Page 1

page 30

bull vs. bear

page 36

design matters

page 58

workplace health and wellness SPRING 2016

junior achievement

hall of fame the pitch

Young inventors & entrepreneurs

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

1


EX

E

HER

E

C O

T

Great care

has a new address.

Now Open Now you can find Cotton O’Neil Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Physical, Occupational & Speech Therapy and Stormont Vail Single Day Surgery at a brand-new, state-of-the-art location. The care you know and expect is now together in one beautiful new location, just north of 6th and MacVicar. Excellence is here.

2

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine 2660 S.W. Third St., Topeka, KS 66606 | 785.354.6000

E

CE

R HE

IS

N

IS

CELL

T

O

N

O’NEIL


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

3


spring 2016

CONTENTS

FEATURES ► PG 10

The Pitch

Young inventors and entrepreneurs won bragging rights and funds in the Washburn University Pitch Competition. ► PG 16

JA of Kansas Topeka Business Hall of Fame Laureates

The 2016 laureates exemplify leadership and play an instrumental role in shaping our community.

THE PITCH

10

► PG 30

Bull vs. Bear

Making sense of the economy and financial markets in the 21st century. ► PG 36

Design Matters

Topeka architects share their inspiration and the trends in workplace design. · Architect One · HTK Architects · Schwerdt Design Group · Tevis Architects · Treanor Architects ► PG 58

Health & Wellness in the Workplace

Two Topeka-based companies are getting creative as they promote health and wellness among employees.

COVER PHOTO JA of Kansas Topeka Hall of Fame Laureates:

page 30

bull vs. bear

page 36

design matters

page 58

workplace health and wellness SPRING 2016

junior achievement

hall of fame the pitch

Spring 2016

► PG 65

TK Business Experts

· Todd Averett · Joe Prokop · Scott Hughes · Phil Walton ► PG 74

TK talks with The Kansas Chamber's President and CEO, Mike O'Neal. ► PG 76

Scene About Town

Young inventors & entrepreneurs

4

IN EVERY ISSUE

Last Word

(LEFT TO RIGHT)

Andrew Corbin Neil Dobler Dick Pratt Eugene Williams

DESIGN MATTERS

TK Business Magazine

Who's who at local business events. · Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce Annual Meeting · 94.5 Country Bridal Fair

36


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

5


From the publisher Tara Dimick

Masks By Hope Dimick

It’s almost funny how easily you can deceive There is no challenge You say the words and they believe The hardest one to deceive is yourself You tell yourself you want something But really you don’t They say you need it to fit in But you want to stand out I try to deceive myself every day But I fail every time I question myself every day It is hard to confess how much I hide

6

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

I drown myself in thoughts as I go to sleep Not someone else's judgment, but my own I am not judged for who I am; I am not hated either But sometimes I hate myself For not being different For not making a difference I watch myself every day on replay And I want to scream at my mediocrity People only know one side of me They don’t know what I think I wish I could shake society up and make it different But the normal tells me NO You don’t want to be different, Do you? I want to wake people up from their coma of normalcy I want to see if people are actually thinking Or if they are machines, turned on and off with the flick of a switch Am I different? Do others have masks? If I were different, would you even glance at my thoughts? Or hear what I had to say? Am I alone with my many masks...

PHOTO BY LINDA HAMLIN

As a business coach and trainer, I work with individuals and groups on how to meet people where they are, how to eliminate distractions and objections to get to a yes, and how to dress the part. These are important tools to success; however, even when wearing those masks, we cannot lose our own identity. In today’s world, our uniqueness has power like never before. That uniqueness enables us to find others with similar beliefs and ideas and use business savvy to be successful within a niche. Recently my daughter wrote about the struggles of finding her own identity while wearing masks to conform to what society expects. Her young perspective is one that each of us faces every day—the fear of losing our identity as a result of always having to wear a mask, and thus falling into mediocrity. A mask is a powerful tool, but the mask must come off. Embrace not only your uniqueness, but the uniqueness of others, to create and live in greatness.


WE DO

COMMERCIAL

LENDING SBA LOANS

REAL ESTATE

WORKING CAPITAL

CHRIS URBAN

BILL TREGEMBA

JOE HOYTAL

BEN TENPENNY

Executive Vice President, Senior Commercial Lender

Senior Vice President, Commercial Lender

Executive Vice President, Commercial Lender

Vice President, Commercial Lender

EQUIPMENT

785-274-5600 CAPCITYBANK.COM

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

7


CHECK OUT WHAT'S ON

magazine.com Check out TKMagazine.com to keep up on business happenings in Topeka. Get expert business advice and up-to-date information on business in Topeka. Send your news releases to tara@tkmagazine.com. Trending now:

BUSINESS GROWTH

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Linda Hamlin Keith Horinek Shelley Jensen Rachel Lock David Vincent

DOUG STERBENZ PRESENT TO WIN PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT:

What's Your Financial Picture? 6 STEPS TO ACHIEVE YOUR DREAMS MARK REINERT, CFP ©

REINERT WEALTH MANAGEMENT

TARA DIMICK TK BUSINESS & FOCUS ENGINEERED

DAYS

WORKING CAPITAL, created by KTWU, is an on-going series about local and regional businesses within the KTWU viewing area. WORKING CAPITAL showcases entrepreneurship, shares business concepts and practical business experiences, and educates and inspires the up-andcoming entrepreneur and current business owners. Check it out on KTWU-HD, Digital Channel 11.1.

M - 12:00 PM

580 AM

SUNDAYS

Hosted by Tara Dimick, Owner & Publisher of TK Business Magazine 11:30 AM - 12:00 PM

WIBW 580 AM

Hosted by Tara Dimick,

UPCOMING GUESTS: Owner & Publisher of TK Business Magazine • Lynn Hulquist, Hulquist Landscapes • Jim Reardon and Nick Neukirch, Legacy Financial Strategies • Dr. Michael Schultz, Horizon Orthotic & Prosthetic Experience • Eugene Williams, KTWU

READ MORE AT TKMAGAZINE.COM Share your news on TKmagazine.com. Email your business news to tara@tkmagazine.com.

@TKBusinessMag

8

Spring 2016

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lisa Loewen

COVER PHOTOGRAPHER Rachel Lock

WORK OPPORTUNITY TAX CREDIT UNDER- LEADERSHIP: UTILIZED BY BUSINESSES HOW PROBLEMS KASSANDRA GRIFFIN, CESP SOLVE THEMSELVES FINANCIAL:

PUBLISHER Tara Dimick

CREATIVE DIRECTOR/DESIGNER Janet Faust

HUMAN RESOURCES:

VALEO BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE

Contributors

@TK...Topeka's Business Magazine

TK Business Magazine

@TK Business

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS & EXPERTS Todd Averett Scott Hughes Lisa Loewen Joe Prokop, CFP®, CRPC® Adam Vlach Phil Walton Robert Weigand, Ph.D. ADVERTISING SALES Tara Dimick 785.217.4836 tara@tkmagazine.com PUBLISHING COMPANY E2 Communications PO Box 67272 Topeka, KS 66667 785.217.4836 FOUNDER ǀ Kevin Doel tkmagazine.com 2016 TK Business Magazine is published by E2 Communications, Inc. Reproduction or use of this publication in any manner without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Every effort was made to ensure accuracy of the information in this publication as of press time. The publisher assumes no responsibility of any part for the content of any advertisement in this publication, including any errors and omissions therein. E2 Communications, Inc. makes no endorsement, representation or warranty regarding any goods or services advertised or listed in this publication. Listings and advertisements are provided by the subject company. E2 Communications, Inc. shall not be responsible or liable for any inaccuracy, omission or infringement of any third party's right therein, or for personal injury or any other damage or injury whatsoever. By placing an order for an advertisement, the advertiser agrees to indemnify the publisher against any claims relating to the advertisement.


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

9


the pitch On the surface, dental floss, ice cream cones and guitars may seem completely unrelated. However, they do have something in common. They all serve as inspiration for the winners of the Washburn University School of Business Pitch Competition. The Pitch Competition, developed by Washburn University School of Business, in partnership with GO Topeka, encourages entrepreneurship and innovation. Washburn University undergraduates, graduates and Washburn Tech students compete to win cash and prizes totaling $25,000 to help them launch their new venture. Contestants develop a “pitch” for their business idea—distilling months of work into seven minutes of clarity, professionalism, inspiration and value. TK will introduce you to this year’s winners, future inventors and entrepreneurs.

10

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


PHOTO BY DAVID VINCENT

YOUNG INVENTORS & ENTREPRENEURS

| the pitch

the product Durable and Environmentally Friendly Dental Floss Holder

the entrepreneur Kristen Kogl Senior, Washburn University

How did you come up with the idea? The idea came about while using a product that was already on the market for convenient flossing, but the idea of using a one-inch string for all your teeth on a floss pick seemed... well, unhygienic. I went from the suspicion of floss picks being unhygienic to finding out that they are, indeed, ineffective due to bacteria building up on the string and being pushed back up into the gums, which contributes to cavities and gum disease. From there, I knew there was a real need in this market.

Kristen Kogl

"It takes a large amount of will, time, flexibility, knowledge, and guts to think through a business idea and bring it from your imagination to reality."

What was the most difficult part of designing your product? Overall, I would say the prototyping process would be the most difficult part because it takes the most time, and it is easy to hit a road block, especially when the product is very complex or delicate.

Spring 2016

Do you plan to patent, produce and sell your product? I do plan to patent, produce, and sell this product. After finalizing the design and contacting a plastic manufacturing plant, I will reach consumers through a website to gain my first customers and feedback for the first two years. Depending on the growth of the company during that time, I will then consider taking my product to retail stores or going through other B2B distribution channels once I am established in the market. Do you see yourself as an inventor or an entrepreneur? Entrepreneur. I believe an inventor and an entrepreneur are similar in striving to create a solution to a problem; however entrepreneurs differ because of their specific skill set to commercialize their invention.

TK Business Magazine

11


YOUNG INVENTORS & ENTREPRENEURS

PHOTO BY DAVID VINCENT

the pitch |

the product Potato Chip Ice Cream Cone

the entrepreneur Brista Robinson Senior, Washburn University

the consultants Christina Forman LeighAnn Defendorf

Brista Robinson

What was the most difficult part of designing your product? The most difficult part was designing a mold that would bake the cones to the perfect crispness while not burning them. I

12

Spring 2016

had gone through several different designs before coming up with the perfect mold. Do you plan to patent, produce and sell your product? I do plan to get patents for the baking molds and eventually the baking process. The cone itself, I don’t believe, is patentable. I will be using the maker stations at 712 Innovation to produce a 3D model of the mold, which I will then print and cast in plaster. By using the maker stations, I can save hundreds of dollars

TK Business Magazine

by not having to go to a metal manufacturer. Since patents are expensive, I will be setting up GoFundMe and Kickstarter crowdfunding accounts in order to raise the rest of the money needed. Who inspires you? My late grandfather is my inspiration. He loved eating potato chips with everything. He would put them in his sandwich and surround his bowl of ice-cream with them while using them as a spoon. He is the reason I dipped my first French fry in my frosty.

PHOTO BY DAVID VINCENT

How did you come up with the idea? For as long as I can remember I have dipped my French fries in my frosties from Wendy’s. I don’t remember the exact moment it struck me, but I thought, ‘Why can’t I have sweet and salty with every bite?” And that’s when I decided to make my own.

"I thought, 'why can't I have sweet and salty with every bite?' And that's when I decided to make my own."


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

13


YOUNG INVENTORS & ENTREPRENEURS

PHOTO BY DAVID VINCENT

the pitch |

the product Personalized Cigar Box Guitars

the entrepreneurs Mark Feuerborn Sophomore, Washburn University Kaleb Marconette Senior, Washburn University

Kaleb Marconette and Mark Feuerborn

"I've used one of my cigar box guitars to record with my band, Buyer Beware, and the audio engineer was intrigued with the sound."

(Responses from Mark Feuerborn)

14

Spring 2016

I decided to try my hand at building one, and that’s where I got the idea to create custom made cigar box guitars for the public.

we were designing these guitars for the best possible sound while still allowing the customer to have input in the design.

What was the most difficult part of designing your product? The most difficult part of making cigar box guitars deals with acoustics. Most of our models are acousticelectric hybrids. They function both ways, so we need to make sure they have a good natural sound to them. Every little detail and part we assemble plays a factor in determining how the instrument will sound, so we wanted to make sure

Do you plan to patent, produce and sell your product? We are now accepting orders for custom cigar box guitars and have already made some sales.

TK Business Magazine

Who inspires you? Elon Musk. The man has developed a fantastic fully electric car, pioneered privatized space transportation, and cofounded PayPal! I have the upmost respect for him because he’s working hard and making strides in the best kind of business: the advancement of mankind. The

icing on the cake is his charity work, as his Musk Foundation donates solar power systems to areas affected by disasters such as hurricanes. He also serves as a trustee of the X-Prize Foundation, supporting competitions to promote advances in clean energy technology.

PHOTO BY DAVID VINCENT

How did you come up with the idea? Cigar box guitars have been around since the Civil War era, but have never really seen much recognition. It’s fairly strange, because artists like B.B. King grew up playing cigar box guitars before they moved on to regular guitars. I remember seeing cigar box guitars in the hands of Paul McCartney and Johnny Depp before, and I had absolutely no idea what instrument they were holding. I remember wondering if it was some kind of ukulele offshoot. I developed an interest in them, but it seemed somewhat difficult to find a music store that sold them.


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

15


topeka business HALL OF FAME JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT OF KANSAS

16

Spring 2016

Laureates inducted into the Junior Achievement of Kansas Topeka Business Hall of Fame exemplify leadership qualities that set them apart as successful business leaders in the community. These individuals have not only proven their success in business, but have also played an instrumental role in shaping Topeka’s vision for a stronger community. Not one of this year’s business hall of fame laureates was born in Topeka. Not one of them attended school in Topeka. In fact, not one of them ever planned to live in Topeka. But as fate would have it, Topeka chose them, and they embraced the opportunities they found here. Each laureate has a different reason for coming to Topeka, but they all have something in common—they fell in love with the people here. As a result, each one of these business professionals chose to devote time and resources to making Topeka a better place to live and work.

TK Business Magazine

PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

By Lisa Loewen Photos by Rachel Lock Photography


… for a harmonized insurance combo. We offer a full line of insurance for families and employees. And all of our policies work in harmony to give you freedom to enjoy every day. Think of us as your one-stop shop for insurance confidence!

FESTIVAL CITY Capital Events

Burlesque dancers. Tulip Time. Food Truck Festival. Exciting events are always popping up in Topeka!

Health – Affordable, trusted coverage that most Kansans choose. Dental – Extensive provider network, preventive services and more. Life – Life insurance and accidental death & dismemberment. Disability – Short-term and long-term disability coverage.

bcbsks.com/GoBlue

Discover Topeka’s favorite festivals at Topeka365.com. Sign up to get the best events sent to your email! VisitTopeka.com | 800-235-1030

space between edge of color and content N.1507 Independent licensees of the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Life and disability products are available from Advance Insurance Company of Kansas, a subsidiary of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

17


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Andrew CORBIN

“I am only as good as the people I surround myself with. I am lucky to work with talented, driven people who make this company a success. I am not better than anyone I work with. I just have a different job.” —Andrew Corbin

18

Spring 2016

When you picture the president and CEO of the largest health insurer in the state of Kansas, you probably think of a powerful man who drives an expensive car. It might surprise you to learn that Andy Corbin’s vehicle of choice is his 50/65 John Deere tractor. Even though he holds the top position at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas, Andy is more likely to be found hanging out at the local farm implement store.

TK Business Magazine

“I am a rancher at heart,” Andy said. “My wife is never surprised when I come home with another tractor. Andy admits he has his hands full, in addition to his responsibilities at BCBSKS, he also owns more than 1,100 acres across four counties in Kansas and 100 head of cattle. But he has his reasons. “It keeps me sane,” Andy said. Andy was born in Alva, Oklahoma, and raised in Liberal, Kansas, so he comes by his midwestern values naturally.


After graduating from Wichita State University with an education degree, his plan was to find a teaching position in Kansas City. Because he was slated for the draft at the time, no one would offer him a contract. He ended up accepting a position at a small high school for a whopping $6,200. Sure enough, he was drafted. When he went to the induction, everything went smoothly until the end of his physical. He was wearing contacts at the time— apparently that was not allowed. The sergeant screamed at him to come back in two weeks, without his contacts in, so he could take the physical again. Nixon stopped the draft on the Sunday before he was supposed to report. After teaching school for two years, Andy went to work for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City in sales, eventually working his way up to a management position. Looking to advance his career, he moved to another Blue plan in Texas and then took a marketing director position with Humana in San Antonio. He quickly learned that not all companies care about their customers the same way. So when the opportunity came to return to Blue Cross and Blue Shield, he jumped at it. “In a thousand years, when I was going to school, I never even once thought of coming to Topeka, Kansas,” Andy said. “But the Topeka community is welcoming and engaging. The people I live and work around are incredible. Why else do you think I have stayed for 29 years?” Andy navigated BCBSKS through some pretty stormy waters. His very first task in his new position in Topeka was to let 350 people go because the company had just lost key Medicare contracts. During that time, he had to not only figure out a way to help the company grow, but to also reassure his remaining employees that they would be taken care of. He rose through the ranks, becoming vice president of sales and provider of professional relations, president of BCBS’ subsidiary Advance Insurance Co. and president of Premier Health Inc., another BCBS subsidiary. He was named president and CEO in 2007. Under his guidance

and leadership, the company thrived and grew at a time when other insurers found themselves struggling. Throughout all of his success, he has remained true to his roots. “If you want to ground yourself, go hang out around the feed store, the implement store. There you will find the salt of the earth,” Andy said. “They don’t care about what you do or the position you hold. They care about the character of the man. They care if I do what I say I am going to do.” That is what Andy views as key to his success—doing what he says he is going to do. That philosophy still holds true today. “I could have retired a long time ago,” Andy said. “But I promised I would stay and help the company through health care reform. That has been going on since 2010, and I expect to be around a few more years to finish what I promised.” Working in the industry for 40 years and achieving innumerable success has Andy thinking about the legacy he will leave behind. “Yes, we have strong reserves and world-class customer service,” Andy said. “But I am the most proud of knowing that I will leave this company in good hands because of the valuable people we have in place who will run the company after I am gone. That is my true legacy.”

“Andy has an internal throttle permanently set on High Speed. He is a tireless worker, considers the needs of others and never loses sight of the goal.” —Harold Stones Sen. Pat Roberts’ Office “Andy has the incredible talent of coming across as tough as nails while having a heart as big as the outdoors. He truly cares about others— associates, employees, and the community. Plus he has a fabulous sense of humor. I think that is a quality that is essential for all leaders. The moment we forget to take time for humor, we lose the ability to be truly effective.” —Miriam Krehbiel United Way Topeka

BIRTHPLACE | Alva, Oklahoma Bachelor’s in Education, Wichita State University Sales Manager, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City Director of Marketing, Humana Insurance Co. President/CEO, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas

1972 1972 1974 1980 1985 1987 2007

High School Teacher and Coach District Sales Director, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Texas Director of Sales, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

19


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

N eil DOBLER

"During my career, hard working people around me have made me look good. Those people are the ones who truly deserve this honor. People at the City work without a lot of recognition. They could make more money elsewhere, but they choose to stay where they are because they want to make a difference in the community." —Neil Dobler

20

Spring 2016

Neil Dobler never planned on living in Topeka. He wanted to live in Kansas City. All he knew about Topeka was the view he caught from I-70 on his way through to somewhere else. When an unexpected change in plans landed him in a Topeka engineering office, he took it in stride. What did he have to lose? He would just move to Kansas City after he had couple of years experience under his belt. That was almost 30 years ago. Neil never moved out of Topeka because he fell in love with the community.

TK Business Magazine

His love affair with Topeka really began when a civil engineering position opened up at the City. He took the position, completely unaware at the time where that decision would eventually take him. Neil immediately became enamored with the projects he was involved with on a daily basis. “It was gratifying to know that I was responsible for things that touch people every day,” Neil said. “It’s the

continued on page 22


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

21


continued from page 20 water department, the street department, the fire department—the basic things a community needs to survive.” While Neil relished his position with the City, eventually even rising to deputy director of public works, he knew his potential for growth was limited at the time, so he made the difficult choice to move into the private sector. However, about five years after leaving the City, he once again found it calling his name. Butch Felker, who was mayor during Neil’s first stint working for the City, decided to run again. He called Neil and asked him to be public works director if Felker won the election. “I didn’t think he had a chance, frankly, so I said ‘sure, I’ll do that,”’ Neil laughed. Much to Neil’s surprise, Felker won, so Neil made good on his promise. A lot happened during the next five years. The focus shifted to infrastructure and economic development. Lack of funding prompted a discussion about potential revenue sources, and Neil played an instrumental role in gaining passage of the Joint Economic Development Organization’s half-cent sales tax in 2004. That tax changed what the City was able to accomplish, especially regarding large infrastructure projects including the Topeka Boulevard bridge and Wanamaker Road. “I really enjoyed that process because it felt like I was doing some vital things to make the community better,” Neil said. When Topekans voted to shift from a strong mayor to a city manager form of government in 2005, Neil agreed to take on the responsibility of acting city manager until a permanent replacement was found. While he found the bureaucratic side of government frustrating, Neil enjoyed the challenge of trying to figure out how to make things happen. “If you can’t figure out how to be creative inside the rules and regulations, then you can’t succeed,” Neil said. On the flip side, Neil found that at some point politics and regulations begin

22

Spring 2016

to drive so much of the decision-making process that you can’t continue to affect change. After four years as public works director and a year as city manager, Neil found himself a little burned out and in need of a change. “You just know going into a government position with a higher level of authority, that you can only stay in it five or six years before you will have to move—either to another community or to another career path,” Neil said. Because he was hopelessly in love with Topeka, moving to another community wasn’t an option for Neil. Instead, he chose another career path— with Bartlett & West. “Bartlett and West gave me the opportunity to stay oriented in the engineering business and still maintain my ability to affect change in the community,” Neil said. His 10 years at Bartlett & West have reinvigorated Neil and reinforced his love for Topeka. And the time away from the public sector has made him contemplate what the future might hold for him. While he doesn’t plan to retire any time soon, he does admit that 10 years from now he might run for local office.

TK Business Magazine

“Neil has a deep passion for the 'business of Topeka' and understands the need for both successful businesses and effective government. He’s been a leader in both." —Keith Warta Bartlett & West “Neil is committed to improving the city of Topeka and has worked to gain community support for projects moving Topeka forward.” —Larry Wolgast Mayor of Topeka

“I don’t want to just quit and go play golf—probably because I’m not a very good golfer,” Neil said. “I want to take the last part of my career and devote it to public service.”

BIRTHPLACE | Camp Verde, Arizona

Moved to Topeka Deputy Director of Public Works, City of Topeka Master’s in Public Administration, University of Kansas Acting City Manager, City of Topeka

1982 1988 1989 1995 1996 1998 2001 2005 2006

Civil Engineering Degree, Kansas State University Civil Engineer, City of Topeka

Consultant Director of Public Works, City of Topeka Vice President, Division Director, Bartlett & West


SPARKING the WORKFORCE • • • • • • •

30+ career programs 4 national training centers custom training for companies new simulation hospital training lab affiliation with Washburn University highest graduation rate in Kansas highest placement rate in Kansas

Washburn Tech . 5724 SW Huntoon . Topeka, Kan. 66604 www.washburntech.edu . 785.670.2200

Volunteer today to inspire tomorrow’s leaders. Visit www.kansasja.org , email donna@kansasja.org or call 785.235.3700. Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

23


Dick pratt

PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

“I am a positive person. If someone wants to start a business, go get it done. I see the world in positives—I just don’t hear too well!” —Dick Pratt

24

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

The next time you visit Allen Fieldhouse at the University of Kansas, look closely at the items on display in the Wilt Chamberlain exhibit and you will see a letter addressed to Dick Pratt with a handwritten note from Phog Allen at the bottom. While attending the University of Kansas, Dick would sit on a wooden stage in Hoch Auditorium and watch Phog Allen coach the basketball players. The sport was still in its infancy at the time, so the crowds were often small. When Phog Allen had the auditorium named after him, Dick sent him a note to congratulate him on the honor. In return, Phog Allen wanted to thank Dick for his kind words, so he wrote Dick a letter with a handwritten note at the bottom that read, “Come back and see Mrs. Allen and I.” Touched that the coach would take the time to write a simple student, Dick kept the letter. He rolled it up and placed it in the bottom of a cardboard box, where it sat for 65 years. His family discovered the letter while helping Dick move and contacted the KU history department to see if they were interested in displaying it.

continued on page 26


Be Your Best You... Beyond the Surface KMC Plastic Surgery offers a full line of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery services including: Breast Reconstruction and Augmentation: Post-Mastectomy Reconstruction Breast Reduction Breast Enhancement Facial Plastic Surgery: Eyelids Face Lift Rhinoplasty Chin Implant

Body Plastic Surgery: Liposuction Skin Tuck Thigh/Buttock Lift Tummy Tuck Cosmetics: Botox® Juvéderm®

Dr. Carla Skytta completed a three-year fellowship in plastic and reconstructive surgery at the Cleveland Clinic foundation, South Pointe Hospital. Additionally, she completed a fellowship in hand surgery at Grandview Hospital in Dayton.

16001 SW 6th Ave., Ste. 310, Topeka 785-271-2297| KMCPlasticSurgery.com

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

25


“On the way to KU, Dick had the letter rolled up in his hand and was swatting flies with it,” Dick’s daughterin-law, Jan Pratt recalled with a laugh. “Wouldn’t you know it, when we got to the auditorium, the lady who greeted us put on white gloves before handling the letter.” Born and raised in Colby, Kansas, Dick grew up working in his father’s hardware store and knew he wanted to be a businessman. When he arrived at the University of Kansas his freshman year, planning to work toward a business degree, he saw a recruitment poster from the Navy ROTC that read “Sign up. See the World. Get your Degree.” He did just that. As a member of the inaugural class of the Navy ROTC at the University of Kansas, Dick attended classes during the school term and spent his summers on the west coast working as a midshipman aboard a Navy ship. “I saw that sign and just went down there and signed up,” Dick said. “It was the smartest thing I ever did.” Not only was his tuition paid for, but he was also able to see more of the world than most Midwestern boys ever dream of. After graduation, he served as an officer of the Navy for three years, stationed out of Camp Pendleton, California. He ended up serving on a ship that traveled around North Korea during the Korean War. In 1952, after being discharged from the Navy, Dick married his longtime sweetheart, Nancy, and moved back to Kansas. His father had purchased a hardware store in Topeka and wanted Dick to run it for him. When they sold the hardware store in 1965, Dick pursued his entrepreneurial dream and purchased two Parkview drug stores—one located at 10th and Topeka Boulevard, and one at 835 Kansas—that he renamed Super D Drugs. He opened three more locations and operated the Super D Drug stores for the next 30 years. “We had a fountain in the drug store,” Dick said. “That was always fun. At that time, drug stores all had fountains. That Super D across from the State office

26

Spring 2016

building was the last store in town to still have a fountain.” No matter how busy he was running the daily operations of five sundry stores, Dick always felt compelled to serve his community. Over the years he was involved with numerous organizations including, the Capper Foundation, the Boy Scouts of America, the Lion’s Club, the YMCA and the State Civil Service Board. He served as Chairman of the State Chamber board, President of Downtown Topeka, and President of the Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce. His love for downtown Topeka was all encompassing. His involvement in the various organizations and associations affiliated with downtown was too numerous to count. “He loved it so much he joined every organization that helped the kids, the community and the businesses downtown,” Dick’s son, Gary Pratt, said. “Dad was involved in anything that would help Topeka grow.” Dick played his own role in helping downtown Topeka grow by renovating a building at 503 Kansas Avenue and leasing it to the state. “I really believe that downtown is the thing that keeps your community going,” Dick said. “We are pretty lucky here to have the Capitol and state offices here. We need to have our downtown looking good for those visitors that come.”

TK Business Magazine

“Dick’s unbridled enthusiasm and love for Topeka, coupled with his eternally upbeat and positive attitude, make him a true treasure for Topeka and a joy to know. He has touched the life of everyone around him." —Jack Brier US Alliance Life “Dick’s contribution to our community is invaluable. He brought a fantastic mix of business sense and creative energy to any discussion, project or event. Dick was a natural leader and was always willing to mentor. He had a tremendous desire to give back to the community and in my opinion was one of Topeka’s finest business and civic leaders." —Greg Schwerdt Schwerdt Design Group

BIRTHPLACE | Colby, Kansas Business Degree, University of Kansas

1948 [ 1949 1952 Returned to Colby, KS 1953 1962 Owner, 1966 Super D Drug Stores and Real Estate Entrepreneur 1993

Military Service, United States Navy

Moved to Topeka, KS

[

continued from page 24


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE IS JUST STEPS AWAY Are you in need of working capital for • • • •

TOPEKA TOWER, SUITE 1400 534 SOUTH KANSAS AVE | TOPEKA, KS 66603 785.233.3600

The Topeka Law Firm for Business TOPEKA ATTORNEYS

Building inventory? Purchasing fixed assets? Expansion of facilities? Capital improvement?

Apply for a Term Loan

JAMES P. RANKIN

CHARLES R. HAY

THOMAS L. THEIS

JEREMY L. GRABER

MARTA FISHER LINENBERGER

AMANDA M. WILWERT

(up to $50,000) through the

First Opportunity Fund Topeka Shawnee County The connection that counts

Call 785.231.6000 or visit www.gotopeka.com/FOF to find out how

Entrepreneurial & Minority Business Development A GO Topeka Program

A Tradition for Legal Excellence Since 1919 WWW.FOULSTON.COM

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

27


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Eugene Williams

“I haven’t had my greatest achievement yet. I can figure out a way to challenge myself to do better than I’ve done in the past.” —Eugene Williams New York. Los Angeles. Boston. Chicago. That sounds like the dream career for someone in broadcasting. So where does a person who has worked in all of those markets find his ideal job? Topeka, Kansas.

28

Spring 2016

Eugene Williams, KTWU CEO and general manager, has spent the past 18 years ensuring public television is alive and well in Topeka. Eugene’s “career” in broadcasting began in the 11th grade when he began announcing for his local high school. As a freshman in college, he walked into his very first television studio and has worked in the broadcasting industry ever since. Recognized early on as a talented, hard working student, one of the producers at the college television station at the University of Alabama asked Eugene to produce a five-minute segment

TK Business Magazine

inside of her show. Eager to get started, his enthusiasm dwindled when she told him that his first task was to do research. “That was my first lesson, not only in broadcasting, but in life,” Eugene said. “It still holds true today. Research is the foundation of everything.” His commitment to quality content landed him a position as host of his own television show the following year. Eugene would attend classes during the week and do the show on Fridays. By the time he graduated, he was hosting two additional shows—a childrens' show and a public affairs show.


“The studio whisked me away one Friday night to downtown Birmingham,” Eugene recalled. “I’m prepping for my interview for the show, like I always do. When they bring in the person I am supposed to interview, it is Ray Charles. He performed on the show and I was hooked on broadcasting.” Being in front of the camera wasn’t his first love, however. It was the engineering behind the scenes. Even though he had no experience with the engineering side of broadcasting, he applied for a job in the engineering department during the summer after his sophomore year to earn some extra money. That fascination with engineering continued after graduation. Thrust into management at an early age at a production company where he worked, Eugene hired a director of engineering who “let him play.” The two of them designed studios and put together remote trucks. Captivated by the engineering side of the business, Eugene went back to earn an associate’s degree in electronic technology and three certificates in electronics and engineering. From there he went on to earn his MBA from the University of Mobile. After working in the satellite industry in Illinois for several years, producing shows all over the country and even internationally, Eugene found his calling in public television. Having worked in major cities all over the U.S., friends asked him why he would leave Chicago for Topeka. “Every place is pretty much a suburb of Chicago,” Eugene laughed.

The north side of Chicago was a great place to live, but very difficult to get around in. Some days it would take him three hours to get home because of the traffic. “I can be in Chicago proper faster now from Topeka than I could be when I actually lived in Chicago,” Eugene said. But for Eugene, the real selling point Topeka had to offer wasn’t the traffic. “I saw one thing: parking.” When you live a city like Chicago, parking is a real issue. That was a huge perk for me.” During his time at KTWU, Eugene has made his mark on public television. He has won three EMMY awards and been nominated eight times. However, he doesn’t sing his own praises. “I am pretty quiet,” he said. “Most people don’t even know that I exist, and I prefer it that way.” Taking on leadership roles in industry-related organizations including the Kansas Association of Broadcasters and the Kansas Public Broadcasting Council, Eugene hopes to share his experience and knowledge to strengthen the industry. His never-ending pursuit of knowledge drives him both professionally and personally. “Knowledge is a major key to everything we do,” Eugene said. “I just want to know more about everything—so I study.” A voracious reader, Eugene says the knowledge he gains is his alone. He doesn’t need to prove anything to anyone else. He is, however, willing to share his knowledge with young people who

ask. He often teaches media classes at Washburn and offers some valuable life lessons. “You have to develop a passion for learning something about the world,” he advises them. “You have to have some critical thinking skills. The more life experience you can gain, the better those critical thinking skills become.” TK

BIRTHPLACE | Mobile, Alabama Broadcast and Film, University of Alabama Executive Producer, Satellite Services General Manager, KTWU

1981 1988 1990 1995 1998

MBA, University of Mobile Station Manager, WYCC

Spring 2016

“Eugene is an innovative thinker, a calculating intellectual, who is a risk taker that thinks outside of the preverbal conventional box and makes the theoretical real.” —Alonzo Harrison HDB Construction Inc. “He is a listener, and that is sometimes missing in leaders. Eugene is able to gather information, process it intelligently, and make the right decision that is best for the station, Washburn and the community.“ —Kent Cornish Kansas Association of Broadcasters "Non-profits need to seek out new entrepreneurial activities to keep themselves relevant and alive in this very competitive industry. Eugene’s success in this arena has maintained KTWU’s ability to remain at the forefront in content production, programming, technology, and revenue generation." —Valerie M.B. VanDerSluis KTWU

TK Business Magazine

29


BULL vs. BEAR Making Sense of the Economy and Financial Markets in the 21st Century

By Robert A. Weigand, Ph.D.

Professor of Finance and Brenneman Professor of Business Strategy Washburn University

Many have argued that we're in the leastrespected bull market in history, and discredited naysayers with nicknames like "permabear" and "Dr.Doom." In this article, I will take a long-term view of the pros and cons regarding the past and current state of the U.S. economy and financial markets, explain why such a wide range of opinions prevail among analysts, investors and the financial media, and identify the main force that propelled stock prices to record levels in 2015. We'll start by considering Figure 1, which shows the long-term growth rates of corporate profits, stock prices, gross Figure 1:

A considerable amount of time has passed since the financial crisis of 2008 and the "great recession" that followed. March 2016 marks the seventh year since the economy began its long, slow recovery and the current bull market in stocks began. The current economic recovery and stock price gains have been accompanied by a considerable degree of skepticism.

30

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

domestic product (GDP, the value of all goods and services produced in the U.S. over time), and new orders for capital and durable goods (spending on big-ticket items by businesses and consumers). Following the 1991 recession, orders for capital and durable goods grew rapidly, with profits and stock prices following along until the late 1990s. Although spending by consumers and business continued at a brisk pace until 2000, it is now widely-recognized that stock values had crossed over into "bubble" territory, which happens when stock prices rise without accompanying growth

continued on page 32


With You at Every Turn

© Copyright 2015. CBIZ, Inc. and Mayer Hoffman McCann P. C. All rights reserved.

Start Up, Emerging, Growth , Stabilization, Maturity, Exit /IP O Each stage of a business’ lifecycle presents a unique set of challenges and needs. CBIZ and Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C. can meet your business needs now and as the seasons change. We offer multiple services with a single focus: your success. ACCOUNTING, TAX & CONSULTING SERVICES provided by CBIZ AUDIT & ATTEST SERVICES provided by Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C. (MHM) Together, CBIZ and Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C. are one of the Top Ten accounting providers in the country.

785.272.3716

www.cbiz.com www.mhmcpa.com www.cbiz.com/cbizmhm-topeka www.mhmcpa.com

Mayer Hoffman McCann P.C. is an independent CPA firm providing audit, review and attest services, and works closely with CBIZ, a business consulting, tax and financial services provider.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

31


Figure 2:

continued from page 30 in fundamentals (such as corporate profits). Because the excess technology investments of the late 1990s did not lead to further increases in profits, stock prices retreated into bear market territory in 2000, with the events of 9/11 prolonging the decline all the way into early 2003. The bull market of the early 2000s seemed poised to right the wrongs of the previous bull, as this time capital and durable goods orders grew proportionately with stock prices, and corporate profits grew even faster— what could go wrong? It turned out that markets had yet another lesson to teach, because profits and stock prices had received significant tailwinds from dual bubbles in real estate and credit. In 2008 the bear caught up with markets again, and the carnage in both the economy and financial markets was more severe than anything seen in the 2000-2003 bear market. Free markets are resilient, however, and starting in 2009 profits and stock prices rebounded once again. This time prosperity seemed to be on more solid footing until late 2012, when signs of a cooling economy began to surface (note the slowdown in spending on capital and durable goods). Profits and stock values continued surging ahead for two more years, but in 2015 volatility began spilling over from global markets. Since then profits and stock prices have declined, capital goods orders have stagnated, and durable goods orders have fallen sharply. This leads to our first question: after all the lessons that were supposedly learned in the previous two market bubbles, how is it possible for profits and stock prices to surge ahead to new highs without support from basic economic fundamentals like spending by businesses and consumers? To answer this question, let's examine Figure 2, which takes a closer look at long-term growth in key fundamentals such as consumer spending, personal income, retail sales and wages and salaries. Even a casual glance at the graph makes one thing clear—during the bull markets of the 1990s and early 2000s,

32

Spring 2016

these economic fundamentals all grew at nearly identical rates, as expected. During the 2008-2009 recession, however, the relationship among these fundamentals suffered a key interruption that has yet to be corrected. Although personal income and consumer spending declined before resuming their upward trend, retail sales and wages and salaries fell by much more, and have continued growing on a slower trajectory throughout the current economic expansion. The fastest-growing component of personal income since 2009 has been—drumroll, please—transfer payment—essentially checks from the government, which is not consistent with expanding prosperity. It's clear that profits and stock prices are not getting any help from standard fundamentals. This leads to our second question: can we identify the factor that enabled profits and stock prices to achieve new highs when basic economic fundamentals were growing much more slowly? Figure 3:

TK Business Magazine

Figure 3 introduces the villain in our story: debt. Despite the poignant lessons of the 2000s credit bubble, and the apparent deleveraging in the Federal and corporate sectors from 2008-2010, debt levels remain excessive and have given corporate profits and stock prices a considerable boost in their march to new all-time highs. Figure 3 depicts the obscene explosion in student debt since 2009, which shows how free markets are always ready to invite new borrowers to the party when old borrowers are tapped out. We'll have more to say about the "apparent" deleveraging in a moment, but first let's pose our third question: how has it been possible for debt levels to remain so high since 2009—especially when we were supposed to be unwinding a credit bubble? Figure 4 provides a long-term view of interest rates, inflation and commodity prices. First, half the answer to our previous question can be found by tracing

continued on page 35


YOUR RESOURCE FOR LIFE INSURANCE & FINANCIAL INVESTMENT* NEEDS.

4DPUU)VOTJDLFS &SJD)VOTJDLFS 5PEE;JNMJDI

487BO#VSFO 5PQFLB ,BOTBT

4FDVSJUJFTPรฒFSFEUISPVHI4FDVSJUJFT"NFSJDB *OD NFNCFS'*/3"4*1$"EWJTPSZTFSWJDFTPรฒFSFEUISPVHI 4FDVSJUJFT"NFSJDB"EWJTPST *OD,BOTBT'JOBODJBM3FTPVSDFT *ODBOE4FDVSJUJFT"NFSJDBBSFTFQBSBUFDPNQBOJFTw

'SPNDPSQPSBUFQMBOOJOHUPQFSTPOBM รถOBODFT ,'3QSPWJEFTZPVXJUIUIF DVTUPNJ[FESFTPVSDFTTFMFDUFE TQFDJรถDBMMZGPSZPVSOFFETอƒ 8FQSPWJEFZPVXJUIBQSPBDUJWFQMBO UPFRVJQZPVGPSTVDDFTT

www.KansasFinancialResources.com

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

33


34

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


continued from page 32

the trajectory of interest rates. The U.S. Federal Reserve Bank, for reasons too obscure for the rest of us to understand, have persisted in their mistake of keeping interest rates too low for too long. The accompanying low cost of borrowing has led to yet another debt bubble—the U.S. and global economies have been drowning in excessive debt for years. Figure 4 also shows some of the unintended damage to another factor considered crucial for modern economies: inflation, or in this case, the lack of it. The global commodity index shown in the graph (based on everything from oil to aluminum to copper) has crashed and taken energydependent economies down with it. For now, bankruptcies have been manageable because, with interest rates still so low, it costs little to extend and restructure the terms of existing debt contracts. Figure 4 also shows the "spread" of interest rates that markets are requiring from low-quality debt (rated BBB) vs. higher-quality Treasuries. Notice how the spreads have widened to levels associated with previous recessions, although still not close to the crisis levels of 2008. Why does this matter? Because credit and stock market bubbles don't pop simply because asset prices are overvalued—they pop when investors suddenly become risk averse, sell out of risky assets and find safe havens in which to invest. The rise in credit spreads indicates that markets have been concerned with repricing risky debt since early 2015, and these concerns have spilled over into the prices of all risky assets, including stocks. Figure 5 introduces our last perspective. When describing trends in corporate and consumer debt in Figure 3, I had referred to the slight deleveraging by business as "apparent"—now I'll explain further. All of the debt in existence today doesn't show up on the chart because more than $4 trillion of public and private debt now resides on our own Federal Reserve Bank's balance sheet, conveniently out of sight—at least for awhile. Most readers have probably heard the term "QE," short for "quantitative easing," thrown around in the last few years. Figure 5 shows what QE means. In addition to its obsession with low interest rates, the Fed has used

Figure 4:

its powers to buy up a substantial amount of the excessive debt in financial markets. Notice how the Fed begins implementing this highly unconventional support for markets in late 2008, and how stock prices begin responding in March 2009. The rest of the story is told by the graph itself. When the Fed is buying debt and injecting more liquid assets back into the banking system, some of the excess liquidity may get loaned out, but most of it winds up chasing stocks and other risky assets. The size of the Fed's balance sheet and U.S. stock prices have been rising in lockstep since 2009. Stock prices haven't been rising because economic fundamentals are growing, they've been rising because global central banks have pumped more than $20 trillion of liquidity into financial markets, and they all plan to accelerate these programs in 2016. Only the U.S. Federal Reserve says it doesn't like this game anymore, and to prove it, they raised interest rates a paltry 0.25% in December. The market's Figure 5:

extended tantrum over this rate increase should tell you all you need to know about markets in 2016. If the Fed keeps raising rates, as they've promised, expect the tantrums to continue all year. If, on the other hand, economic and financial conditions weaken precipitously, the Fed may very well find itself rejoining forces with all the other major central banks around the world, which continue depressing interest rates. In case you haven't heard, Japan, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland are all quite proud of their negative interest rate policies, yes, you read that right, and some are already forecasting that the U.S. Fed will be forced to follow along within another year or two. So, if you've found the recent volatility in markets entertaining . . . you're in luck. My prediction is that stock, bond and commodity prices, not to mention the grand wizards at the Federal Reserve Bank, have more surprises in store for us in 2016 and beyond. Buckle up. TK

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

35


DESIGN MATTERS Topeka architects share their inspiration and the trends of workplace design. “Design matters. Good architectural design lifts people’s spirits. Whether it is a place of business, worship, learning, leisure, public service, or home life, buildings affect each one of us in many subconscious and emotional ways. Just like a great piece of music, good architectural design changes us when we enter, involves us when we are within it, and remains within our memories when we leave. Mankind has understood this since the dawn of time, and it is no different today.” —Greg Schwerdt President Schwerdt Design Group

36

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


Landscape Design and Installation | Lawn Care and Maintenance | Irrigation

Outdoor imagination for projects big and small. If you can imagine it, we can create it. Topeka Landscape specializes in custom landscape designs that conform beautifully to your style as well as your budget. This year, let Topeka Landscape break down the barriers between inside and out, making your yard a natural extension of your home. Visit our website today to learn more!

topekalandscape.com

3220 SW Auburn Rd | Topeka, KS 66614 | 785.232.8873

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

37


38

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


ARCHITECT ONE

project | Cyrus Hotel location | Topeka, KS completion date | Late 2017 concept image credit | Lake Flato

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

39


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

ARCHITECT ONE Scott Gales, AIA, LEED AP President Architect One

TK: How did you discover your passion for architecture? GALES: I found and developed my passion for architecture in the era before the Internet. To keep me busy when we would go places, my Mom would give me a pencil and a note pad and have me draw. I especially liked to draw the rooms or buildings we were in or nearby. Since I grew up in smaller communities in Kansas, I didn’t have the influences of living near architecture of the big cities. My influence was the 1968 version of the Encyclopedia Britannica we had at home. That set of encyclopedias, was the door to learning about architecture, history, art, and the world beyond my horizon. TK: What is your definition of good architectural design? GALES: Good architecture is a combination of many things. Most prominently among them is good technical design, a sense of poetry about the form, and

a resulting sensory response from the act of engaging the built environment. When architecture embodies these ideas, it is more than just a place or a building; it begins to become unique and makes a positive impact on our everyday lives. TK: How can good design and architecture help a business stand out? GALES: Good architectural design helps develop a brand. Businesses hang their signage on the façade to promote the company, the building should do the same. It can be as effective for brand recognition as a logo, when well designed. When you are recruiting new employees, nothing can be a better recruiting tool than a well-designed building that gives employees a sense of pride. The same is true for keeping your best employees. Study after study confirms that money isn’t everything when employees are asked why they stay or leave a place of work. Employees want to feel like their effort matters, has purpose, and contributes to the company’s success. A well-designed building and work environment can be Topeka Center very influential in for Advanced Learning USD 501 achieving that result. Estimated Completion: August 2017

40

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

Architect One, Inc. & HHB BBQ BEFORE

TK: What trends are you seeing in workplace design? GALES: Flexibility. The current school of thought is that Architect One, Inc. & HHB BBQ the open office AFTER environment is the way of future design environments. Millennials are used to existing in a more “social” culture, we are seeing a trend of low-wall work environments TK: What mistakes do owners where everyone is able to make when it comes to the have eye-contact. This is architectural design of their done with the expectation business? that it promotes interaction, GALES: Businesses owners communication, and make a costly mistake when collaboration. My experience they only design for what they is that not everyone works the think are today’s problems same, and not all work tasks or needs without looking are conducive to the same beyond tomorrow. Allowing work environment. While for expansion and flexibility open office environments can in the design process can be improve collaboration, they instrumental in the long term may also increase distractions success of a business that that might ultimately reduce needs to build or remodel productivity and efficiency. today. When an open office area is required, we encourage several Full interview available online. options to accommodate different work styles.


Trust Schendel for ALL your lawn and landscape needs. The local experts at Schendel Lawn and Landscape have one goal: to make your life easier and your property more valuable. Whether it is your home or your business, we will keep your property looking its best.

WeedZero Lawn Fertilization Irrigation Installation and Service Mowing and Snow Removal

Hardscape Design and Installation Landscape Design, Installation, and Maintenance

785.286.0015

mycreativelawn.com

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

41


HTK ARCHITECTS

project | Laird Noller Ford Renovation location | Topeka, KS completion date | 2015 photo credit | Colin MacMillan

42

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

43


PHOTO SUBMITTED

HTK ARCHITECTS Charles Smith, AIA Vice President HTK Architects

Washburn Rural Addition and Renovation Completion: 2012 Photo Credit: Colin MacMillan

TK: What architecture and architects have inspired you? SMITH: I consider myself an eclectic and am inspired by a very broad range of architectural styles and buildings. From the very technical and artistic, such as the Milwaukee Museum of Art Quadracci Pavilion, by Santiago Calatrava, to the very strictly ordered and formal of ancient Greek and Early Christian buildings and their influence on many historic and civic buildings and architecture in general. I also appreciate great examples of modern and post-modern architecture. In the end, each and every building or place one experiences, shapes and influences ones subconscious understanding of sense of place and inspires, whether consciously or subconsciously. TK: What are the biggest mistakes business owners make when it comes to architectural design of their business? SMITH: Thinking they can design (and/or build) it

44

Spring 2016

themselves for less. This goes hand in hand with the idea of over pinching the penny. In the end, they may have saved a few dollars, but fractional in grand costs and in doing so gave up so much. Think of it like a car, many of us can maintain a car and complete small repairs, but very few can completely renovate and customize a car, nor design a new car. We simply don’t have the time to devote to it, a deep understanding of process, technical expertise, and simply the years of experience and lessons learned. TK: Are projects incorporating “green” design? SMITH: The default answer is yes. That is because many products and systems are simply only manufactured “green”. So at a baseline, all projects are green whether conscious or not. Going green considers the impact on the natural environment and the impact on human interaction with the building environment. It can get pretty

TK Business Magazine

philosophical quickly. A few easy considerations to begin your “green” project: • REUSE existing building stock. Can you renovate and existing building vs. building new? • REUSE existing building sites. Can you reuse an abandoned old building or developed site? • REUSE materials. Can you reuse and recycle materials in your existing building or from salvaged materials? • Conserve vs. making energy. You can conserve more energy, more cost effectively than you can micro-site generate energy. With that said, if you are in a business where recapturing spent energy is easily achieved, do it. • Daylight vs. artificial light when possible. • Be careful of “TRENDS”. We benefit from a lesser impact on the environment

HTK Architects Completion: 2013 Photo Credit: Gary Jones

and possibly reduced operational costs. TK: What project really has your creative juices flowing? SMITH: WOW…there are so many very satisfying projects it is hard to name just “a” project. However, I would be remise if I didn’t name our office, HTK Architects, at 900 S. Kansas Ave, Ste 200, and invite everyone to come check it out. It embodies the eclectic attitude I spoke of and a strong understanding of truly sustainable design. Imagine designing your own space with 18 other architects and interior designers weighing in, it was challenging at times, but also a learning experience. At the end of the day, the collaborative input that is so important from the client/ user impacted the design in a very positive way. Full interview available online.


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

45


46

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


SCHWERDT DESIGN GROUP project | KaMMCO/Kansas Medical Society Corporate Office Building Addition/Renovation location | Topeka, KS completion date | 2009 photo credit | Gayle Babcock, Architectural Imageworks, LLC

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

47


PHOTO BY SHELLEY JENSEN

SCHWERDT DESIGN GROUP Greg Schwerdt, AIA, LEED AP Principal-in-Charge Schwerdt Design Group

TK: What has your creative juices flowing? SCHWERDT: Currently at SDG, we have a really fantastic Team and are having a lot of fun. The design of the new Federal Home Loan Bank of Topeka certainly has gotten our entire Team’s creative juices flowing. We are also thrilled to be designing a new Art Gallery and Recital Hall for Washburn University, as well as the renovation of the historic Boam and Powerhouse Buildings on the Menninger Hill Campus as the new home for the Sunflower Foundation. Wheatfield Village, a dramatic new mixed-use development at 29th & Fairlawn, as well as a new downtown Public Market are also on the drawing boards. Stay tuned!

TK: What architectural building has inspired you the most? SCHWERDT: Allen Fieldhouse stands out. Rock Chalk Jayhawks! TK: What trends are you seeing in architectural design? SCHWERDT: We are seeing trends arising from generational shifts. Almost every client that commissions us to design their project requests that we design environments that appeal to young people, attract talent, retain that investment, and position their organization for the sustainable future. Similarly, most clients ask us to explore and incorporate renewable energy and sustainability technologies into their designs.

Canyon Farms Clubhouse, Lenexa, KS Estimated Completion: Summer 2017

48

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

TK: How does a business owner know it’s time for a renovation or redesign? SCHWERDT: Indicators that it is time for a business owner to start a renovation include low employee morale, high turnover, spiking Advisors Excel Office Renovation energy costs, Completion: July 2013 drop in customer Photo Credit: Grant Fitch Photography counts, increasing staff illnesses, and/or TK: How can good design and difficulties providing access architecture help a business to our aging population. stand out? TK: Are new construction/ SCHWERDT: Good design major renovation projects and architecture can help incorporating “green” in the a business stand out by materials and products that conveying distinction, are being chosen? Benefits? and this usually requires SCHWERDT: “Green” courage. Great architecture products are being using is not possible without great in every project in our clients, and great clients are office. Whether it is a courageous businesspeople. large corporate client or a Playing it safe, blending in, single family home-owner, choosing well-worn materials sustainability and efficiency and forms assures failure in are hallmarks of our client many cases. Pressing your base. Native grasses, architect to create great rapidly renewable lumber design does not require that flooring, recycled steel, you increase your budget. It variable refrigerant flow, simply requires that you ask ground source heat pumps, more of your team. The best photovoltaic, CO2 room designs have nothing to do sensors, LED lighting…it all with the size of the budget. is on the table for our clients. Full interview available online.


Roofing excellence since 1979.

Do the right thing. “When a customer needs help, we always do the right thing.” For 35 years and three generations our family has kept that promise. Our proven approach saves money and prolongs the value of your investment.

(785) 232-4276 www.MidwestCoating.us

Don’t risk your roof on an unproven contractor. Call the pros at Midwest Coating.

Randy Morris

President

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

49


50

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


TEVIS ARCHITECTS

project | Security Benefit Place location | Topeka, KS completion date | 2005 photo credit | Tevis Architects Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

51


PHOTO SUBMITTED

TEVIS ARCHITECTS David Heit, AIA, NCARB Associate Principal Tevis Architects

TK: What is good architectural design? HEIT: A successful project must first fulfill the owner’s facility needs and advance their mission, all within their project budget and schedule. Good design goes beyond fulfilling needs and elevates the experience of people. It celebrates the purpose of the building and expresses the meaning of the activities taking place in it. TK: How can good design and architecture help a business stand out? HEIT: First impressions. We all know first impressions matter. Seeing the building, or walking into an office, is very often an individual’s first

Capitol Federal Home Office Completion: 2013 Photo Credit: Tevis Architects

interaction with a business, before they ever meet a person. A well-designed and attractive building or office space can set a positive tone for how your business

52

Spring 2016

is perceived by prospective clients, prospective employees, and the competition. Investing in an attractive, high quality environment sends a clear message that a business’s leaders value quality and have achieved success. The style, materials, and color palette of a workplace, chosen wisely, can also communicate and reinforce a business’s brand, purpose, and values. TK: What is topping the “must-have” list? HEIT: Flexibility is probably the single biggest “musthave.” We are finding that work spaces must be easily adaptable. Businesses are more frequently reorganizing employees in response to particular projects or new strategic initiatives. These moves must be able to be completed quickly with minimal effort and expense. Work spaces also have to be able to incorporate new and emerging technologies which continue to evolve at an ever-faster rate. And the contemporary workplace must support a workforce that is more diverse in age, gender,

TK Business Magazine

ethnicity, values, and expectations than ever before. TK: When is it time for a renovation or redesign? HEIT: When the Capitol Federal Home Office finishes and furniture Completion: 2013 in the office are Photo Credit: Tevis Architects older than the new employees, it’s probably bring value, but they are less time for a renovation. But concerned about certifications in all seriousness, when and labels. employees are “making-do” TK: What architecture and and improvising to overcome architects have inspired you obstacles and discomforts the most? created by the physical HEIT: I am one of a small workplace, it is time to minority of contemporary redesign. The physical space architects who has been should support and enhance educated in the classical the abilities of employees, tradition. I am most inspired enabling them to be as by architects of the first part effective as possible. of the twentieth century, who TK: Are projects spent their careers balancing incorporating “green”? history and modernity in HEIT: A few years ago, response to a society and when energy costs soared, a profession whose tastes “green” or sustainable design morphed dramatically as they grabbed a lot of attention embraced new technologies, and became a major topic materials, and construction in design. Building owners processes. I am particularly became caught up in creating inspired by Bernard Maybeck, a LEED-certified building. A Julia Morgan, and Bertrand “keeping up with the Joneses” Goodhue and I admire the mentality seemed to prevail. work of Robert AM Stern Today we are seeing building for embracing tradition in owners more interested in contemporary buildings incorporating those ideas that today. really reduce operating and maintenance costs, extend Full interview available online. the life of the building, and


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

53


TREANOR ARCHITECTS

project | Kansas Statehouse Preservation & Restoration location | Topeka, KS completion date | 2014 photo credit | Architectural Fotographics

54

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

55


Vance Kelley Principal Treanor Architects, P.A. Treanor Preservation preservation and restoration of the Kansas Statehouse. The Statehouse truly belongs to Learned Hall Engineering Expansion Phase 2, and represents University of Kansas School of Engineering Completion: 2015 all Kansas Photo Credit: Randy Braley Photography citizens. Because of that, it represented TK: Why did you choose to a challenge for us that we become an architect and described as a “once-in-awhat was your inspiration? lifetime opportunity.” The KELLEY: It was the older building had served the State and historic buildings, the of Kansas well for over a buildings that reflected 100 years. However, lack of high-quality design and maintenance and low-quality that incorporated quality remodeling projects through materials and high levels time had diminished the of craftsmanship. It was functionality and beauty of about the history of the the building. In addition people who felt compelled to this, the building had to make our cities and towns outdated utilities as well better. It was the buildings as limited life safety and in our community that had accessibility features. The a positive influence not only challenge was how best to on the physical environment, expand and modernize this but also contributed to the historic landmark while at positive attitude of Topeka. the same time preserving I’ve been fortunate to and restoring its original have worked on many iconic character-defining features. and historic buildings in We believe we successfully Topeka and around Kansas completed the challenge and such as the Great Overland hope Kansans are proud of Station, Dillon House, Chase their capitol. County Courthouse, Pittsburg TK: How can good design and Public Library, and of course architecture help a business the Kansas Statehouse. stand out? TK: What project really got KELLEY: A well-designed your creative juices flowing? building is the physical KELLEY: One of the projects manifestation of a business’ in Topeka that Treanor brand identity. It should is most proud of is the

56

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

reflect the personality of the business from the signage to workplace comfort. It is important for architects and interior designers to work together to ensure that all elements of a building demonstrates a business’ culture. TK: What trends are you seeing in workplace design? KELLEY: With offices in Kansas, Missouri, Colorado, Texas, and Georgia we’ve certainly noticed a trend in workplace design where clients are influenced by the desire to reduce real estate costs, increase the recruitment and retention of employees, improve workforce productivity, and increase creativity and innovation. Within our own firm and our clients’ firms, we have seen the implementation of flexible

PHOTO SUBMITTED

TREANOR ARCHITECTS workspace strategies as well as the adoption of “hoteling”— the use of unassigned desks, cubicles and offices reserved as needed instead of always having permanently-assigned seating. TK: How are projects incorporating “green”? KELLEY: We are now analyzing the energy and carbon foot print involved in building and maintaining where we live and work. This concept has not only improved the new buildings we design for our clients, it has also increased the desire for communities to preserve and revitalize existing and historic structures rather than demolishing them and sending large quantities of debris to our landfills. TK Full interview available online.

Al-Janoubi Village & Al-Shamali Village, Hamad bin Khalifa University, Doha, Qatar Completion: 2013 Photo Credit: Copyright Geary O'Leary


Entrepreneurial & Minority Business Development A GO Topeka Program

Small Business

Calendar of Events February - May 2016 FEB 16

Blue Ribbon Academy - Lunch & Learn, Find Your Marketing Plan & Knowing Your Brand Martha Bartlett Piland

MARCH 1

FastTrac NewVenture Entrepreneurial Education Course (9 Weeks)

MARCH 17

FastTrac GrowthVenture Entrepreneurial Education Course (8 Weeks)

MARCH 29

Blue Ribbon Academy - Lunch & Learn, Marketing with Social Media - Kerrice Mapes

APRIL 26

Blue Ribbon Academy - Lunch & Learn, Marketing to Millennial’s Alissa Menke

MAY 1-7

Small Business Week Celebration

MAY 10

Small Business Awards Luncheon Keynote: Juan Sepulveda, Senior VP, PBS

MAY 17

Blue Ribbon Academy - Lunch & HR Series - Kristina Dietrick

MAY 18

Breakfast Buzz

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: GO Topeka’s EMBD 785.231.6000 manderson@GoTopeka.com www.gotopeka.com/events

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

57


HEALTH &WELLNESS IN THE PHOTO Front row: Amber Moon, Molly Coplen, Anna Henderson Second Row: Cathy Riedy, Brice Smith, Bob Young, Michelle Shima,Sidney Noble Last row L-R: Mischa McHenry, Kristi Mitchell, Roxann Johnson, Lyle Thiessen, Robin Brower, Danielle Pettit, Ryan Hoskinson, Fai Ng, Jody Broughton

By Adam Vlach Photos by Rachel Lock

From simple cafeteria menu changes, to a codenamed workplace gym, to escaping zombies, two Topeka-based companies are getting creative as they promote health and wellness among employees.

BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD OF KANSAS

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas, the state’s largest health insurance provider, has an entire department

continued on page 60

58

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

IN THE WORKPLACE


Join Us for an Inspirational Leadership Event

Rock a Career in Real Estate!

Mark your calendar for the seventh annual Refresh Leadership Live Simulcast. This year’s speaker lineup features an outstanding trio of leadership and development experts ready to share their expertise on reaching the next level, inspiring your people, and becoming a more effective leader.

Call or visit us online for more info.

#HOMEROCKS For more info call:

(785) 267-2773 CBKansas.com GRIFFITH & BLAIR AMERICAN HOME

To Join our Team of

Award-Winning Agents, Contact Sara Fox today!

2222 SW 29th St., Topeka, Kansas 66611

785-267-8322 | Sara@CBKansas.com

WHAT GOT YOU HERE, WON’T GET YOU THERE

Q&A: LEADERSHIP LESSONS FROM INSIDE THE PAINT

THE 10 Ls OF LEADERSHIP

MARSHALL GOLDSMITH

SHAQUILLE “SHAQ” O’NEAL

KAPLAN MOBRAY

REGISTER TODAY AT © 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated Except Offices Owned And Operated By NRT Incorporated.

REFRESHLEADERSHIP.COM/LIVE

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

59


continued from page 58 dedicated to ensuring its employees stay healthy. Led by Michelle Shima, coordinator of corporate health services and chair of the company’s wellness committee for 2016, a team comprised of a registered nurse, gym instructors and an administrative assistant provide a multitude of opportunities for employees to maintain a healthy lifestyle. “We see employees for health questions, blood pressure checks and different things – just advice on should they go to their doctor, do they need to go to the emergency room,” Shima said. “We also do flu shots in our department.”

Healthy Environment The wellness team coordinates employee health, including programs to

"We wanted to walk the talk." —Mary Beth Chambers Corporate Communications Manager Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas

help employees be healthier both inside the office and in their everyday lives. Blue Cross and Blue Shield boasts an employee gym, located in the basement of the building, which is named “Club Blue” and was described as “state-of-theart” by Mary Beth Chambers, manager of corporate communications. “It’s very nice,” said Chambers. “Our employees do pay $15 [per month], but they can access the gym during weekends and whenever they want to. It’s a nominal fee, but we feel like if we do charge them, they are more likely to use it.”

60

Spring 2016

The $15 per month gym fee allows employees access not only to exercise equipment, but also to various classes taught by instructors as well. Fitness classes alternate every quarter and include cycling classes, a Zumba-type class, cardio and strength training classes, yoga, Pilates and relaxation classes. Classes are offered before and after work hours and during lunchtime, Shima said. But with the gym open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, employees can access the gym anytime they feel like burning off some energy or taking a break for a relaxation activity, as long as it’s not on company time. “It’s a big space, but it seems like it’s getting tighter and tighter,” Shima said. “It’s widely used. We also have shower facilities, so if people do work out during the lunch hour, they can take a quick shower.”

Healthy Food Options The push for employee wellness reaches beyond the gym at Blue Cross and Blue Shield and into the cafeteria. “We’ve done a lot of work with our cafeteria to help make items healthier, like now they offer an oatmeal bar in the morning,” Shima said. “They’ve also decreased portion sizes, so if people want a half portion, they’re allowed to purchase a half portion.” Employees may now also substitute fruit-infused water for tap water. A dietician has been working with Shima’s department to determine the nutritional content of foods. Brochures with the nutritional information of offered foods are available to the employees.

Healthy Challenges In addition, the wellness team offers different programs each year, such as a weight loss and weight maintenance challenge. “If you’re overweight and you lose a certain percentage, you’ll get rewarded,” Shima said. “Or, if you maintain your weight (if your BMI is under 25), you get rewarded because you’ve maintained that weight.”

TK Business Magazine

To help with these challenges, the wellness team offers employees devices that keep track of how much they exercise or the amount of fruits and vegetables they eat. These trackers, Shima said, encourage employees to exercise 30 minutes a day, five to six days a week, and to eat five to six pieces of fruit or vegetables a day. This year, a dietician will be visiting each department to promote healthier eating, whether that be finding alternatives to food as rewards or coming up with healthier food options to serve at group functions.

Healthy Focus Chambers said the reasons behind Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas’ dedication to its employees’ health are simple. “As a health insurance company, we’ve always known we can’t be out encouraging the customers who buy our products to live healthier, or the employer groups who buy our insurance to encourage their employers to be healthier, if we’re not willing to do it for our own employees,” Chamber said. “We wanted to walk the talk.” Chambers added, “There’s also the aspect of productivity. If we have a healthier workforce, then they’re going to be at work more. There’s going to be less absences from sickness, and the amount of work that we can do to serve our customers will be able to be increased. Obviously, we want to do the best job we can to serve our customers.”

TITLE MIDWEST

You don’t have to be a health insurance company to promote wellness though, and Topeka-based Title Midwest, a title and closing services company and parent company to eight title companies across the Midwest, proves that by doing what it takes to keep its employees healthy and happy, even if it means eluding the walking dead. As marketing and communications for Title Midwest, Kathy Smith works to facilitate the wellness program across all 60 offices throughout the Midwest.


Wellness—More than a Game Smith said the company is in the middle of a fun walking challenge developed by people who used to be involved in the video game industry. The goal of this challenge is for employees to walk enough steps each day to stay ahead of the “zombies” that are chasing them. “It’s more than just walking,” Smith said. “You’re being chased by zombies and trying to get away from them, and there’s all these little challenges that you can do all day that are quick and short that get you moving around instead of being stuck at your desk.” Employees take on the zombie challenge in teams comprised of employees from different offices across the region—something Smith said was

“It's more than just walking. You're being chased by zombies..." — Kathy Smith

Marketing and Communications Title Midwest great in helping people get to know each other. Team members track their steps each day with either a Fitbit or a pedometer provided by the company. Teams move forward to virtual destinations each day depending on the number of steps they walked in total. If a team doesn’t make enough progress, well…

“You can be caught by zombies,” Smith said. “Some people want to be caught because, if you’re caught, your steps actually make the zombies go faster, and you can catch your other employee friends. That’s a little bit evil, but it’s funny.”

Spring 2016

continued on page 62

TK Business Magazine

61


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Lora Carlson, Kathy Smith and Keith Love, Title Midwest continued from page 61 Title Midwest has hosted other walking challenges in the past as well as a “Biggest Loser” competition, which rewards employees who lose the most weight in a set amount of time. In addition, the company offers on-site biometrics screenings that created an opportunity for health coaching for employees.

Wellness—Body and Mind In addition to a strong emphasis on physical health, Title Midwest recognizes the importance of maintaining employees’ positive mental health. “There are several things for morale building,” Smith said. “This [zombie] competition has done a lot of that, because it’s just fun and silly, and people are having a good time with it. Something else that we offer every year,

62

Spring 2016

each employee is given two days paid to do community service. They can choose where they go and what they do.” Giving employees the option to give back to a cause that they choose and love is good for morale and spirit, Smith said. “Part of our company culture statement is to be healthy and have fun, and I think that if you are enjoying things as part of your workday, you tend to be a happier person and you tend be a happier employee, so we’re constantly looking for ways to bring about a pleasant work atmosphere and something people look forward to coming to work each day,” Smith said. Whether it’s through a gym, onsite dieticians, paid time off to volunteer or taking part in challenges involving invisible zombies, successful companies show that promoting employee health is TK imperative, and even fun.

TK Business Magazine

Looking for guidance on workplace health and wellness? WorkWell Shawnee County exemplifies dedication to health and worksite wellness. Formed in 2011, WorkWell Shawnee County is a volunteerled employer coalition under the umbrella of Heartland Healthy Neighborhoods that is comprised of about 30 members from organizations, including The American Heart Association, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas, the State of Kansas, the City of Topeka and departments within the Shawnee County government. Michelle Shima, coordinator of corporate health services for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas, is the chair of WorkWell Shawnee County. Shima works with Missty Lechner, the advocacy project director at The American Heart Association and co-chair of WorkWell Shawnee County, to share ideas and ensure the organization keeps producing innovative ways to promote health and wellness in the workplace. Lechner said the greatest resource the program offers is the ability for employees throughout different companies to learn from their peers regarding ways to stay healthy in the workplace and to talk with other worksite wellness professionals. WorkWell Shawnee County also provides updates on programs designed to help with worksite wellness.

For more information, visit workwellsc.org or heartlandhealthyneighborhoods.org


KMC Hair Center’s hair restoration specialist Meena Singh, MD is seeing patients in our Shawnee, Topeka and Leawood locations. The KMC Hair Center specializes in hair transplant surgery, as well Meena Singh, MD as non-surgical hair restoration options. To learn more about hair loss and if our treatment options are right for you, visit KMCHairCenter.com or call 785-272-6860.

We treat conditions of the hair, skin, and nails including: • Skin Cancer Screenings and Biopsies • Psoriasis • Atopic Dermatitis • Acne • Rosacea • Dermatologic Surgery • Eczema • Cosmetic Dermatology • MOHs Surgery ... and more

Call 785-272-6860 or visit KMCPA.com to make an appointment. KMC Dermatology

2921 SW Wanamaker Drive | 785-272-6860 with locations in Lawrence, Leawood, Shawnee and Manhattan

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

63


64

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


JOE PROKOP

TODD AVERETT

CFP速, CRPC速 Tucker Financial Services

President Leading People Partners, LLC TK BUSINESS

EXPERTS

SCOTT HUGHES

Vice President, Loan Officer Silver Lake Bank

PHIL WALTON

NMLS #790986

Leadership Expert & Professional Trainer Leadership Mpact

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

65


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Leading Change Are you doing business this year exactly the same way as you did business last year? Probably not. Most businesses and organizations are going through significant changes—changes to strategy, changes to products or services, changes to processes, changes to technology, changes in regulations or business climate, or changes in management. Many leaders have a great sense of urgency in getting through these changes quickly and moving on. But they are frustrated when their teams and organizations don’t move fast enough—or at all. Most people and organizations can work their way through small changes over time. But for big changes—well, let’s just say that is another matter entirely. Following the below key approaches does not guarantee an easy road through the change process, but it does make the chance of moving forward positively much greater.

TODD AVERETT

President Leading People Partners, LLC

4 Key Approaches for a Smooth Change Process

1 2 66

Deliberately plan for change.

Far too many changes are allowed to “just happen” with no planning. This step involves having an actual written plan to manage the change process. If the change you are making really matters to your organization, a written "change plan" can be every bit as important as a marketing plan or a financial plan.

3

Create a case for change.

As a leader, create a case for the change and communicate that case consistently. Why must the change be made? Why is it urgent for the change to be made now? Sometimes teams do not see the full picture of your business or organization. Provide them with more information—competitors, customers, sales results, cost trends—to help them see, feel and understand the case for change.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

4

Help people let go.

Many people tend to grow used to their current way of doing things. They may not even like how things are done, but they are used to them. They may have helped create the approaches that are being used and feel ownership for what’s done today. Or perhaps, they are uncertain what their roles will be after the change, if they have the skills needed to do what will be required of them in the future, or if they will even have a job at all! If leaders do a good job in creating a case for change, the next key step is helping team members feel like they can not only survive, but also thrive in the new situation. Being up-front with people about this need to let go and acknowledging the loss is what wise leaders do. Then, leaders can provide additional training, encouragement, and as much clarity as possible for the new approaches, tools, roles and responsibilities. They can also continue to share a picture of what the future can look like—a better future.

Celebrate wins.

Wise leaders look for opportunities to celebrate, not just for the final completion of a big change, but at small incremental points. They also recognize and celebrate with those individuals who have adopted changes especially well, creating positive models for the rest of the organization.


Julie C. Swift, DDS, MS www.topekaperio.com

Offering a full range of periodontal services, including maintenance, surgical, esthetic and implant procedures.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

67


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Financial Planning Do you have a true financial advisor? Fiduciary

A true financial advisor is a fiduciary for you. A fiduciary manages another party’s assets and has legal and ethical obligation to put the other party’s interest’s first. For a financial advisor, that means helping a client make decisions that are in his /her best interest, even if it means reduced compensation or no compensation for the advisor. Not all financial advisors are fiduciaries. The term financial advisor is used loosely in the financial and insurance industries. Just because people call themselves a financial advisor, it does not mean they are a fiduciary looking out for your best interests and legally for putting your interests first.

Certified Financial Planner™

A true financial advisor is a CFP® professional. The CFP® Board of Standards is similar to the Medical Boards in the regard they are overseeing the advisor and his practices to insure clients are receiving true un-biased advice. A CFP® professional knows and understands the importance of providing the best financial advice suited to your specific needs and not his/her financial pocket books. (Investment advisory services offered through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, a Registered Investment Advisor. Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Cambridge and Tucker Financial Services are not affiliated. 5835 SW 29th St, Ste 201, Topeka, KS 66614)

JOE PROKOP

CFP®, CRPC® Tucker Financial Services

CFP® STATISTICS • Approximately 20% of financial advisors in the U.S. are CFP® professionals. • 73,684 CFP® professionals nationwide. • 711 CFP® professionals in Kansas. Information provided by www.cfp.net as of 12/31/15

Helpful Hints for Selecting a True Financial Advisor Determine if your advisor has a CFP® designation or holds a Series 65 or 66 securities license by going to www.brokercheck.finra.org or look for the CFP® letters behind his/ her name. If you are not sure, ask.

68

Spring 2016

Does your advisor discuss multiple products and strategies with you and provide the pros and cons to each option? Certain commissionable products do not require the advisor to act as a fiduciary, but if your advisor is trying to make the case for them, be sure you understand why it is the best option.

TK Business Magazine

Does your advisor share how he/she is compensated and by how much for each product being recommended? A true, “fiduciary” will share with you how much he/ she will earn from you.


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

69


PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Commercial Real Estate What are the facts regarding owner-occupied commercial real estate? What is owner-occupied commercial real estate? To meet the requirements for owner-occupied commercial real estate, the property owner must occupy 51% or more of the property, and a minimum of 51% of rent paid must come from the owner and/or guarantor or affiliate of the owner.

Can the property be owned by a limited liability company that is a different entity than the business? Yes, as long as the operating business leases from the LLC and the operating entity and the LLC are owned by a majority of the same owners. There has to be a direct correlation between the two entities and ownership. The majority of business owners who own their real estate use an LLC to own the property.

Is owner-occupied commercial real estate the right choice for my business? Owning your own building gives you control over: 1. Increasing rents as lease rates typically only go up over time. 2. The condition of the property—you determine maintenance and improvements. 3. Who your neighbors are if there are additional tenants in the building. Another advantage is the ability to build equity in the tangible real estate asset. Tax and financial advantages exist as well and should be discussed with your accountant and financial advisor.

How much money do I need for a down payment and what are the terms? Typically, an owner-occupied commercial real estate loan will have the following terms; a 20% down payment, an interest rate that is fixed for 3-7 years with an amortization of up to 20 years.

70

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

SCOTT HUGHES

Vice President, Loan Officer Silver Lake Bank

NMLS #790986

Member FDIC | Equal Housing Lender

What financial requirements are needed to qualify for the loan? While each application and transaction is different, the bank will look at factors such as historical profitability of the operating business that will be paying the lease payment, financial strength of the individual owners and guarantors, current lease rates for similar types of properties in the area and credit history of the business and guarantors.

Are there Small Business Administration programs available for owner-occupied commercial real estate? Yes, the most common SBA program for owneroccupied commercial real estate is the SBA 504 Program. This program allows for a smaller down payment of 10%. The remaining 90% is split into two loans—50% of the loan will be funded with traditional bank financing and 40% funded by the SBA. The main advantages of using this program are the lower down payment and a 20-year fixed rate on the 40% SBA loan. To initiate a SBA loan request, contact your lender at Silver Lake Bank.


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

71


72

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


Leadership PHOTO BY RACHEL LOCK PHOTOGRAPHY

Leadership is not for the fainthearted. There are many people who are in recognized leadership positions, and many who are not. No matter the position or role, leaders need to understand what is required of them. There was a time when a group of men came together and "attached themselves" to a cause. They were both "brave and mighty, joined together in a noble task: to help their leader become king." I believe we can learn three characteristics from these men that are vital in 2016.

Commitment These men were determined to make their leader, David, king. They were single minded, wholehearted and committed to David and to the "Individual COMMITMENT to a cause. However, we group effort—that is what makes face two choices a team work, a company work, a regarding personal society work, a civilization work." commitment: the —Vince Lombardi pursuit of comfort or the pursuit of a cause. If you choose comfort, you eliminate yourself from effective leadership because your decisions will be selfserving. If you choose a cause, then be careful of the cause you choose.

Competence These men understood the times in which they lived in. They were ready for battle and they were the kind of people you would want to have when going against an enemy. They were proven, competent warriors who knew what to do and how to do it. We realize that today we are not talking about actual "battles." However, we need to ask ourselves: • Do I understand "COMPETENCE goes beyond the environment words. It’s the leader’s ability to in which I say it, plan it, and do it in such work? a way that others know that you • Am I a proven know how—and know that they leader who want to follow you." knows what to —John C. Maxwell do and how to do it? • What am I willing to do to become competent to lead others?

PHIL WALTON

Leadership Expert & Professional Trainer Leadership Mpact

Courage We need courageous leaders today; however many people are put off by leadership because it comes with costs and consequences. Don’t give in to fear. Courageous leaders make decisions based on what is best for the "COURAGE is doing what organization, or the people you’re afraid to do. There can they lead. It takes courage be no courage unless you’re to face your fears and find scared." ways to address them that will —Eddie Rickenbacker ultimately benefit the people who are looking to you for leadership.

Businesses, organizations, and churches, as well as our community and our world, seek ordinary individuals willing to become brave leaders who are committed, competent and courageous. Bill Hybels once wrote, "God didn't make you a leader to respond to stuff all day. He made you a leader to move things forward." It is time to move things forward in 2016. Be committed. Be competent. Be courageous.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

73


the last word under his own label. Dad had three employees: Mom, who did the orders and invoices; the delivery guy who drove Dad’s only business asset, a delivery van; and yours truly on some weekends and in the summer. My parents’ dream fueled Dad’s entrepreneurship, and, in turn, the fruits of their hard work resulted in home ownership and a college education for me. For my part, I helped Dad stock grocery store shelves with his bread and delivered his milk to church camp. I knew and respected what was making my employment and my educational opportunity possible. I’ve never forgotten that and I’ve had a profound respect for business, especially small business, since.

Lessons Learned from the Legislature

Mike O’Neal

President & CEO The Kansas Chamber

— Served 28 years in the Kansas House of Representatives — Served two terms as the Speaker of the House — Graduated from the University of Kansas and the University of Kansas School of Law

Passion for Business

My respect for business started when I was young. My dad was both an employee and a small business owner. He was a route salesman for a baking company. He worked hard six days a week to pay our bills. It was enough to keep our heads above water, but not enough to realize my parents’ dream of home ownership and college for their only son. My dad had an opportunity to buy a small commercial residential dairy route, utilizing a large commercial dairy production facility in a nearby town to package his product

74

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

I learned that democracy is messy, often dysfunctional, partisan, cumbersome, frustrating, yet indispensable to the wellbeing of the state. It beats, by a wide margin, whatever the second best form of government on the planet may be. It also provides, arguably, the best education outside the classroom. More importantly, a part-time, citizen legislature is the best form of state democracy, consisting of citizens from all walks of life, from all parts of the state, taking time away from their jobs and families to represent their neighbors in Topeka and address their needs, concerns, aspirations and provide the ways and means for government to function. I learned that politics is the art of compromise—that your opponent in the legislature today may be your ally tomorrow. So, act with integrity, and when you disagree, and disagree you must at times, then disagree without being disagreeable.

Vision for the Future of Kansas

Kansas, notwithstanding our lack of mountains and beaches, continues to be one of the very best places to live and raise a family. We have an abundance of educational opportunities, both public and private. Kansans have a work ethic second to none. My vision for Kansas is that we couple these attributes with a governmental and regulatory environment that is welcoming and helpful to entrepreneurial spirit and business enterprise and does not create or perpetuate barriers that drive business away and fail to attract new business and industry to the state. Kansas businesses are the economic backbone of the state. They make it possible for our children, our educational product, to have an opportunity to succeed with career and family. Kansas businesses and industries make it possible for us to have the educational institutions we have, the roads, public safety assets, health and welfare systems and all our leisure and entertainment opportunities. If they have the opportunity to be successful, the state and its citizens will be successful. It’s our state’s businesses and industries that make the economic pie bigger for all. Grow GDP and everyone, including state and local government, benefits.


Achieving Economic Growth through the Kansas Chamber Our Kansas Chamber Legislative Agenda is a product of member input, the work and recommendations of our various work groups, results from our annual Business Leaders’ Poll, state and national studies and our annual Competitiveness Index results. Our nearly 50 member Board of Directors approves the final product in December and we then take our agenda to the Kansas Legislature. Thanks to significant election wins over the past three election cycles in particular, we now have a pro-business, pro-jobs majority in both the Kansas House and Senate. Our Kansas Chamber Legislative Agenda has influenced, and does influence lawmakers, by reflecting the positions of the businesses and industries in their districts. The Kansas Chamber Legislative Agenda covers taxation, government

efficiency, legal reform, human resource issues, health care, regulatory affairs, energy and environment, and education. The successes of our Legislative Agenda, over the past decade in particular, have meant more tools in the economic development toolbox, less taxes and more capital, lower workers compensation and other business costs, a stable legal environment, fewer governmental barriers for our members, and a business-friendly environment for existing and prospective businesses. In addition, we have a strong proeducation agenda that supports giving classroom teachers the resources they need to address every student’s needs such that we can truly prepare students for college and careers that are aligned with the needs of Kansas businesses and industries.

Business Engagement to Strengthen the Economy

Higher Ed leadership has voiced a willingness and commitment to involve business and industry in the quest to align students and curriculum with the needs of our employers. Businesses need to accept the invitation and, where indicated, proactively seek public-private educational partnerships.

If a business is not already a member of the most effective business advocacy organization in the state, they should be! Many of our members depend on us to “be there so they don’t have to be.” Businesses, and employees of those businesses, need to be aware of the issues that affect business and the jobs those businesses produce. They need to become acquainted with those who have been elected to represent them in Topeka, along with their positions on issues important to the business community. Getting involved in our various member-driven work groups is a way of assisting us in keeping focused on the “real world” state, local and national challenges our businesses and industries deal with on a daily basis. Our students are tomorrow’s workforce, and Kansas businesses need to engage with our educational institutions to corroborate on the skills needed for our students to be successful in the marketplace. Our new K-12 and

Biggest Challenges for Kansas

Kansas, like most states, is still struggling with the hangover effect of the deep recession from 2008. As a cash basis state, we have fared better, since, by state constitution, we must balance the state’s books at the end of each fiscal year. Kansas has taken bold steps to improve its economic climate and attractiveness to those with capital to invest by reforming its tax policy to move away, over time, from taxing our productivity and move toward taxing consumption. Those steps, and others, have improved our national rankings and we currently outperform every state in our region except Colorado. The challenge is that the Legislature has not brought spending in line with the lower tax revenue resulting from

reductions in personal income taxes that benefitted all Kansas taxpayers. The 2012 tax reforms are working. We have seen promising growth in new business filings and job growth, after a decade prerecession where the only true job growth was in public sector jobs. We have a low unemployment rate. But, for tax reforms to truly reach their designed potential, there must be state budget discipline so this continues to be a challenge facing us. Tax policy reforms take time to produce their full stimulative effect. In the meantime, government needs to live within its means like Kansas businesses and families do. To stem the tide of students taking advantage of our abundance of educational opportunities in the state only to leave the state to pursue career opportunities, we need to expose our students to the abundance of opportunity that exists here long before they approach graduation. It’s worth repeating that we need to get K-12, Higher Ed and Kansas business and industry on the same page and work corroboratively, rather than in parallel universes.

What Do You Know For Sure?

I know that for all the issues that the media exploits to suggest how bad things are in Kansas and how Kansans are divided, the reality is that there are vastly more areas where Kansans are united. We live in the greatest country on earth thanks to the freedoms our Founding Fathers guaranteed and we live in a state with a proud heritage of human rights, individual freedoms, limited government, a system of free, competitive enterprise and a spirit of entrepreneurship and optimism. I know that faith, family and freedom are precious and should not be taken for granted. I know that we, as a state, continue to live up to our motto of reaching “to the stars through difficulty,” and that we succeed when we put our collective minds to it. I know that we are not only the “Heartland;” we are, as my friend Neeli Bendapudi, Dean of the KU School of Business says, “the intersection TK of smart and nice”.

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

75


76

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine


scene about town

1

Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce Annual Meeting Ramada Downtown January 21, 2016 PHOTO 1 Tomari Quinn and Zach Ahrens, Topeka Capital-Journal

PHOTO 2 Barry Feaker, Topeka Rescue Mission; Carl Ice, BNSF Railway; Duane and Beth Fager

PHOTO 3 Keith Drinkard, INTRUST Bank and Congresswoman Lynn Jenkins

PHOTO 4

2

Jim Parrish, Parrish Management Corp. and the Honorable Nancy Parrish, Third Judicial District

PHOTO 5 Jim Ramos, Jeremy Goodwin, Chris Fisher, Jon Janes, Roger Brokke, WIBW-TV

PHOTO 6 Scott Griffith, INTRUST Bank; Michel' Cole, Westar Energy; Matt Pivarnik, Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce; Commissioner Shelly Buhler, Shawnee County; and Brent Boles, Schendel Lawn & Landscape

3 5

4

6 Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

77


scene about town

94.5 Country Bridal Fair Ramada Downtown January 23-24, 2016

1

PHOTO 1

PHOTO 3

Ken and Maggie Doll, Ken Doll Photography

Jim Daniels and Rusty Walker, WIBW 94.5 Country

PHOTO 2

PHOTO 4

Mica de la Torre and Marlen Oliveros, Linens by Marlen

Angeline Spader and Jaya Challa, KMC

PHOTO 5 T.H. Peterson Photography Booth

PHOTO 6 Aunt Nancy's Face Art Booth

PHOTO 7 Dillon House Events Booth

2

3 78

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

4

5

6

7


Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

79


WE’RE HERE With What Matters Most In Your Time of Need.

FALLS

ON-SITE LAB & X-RAY

FEVERS

COLDS HOURS M-F 8am - 8pm SAT 8am - 4pm SUN 11am - 5:30pm

785-234-2400

LOCALLY OWNED

80

Spring 2016

TK Business Magazine

2 BLOCKS WEST OF 6TH & WANAMAKER 601 SW CORPORATE VIEW RD | SUITE 200 | TOPEKA

TK Business Magazine Spring 2016  

TK Business Magazine highlights the 2016 Junior Achievement of Kansas Topeka Hall of Fame laureates, showcases architects and local architec...

TK Business Magazine Spring 2016  

TK Business Magazine highlights the 2016 Junior Achievement of Kansas Topeka Hall of Fame laureates, showcases architects and local architec...