIGHT PLANNING

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efore we jump in the cockpit and start having real fun, we have to do our due diligence and prepare the flight plan. The flight plan is a written outline of the flight, detailing the locations, directions and altitudes we'll be flying to get from our current location to our final destination. There are several tools to assist pilots in their flight planning, but when it comes to x-plane, we prefer using the Goodway Flight Planner by Stephane Maurel. Goodway is specifically designed to be used with X-Plane and contains a multitude of helpful features to prepare your flight plan. The software is available in a limited free version and a more full-featured payware version. The pay version of Goodway allows you to print

Our flight plan begins with a trip to www.airnav.com maps, view your progress along the flight plan to select a departure procedure from KTEX. KTEX is from within x-plane and file your flight plan a small airport and doesn't have a Standard Instrument with the VATSIM or IVAO networks. Departure procedure BUT it does have what is called an "Obstacle Departure Procedure". Object departure procedures are designed for, ironically enough, obstacle avoidance. In the case of KTEX, most of the obstacles are trees. The departure procedure is found in Plate3 in the Appendix.

Looking over the procedure for KTEX at left, we see that this procedure is not applicable for Runway 9. Since we'll be departing the airspace in a westerly direction, we'll be using Runway 27 for convenience and in addition, a bit more safety as a departure using Runway 9 has little room for error with mountains on all sides. Scrutiny of the obstacle procedure calls for both a takeoff minimum and a departure procedure, again for obstacle avoidance. Takeoff minimums for RWY 27 are 457 feet per nautical mile to 10500 ft. This works out to a climb rate of 1371 feet per minute which is well within the climb capabilities of the MU-2. The performance charts for climb can be found in the POH. With takeoff minimums covered, we then note the THIS HANDBOOK IS FOR ENTERTAINMENT ONLY NOT TO BE USED FOR ACTUAL FLIGHT


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flight planning departure procedure. We'll climb to 12,000 via heading 273 to intercept the Cones VOR (ETL) -096 radial and fly that to the VOR station. We need to cross the VOR at an altitude of 12000 ft or higher. Our cruising altitude will be 14,000 and our route of flight is designed to be as short as possible to maximize efficiency and minimize fuel burn and therefore costs. Since our cruising altitude is below 18,000 ft we'll be utilizing the Low Aiways between KTEX and KSLC, specifically V382 and V134 and points in between: Grand Junction Vortac (JNC) , Carbon VOR (PUC) and Farfield VORTAC (FFU). We will not be utilitzing any standard approach procedures into KSLC due to our lower cruising altitude and KTEX's relatively close proximity to SLC. In addition, our trek around the nearby mountains will have us heading straight into Runway 34, making a simple ILS localizer approach ideal. Another trip to www.airnav.com yields the approach plate for Runway 34R and is included in Plate 4 in the appendix. With our departure, enroute and approach selected, our route of flight is shown below.

ETL . V382 . JNC . V1 34 . PUC . V1 34 . FFU Now that we have our route determined, there's a few things we can do. If we are going to fly this flight on the VATSIM or IVAO networks, we'll need to file a flight plan. Flight plans are relatively standard in their format and a written example is shown in the figure below. You can file flight plans for these networks in a multitude of ways including through the Goodway Flight Planner. Note that the personalized information has been written in red. Depending on what livery you select and your online ID, this information will be unique for each flight.

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flight planning Whether or not we fly online, the flight plan is an essential part of any IFR flight, communicating to ourselves as pilots exactly how we're going to conduct the flight. Having a simple textual outline of the flight plan as shown on the previous page may be sufficient for Air Traffic Control, but it's not very useful at all in the cockpit; therefore, we'll want to have a stack of information handy that is useful to us before and during our flight. This is where the Goodway Flight Planning software comes in. As in most flight planning software, you enter the route of flight, which we established above, along with all the other pertinent information and the flight planner will produce a map of our flight, a "profile", which will show us our altitudes at each waypoint along the route, and a concise textural description of each waypoint. Add to this stack of information details of the ILS approach and now we have some handy items we can keep nearby to refer to as we conduct our flight. All the information below can be found in the appendix of this tutorial. Now that we have the preliminaries out of the way, let's go saddle up! MAP OF FLIGHT PLAN

TEXTUAL OUTLINE

Today's aeronautical charts find their roots in the hand drawn charts of Elrey Jeppesen, a pilot in the early 30s. Elrey Jeppesen made extensive diagrams and notes of topographical features everywhere he flew while working for Varney Airlines. His "charts" became so much in demand by other pilots that he began to sell copies of them. From those early charts grew the Jeppesen Sanderson company we all know today.

RWY 34R APPROACH PLATE

FLIGHT PROFILE

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PRE.FLIGHT

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DISCLAIMER Version 1.0 of the MU-2 does not currently simulate many procedures and steps associated with abnormal or emergency procedures beyond x-plane's normal failure model. Because much of preflight is designed to check for those things that would fail or go wrong during a flight, much of the pre-flight process is not included in this tutorial. We are going to assume that all pre-flight checks were satisfactory and that all systems are tested and working. x-scenery.com is actively working on simulating pre-flight checks and systems simulations.

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ue to the nature of virtual flight simulation, a preflight check around the aircraft is not necessary to obtain a reliable aircraft. In xplane, we simply turn off the failure system and we're assured a working airplane. Therefore, the preflight process for this tutorial will be the determination of fuel requirements and setting the fuel level in x-plane as well as going through the cockpit checklist and getting our navigation parameters set up. Normally, determining the fuel load is done during flight planning as opposed to pre-flight; however, since setting the fuel level in x-plane is a simple matter of adjusting some sliders in the aircraft

menu as opposed to submitting a request for fuel and waiting on a truck, it's just as easy to figure the required fuel here and set the fuel load before engines start. The Pilot Operating Handbook contains all the necessary charts to calculate the fuel load during climbout, cruise and descent. We will not go over the fuel estimation process here as that does not relate to the nuances of operating the MU-2. Our calculations for fuel load, plus 45 minutes of reserve after reaching our destination yielded a required fuel load of 910 lbs (@ 140 gallons). These calculations assumed a takeoff weight of 10,350 lbs.

The MU-2 has an auto fuel transfer system that maintains the main tank at near-full level. When the simulation begins in XPlane, the fuel level is randomly set by xplane with the main tank partially full. When power is turned on, the system will begin transferring fuel to the main tank. You can confirm the transfer by observing the main fuel gauge.

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PRE.FLIGHT To set the fuel level, go to the Aircraft > Weight & Fuel menu option (Figure 1.). A window will appear and one of the panels in this window will be the fuel load (Figure 2). There are two sets of three sliders, the top or first three and the bottom or last three. The bottom three sliders are used to put fuel in the tanks. The topmost slider, "fuel TOTAL" is informational only and will change as you manipulate the bottom three sliders. The "fuel LEFT" and "fuel RIGHT" sliders are not used. The top slider of the bottom set will fill the tip tanks, the middle slider will fill the outer tanks, and the bottom most slider will fill the center (main) fuel tank. Currently, there is only one slider for the tip and outer tanks respectively and the fuel will always be the same level on both sides. You cannot move the slider more than the fuel tank can hold, so to fill a tank, simply move the slider as far to the right as it will go. Since our fuel calculations only call for 910 lbs for this trip, the main fuel tank's 1032 lb usable capacity is sufficient for our trip. The fueling procedure for an MU-2 requires that one side (tip and outer tank) not have more than 150lbs of fuel than the other side. More than one line personnel has learned this the hard way when they filled up one side of an MU-2 fully only to find one tip tank hanging precariously close to the ground. FIGURE 1 .

TIP TANKS OUTER TANKS MAIN TANK

Fuel is transferred to the main tank from the tip tanks by using air tapped from the engines to pressurize the tip tanks. A valve between the tips and main tank is opened to allow fuel to flow. This transfer is continuous to keep the center tank full. Rev-December 2008

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FIGURE 2.

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With fuel in the tanks, it's time to climb into the cockpit and get set up to go. You'll need to be familiar with the locations of the various controls as we go through our checklists. Figure 3 below shows the general regions of the cockpit we'll be using for this flight. Refer to the pilot operating handbook for the exact location of specific controls.

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1 7 FIGURE 3. PANEL AREAS

PANEL SECTIONS: 1.) Left Pilot Panel 2.) Left Switch Panel 3.) Pilot Main Panel 4.) Engine Instruments 5.) Radio Stack 6.) Test Switches / Fuel Gauges 7.) Center Pedastal 8.) Right Switch Panel

NOTE: THE CHECKLISTS AND PROCEDURES THAT FOLLOW ARE SPECIFIC TO THIS VIRTUAL MU-2, REFLECTING THE FEATURES AVAILABLE IN THE PRODUCT AND DO NOT ATTEMPT TO RECREATE EVERY STEP OF THE EXACT MU-2B-60 PROCEDURES.

We'll begin with the cockpit check. The cockpit check makes sure that all the various controls are where they need to be prior to engine start. Before we do engine start however, we'll depart from the operational checklists and set up our avionics & radios for the first waypoint in preparation for departure, which will minimize our workload after rotation since we'll be plenty busy keeping the aircraft within it's Astute obververs will note that the radio panel is NOT performance envelope. After setting up our the radio panel found in the MU-2 Marquise, but navigation info, we'll move on to engine start rather the radio panel from older MU-2 models. Xand get underway. All the checklists are found Plane's functionality works better with this in the Pilot Operating Handbook but are arrangement than that of the Marquise. X-Scenery repeated here for this tutorial. hopes to rectify in the future. Rev-December 2008

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PREFLIGHT

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NOTE: A WORD ABOUT MANIPULATING CONTROLS Though controls can be operated while in dynamic camera mode (CTRL-O), doing so is very difficult due to the simultaneous tracking of the view and the control itself. It is best to either use the 'q' and 'e' keys to look left and right respectively and use the 's' key to look down. Alternatively, you may use CTRL-O to move the view (like to the overhead) and then tap the 'q' or 'w' key to relinquish control from the mouse, and then manipulate the control. Think of it as "bracing" yourself to do something as opposed to trying to do delicate work while you're moving. Once you get it the habit, it becomes very natural.

We first complete the cockpit checklist shown below left. If you familiarize yourself with the location of the cockpit controls, then the list is very straightforward. After completing the cockpit check, we set up for our first waypoint. Imagine right after takeoff, we'll be focused on maintaing climb and proper heading. Recall that we'll be following an obstacle departure procedure that has us flying a heading of 273 during climbout. We'll be using the Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI) shown below as our primary COCKPIT CHECK instrument so we'll set the heading 1.) Static Source Select NORMAL STATIC SOURCE bug on the HSI to 273 degrees. To 2.) Left Switch Panel a.) Landing Gear Switch.................................DOWN set the heading bug, put the mouse b.) Master Switch...................... GUARD DOWN AND SAFETIED cursor over the heading bug adjustor c.) Trim Aileron Switch................. GUARD DOWN AND SAFETIED 3.) Center Pedastal a.) Condition Levers................................... TAXI b.) Power Levers.................................FLIGHT IDLE c.) Run/Crank/Stop Switches.............................CRANK d.) Start Selector Switch..................... AIR START & SAFE e.) SRL Switches........................................ ON 4.) Right Switch Panel a.) Cabin Air Selector Switch.............................OFF b.) Manual Pressure Control Valve................. FULL INCREASE c.) Cabin Altitue Select Knob........... 1000' ABOVE AIRPORT ELEV d.) Cabin Rate Control Knob........................... MINIMUM 5.) Overhead Switch Panel a.) Landing Light Switches............................RETRACT b.) Other Switches......................................OFF 6.) Instrument Panel a.) Altimeter..................................CHECK AND SET b.) Continuous Ignition Switches.......................... OFF

knob and click-drag horizontally to adjust. Next, set the Omni-Bearing-Selector (OBS) to course 096 per the flight plan using the same click-drag procedure. Note a digital readout of the course in the upper right hand corner of the OBS shown above. You'll notice there's only 3 degrees difference between our departure heading of 273 and the 096 radial from CONES VOR, which will have us tracking 276 towards the VOR. We intercept the radial rather quickly after takeoff and you'll have to pay attention as you tend to the airplane during climbout. Next, we'll need to tune the radios to the CONES VOR, we'll ignore any COM radio settings for this tutorial. Turn on the battery key switch on the pilot's switch panel to turn on the power, then flip the two radio switches on the pilot's left panel to the left in order to turn on the Rev-December 2008

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radios. Set the NAV 1 radio frequency to the CONES VOR, 110.20. Radio frequencies are NOT set by click-dragging as with the HSI, but by single clicking around the large knob to increment the mega-hertz frequency (left of decimal) and single clicking around the small knob to increment the kilohertz frequency (right of the decimal). See figure lower right for the location to click and the appearance of the cursors.

RADIO SWITCHES / ELECTRICAL PANEL

NAV 1 SET TO CONES VOR (11 0.20)

Next, adjust the altimeter by to the published field elevation of 9078 ft using the adjustment knob on the lower left of the altimeter. Use the click-drag procedure similar to setting up the HSI to adjust the barometric pressure. With these basic settings, we have what we need to navigate immediately after takeoff. Once we are established in our climb, we will make additional adjustments and preparations for the subsequent waypoints. I recommend printing out Plate 2 (Goodway Flight Plan Output) for use while you conduct the flight. Let's get the engines started! RADIO CURSORS

ALTIMETER SET TO FIELD ELEVATION Rev-December 2008

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ENGINE START

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tarting a Garrett TPE-331 on the MU-2 is uneventful and about as easy a turboprop start as you're going to find. The start process is computer controlled and after initiating the start, you'll just need to keep an eye on the engine gauges. Step through the 'BEFORE ENGINE START" checklist, then move onto the "ENGINE START" checklist on the following page. The x-scenery MU-2 has a unique propeller animation for starts, we recommend you try an external view of the engine start. Using the CTRL-1 (left) and CTRL-2 (right) key combination is the same as pushing the engine start buttons. BEFORE ENGINE START 1.) Master Radio Switches BOTH OFF 2.) Left Switch Panel a.) Generator Switches.............................. BOTH OFF b.) Inverter Switch......................................ON c.) Fuel Switches....................................... ON d.) Fuel Transfer Switches.............................. AUTO 3.) Center Pedastal a.) Condition Levers................................... TAXI b.) Power Levers.................................GROUND IDLE c.) Run/Crank/Stop Switches........................BOTH TO RUN d.) SRL Switches........................................ ON

WHAT IS SRL? The MU-2 Marquise uses a computerized engine control system called the "Single Redline System" or SRL. The SRL system provides a single reference value for gauging engine performance, in this case, the EGT. The value on the EGT gauge is not the actual EGT but rather is a "corrected" value using other inputs. The sytem is designed to run continuously and would only be disabled in abnormal situations. Simply put, keep the engine under the redline value of 650 degrees Celsius...the single redline value.

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ENGINE START ENGINE START 1.) Center Pedastal a.) Start Seletor Switch............................. LH GND START b.) LH Start Button............................PRESS AND HOLD 1.) Engine RPM Rise 2.) Indicated Fuel Flow 3.) Rising EGT 4.) Start Indicator Light................. ON ABOVE 10% RPM 5.) Start Indicator Light................... OFF @ 60% RPM 6.) Engine stabilize @ 72% RPM 7.) End of LH Engine start sequence c.) LH Generator Switch.................................. ON d.) Start Selector Switch........................ RH GND START e.) RH Start Button............................PRESS AND HOLD 1.) Engine RPM Rise 2.) Indicated Fuel Flow 3.) Rising EGT 4.) Start Indicator Light................. ON ABOVE 10% RPM 5.) Start Indicator Light................... OFF @ 60% RPM 6.) Engine stabilize @ 72% RPM 7.) End of RH Engine start sequence f.) RH Generator Switch.................................. ON g.) Start Selector Switch..................... AIR START & SAFE

TPE-331 Fixed shaft turboprops require propellers be at flat pitch for engine start. This minimizes wind resistance on the prop. The MU-2 has full-feathering, mechanical prop governors which cause the props to automatically feather when the engine shuts down. To prevent this during normal engine shut down, the MU-2 utilizes "start locks" to hold the props at flat pitch. A failure to follow proper shut down procedures would cause the props to feather and require the use of the "UNFEATHER" button on the center pedastal. Version 1.0 of x-scenery's MU-2 does not currently simulate the prop locks. Both engines should be stablized around 72% RPM with the power levers at "ground idle" and the condition levers at "TAXI". Ground idle represents zero torque in this simulation. This is not always accurate compared to the real MU-2 due to x-plane's engine model, but is certainly close enough for our purposes. Let's get ready for taxiing and takeoff!

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TAKEOFF

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o now we can begin to taxi out to RWY 27. Release the parking brake just left of the center pedastal by grabbing it and pushing it in all the way and advance the power levers as necessary to add power. Note that the engine RPMs will climb a bit as you add power. As we begin to taxi, we can quickly go through the pre-taxi checklist and set a few necessary items before we get in trouble. PRE-TAXI CHECKLIST 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.)

Master Radio Switches Beacon Nav Lights Strobe Lights Taxi Lights Landing Light

AS AS AS AS

The power levers can be operated in multiple ways. You may use the F1, F2 and "period" keys to manipulate the power just as x-plane has always done. The levers will respond to joystick input as normal. Additionally though, you may operate the levers using the mouse. You may grab either the right or left power lever independently or you may grab the space between the levers to operate both levers at the same time. In the event the levers become separated, then you can grab the space just to the right of the left power lever. Doing so will cause the right power lever to "snap" to the same position as the left lever and the levers will move together. Using this method is more realistic and allows you to pull the propellers into reverse simply by pulling back on the power levers just as on the real MU-2 as opposed to hitting the "period" key. If you're using a joystick however, this will cause your levers to be out of sync with your joystick throttles.

BOTH ON ON REQUIRED REQUIRED REQUIRED REQUIRED

BETA RANGE ANNUNCIATOR LIGHTS

WHAT IS BETA RANGE? In a real MU-2, the power lever region of the center pedestal is divided into two distinct sections. The lower range is highlighted with yellow and black lines and the higher range of lever travel is not. In the upper range, the power levers control fuel flow to the engine and the prop governor changes propeller pitch to maintain engine RPM. In the lower range, the power levers control the actual pitch of the propeller itself and the fuel controller changes the amount of fuel to the engine in order to maintain engine RPM. The term "BETA" refers to a Greek letter that is used in engineering parlance as a variable for the angle of propeller pitch. Therefore, in the "beta range" of operation, the pilot controls the pitch (or beta angle) of the propeller, not the prop governor.

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TAKEOFF Before takeoff we'll stop in the holding area, get mentally ready to depart and then go over the pretakeoff checklist. Here's a few things to be mentally prepared for. As described in the "ROLL TORQUE fact box, the plane will tend to roll clockwise after rotation. We counter this somewhat in the pretakeoff checklist by adding in "one left dot" of roll trim. One dot of left roll trim will keep the aircraft relatively level around our rotation speed of 105 KIAS. As the aircraft accelerates during climb, we'll need to decrease the roll trim as required. The MU-2 is a very trim intensive airplane and you can expect to constantly be adjusting trim with any change in power or speed. Stay on top of the trim situation until reaching cruise speed! It should be an extension of your normal control inputs in this aircraft. There has been much discussion during x-scenery's MU-2 development about the roll torque and whether a real MU-2 exhibits behavior to the same degree. I have piloted a real MU-2 on takeoff many times and the effect is not perceived to be as pronounced in reality but it is certainly there. If you release the yoke during climbout in a real MU-2 with neutral roll trim, it will most assuredly roll to the right. The most important things to focus on after rotation is the obstacle departure heading of 273, which happens to be the magnetic heading of RWY 27, in order to intercept R-096 and track to the VOR on CRS 276. Also, maintain a climb rate of 1400 feet of minute per the obstacle departure procedure, though we'll be getting airborne plenty early enough. After takeoff, we'll go through a climb checklist. Let's get airborne! Rev-December 2008

ROLL TORQUE Newton's 2nd law states that every action has an equal and reaction. In this case, the turning of both propellers in the same direction will cause the aircraft to roll in the opposite direction. Because power is imparted to the turbine shaft via gas expanding through the power turbine. The expanding gas pressure is uniform and pushes the power turbine blades in one direction and pushes the stationary blades in the other. The power turbine turns the propellers and the stationary blades tend to turn the aircraft body.

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TAKEOFF

PRE-TAKEOFF Checklist 1.) Flaps

2.) Condition Levers 3.) Pitch Trim 4.) Yaw Trim

5.) Roll Trim 6.) Bleed Air

7.) Cabin Air Selctor

20 DEGREES

TAKEOFF / LAND

5 DEGREES NOSE UP CENTERED

1 DOT LEFT OFF

RAM

Taxi onto the runway, get centered and advance the power levers smoothly until the EGT gauge reads 650. We do this because Telluride Regional (KTEX) is at 9078 MSL and engine power is diminished at higher altitudes. We cannot achieve 100% torque without exceeding EGT limits, therefore the EGT limit is our primary feedback for engine performance. Around 105 KIAS, begin LIMITS

rotation and immediately after takeoff, maintain a nose pitch of about 8-10 degrees on the attitude indicator, until positive climb is established. The plane may tend to roll to the right, counter with left yoke as necessary. Once positive climb is established, raise the landing gear. As you accelerate through 120 KIAS, raise the flaps from 20 to 5 degrees and maintain a climb rate between 1200 - 1500 fpm. Lift will be reduced as the flaps retract and you'll need to adjust with the yoke to maintain the climb rate. Reduce the roll trim as the airspeed increases and add pitch trim as necessary. When you accelerate through 150 KIAS, raise the flaps all the way up, again countering with back pressure and pitch trim as the flaps retract. Above 10,500 Rev-December 2008

There are three primary operating limits that govern the MU-2. Airspeed, Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) and Torque. Airspeed limits are imposed by the structural strength of the airframe, EGT limits are imposed by the metallurgical properties of the engine components and the Torque limits are imposed by the strength of the transmission gearbox. At low altitudes, airspeed will be the primary limit, at mid altitudes the torque will be the primary limit and at higher altitudes the EGT will be the primary limit. You must watch all indicators and not exceed these operating limits.

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TAKEOFF

ft. we'll maintain 155 KIAS for climb by adjusting pitch as necessary. 155 KIAS is a normal climb airspeed between 10,000 and 15,000 ft. You should be heading out on a magnetic heading of 273 with the CDI needle in the HSI almost centered as you quickly approach R-096. Fly the needle to the CONES VOR while climbing to 14,000 ft. Note the distance to the VOR station in the upper left hand corner of the HSI. Let's go over the climb checklist to see if we missed anything.

CLIMBING OUT FROM TELLURIDE REGIONAL CLIMB CHECKLIST 1.) Pitch Attitude 2.) Landing Gear 3.) Airspeed 4.) Flaps 5.) Airspeed 6.) Flaps 7.) Airspeed 8.) Landing Lights 9.) Cabin Air Selector Switch 10.) Wing Deice 11.) Continuous Ignition 12.) Cabin Pressurization 13.) Engine RPM 14.) EGT 14.) Torque

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13 DEGREES NOSE UP MAX UP 120 KIAS RETRACT to 5 DEGREES 140 KIAS MIN RETRACT FULLY 155 KIAS (NORMAL CLIMB) OFF BOTH AS REQUIRED AS REQUIRED MONITOR 96% - 98% (CRUISE CLIMB) 650 C MAXIMUM 100% MAXIMUM

From the checklist, we need to set the Cabin Air Selector Switch on the CoPilot switch panel to "BOTH". This will provide bleed air to pressurize the cabin as we climb. It is normally turned off during takeoff to ensure maximum power from the engines. Set the bleed air to "BOTH" by click dragging on the switch horizontally. The rest of the checklist is to be complied with depending on takeoff conditions. All anti-ice and lighting switches are on the overhead panel. Note that if you extended the landing

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TAKEOFF lights before takeoff, the maximum operating speed with these lights extended is 175 KIAS, so don't forget to retract them. If you're conducting this flight in moisture conditions, then be sure to turn on the continuous ignition switches before activating any anti-ice controls. Ice accumulating on the intake of the engine can be sucked into the engine and cause a flameout. With the climb checklist complete, most of the initial workload is done and we can focus on navigating our course. Continue climbing to 14,000 ft on course towards the CONES VOR.

PRESSURIZATION CONTROL PANELS

LEVEL AT 1 4,000 ft. 5 MILES FROM CONES VOR

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The pressurization control panel contains a little window at the bottom of the gauge face. As you select a cabin altitude, the altitude at which the cabin pressure will be maximum is shown in this window. When the cabin altitude is set to zero or sea level, then at 15,000 ft. the cabin pressure will be at a maximum value of 6.10 PSI. Because pressurization stresses the fuselage structure, it is desirable to NOT have the cabin pressure at a maximum. Increasing the cabin altitude can reduce the cabin pressure. By controlling the rate of change of the cabin pressure with the rate knob, you can control passenger comfort by gently changing the pressure thereby easing the stress on the fuselage without creating passenger discomfort.

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ENROUTE

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A

s you level off at 14,000 ft, you should be tracking 276 and be more than 6 miles from CONES VOR if you maintained your climb speed of 155 KIAS. As you accelerate, adjust your trim as necessary. You can expect cruise speeds between around 285-295 KIAS depending on winds and temperature. Our next waypoint after CONES will be Grand Junction VOR (JNC) which is bearing 326 degrees from ETL. Set your heading bug on the HSI to 326 in preparation for the turn and continue tracking towards CONES. When the HSI indicates that you are approximately 1.5 NM from CONES, start your right turn to 326 and at the same time, turn your OBS on the HSI to course 326 and then center and track the needle from CONES. The

BEGINNING TURN TOWARDS JNC R-1 46

GOODWAY FLIGHT PLANNER SCREENSHOT

TRACKING THE JNC R-1 46 RADIAL

TO/FROM indicator on the HSI will indicate that the station is behind you and you are flying "FROM" the CONES VOR. When you reach the midway point between ETL and JNC, the HSI DME will show 33 NM from ETL. Turn your NAV 1 receiver to 112.40 to tune in the JNC VOR. You're CDI needle on the HSI should stay centered and the TO/FROM flag will flip and point TO JNC. Continue to fly "the needle" and track toward JNC. Refer to Plate 2 for the next waypoint, Carbon VOR (PUC). Our bearing from JNC to PUC will be 275 degrees. As you approach JNC, again about 1.5 NM out, turn the heading

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ENROUTE

bug to 275 degrees in preparation for the turn. At 1.5 NM DME begin your turn towards 275, turn the OBS on the HSI to course 275, center and track the needle FROM JNC. Note in the chart below that the course along V134 between JNC and PUC indicates what is called a "change over point" or COP (circled in red). The reason for a change over point is to indicate a special point at which you change your NAV receiver frequency from the "FROM" station to the "TO" station. Normally this is done midway between stations, but when geographical or other obstacles would cause a signal to be unreliable, then a COP point is specified to indicate a location of reliable signal reception. The COP during this leg is 72 DME from JNC VOR. At this point, change the NAV 1 frequency to 115.50 and again, the CDI should remain centered while the TO/FROM flag flips and indicates "TO".

IMAGE FROM SKYVECTOR.COM

When approaching PUC, again 1-2NM out, turn your heading bug and OBS to 293 in the same manner as previous waypoints and track from PUC towards FAIRFIELD VOR (FFU). Change frequencies from PUC to FFU (116.60) midway between these waypoints (48NM DME) and track TO FFU. Now is a good time to pull out your charts and review for our descent and approach into Salt Lake City.

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DESCENT and APPROACH

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A review of our approach plates indicates that our approach will begin at the initial approach fix of the FAIRFIELD VOR (FFU). The approach calls for crossing the FFU VOR at 13,000 ft. or above. Being that we're at 14,000 ft, we have to drop 1000 ft. We'll plan on descending at 500 ft/min, which means a nominal 2 minute descent. At 240 KIAS, we're traveling about 4 NM a minute which is an easy number to calculate in our heads. A 2 minute descent at 4 NM/min yields an 8 NM ground distance to descend 2000 ft. Remember that the DME distance shown on the HSI is the straight line distance between the aircraft and the VOR station, not the distance along the ground. In our case, we'll want to begin our descent about 12 NM DME from FFU down to 13,000. Beginning a bit early will allow us to level off and bleed some speed before crossing FFU. The MU-2 can be a slippery plane and bleeding speed while descending is not always easy if you're high. Retard the power levers as necessary to slow to 200 KIAS. In anticipation of our turn at FFU VOR, turn the heading bug to 346 degrees and at about 1.5 NM DME from FFU VOR , make your turn to this heading. After getting established on the 346 heading, turn the IMAGE FROM SKYVECTOR.COM OBS needle to 346 and track R-346 from FFU. Retard the power levers as necessary to maintain 175 KIAS. The PLAGE intersection is the location where we'll intercept the localizer. It is 9.7 NM DME from FFU along R-346 so keep an eye on the DME and when you're about 7.7 NM DME from FFU, turn the OBS to the approach course of 341 and tune the NAV 1 to the localizer frequency of 109.50. Watch the CDI for localizer interception and turn to the approach THIS HANDBOOK IS FOR ENTERTAINMENT ONLY NOT TO BE USED FOR ACTUAL FLIGHT


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APPROACH course of 341 and begin a 1000 ft/ min descent as the needle centers, maintaining 175 KIAS along the way. At this point we should be about 20 NM from the end of the runway and we should go over our descent and approach checklists. DESCENT 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.)

Cabin Altitude Select Fuel Transfer Switches Pitot Heat Continuous Ignition Anti-Ice Systems

1000 FT ABOVE AIRPORT ELEVATION TIP MANUAL or OFF ON AS REQUIRED AS REQUIRED

APPROACH 1.) Cabin Altitude Differential Pressure CHECK FOR ZERO 2.) Condition Levers TAKEOFF / LAND 3.) Flaps 5 DEG (BELOW 175 KIAS) 4.) Landing Gear DOWN (BELOW 175 KIAS) 5.) Airspeed 140 KIAS MINIMUM 6.) Landing Lights AS REQUIRED 7.) Flaps 20 DEG (BELOW 155 KIAS) 8.) Flaps 40 DEG (BELOW 120 KIAS) IF NECESSARY 9.) Landing Gear CHECK DOWN AND LOCKED 10.) Condition Levers RECHECK TAKEOFF / LAND 11.) Power Lever RETARD AS NECESSARY

The MU-2s flaps can be extended to 40 degrees below 120 KIAS, but once the flaps are locked at 40 degrees, you can then increase speed up to 155 KIAS. In this configuration, the MU-2 can descend at almost 4000 feet to get you on the ground in a hurry. 5 or 20 degrees of flap extension is recommended for normal landings.

Things should be moving fairly quickly at this point. You'll be executing the descent and approach checklists along this leg while you maintain your descent. Our goal is to be about 10,000 ft at 17 DME. After 17 DME, continue descending down to 9500, slow to 170 KIAS and set the flaps to 5 degrees. Remember to adjust the roll trim as necessary with changes in airspeed, we don't want to be fighting it at this point. At 15.5 DME descend down to 7100 and watch for the glide slope needle. Lower the landing gear and slow to 150 KIAS. As you pass through 155 ON FINAL, A BIT HIGH FOR GOOD MEASURE Rev-December 2008

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LANDING KIAS, lower the flaps to 20 degrees. We're now in the landing configuration and should maintain a conservative 125-130 KIAS during the descent along the glide slope. As you cross the threshold, slowly retard the power and adjust pitch as necessary to land the plane. Some MU-2 pilots prefer to fly their approaches above the glide slope and with a little extra speed to give them a higher margin of safety in the event of an engine failure. In doing so, they descend with a nose-low attitude, relying on the flaps to slow the plane quickly when leveling off above the runway. A reliance that is well proven with the MU-2's large flaps.

ON APPROACH AT 1 25 KIAS

LEVELING OFF AT 1 05 KIAS Rev-December 2008

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LANDING AFTER TOUCHDOWN 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.)

Power Levers Beta Range Annunciators Power Levers Power Levers Condition Levers

GROUND IDLE BOTH ILLUMINATED REVERSE AS REQUIRED GOUND IDLE AFTER REVERSE TAXI

AFTER LANDING 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.)

Anti Ice Systems Flaps Landing/Taxi Lights Strobe Lights Continuous Ignition

OFF UP AS REQUIRED OFF OFF

SHUTDOWN 1.) 2.) 3.) 4.) 5.) 6.) 7.) 8.) 9.)

Parking Brake Cabin Air Selector Radio Master Switches Power Levers Run-Crank-Stop Switches Power Levers Generator Switches Inverter Switch Start Selector Switch

SET OFF OFF GROUND IDLE OFF MOVE TO REVERSE AT 50% RPM OFF OFF AIR START & SAFE

After touchdown, bring the power levers all the way back to flight idle. Watch for the beta range annunciators to light up. After both annunciators are lit, you can pull the power levers into reverse as necessary. Execute the "AFTER LANDING" checklist and taxi to the ramp. You can use reverse thrust as necessary if you had to park against the grass as we did! :-) Once you've parked, go through the SHUT DOWN checklist and stretch! We hope this tutorial has helped you get a feel for x-scenery's MU-2 and in time, you can expect handling it to become second nature. Happy Landings!

SAFE & SOUND at KSLC Rev-December 2008

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APPENDIX

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PLATE 1: GENERAL FLIGHT PLAN / NAV LOG

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PLATE 2: GOODWAY FLIGHT PLAN OUTPUT

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PLATE 3: KTEX OBSTACLE DEPARTURE

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PLATE 4: KSLC ILS 34R APPROACH

Rev-December 2008

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MU-2 for x-plane Tutorial  

A tutorial flight for the MU-2 for x-plane by x-scenery.com. Demonstrates basic operation of the MU2 in a short 1 hour flight.