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Rider: Kinsley ThomasWong | Location: Central Coast, CA | Photo www.killedthewind.com

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Highlights this issue:

Fastrack: The Next One-Pump Innovation?............................................... Pg 12 Shades of Green: The Making of a Kitesurf Movie.................................... Pg 30 There’s Snowplace Like Home: Domestic Snowkiting Destinations in the US ............................................................................. Pg 40 The El Nino Phenomenon: Funky Weather This Year?............................... Pg 46

Go directly to the source for more product info and updates

PLUS:

Close Up profiles pro riders Josh Mulcoy from Liquid Force and Sandy Parker from RRD/Mystic. . .................................................................Pg 36 Designer’s Corner: Caution Mayhem 2010, Epic Renegade, F.One Acid, Genetrix Origin, Liquid Force Alliance Snowboard, Mystic 2010 Shadow Harness and Slingshot Arcane. . .........................................................................Pg 70 Instruction: How to help a kiter in need and score good karma points. ..........Pg 78 Workbench: When to DIY and when to leave it to the pros. .............................Pg 84

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Rider: Ian Aldredge | Location: Indonesia | Photo Jason Wolcott

Featured Video: The Dirty South

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The Dirty South: Get a taste of what’s to come in Ben Wilson’s newest dvd, The Dirty South, scheduled to release this spring! www.benwilsonsurf.com


Rider: Jan Schiegnitz | Location: Oahu | Photographer John Bilderback

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Thanks to our sponsors: Best Kiteboarding Kitaddict/Envy Kiteboarding F.One Live2Kite.com Pismo Beach CVB Vela/Dare2Fly Corpus Christi, CVB The Kitehouse Kite Naked Palapas Ventana EH Kiteboarding NPX Wetsuits See www.thekiteboarder.com/catalog for complete selection. Offers good in the US/Canada only. See International Subscriptions for offers outside North America or email marina@thekiteboarder.com

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THEKITEBOARDER.COM

Shades of Green

The Making of a

Kitesurf Movie

Snow Place Like Home

El Nino: Blessing or curse?

Off to the Rescue: Helping Kiters in Need

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Wood/PVC Blended Core Construction Medium Flex Profile for both more pop and shock absorption Liquid Rails™ Performance Sidewall Double to Subtle Quad Concave Bottom Shape

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Proving that powered-up unhooked riding isn’t just for the young guns, Australian ripper Richard Milne pushes himself harder than most – and is more than 40 years old. Photo Jennifer Milne

Features laun

Ben Wilson doesn’t usually ride with straps, but withthe thecrowd Fastrack he can good quickly install Zach Kleppe entertains withsystem, a particularly wipeout. straps to just the spot he wants in seconds. Photo Jason Wolcott

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With the Fastrack system, you can fine tune your strap positions to suit your style or the conditions. Photo Jason Wolcott

Densely populated areas seem to be experiencing the majority of multi-use challenges. Photo Katina Arnott

In the traditional system, a pack of threaded inserts set in foam or plastic are installed into the core of the board and then glassed over. This system has worked well over the years, but the big disadvantage is that you are at the mercy of the manufacturer for your choices of strap or binding placement. Slingshot Kiteboarding has recently come up with a new system of attaching straps to boards to solve this problem. Known as Fastrack, this new system looks similar to a mast track on a windsurf board, and allows the rider to dial in their stance to their exact preference. According to Tony Logosz at Slingshot, “Burton put a similar system in snowboards which was accepted and liked. When we started prototyping the idea, we didn’t come across any negatives, only positives, so we pursued further development. We’ve been testing the system for over a year now.” According to Slingshot, the new Fastrack system offers many benefits over the traditional system and is currently available on Slingshot’s line of Aviso surfboards. Slingshot will also integrate Fastrack into some 2010 boards including the new Darko twin tip, with both options available (Fastrack and non-Fastrack boards) on select 2011 models. According to Logosz, Fastrack allows riders to adjust their stance anywhere within a 20”-26” range, instead of in 1” increments like the current systems .He claims that boards utilizing Fastrack are lighter and stronger due to the lack of insert packs and an improved load distribution. Not only can your strap placement be much more adjustable with the Fastrack, but you can change your straps or remove them in less than five seconds. “Instead of industry set systems, especially on surfboards, now riders can set straps exactly to their sweet spot and personal preference and change quickly to adjust for different conditions or other riders,” said Logosz. “Now you can make your twin tip more directional-like by bringing your back foot back, allowing you to throw big spray like a directional.”

fastrack:

There was a day when we were all content to pump up each segment of our kite individually, and now virtually every kite sold has some form of another Slingshot innovation, the One-Pump system. There may be a day that we look back and can’t recall why we let ourselves be limited by the standard insert placements on our boards, but the Fastrack system has a long road ahead if it’s going to become the new industry standard. We always like to see new innovations, but most riders have never felt limited by traditional systems, so it may be awhile before the average rider demands a system like this. The most promising use for the Fastrack is going to be on surfboards, where you will be easily able to move the straps to suit the conditions. The Fastack system is an interesting concept, and whether or not it becomes widely used, it’s exciting to see development happening in area that has remain unchanged in the history of kiteboarding.

On the Darko, the first Slingshot twin-tip to be equipped with Fastrack, you will be able dial in the exact stance you want anywhere between 20-26”. Photo Courtesy Slingshot

By Marina Chang

12 Fastrack: The Next One Pump?

“ Slingshot’s the nextinnovative one pump? new footpad and strap system.

Shades of reen G

By Paul Lang

Over the past 10 years, most of the equipment we use as kiteboarders has gone through major design changes, each time becoming more refined and easier to use. I say almost all because some of our equipment is the same now as it was at the beginning of the sport. For instance, despite all of the technical gains that have been made in R&D, the system of attaching foot straps and bindings to boards with threaded inserts has remained completely the same.

12 thekiteboarder.com Skyline, Utah offers 100 miles of terrain for every level of rider. Photo Gustav Schmiege

SNoW PlaCe

Burton put a similar system in snowboards which was accepted and liked. When we started prototyping the idea, we didn’t come across any negatives, only positives, soa The Making of Kitesurffurther Movie we pursued development. We’ve been testing the system By Reo Stevens | Photos by Jason Wolcott for over a year now.

Slingshot will unveil the Darko twin tip with Fastrack at the 2010 La Ventana Classic and KiteXpo January 17-24. Check out the new clinics and day trips offered at this event along with the latest updates at www.palapasventana.com/lvclassic.aspx

It was hard to convince Ian Alldredge to come back to Indonesia after being skunked last year, but the incredible conditions on this trip made his return more than worthwhile.

thekiteboarder.com 13

Skyline, Utah, has become a world-renowned destination for snowkiting, hosting riders from across the country and the globe throughout the winter season. Skyline is home to the US Open Snowkite Masters, and attracts riders of all abilities to enjoy its varied terrain. The small-town atmosphere allows for a relaxing vacation while having fun on the mountain all day. Rated as “The New Snowkite Town” by National Geographic and as an ideal place to learn alpine kiting techniques by Men’s Journal, Skyline offers something for every winter kiter.

Skyline, Utah By Heather Schenk

lIke HoMe D o m e s t i c W i n t e r Tr a v e l

Best Time to Visit:

January- March for the deepest snow and powder conditions, with an extended season from December- April. Skyline is consistently windy November-April.

Every winter, the temperature goes down and most of us don’t spend enough time on the water to stay sane. To get our water fix, we spend lots of money traveling to exotic locations where winter doesn’t seem to exist. Doing that keeps us happy, but it also costs a lot of money. This year, why not do things a little differently? Here in the US, we have easy access to some of the best snowkiting available on the planet. Why head halfway across the globe, when we have such a great resource right in our own backyard? If you have never given snowkiting a try, make it a point to do it this year. You probably already own all the gear you need (your regular kite gear, plus a snowboard or pair of skis) and if you already know how to kite, then getting started on the snow will be easy.

Typical Winter Conditions:

Skyline’s playground is naturally set up to work with any wind direction, and with a few feet of snow, most of the mountain is open variables to ride by December. Wind rolls he different that need to come together in kitesurfing to produce over the ridge at memorable least five daysday a week, typically fromeven the the most consistently windy a truly of barrels make southwest. Stormsdifficult can bring windsare along waves to northerly score. There so with many combinations to get right: potential whiteouts. During high pressure, easterly winds swell size, direction, tide, wind strength, and wind direction. To create that provide light wind sessions the lee side of the hills. memorable situation is on nearly impossible; much like a painter mixing various Skyline is located at an elevation 10,000 feet on the that gives them just the hue portions of different colors toofform a combination exposed Wasatch which lines and shade theyplateau, were looking for. it up perfectly for catching valley thermals and upper-level winds almost daily. thekiteboarder.com While it offers consistent wind conditions, it is also set up to grab incoming storms, which can turn a beautiful day into a whiteout. Be prepared for backcountry mountain conditions and drink plenty of fluids to combat the high altitude. Skyline’s snowplow drivers are known as the best in the state, and they diligently work to keep the pass open, but it’s always a good idea to check the forecast and be prepared for the day.

30 Shade of Green.

The making of a kitesurfing movie. 30 thekiteboarder.com

Our suggestion to save a little money this winter is to keep things local and expand your horizons by taking a snowkiting vacation. After all, there’s snow place like home. For more information on the US Snowkite scene, check out www.driftsnowkitemag.com

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How to Get There:

Fly into Utah’s Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) and rent a car. Travel south to the outlying town of Fairview, a quiet outpost at the bottom of Highway 31. The riding area is 14 miles up the canyon and will be obvious as you crest the summit ridge of Skyline. The parking lot at Milepost 14 on Highway 31 is the spot to be.

Where to Stay:

Departments

Mount Pleasant offers all amenities including a full service grocery store, the county’s only bar, and Utah’s largest kite shop along with the largest hotel in the region. Fairview boasts the closest food and lodging at the base of the canyon to Skyline. Check out Horseshoe Mountain Resort in Mount Pleasant (435-462-9330) or Skyline Motel in Fairview (435-427-3312) and stop by the Home Plate Restaurant for the best food around.

What to Do if No Wind:

Kite Utah offers snowshoe rentals to check out the beautiful scenery or you can rent a snowmobile at Big Pine Sports in Fairview for the day and make your own adventures. Skyline is a huge destination for snowmobiling. You can also bring your own backcountry skis and tour across Skyline’s 100-mile ridge.

30 Close Up

Contact for More Info: Kite Utah (www.kiteutah.com) is the local shop and school. Kite Utah is the only authorized school in the region and holds a permit from the US Forest Service to teach at Skyline. Kite Utah will be offering camps throughout the winter of 2009/2010 hosted by Chip Wasson, Guillaume Chastagnol, and Heather Schenck, along with private instruction (dates listed at www.FlyOzoneUSA.com). Kite Utah is located on the backside of the Triangle Bar, another kiteboarder-owned establishment. 40 t h e k i t e boa r d e r . c om

Liquid Force’s Josh Mulcoy and RRD’s Sandy Parker profiled.

t h e k i t e boa r d e r . c om 41

Domestic winter travel destinations.

El Niño events are infamous for bringing greatly increased amounts of precipitation resulting in disastrous flooding, especially in the January to March timeframe. However, impacts to the winds are less obvious. In El Niño years, the jet stream tends to split with the storm track dipping more southward than in typical winters. This split weakens the strength of storms, resulting in plenty of precipitation, but less storm-driven wind. After analyzing data from the last several years across the iKitesurf.com weather network, an interesting pattern emerges regarding El Niño winters. San Francisco winds tend to be generally weaker across the central coast, Bay, and Delta, due to cooler, cloudy, and rainier weather. However, springtime winds, especially across the Bay, begin to ramp up faster than normal. For instance, over the last three El Niño events THEKITEBOARDER.COM at 3rd Ave. Channel (see Graph), the month of April has had 21 to 28 days in which the peak afternoon wind average was over 20 knots. Meanwhile, in non-El Niño years, the number of times in which the winds reached over 20 knots was only in the teens.

Shades of Green

The impact of El Niño to southern California also tends to weaken winter winds. This is because of slightly cooler than normal weather and increased cloud cover that accompany additional rainy days. As a result, there are less thermal wind days.

El Niño is likely to bring a wet winter with more clouds and cooler days, resulting in less of a chance for solid winds. However, El Niño winters generally lend themselves to a faster strengthening of springtime winds (April/May) across San Francisco Thethe Making of a Bay (especially the Central Bay and kiTesurf Peninsula sites). Additionally, during El Niño Movie winters the Sierra Nevada typically receive abnormally heavy snows, making for great snowkiting conditions.

Texas:

El Niño brings abnormal amounts of rainfall to the Gulf Coast, especially to south Texas. In fact, over the last century, rainfall during El Niño events has been nearly double that of non-El Niño winters. The increased rainfall means more clouds and generally cooler weather. Since Texas beaches are largely dependant on thermallydriven sea breezes for winds, it is easy to see how El Niño tends to impact the region with lower winds. This impact is particularly notable in the early spring months (late February to April). For example, over the last 10 years, South Padre Island has seen 2025 days where winds peak at over 20 knots in the month of April in non-El Niño years. However, in El Niño years, April has usually only seen 14-16 days where winds reached above 20 knots.

El Niño:46 Blessing or Curse for Winter Kiting? The El Nino Phenomenon. By Benjamin Miller, Ikitesurf.com Meteorologist

El Niño

Blessing or curse for winter kiting?

has been the scapegoat of weather phenomena for years. In fact, the Peruvian fishermen who are credited with discovering El Niño in the early 1500’s viewed it as a curse. And not without reason, for the arrival of El Niño marks the beginning of an extended period of poor fishing for these generally productive waters. More recently, climatologists and meteorologists have recognized that El Niño brings many abnormal and adverse weather conditions to North American winters as well. Most well known are the destructive floods across California and the unusually warm temperatures across the Northern Rockies and Plains. But El Niño has been linked to many more subtle effects too. Just how will it impact your winter kiting plans?

6 t h eki t e b o a r d e r . c om

WHAT IS EL NIÑO? Put simply, El Niño is a disruption in typical ocean and atmosphere interactions. Ordinarily, easterly trade winds keep the warmer surface water piled up across Indonesia and north Australia, while cooler water upwells along the South American coast. However, this buildup of water can only last so long before the warmer surface water beings to propagate eastward. This ets off a series of shallow ocean waves called Kelvin waves, which help to transport the warmer water toward Peru and Ecuador. Once the warmer water arrives along South America it begins to spread northward and southward and impacts to North American weather patterns become more prominent. The biggest impacts are generally in the winter and spring months.

Hawaii: During El Niño winters, the North Pacific High dips farther

southward than in ordinary winters resulting in a weakening of the northeast trade winds that prevail across the Hawaiian Islands. Because of the sagging North Pacific High, the jet stream is able to dip farther southward as well. This tends to allow storms to get closer to the islands. These storm systems don’t bring much rainfall (moisture gets shoved eastward and drought is a common problem in Hawaii during El Niño winters), but they do bring bigger than normal waves to the North Shore and stronger stints of northeast to northwest winds.

What adds considerable uncertainty to any extended forecast is that not all El Niño’s are created equal. However, preliminary data from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) buoy network and the majority of El Niño climate models indicate we’re in for a moderate El Niño for the 2009/2010 season. So, in general, the effects this season should be a bit muted compared to a strong El Niño year. El Niño will likely impact Hawaii with weaker than normal northeast trade winds, but stronger stints of winds from passing storm systems. El Niño brings cooler air temperatures and less thermal-driven wind.

El Niño brings abnormally wet winters to the Gulf Coast. This is particularly noticeable in south Texas. With cloudier and cooler days, solid days of wind will be fewer and farther between. This is especially true in the early spring when the more solid sea breezes are generally slower to return compared with non-El Niño years.

Snow Place like Home

Brian Schwarz from Calikites in San Diego Bay. Photo: Andrew Schwarz

Florida: el nino:

Impacts from El Niño on the Sunshine State are similar to the rest of the Gulf Coast region. Florida sees more precipitation during El Niño versus a non-El Niño winter.

Blessing or curse? However, climate data reveals an interesting trend. Temperatures actually tend to remain above normal through mid-January. So, although El Niño brings additional rainfall and generally more clouds, winds tend to remain comparable to non-El Niño winters, at least through mid-January. Then, temperatures tend to cool and thermally-driven sea breezes Kiters weakenin a bit.need Springtime winds (mainly March and April) during El Niño years have been historically a bit weaker across Florida. The lower wind impacts are greater for the Gulf Coast beaches than the Atlantic Coast.

off to tHe reScue:

Baja: iKitesurf.com meteorologist Mike Godsey has spent Helping several winters in Baja and reports that the more southerly storm

21

track of El Niño winters results in two significant impacts. First, Baja experiences cooler air temperatures and more cloudy days, meaning fewer moderate, or even mild, thermally-driven wind days. Second, the more active winter weather pattern, coupled with the more southerly position of the Four Corners high, results in a greater frequency of El Norte wind days, which typically lasts three to eight days. With the more active El Niño-driven storm track, these events will likely be more in the three to five day range. However, one other factor is that the North Pacific High is generally farther south during El Niño winters somewhat negatively affecting the El Norte wind. As northwest winds come off the North Pacific High, they tend to drive the north-northeast El Norte winds farther from shore. In general, look for kiting conditions to be more challenging as stronger winds tend to remain away from the beaches. Baja’s famed El Norte wind is often more frequent during El Nino but other factors during this weather pattern can make these winds more gusty and unsettled near shore.

44 Analyze This

California:

40 There’s Snow Place Like Home.

new ProductS forEl2010 Niño brings increased precipitation, but tends to impact the winds mainly in the

While shooting footage for the Shades of Green Movie, Ian Alldredge, Reo Stevens, Ben Wilson, and Bear Karry scored some of the best waves of their lives. Here Ian goes further into the green room than most kiters will ever experience. Read the story behind this amazing trip beginning on page 30. Photo Jason Wolcott

The TKB team puts five new products to the test.

70 Designer’s Corner

Designers talk about their new and next gen products for 2010.

78 Instruction

How to help a kiter in need and score good karma points.

84 Workbench

What to fix yourself and what to leave to the pros.

spring. Effects seem to be fairly small for the Atlantic Coast, but greater for the Gulf Coast. If you’re planning to go kiting during spring break, I’d say stick to the central or south Florida coast.

CONCLUSION:

El Niño is an irregular event that varies in intensity with each occurrence. Wind is driven and effected by countless mechanisms both large and small scale and El Niño is just one such mechanism. To say that El Niño will specifically cause or prevent a windy day is beyond any forecaster’s skill. Your best bet for maximizing your water time is to monitor the forecasts, wind trends, and real-time data for your favorite areas. iKitesurf.com is a powerful FREE weather service which includes access to over 45,000 weather stations and accurate model forecasts for riding spots worldwide. A premium service is available which includes precision weather stations and Meteorologist forecasts. Visit www.ikitesurf.com/thekiteboarder to receive your discount on a premium ikitesurf.com membership!

t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 7


THINK PASSING THE TORCH

A

Photo Dallas McMahon

little over five years ago I started this magazine with nothing more than sand in my pockets. Here we are kicking the door open to 2010 and we are slowly and steadily growing every issue. I remember many people saying we would not last more than two magazines. Our publisher Marina Chang was my first hire and by issue number two she was my partner. Both of us have taken our lumps over the years and sacrificed corporate salaries and benefits all for the love of kiteboarding. Many people think we are owned by some big fancy company, but the reality is we have remained an independent privately-funded magazine.

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8/19/09

Over the years we have hired many great people who ultimately went and worked for our competition. Brian Wheeler, who is the Managing Editor for 7:52:32 AM Kiteboarding Magazine, got his start as an intern for us many years back. Gabe Brown worked for us before his stint as the editor of Kiteboarding Magazine. Some of the photographers whose photos you see inked in dozens of magazines around the world got their start submitting photos to us early in their careers. Many of the top pros in the world have had their first photo printed in TKB. I am not writing this to sound pretentious. It makes me proud to know that TKB is one of the few magazines that focuses not only on the pros, but on everyday riders. I too remember my roots. I got my start from Tom James when he hired me almost a decade ago at Kiteboarding Magazine. I made 18 magazines with them until I decided to do my own thing and make the magazine I always wanted to make. With that said, it is an honor to introduce to you the new editor of The Kiteboarder Magazine. I am not going anywhere, but it is time to turn the reins over to Paul Lang. I met Paul four years ago when he sent me a photo for the Send It photo section. I did not know him from Adam, but our passion for kiteboarding made our worlds collide, and we hired him on shortly after as our Assistant Editor. Four years later, Paul has proven beyond a reasonable doubt that he deserves the editor’s crown. As I said, I am not going anywhere. I guess after 10 years of making kiteboarding mags, maybe I deserve my new title as Executive Editor/Janitor/Beach Bum. It brings me great pleasure to introduce Paul Lang as our new editor.

8 t h eki t e b o a r d e r . c om

ENJOY!

t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 9


Executive Editor RYAN RICCITELLI ryan@thekiteboarder.com

CONTENT EDITOR/PUBLISHER MARINA CHANG marina@ thekiteboarder.com

EDITOR Paul Lang

ART DIRECTOR SHANA GORONDY

TECHNICAL EDITOR GARY MARTIN

EDITOR AT LARGE ALEXIS ROVIRA

Director Web Strategy Peter Grendler

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHY DALLAS McMahon

SENIOR WRITERS

Marina Chang, Paul Lang, James Brown, Gary Martin

EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS

Neil Hutchinson, Joe Bidawid, Paul Menta, Kevin “Top Hat” Senn, Henry Dupont IV, Bill Lee, Paul Lang, Stefan Ruether, Ruca Chang, Mira Kwon, Rick Iossi, Toby Brauer, Jeff Howard, Dave Loop

CONTRIBUTORS

Kurt Miller, Reo Stevens, Josh Mulcoy, Sandy Parker, Heather Schenck, Monty Goldman, Joel Beatty, Nathan Borer, Tom Fredericks, Benjamin Miller/www.ikitesurf. com, Peter Schiebel, MoMi, Raphael Salles, Martial Camblong, Sheldon Decosse, Max Blom Jr., Tony Logosz, Paul Menta/www.thekitehouse.com, Jeff Howard

SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHERS

Paul Lang, Dallas McMahon, Kim Kern, Carol Bolstad, Nikki Riccitelli

PHOTOGRAPHY

Jason Wolcott, Slingshot, Jamie Douglas, Image Mouvement, Band Originale, Erik Aeder, Axel Reese, Best Kiteboarding, Windzup, Helen Trotman, NJS Designs, Roberto Foresti/Canon, Daryl Drown/www.oceanextremesports.com, Ozvisuals, Shal Jacobovitz, Patrick Rebstock, Charley Hambleton, Image Mouvement all the rest is from Band Originale, www.mauitoast.com; Josh Anon, Chris Burkhard, Gustav Schmiege, Aaron Beck, Joel Beatty, Ben Berndt, Andrew Schwarz Loren Holmes, David DeVries, Mike/www.killedthewind.com, Chris Tronolone, Monty Goldman, Joel Beatty, Nathan Borer, Loren Holmes, Zinou Guiri/www. adrenaline-kitesurf.com, Gregg Gnecco, Jeff McKee, www.thekitehouse.com, http:// imagesbydoc.com, www.fixmykite.com, Davo Hidalgo, Donald witkowski, Justin Slattery, Paul Jaffe, Kurt Schmeizer, Dustin Deardorff, Mike Oleness, Dave Barnes, Carol Bolstad, Katina Arnott, Scott Edwards, Kylee Staughton, Jeremie Tronet, Tony Brady, Christian Caneso, Jon Rock,Tim Hatler, John Bilderback, Karine Aigner

Thanks to all editorial and photography contributors for supporting this magazine!

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www.thekiteboarder.com www.asnews.net www.theringmedia.com www.fubar.com/asnews www.myspace.com/theringmedia http://twitter.com/The_Kiteboarder

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Ben Wilson doesn’t usually ride with straps, but with the Fastrack system, he can quickly install straps to just the spot he wants in seconds. Photo Jason Wolcott

With the Fastrack system, you canthe fine tune with your a strap positions to suit your Zach Kleppe entertains crowd particularly good wipeout. style or the conditions. Photo Jason Wolcott

Densely populated areas seem to be experiencing the majority of multi-use challenges. Photo Katina Arnott

In the traditional system, a pack of threaded inserts set in foam or plastic are installed into the core of the board and then glassed over. This system has worked well over the years, but the big disadvantage is that you are at the mercy of the manufacturer for your choices of strap or binding placement. Slingshot Kiteboarding has recently come up with a new system of attaching straps to boards to solve this problem. Known as Fastrack, this new system looks similar to a mast track on a windsurf board, and allows the rider to dial in their stance to their exact preference. According to Tony Logosz at Slingshot, “Burton put a similar system in snowboards which was accepted and liked. When we started prototyping the idea, we didn’t come across any negatives, only positives, so we pursued further development. We’ve been testing the system for over a year now.” Slingshot believes the new Fastrack system offers many benefits over the traditional system and is currently available on its line of Aviso surfboards. Slingshot will also offer Fastrack on its new Darko twin tip coming out this February, and plans to integrate Fastrack into the majority of its 2011 board line at no additional cost to the end-consumer. According to Logosz, Fastrack allows riders to adjust their stance anywhere within a 20”-26” range, instead of in 1” increments like the current systems .He claims that boards utilizing Fastrack are lighter and stronger due to the lack of insert packs and an improved load distribution. Not only can your strap placement be much more adjustable with the Fastrack, but you can change your straps or remove them in less than five seconds. “Instead of industry set systems, especially on surfboards, now riders can set straps exactly to their sweet spot and personal preference and change quickly to adjust for different conditions or other riders,” said Logosz. “Now you can make your twin tip more directional-like by bringing your back foot back, allowing you to throw big spray like a directional.”

fastrack: the next one pump?

By Paul Lang

Over the past 10 years, most of the equipment we use as kiteboarders has gone through major design changes, each time becoming more refined and easier to use. I say almost all because some of our equipment is the same now as it was at the beginning of the sport. For instance, despite all of the technical gains that have been made in R&D, the system of attaching foot straps and bindings to boards with threaded inserts has remained completely the same.

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Burton put a similar system in snowboards which was accepted and liked. When we started prototyping the idea, we didn’t come across any negatives, only positives, so we pursued further development. We’ve been testing the system for over a year now.

By Marina Chang

On the Darko, the first Slingshot twin-tip to be equipped with Fastrack, you will be able dial in the exact stance you want anywhere between 20-26”. Photo Courtesy Slingshot

There was a day when we were all content to pump up each segment of our kite individually, and now virtually every kite sold has some form of another Slingshot innovation, the One-Pump system. There may be a day that we look back and can’t recall why we let ourselves be limited by the standard insert placements on our boards, but the Fastrack system has a long road ahead if it’s going to become the new industry standard. We always like to see new innovations, but most riders have never felt limited by traditional systems, so it may be awhile before the average rider demands a system like this. The most promising use for the Fastrack is going to be on surfboards, where you will be easily able to move the straps to suit the conditions. The Fastack system is an interesting concept, and whether or not it becomes widely used, it’s exciting to see development happening in area that has remain unchanged in the history of kiteboarding. Slingshot will unveil the Darko twin tip with Fastrack at the 2010 La Ventana Classic and KiteXpo January 17-24. Check out the new clinics and day trips offered at this event along with the latest updates at www.palapasventana.com/lvclassic.aspx t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 1 3


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Texas to Host Extreme Watersports Games

US riders Rob Douglas and Melissa Gil set US records in Luderitz. Photo Jamie Douglas

New World Kitespeed Records Set

By Marina Chang

Corpus Christi is hosting the first annual Texas Extreme Watersports Games from April 22 -25, 2010, at the Corpus Christi Downtown Marina. A new addition to the fourth annual Texas International Boat Show, the Games will consist of The Texas International Kiteboard Competition, an IKA (International Kiteboarding Association) World Cup event with a $10,000 purse showcasing the world’s best racers in both traditional course and boarderX formats, the Texas International Wakeboard Competition, A WWA (World Wakeboarding Association) sanctioned event, and the Texas Power Boat Shoot-Out, an APBA (American Powerboat Association) sanctioned event. All these events will take place around the Texas International Boat Show, using the area between the seawall and marina and the area between the T-Head and the breakwater. Each event will consist of one practice day and one day of heats leading to the semi-finals and the finals. Corpus Christi, with its fabulous spectator facilities, will enable each event to be organized for maximum spectator impact. Plans are also in the works to offer a KiteXpo demo event showcasing 2010 gear available for testing by intermediate riders, very similar to the La Ventana Classic (January 17-24, 2010) and the Pismo Beach KiteXpo (March 1921, 2010) events, co-sponsored by The Kiteboarder Magazine. For more information please visit: www.TexasInternationalBoatShow.com Pismo Beach is one of California’s most consistent riding spots in the spring.

By Marina Chang/Melissa Gil

On November 14, Frenchman Alex Caizergues (F-One) set a new kite world record on his 8m Bandit III at 50.98 knots, breaking his former record of 50.57 knots. Caizergues said, “Speed is first for me a passion. I’m addicted to this sport, to the feelings I get when I’m going down the run at more than 100 km/h (62 miles peak speed). It’s also a kind a “fulfillment” because with all the F-One team, we put so much energy and effort all year long to be ready for this event, to achieve our goals when I break a record it’s a real moment of joy and happiness, shared with all the people involved in this adventure, even if they are usually far away!” He added, “I set the world record with less wind than last year, around 40 to 45 knots only. I really believe I have the ability to break the outright record, but now will have to wait until next year!” The French hydrofoil trimaran Hydroptere set the current world sailing speed record at 51.36 knots when its crew beat Caizergues’ former record last September 4. The event also marked two new USA speed sailing records. Rob Douglas (Cabrinha) came in just a hair behind Caizergues at 50.95 knots and newcomer to speed racing Melissa Gil (Cabrinha) finished with a speed of 38 knots. Started in 1997, the Lüderitz Speed Challenge is an annual speed sailing event held every November in Lüderitz, Namibia, on the west coast of Africa. The course is at a spot called the Second Lagoon, where it can blow up to 55 knots. In the four weeks of the event, speed sailors had only eight days of racing; records show that it was the worst November to date for wind since 1972. Race days were held on days with wind over 25 knots and up to 45 knots. Caizergues, Douglas and Seb Cattelan (first sailor to break 50 knots) have all recorded GPS speeds in excess of 51.50 knots so it is just a matter of time before they sail this fast between the gates of the course. Plans are already being developed to make Luderitz faster next year by building a better chop killer. For complete info, see www.luderitz-speed.com

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International competitors like RRD’s Abel Lago will compete in the first ever Games consisting of traditional course racing and boarderX heats for the $10,000 purse. Photo Erik Aeder

Alex feels confident that kiters will break the current trimaran speed record next year. Photo Band Originale

Pismo expo back to three days By Marina Chang | Photo Paul Lang

If you can’t make it to the La Ventana Classic SUP and KiteXpo January 17-24, 2010, mark your calendars for the 7th annual Pismo Beach SUP and KiteXpo in California March 19-21. Due to popular demand and to allow the best wind window to demo gear, the event is back to its original roots and will once again run for three full days. This pure demo event is a great way to meet other kiteboarders from across the state and try out what you want to ride when the full season gets in swing again. Combined with killer daily raffles, a BBQ fundraiser for the local college kite clubs and a huge bonfire party Saturday night, the Pismo Beach KiteXpo is one of the best opportunities for you to try a wide variety of gear and designs from many brands at one time and in one place. For complete information on the La Ventana Classic and KiteXpo see www.palapasventana.com. For more details on the Pismo Beach Kite and SUP Expo, check out www.xtremebigair.com/kitexpo

Photo Axel Reese

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Need Alex broke the kitespeed record despite Luderitz having the least amount of wind in November since 1972. Photo Mouvement

Eight time world kiteboarding champion and sports model Kristin Boese is reaching out to girls around the world to sharpen their skills and learn some new riding tricks. Kristin has passionately organized and run a total of 16 girls’ clinics around the world in the past 7 years neither for profit or promotion and even with her own funding just out of passion. But the popularity and interest caught fire and now there is a demand to take the clinics to the next level which inspired the German cover girl to start KB4Girls Kiteboarding Clinics in 2010. Boese said: “I want to give female kiteboarders of all ages and levels from around the world the opportunity to come together, have fun, learn some new tricks and meet some other girls with the same interest.” The tour is sponsored by Best Kiteboarding and DaKine. Kristin added, “Like most other sports, kiteboarding is pretty male dominated and from my own experience, I know how tough and intimidating this can be for female riders. It can make all the difference if they are in an environment with other females who can encourage them and give them the confidence they need to excel.” Kristin’s 2010 tour so far includes stops in Australia, Hawaii, Egypt, UK, Germany, Sweden, California and Oregon. For more info, you can contact Kristin directly at mail@kristinboese.com Fresh from the San Francisco Bay Area and just in time for the spring winds, Oakland, Californiabased www.KiteGearBoxx.com is pleased to announce the January 2010 launch of their website and apparel line. The site features a variety of Californian kiter-designed and inspired clothing and accessories. Founder and IKO instructor Royce Vaughn says, “Go online, check out the KGB swag clothing line — there are a lot of choices from 70’s surf throwbacks to 80’s style pop art and even modern graphic designs. We’ve got something to suit your style, and we plan on adding new designs each month.” Over this next season stay on the lookout for new and innovative introductions to the KGB swag kite products lineup, soon to be blowing your way. Inquiries welcome at kgbswag@me.com. Get some!

t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 1 7


Photo Helen Trotman

Photos Courtesy Best Kiteboarding

Gavin Butler Company: Best Kiteboarding Job Title: Photo/Video/Shipping/Warehouse Years in Industry: 5 Words of Wisdom: Say yes to opportunities that arise Years Kiteboarding: 5. Sort of… Kite: Kahoona or whatever the team riders have inflated Board: My surfboards or whatever the team riders have on the beach How would you describe your position at Best? What are your job responsibilities? I do a little bit of everything for Best right now. I take care of the warehouse, shipping, and inventory and also do photo and video shoots on the road or product shoots in house. How did you end up working in the kiteboarding industry? I was working for one of the founders of the company when Best was formed. What did you do prior to working for Best? I was a Chef. Being a kiteboarding photographer sounds like the best job in the world to a lot of people. What are some of the challenges of shooting this sport? Working with the weather would be the biggest. You need sun and wind and that is up to the powers that be. Keeping things within budget and making sure to shoot the product is important to. You also have to make sure the team is on the new gear you are supposed to be shooting. What is your typical day at the office like? Coffee, and then ship any orders that need to go out. Then shoot some product photos or video, edit photos and video, and email photos around. I might be out 1 8 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

of the office on a shoot, or might have a shipment from China that needs to be put in stock. It varies everyday. Is working in the kiteboarding industry all it’s cracked up to be? That depends. What’s it cracked up to be? What do you see as the biggest challenge to the kiteboarding industry as a whole? People always ask this question, like there is something wrong with the industry. Kiteboarding is what it is. There are so many aspects of the sport from wave riding to racing to freestyle. No one style is right or wrong. The link between them all is FUN. If anything, the industry needs to push the FUN aspect more. The Best Offshore Odyssey is a fantastic medium for this. Good photography is important as well - Koch and Elkus are shooting great stuff right now. The biggest challenge now is the economy. Kiteboarding is a luxury sport. It will be interesting to see how it comes out of the recession. What brands will remain? Will both freestyle tours still be around? What magazines will survive? What advice do you have for someone that wants to work for a kiteboarding manufacturer? Work hard and be flexible.

Photo Courtesy NJS Designs

Originally from Australia, Gavin has one on the most coveted jobs in the industry shooting the Best Girls.

Photo Courtesy windzup

INSIDE JOB

k c a Sm Epic Kites and Dimitri Maramenides have teamed up with Maelstorm Gear in order to bring you some new, exciting and innovative kiteboarding accessories for 2010. Hot products coming soon include three Dimitri Pro model boards, polarized sunglasses for in or out of the water, radio helmets, and much more. For more info check www.maelstormgear.com Crazy Fly kiteboards has teamed up with renowned kite raceboard designer Nils Stolzlechner from NJS Designs to offer kite racing boards in 2010. Nils’ designs have taken many first places Men’s 2009 World Championship, Women’s IKA Worlds, and many more. Combining top notch board construction of CrazyFly, proven designs from Nils along with performance fins from Future, the new boards will be available in February. Seven years ago, Windzup was formed as a lifestyle company to support and enhance the style of life of its founding members. Their dream was simple: Share their passion for wind power and enjoy time on this planet with friends, toppled with limitless adventures. Still based near Skyline, UT, Windzup’s worldwide distribution center is now combined with the Triangle Bar and Skyline Yacht Club in downtown Mount Pleasant. Kiters can look forward to a welcome atmosphere when they hit the Wasatach Plateau for a snowkite session, enjoy their favorite brew while watching kite flicks on the big screen, check out the latest gear from Ozone and relax after a day of riding at the nation’s first Snowkite Yacht Club. Just be careful about ringing the bell at the bar ‘cause that means you owe the house a round! Kite racing has experienced rapid growth in the last few years and one of the early stars was Anthony Chavez, winner of 12 first place race titles including the 2007 US Kiteboarding Race Championship and the 2008 Cabrinha Race Series in San Francisco, CA. Back from a year hiatus overseas, RRD and www.live2kite.com welcomes him home with a new sponsorship for the upcoming year. Look for a strong comeback from Chavez on RRD’s Addiction race kite.

Rider: Sebastian Cattelan Photo: Rachid Roussafi

Genetrix is proud to announce the North American debut of two brand new kites: the 2010 Hydra V4 and the 2010 Origin to be unveiled at the La Ventana KiteXpo from January 21-24, 2010. The Hydra V4 is our flat kite concept proven on the European market since 2004, the next generation of the same kite that powered Sebastien Cattelan when he shattered the 50 knot barrier in 2008. The Origin is Genetrix’s latest creation -- guaranteed to take your freestyle to the next level.

High performance | Freeride Massive depower High stability in strong wind Single point inflation system Widest wind range on the market No middle strut, ultra flat and aerodynamic Sensational upwind ability Great low end power High end construction 7m | 9m | 12m | 14m

r the Ente ffle at a ra rity r cha tana fo a n e in La V ce to w 10 n 0 2 a h w c ne d n a in br Orig

Wave | Freestyle Auto-relaunch Single point inflation system Wide wind range and depower Optimized handling response Quick turning responsiveness Multi-point tuning High end construction 5m | 7m | 9m | 11m | 13m | 15m

GENETRIXKITESURF.COM US distributor ZoneXcess LLC (888) 250-7962

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Kevin and Bruna, new PKRA World Champions.

PKRA Crowns

Two New World Champions By Marina Chang | Photo Roberto Foresti/Canon

The last leg of the 2009 PKRA World Tour in New Caledonia was the most exciting in years, delivering many upsets and triumphs. Spanish rider Alex Pastor (Naish) proved he was the man to beat in the men’s Freestyle event, winning both the Singles and the Doubles elimination and capturing his first ever Tour title. Naish team mate Kevin Langeree (NED), after many years of battle with five-time reigning PKRA champion Aaron Hadlow (Flexifoil), claimed his first ever World Championship title and Brazilian rider Bruna Kajiya (Flexifoil) captured the women’s title over the young Spanish rider and 2008 World Champion Gisela Pulido (Airush). Congratulations to Kevin and Bruna as the new reigning overall World Champions of the 2009 PKRA Tour! For complete details, video and images, see www.prokitetour.com

com

ps

GET SOME SNOW THIS WINTER By Marina Chang | Photo oceanextremesports.com

Daryl Drown of Ocean Extreme Sports in Florida enjoys bluebird conditions at the mountain.

The third annual Best SuperFly Open will be held March 11 – 14, 2010 at Powder Mountain. Forecasters are predicting a great snow season this winter and there’s no shortage of snowkite events in 2010 like the third annual Best SuperFly Open, March 11 – 14 at Powder Mountain Resort, Utah. Enjoy ski-in, ski-out introductory kite clinics and watch some of the best snowkiters in the world showcase their talent. Launch off snow features prepared with the help of Powder Mountain’s own snow grooming team. Slide across rails and boxes generously provided by event sponsors. Compete in or watch any of the four event categories; freestyle, big mountain race, kitecross, or big air. There will be a cash purse, tons of swag to give away and the first 30 registrants will be entered to win a new 2010 Best Bularoo! Visit www.superflyopen.com for more information and check out packages starting at $399 which include registration, lodging, lift tickets, food and parties! If you are interested in taking your kite skills to snow, this is a must-go event for kite enthusiasts worldwide. See www.driftmagazine.com for a complete listing of snowkite events.


shop talk

warz owners: Shane Banner and Brian Sch Ages: 29, 30 Location: San Diego 83 Contact: www.calikites.com, 619.223.54 s Riding for how long: 10 year 12 or Favorite Conditions: Warm water, t. mus a are smaller, and friends When did you first get exposed to kiteboarding and when/where did you learn/start? Shane: Brian and I went to college at the University of Colorado, Boulder. We were looking for things to do when we weren’t skiing; I mean studying. A bunch of us started flying a foil kite. We flew that for a few months and then we incorporated it into snowkiting on Lake Dillon Reservoir. When summer came we did some road trips to Lake McConaughy and figured out how to get going in the water. After that we were hooked. What motivated you to get into the kiteboarding retail business and lessons? Brian: I had moved out to San Diego with my girlfriend and joined a finance firm. On every lunch break I was running to Fiesta Island and changing out of my suit and putting on a wetsuit. The local guys said I wouldn’t last long and they were right. I found a shop in Coronado and knew I needed a partner so I called Shane who was living in Denver. Two weeks later we opened the shop. What is the kiteboarding scene like in your area? What makes it special in your view? San Diego is a really interesting place to ride. This is one of the friendliest areas I have ever been in. As most people know, the wind is light here, so when we do get the occasional good day, everyone drops everything and runs to the beach. No riders here take it for granted, so I think that’s what keeps it so friendly. Why did you recently move your shop location? We had sort of lost track of why we started the shop. We wanted to be out there riding with everyone, but over the years our school got busier, and we spent more time at the shop and less time on the beach. Our local riders kept telling us that we would be doing more business and having more fun if we were at the beach. So we changed our business plan and will be out a lot more. What brands do you represent and why? Every year we get a bunch of kites from the manufacturers and we go down to the beach and test them all with a few of the local riders and get feedback. Then we choose which kites from which brands we want to stock. We have gotten really good at carrying a wide range of kites to cover almost every rider. If someone wants a kite from a brand that we are not currently stocking, we are still able to keep that customer happy. 2 2 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

Photo Shal jacobovitz

calikites

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Calikites offers group tours to places like San Felipe, Baja California. Photo Ozvisuals

Do you require your instructors to have certification? Why and what kind, or why not? Everyone who has ever taught at Calikites has been PASA certified. I believe that being certified by either PASA or IKO is very important. When I got certified six years ago I went in with an open mind. After the course was over I had learned so much that it completely changed the way I taught. PASA is really good at their job and I think that is one of the main reasons our school continues to be successful. It is important to have a network behind you so if anything ever did go wrong with our shop, school, local beach regulation, etc., they would be the first people I would call. How does your shop support the kiteboarding community? Are you involved in helping the local community in general? We organize lots of trips. Since the wind is light we find it necessary to travel for better wind. There are so many good places to go that are so close to San Diego. We are usually going somewhere to chase the wind every month. We have planned trips ranging from weekend outings to a trip that had a 50 passenger bus and an entire takeover of a hotel. We are constantly traveling to come up with new hotspots to take people. Where do you draw riders from? What tips can you offer experienced kiters who want to come kite your area? San Diego is a great place to get started on a kite trip, so we draw riders from all over the world. You can take new guys out and get them started in the lighter wind and get all of the kinks out. If you have a few people that want to go to Baja, give us a call and we’ll build you an itinerary based on the wind forecast for Baja. We are the last kite stop before the border, so if you need help or have forgotten something give us a call and we’ll hook you up. What is the best way for people to check the forecast and current conditions in your area? There is no great forecast for San Diego, but www.ikitesurf.com is the best way to check on current conditions. The more north the wind is showing the better it is going to be. For Baja, check out www.buoyweather.com, but nothing is as good as local knowledge. What is your biggest challenge as a kiteboarding retailer? Finding time to ride, but we are working on that. Any words of wisdom you want to share with our readers? Brian: It’s better to be outside looking in than inside looking out. Shane: Demand the can.

There’s never a dull moment with the CaliKites crew. Photo Paul Lang

F-One is growing its network of US riders and welcomes Gary Rhodes, Evan Fairchild (pictured) and Freddy Zamora to its team. Rhodes is well known in Hatteras and has worked for many years at Kitty Hawk Kites. Evan Fairchild from Santa Cruz, California, is a young and promising freestyler who has turned heads at 3rd Avenue and is just starting to get noticed on the collegiate kiteboarding scene, and Freddy Zamora from Puerto Rico, one of the best riders on the island, is eager to show his talent during upcoming contests. www. f-onekites.us/team

video

reviews By James Brown

Trainer Kite: Boot Camp

Flying a trainer kite is a step in learning to kiteboard that is unfortunately, is often skimmed over. The stress-free time spent learning about wind direction, the wind window and building muscle memory makes the advanced steps much easier. Leading Edge Productions now offers a popular 2-meter two-line kite and includes a companion DVD. The video shows how to set up the kite prior to launch, describes the wind window and talks about kite control to get you started. Running Time: 6+ minutes For more information go to: www.leadingedgeproductions.ca

Shades of Green

They say nothing in life is free. But in this case, Ben Wilson and his sponsors have generously made this full-length documentary-style film available online for FREE! As featured in this magazine beginning on page 30, check out some of the best kitesurfers in the world charging epic Indonesian waves. They make it look fun and easy—until things go wrong. I suppose the high risk of riding huge barreling waves is what makes it so thrilling. Featuring Ben Wilson, Reo Stevens, Bear Karry, Ian Alldredge and surf photographer Jason Wolcott. Running Time: 37+ minutes To view the video go to: www.benwilsonsurf. com/benwilsonvision.htm You can also buy kiteboarding DVDs at www.thekiteboarder.com

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What Our Readers Have To Say Dimitri Maramenides navigates a few rocks in Aruba with a style that is all Dimitri. Photo Helen Trotman

letter of the month Keep it Clean

After spending a week in the Bahamas with my girlfriend for a little R&R and some kiting, I felt it necessary to send an official thank-you letter to the crew at The Kiteboarder. You see, this time, it wasn’t inspiration or endless hours of reading and visual entertainment you provided me. I’m thanking you for dressing me in free swag that was suitable enough to allow me into the finest establishments on the island. Upon arrival, it was brought to my attention that the fanciest of my shirts was my new t-shirt from The Kiteboarder. I wore it to all of our fancy dinners, making sure to keep it clean. I was pretty sure I went unnoticed, until one night as we finished up dinner, our Bahamian waitress looked at me and said, “Wow, with the wind we’ve been having, you must be horny all the time.” Thank you to the Crew at The Kiteboarder for always dressing me in style! Mike Mike, we find ourselves in the same situation as you all the time. Here’s a big tip: Bring a light jacket or button-up shirt to cover up the back of the shirt if you happen to be visiting an upscale-type place. Our official “The Kiteboarder Magazine Whitecaps Make Me Horny” shirts have been very popular. Get your own in our store at www.thekiteboarder.com –Ed.

Even in the Desert

Keep up the good work! Hope business is great! I would love to sign back up with the magazine. Even out here in the desert we have to get our fix. Thanks, and I hope you don’t mind amateurs sending in photos. Christian Canese, Lake Pleasant, Arizona

Got somthing on your mind? Submit your letter and you could win a killer t-shirt from Windcult Kiteboarding! E-mail ryan@thekiteboarder.com

Christian, we never mind getting photos from amateurs; in fact we encourage everyone to send us photos! Few things get us more excited than seeing photos of everyday riders pushing themselves and having fun! –Ed.

Check’s in the Mail

After thinking that you guys overlooked my subscription renewal, I just looked up the check and realized it was made out to a different magazine. I guess my wife renewed the wrong magazine. I like yours the best and didn’t plan on renewing those other guys. We’ll get a check in the mail to you pronto. Sorry about the confusion. Tim Tim, Thanks for the comment and no problem on the confusion. We appreciate your continued business. Next year, don’t send your money to those other guys and get yourself a Classy The Kiteboarder T-Shirt! –Ed.

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West coast competitors are looking forward to competing against the ‘right coast’ this spring. Photo Patrick Rebstock

CKA’s First West Coast Roundup

By: Kurt Miller

I

n the fall, California’s coastal winds can be fickle. This year, the collegiate clubs on the west coast made a leap of faith and held the first annual Collegiate Kiteboarding Association (CKA) West Coast Roundup at Pismo Beach in late October. Despite our hubris, the wind gods provided a beautiful 18-20 knot breeze lasting the entire competition. Riders came from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, UC Santa Barbara, and the University of San Diego. Matt Sexton started the CKA several years back at Eckerd College in Florida. It has since grown to include a number of schools throughout the U.S. This year’s competition at Pismo Beach was the first ever held on the “left” coast.

The waves were head-high and the onshore winds made riding down the line difficult, but several competitors made it work. Patrick Rebstock (Cal Poly) was throwing huge airs and backrolls, while Cameron Biehl (UCSB) looked like a seasoned veteran. I did OK. Eventually the group of competitors was whittled down for the final. The UCSB group took three out of four spots in the final. Adrian Straight (UCSB), Johnny Heineken (UCSB), Kurt Miller (me, UCSB), and Patrick Rebstock duked it out in a furious 10-minute heat. Johnny laid the backside smackdown on some waves, while Patrick showed the crowd that you

don’t need straps to boost. I did OK again. Meanwhile, the dark horse Adrian pulled out a few tricks of his own. He clandestinely snuck outside and caught the three biggest waves of the heat, riding them all the way to the beach. At the end of the final, the judges agreed that Adrian’s waves best represented “surf” style, and handed him the laurels of glory. I got second, followed by Patrick and Johnny.

Immediately following surf style was freestyle, where Cal Poly pulled out the big guns. The wind started to fade halfway through the freestyle portion, so the heats were fired off in rapid progression with plenty of chaos. Mikey Benaron (UCSB) pulled some ultra smooth moves, almost landing a flat pass 360. Will Caldwell (USD), the only representative from San Diego, impressed the crowd with his style and earned a spot in the final. Joining him were sponsored riders from Cal Poly: Patrick, Reed Brady, and Madison. These guys languidly pulled 313’s, L3’s, and front mobes like it was nothing. As a judge, I had a hard time keeping up with them. Once the heat ended it was clear that picking the winner would be difficult. At the end of the day it was Reed who claimed the top stop in freestyle, followed by Patrick with his deep repertoire of difficult maneuvers, Madison and his PKRA tricks, and Will with his clean technique. As we wrapped up the competition it was clear that it was an amazing day with stellar performances by all riders involved. The real accolades, however, should go to Andy Crafts, the Cal Poly boys,and Zach Goepel for organizing the event and scheduling it during a rare fall breeze. How could the wind gods deny such epicness? There are three more scheduled California competitions this year in San Diego, Santa Barbara, and back at Cal Poly. The CKA will hold a collegiate championship round May 7-9 in Corpus Christi, TX. Those east coast kids better watch out! For more information on CKA or how to get a club started in your area, see www.collegiatekiteboarding.com

Patrick Rebstock defeats gravity with his strapless airs. Photo Charley Hambleton

As I pulled up to the competition, late of course, I was informed that my heat was going to start in five minutes—just barely enough time to pump up! First up was surf style. The riders in the first heat put on extra large T-shirts and grabbed their surfboards for an intense 10-minute heat, while I wandered around aimlessly with my kite, wondering about the rules and when exactly the next heat started. Apparently, the rider’s meeting, the one I didn’t make, made the rules very clear. Lucky for me, this CKA competition wasn’t exactly strict—beside a few minor details, the only real but unspoken rule was that straps plus surfboards equals cheating. 2 6 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

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1. Rebel Bo Peep pouring a pint of Red Hook’s

Slim Chance on. Photo Katina Arnott 2. Congratulations to Andrew Miller who gets the romantic kite of the year award for asking his new fiancé Theresa to marry him during a recent kiting session. Photo courtesy of Andrew Miller 3. West coast collegiate clubs having fun at their first event in Pismo Beach, CA. Photo Scott Edwards 2 8 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

4. The Kiteboarder Magazine and fubar.com

Halloween Party at the The Kiteboarder Compound. The girls went all out to show their love for TKB. Photo Ryan Riccitelli 5. Collegiate Kiteboarding Tour representing TKB at their first west coast competition. Photo Kylee Staughton 6. The infamous Pirate Punch vat! This orange cooler is legendary in the dirty south. Photo Tony Brady

7. This is how Andrew Miller asked his wife to

marry him. Photo courtesy of Andrew Miller 8. The Kiteboarder compound going off on Halloween, in Corpus Christi, Texas, with special musical guests, The Raspas. Photo Ryan Riccitelli 9. Linn Svendsen enjoys an afternoon dip in the Marshall Islands. Photo Linn Svendsen 10. Jon Rock teaching SUP lessons on Packery Channel in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Photo southcoastkiteboarding.com

11. Best Girls Rule! Photo Gavin Butler 12. South Padre sunset session in the fall!

Photo Christian Canese

13. T hings always get rowdy during happy

hour at the Cielto Lindo in San Quintin, Baja. Photo Paul Lang 14. Guests at Palapas Ventana get a ride for another Hot Springs Downwinder in La Ventana. Photo Tim Hatler

15. Jon Rock and Nikki Riccitelli, the hosts of

the TKB compound Halloween Party. Photo Tony Brady 16. Jason Slezak found himself apprehended by the Hood River Wind Patrol. Photo Paul Lang 17. Kiteboarding Girls Gone Wild at the TKB Halloween bash. Photo Jon Rock 18. Chris Canese’s love shack. Photo Christian Canese

If you have a photo that you would like featured in The Kiteboarder Magazine, please e-mail ryan@thekiteboarder.com

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It was hard to convince Ian Alldredge to come back to Indonesia after being skunked last year, but the incredible conditions on this trip made his return more than worthwhile.

Shades of reen G The Making of a

Kitesurf Movie

By Reo Stevens | Photos by Jason Wolcott

he different variables that need to come together in kitesurfing to produce a truly memorable day of barrels make even the most consistently windy waves difficult to score. There are so many combinations to get right: swell size, direction, tide, wind strength, and wind direction. To create that memorable situation is nearly impossible; much like a painter mixing various portions of different colors to form a combination that gives them just the hue and shade they were looking for. 3 0 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

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“What do you think? Third session, or should we hit the Bintangs?”

invite him on our Indo trip and throw him into a sink-orswim situation with the type of surf most people only experience through videos. Everything came together so quickly for Bear that his new quiver of kites, boards, and harnesses went straight from the box they shipped in to his board bag. Before boarding a flight to Bali, Bear had only been out of the country one time. Not knowing what to expect, his bags were fully stocked with anything you may need to explore a third world country for the first time. He had ibuprofen, his anti-diarrhea medication, antibiotics, and even an emergency condom stashed in his wallet. Soon after arriving in Bali, we all met up with Ben Wilson and Jason Wolcott for dinner. We arrived to the restaurant to find Ben sitting at the head of the table ready to give Bear his initiation as a pro kitesurfer. “Welcome young Bear Cub,” Ben said. “Now sack up and pound this beer you little ginger-headed girl, cause there are plenty more where that came from! Welcome to Bali! Wait till you see what we have in store for you tomorrow!” The next morning we awoke to the piercing alarm that Jason set an hour earlier than any of the rest of us thought necessary. Jason is originally from Ventura, California, and has been living in Bali for the past year. He’s managed to become fairly fluent in the Indonesian language as well as the shortcuts through the narrow

This trip came together with the unique blend of conditions that all wave riders search for. Just the right mixture of wind, water, waves, and friendships resulted in a spectacular showcase of all the Shades of Green Indonesian waters have to offer. Realizing the rarity of what we were experiencing, we managed to capture one of the best sessions that any of us have ever had and put together the Shades of Green video to share our experience.

Smile Ben!

The boys hitch a ride back to the beach after a long day on the water.

Ian Alldredge and I had been traveling all summer long, getting only a few days of kiting here and there, but nothing worth writing home about. For the past four years, I have made the yearly journey to Indonesia and have come to appreciate the Indonesian culture. I’ve learned a few bargaining skills and even occasionally muster up the courage to venture out onto the busy, hectic streets on a motorbike. During summer, Indonesia is usually a safe bet for at least a few weeks of fun surf, but the previous year was somewhat of a let down after spending three weeks in a surfing paradise with hardly any swell. I had coaxed Ian into making the long voyage from Santa Barbara with promises of windy barrels, but he traveled here only to find smaller surf than he left at home and no surf in the forecast. This year it took bit more convincing to get him to make the trip, and I think the only reason he decided to come to Indonesia was because it was on his way home from South Africa. Ian invited his friend from California, Bear Karry, a newly sponsored kiter. We figured the best way to break him in to professional kiting was to Ben Wilson, down low, threading the needle.

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Reo Stevens finds enough room to wave to the paparazzi.

Who’s ready for their close up?

neighborhood cat curled up and sleeping in our kites the previous night that we realized what happened. Suddenly it all made sense. Each set of perforated lines came in rows of four with the spacing and size that would perfectly match up with the claws of a starved Balinese cat. Luckily, the wind line never completely filled in that day, leaving us to spend hours by the pool with the local Indo crew using anything that could possibly be used to cure the “cat scratch fever” that our gear was suffering from. We had one roll each of duct tape and kite repair tape, leaving the three of us fighting over our limited repair supplies and the one pair of scissors that we happened to have with us. By the end of the day, each of us had at least one kite in usable condition and there were three well deserved, ice cold Bintangs (the local beer) waiting for us at the restaurant courtesy of Mr. Wilson. The next morning we awoke to three fully inflated kites and an Indian Ocean swell in full effect thumping on a lowering tide. The conditions provided us with a much-needed surf session to wash away the bad memories from the day before. After a long morning of clean, glassy waves, we were finally chased out of the water, not by the usual suspects of thirst, hunger, or sunburn, but by the inevitable tease of a wind line coming in. We paddled in to get breakfast and talk about the plan for the day.

back streets of Bali making him one of the quickest chauffeurs available. “Wake up boys! Get your boards on the van, traffic’s about to start. If we wait any longer even I won’t be able to get you guys there on time!” The threat of missing our flight was enough motivation to get us up, scrambling to finish packing and loading our gear in the van. At the airport, we grabbed as many porters as we could find to carry the immense pile of gear we had with us. The next few hours were filled with negotiations, bargaining, an airplane with parts held on by duct tape, and a bumpy van ride through a maze of badly deteriorated roads while nursing hangovers from the previous night’s fiasco.

by the situation, I ran back to my room to grab another kite, but the second kite leaked even worse than the first! About the time I was pulling out my first bladder, Ian and Bear were going through the same terrifying realization that all of their kites leaked as well. With the first few bladders out, it became apparent that this would not be an easy fix. Each and every strut had dozens of small holes, all in tiny uniform lines.

We arrived to our final destination in the late afternoon to find the expected swell in full effect. The wind was light but we could see a strong wind line around the point, so we started to unpack our bags and put boards together. Indonesia has no shortage of locals looking for employment and the traveling surfers and kitesurfers are a main source of money for the local economy. As our kite caddies began to pump up our kites, they couldn’t figure out what they could possibly be doing wrong as Ben’s kite pumped up fine while Bear’s, Ian’s and my kite were deflating quicker than they could pump. To my dismay, each and every bladder on my kite was leaking. Confused and frustrated

The source of the tiny holes left us baffled for hours. We went through every possible scenario; badly packed bags, fin tears, and even the possibility that Ben had secretly sabotaged us since his kites were left without a scratch. Ben found our problems entertaining enough to video us hurriedly repairing bladders while asking us, “What happened? Why are you doing that?” It wasn’t until someone remembered seeing the local

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Both Ben and I have some experience with a filming technique known as tracking, when one rider films while riding alongside the other, trying to maintain a steady and smooth shot providing a unique view of the kiter riding the wave. Tracking isn’t something for everyone as it requires a fair amount of kite and board control as well as a reckless disregard for safety. To get the shot, you have to be right where you don’t want to be: As close to the other rider as you can get, in the direct path that they are traveling, all while avoiding their lines that are right over your head. If all of that isn’t enough to make you feel a little uneasy, add the fact that you’re trying to juggle all of this while sharing a very fast hollow wave breaking on the sharp shallow reef below. To be honest, Ben and I were getting quite a thrill and did our best to ignore the possible consequences. We did have a few mishaps with kites crashing into each other, and Ian and I had a close call when we misjudged our speed and distance resulting in Ian cart wheeling down the face of the wave, taking me out at the ankles. In the end, despite us risking ourselves to get the shot, no one got hurt, and we managed a few good clips from the experience. We stayed at this spot for a week and had four days of wind for at least a few hours a day. We had amazing surf the entire time. Boards were broken, lines were tangled, and a few feet were left with reef wounds, but there wasn’t one complaint from any of us. We all climbed aboard the same duct tape-covered aircraft that we arrived on completely content with the time that we had shared over the past week. All that was left to do was to sit back, relax, and try and distract ourselves from the wave withdrawals that we were going to go through by having fun with Ian’s fear of flying for the entire trip home. You can watch Shades of Green, the movie that this trip produced at www.naishkites.com/en/videos/index.html I hope you enjoy the movie nearly as much as we did making it! t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 3 5


Josh checks out the scene at one of his favorite local breaks.

josh mulcoy

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Age: 36 Height: 6’0” Weight: 170 lbs. Years kiting: 8 Favorite Spots: Anywhere in the Santa Cruz area Favorite Conditions: Side off Favorite Moves: I don’t have a favorite move, anything to do with riding a wave Sponsors: Liquid Force, Dakine, Fox, Kaenon, Vans Centurion and Stretch

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GEAR SET-UP

Boards: 6’0” LF Quad Bindings: None Kites: LF Havocs Harness: DaKine Pyro

Although Josh travels to many exotic locations, his favorite place to ride is his hometown of Santa Cruz.

1. I feel it is good to drop in on waves like a surfer which means sometimes slowing down and waiting for the wave or stalling and waiting for it to peak up.

By Marina Chang | Photos Chris Burkhard

Open up any surf magazine and you’ll probably find a photo of Josh Mulcoy hitting the lip of some dream break you’ve been fantasizing about. Born and raised in Santa Cruz, California, Josh has been a sponsored pro since high school and has been living the dream and traveling the world ever since. About 8 years ago, he saw Dave Broome and the Schiebels from Caution riding at Waddell. They made it look like so much fun that he was immediately intrigued with the sport’s potential of turning the ocean into a big water park and being able to go wherever you wanted instead of only being limited to one spot. Today, Josh is sponsored by Liquid Force and doesn’t travel anywhere without at least one kite. When, where and why did you start kiteboarding? I started 8 years ago. I drive up the coast from Santa Cruz a lot to surf and would stop and watch the kiters at Waddell. It just looked too fun. Then I saw a video of Peter Trow and he made wave riding look so good I had to do it. Luckily Dave took me under his wing and helped me out. Did you start out on a twin tip or go straight to a directional? I started on a LF Trip wakeboard. Do you only ride waves or throw in some freestyle every once in awhile? I only ride waves as freestyle isn’t for me. I like to watch the guys that kill it. Pretty damn impressive what people are doing in freestyle now! What boards are you riding and why? I am riding LF 6’0” quads. I feel so lucky to be getting boards from Pat Rawson. He is one of the best shapers ever and to be able to get boards for kiting is so insane. I hope the kite world realizes how lucky we are to have shapers like Pat involved in our sport. Do you ride strapless, strapped or both? Strapless as I I like to kite just like I surf. I don’t use straps surfing so why do I need to in kiting? Do you think kiteboarding can ever run a legit kitesurfing competition and what do you think it will take? Yes, I think all the best guys need to get together and make it happen. If they all get together and set the judging scale and how to judge like a surf contest I think we can pull it off. You really need to have surf judges that understand style and how critical your maneuvers are or are not. 3 6 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

2. Depending on the wind, if it is side onshore this means you need to loop the kite to keep it in front so it doesn’t fall out of the window and drift back towards the beach. 3. Depending on the wave, try to stay in the pocket and not get way out in front of it. The pocket is where the lip is! 4. When traveling, always bring stickers or some good tape to fix your kites or boards. 5. I don’t wear straps but still always bring them as you never know when it is going to be huge and you will want them. What do you think of stand-up paddling? It’s fine but not for me. The only thing that kills me about it is when all of a sudden a guy buys one and paddles 20 yards past everyone and tries to catch every wave. It’s not the board or the paddle that makes it bad, it’s the person that doesn’t understand surf etiquette. That is what drives me crazy but kiting can be this way too. Who have been your major influences in the sport? Peter Trow, Morris, Moe, Ian and Ben Wilson. What do you think makes an ideal surf kite? A kite that sits there so you can surf the wave like a surfer. What kind of directional board would you recommend to a kiter with no surfing background and what are the top three skills you think they should work on first? I would recommend a surfboard with straps around 6 feet for both experienced and novice surfers. I think beginners should work on their style and flow with the wave. Take your time to figure out where to put the kite and feel the power of the wave. I would go by the quote that you can’t run before you can walk. I see people attack waves but their style is horrible. Take your time and work on your fundamentals and the basics of wave riding. What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the kiteboarding industry? In wave riding, it is to get it out to the public better. I see it all the time in the surf industry — people don’t have any idea of what is going on in wave riding with a kite. I think guys like Ben Wilson are one of the best things

going on in our sport right now.The movies he makes showcase wave riding at its finest. When I am on a surf trip with my friends and I show them one of Ben’s movies, they are blown away. If kitesurfing can get into the surf industry better, it would blow up. What is your worst wipe out/scariest kiteboarding experience? When I was first learning I went to the beach by myself with no one around. I had no idea about kite sizes, hooked my lines up backwards and the kite launched and started going in death spins. I was getting picked up and slammed on the sand. It was a humbling experience and taught me to always double check my lines! Where is your favorite place to kite and why? Anywhere around Santa Cruz ‘cause it’s home. What is your most memorable kiteboarding experience? I was on a island off of Tahiti with Moe, Morris and Scott. We surfed this reef the day before and it was perfect barrels — so fun. I woke up at dark and tried to paddle out but the current was too strong. So I came in, grabbed my kite and got to ride perfect barreling waves with no one around. Then the current died, I landed the kite and went surfing. It was like a dream. What are your must have’s that you can’t live without? My surfboard! Any words s of wisdom you want to share with our readers? Do what you love for the enjoyment of it and good things will come. t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 3 7


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sandy parker Age: 33 Height: 5’8” Years kiting: 11 Favorite Spots: Sherman Island, Dillon Beach, Texas Gulf Favorite Conditions: Windy Favorite Moves: Waves Sponsors: RRD, Mystic, Kitopia

GEAR SET-UP

Boards: RRD K50 Race board, Kitopia Custom Surfboard Bindings: Only on my race boards, otherwise strapless Kites: RRD Obsession Lines: Standard Harness: Mystic waist Right now, Sandy is all about strapless riding and racing. Photo Josh Anon

1. When in doubt, let go of the bar! These are the most common words I use in teaching; most any trouble you may get yourself in can be fixed or minimized by just letting go of the bar. 2. Ask questions when kiting a new location — you will probably make a new friend as well. Sandy with her new RRD K-Race board at the World Nationals. Photo www.mauitoast.com By Marina Chang

If you’ve ever been to Sherman Island in California, chances are you have met Sandy Parker. Together with her brother Donny, Sandy started Kiteopia in 2002, now one of the most popular schools in the Bay Area due to the area’s consistent winds and strong reputation for quality instruction. Newly sponsored by RRD and Mystic with plans to compete on the international kite racing circuit in 2010, Sandy got bit by the kite racing bug four years ago by a former student and has hosted a fun course event for the last three, usually around the 4th of July weekend. Next year, Sandy and Donny are planning an even larger event so be sure to mark your calendars! Kiteopia and the Sherman riding crew know how to throw down a good time and you won’t be disappointed with the riding conditions or festivities. When, where and why did you start kiteboarding? In 1998. My brother was a windsurfer, took a trip to the Gorge and came back stoked to learn how to kite. He bought a Flexifoil Stacker 8 and asked me if I wanted to go to the park and fly a kite. Once I got this trainer kite in my hands I was hooked. What was your first exposure to kite racing and what got you interested in it? My first exposure to kite racing was when a former student of mine, John Gomes, founder of the Cabrinha series in San Francisco, got me stoked on the Thursday night races. You recently competed in the World Kite Racing Championships with the top ranked kite racers in the world. What was that experience like? It was amazing to be a part of a once in a lifetime event with the best kiters in the world next to me. What tips can you share that will help a rider when first getting into racing? Practice going upwind and when your legs are burning, keep going. Get comfortable riding very close to other kiters and practice riding downwind as fast as possible. When you crash, tuck and roll and try to keep going. 3 8 t h ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

3.  When you go kiting, take everything and don’t leave anything at home!

What makes a good race kite? A good race kite is a kite that is actually a good all around kite. It must be great for upwind but it also must be good for downwind and definitely stable enough to handle gusty winds at the starting line. Are you riding production race boards or customs? I’m riding both depending on the course. My brother has built my race boards since I think 2007 but this summer I have been riding the RRD K50 and loving it. Do you think racing is becoming too high tech and an elite e.g. a “rich man’s” sport? No, and I’m glad there are people who can put money into the sport — we need it for future development in racing. Eventually it will plateau and the strongest and most talented athletes will still outshine the rest. Since racing is so new, the one with the best gear does have an advantage but eventually we will all be on similar gear. I have been right in the middle of the development of course racing and there have been times I have been on the newest trend and had all the advantages, and there have been times that I have been on the wrong gear. It’s been a race to see who can come up with the best board and I think we as a sport are really close. I guess I can say over the years it’s been a compliment when world class riders race over to me after a race to see what I was riding but I’m usually running away to keep my secrets. My brother and I have had so much fun developing boards for the races; some have worked some haven’t, but the process has been memorable. Who have been your major influences in the sport? My brother Donny Parker.

What is your favorites style of riding and why? Strapless wave riding because I like the freedom of not being locked in. Is there any particular trick you are working on and what is the challenge? Strapless back roll on my surfboard. I keep losing it! What do you think is the biggest challenge facing the kiteboarding industry? Safety! The industry seems to be focusing more on performance than safety. What is something about you that you do outside of kiteboarding that most people wouldn’t know? I don’t do much outside of kiteboarding anymore but most people don’t know I have owned horses my whole life and still do. But no, I don’t ride anymore. What is your most memorable kiteboarding experience? Winning the US Nationals in 2009. The US Nationals in Texas was the most challenging and exciting race I have been a part of. It was so close between myself and the other female riders throughout the whole competition. It was seconds between each of us as we would pass through the finish line. Any words of wisdom you want to share? Go out and kite! If you are starting to get bored try something new. If you’re not sure what to try, take a lesson. A good instructor will get you stoked on the sport again. All instructors enjoy advanced lessons as it gets them out on the water too. A saying my brother always says is, “If your kite is not wet you are not trying hard enough.”

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You Ride

They Watch

You Laugh

They Cry

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Skyline, Utah offers 100 miles of terrain for every level of rider. Photo Gustav Schmiege

Snow Place

Like Home D o m e s t i c W i n t e r Tr a v e l

Every winter, the temperature goes down and most of us don’t spend enough time on the water to stay sane. To get our water fix, we spend lots of money traveling to exotic locations where winter doesn’t seem to exist. Doing that keeps us happy, but it also costs a lot of money. This year, why not do things a little differently? Here in the US, we have easy access to some of the best snowkiting available on the planet. Why head halfway across the globe, when we have such a great resource right in our own backyard? If you have never given snowkiting a try, make it a point to do it this year. You probably already own all the gear you need (your regular kite gear, plus a snowboard or pair of skis) and if you already know how to kite, then getting started on the snow will be easy. Our suggestion to save a little money this winter is to keep things local and expand your horizons by taking a snowkiting vacation. After all, there’s snow place like home. For more information on the US Snowkite scene, check out www.driftsnowkitemag.com

Skyline, Utah, has become a world-renowned destination for snowkiting, hosting riders from across the country and the globe throughout the winter season. Skyline is home to the US Open Snowkite Masters, and attracts riders of all abilities to enjoy its varied terrain. The small-town atmosphere allows for a relaxing vacation while having fun on the mountain all day. Rated as “The New Snowkite Town” by National Geographic and as an ideal place to learn alpine kiting techniques by Men’s Journal, Skyline offers something for every winter kiter.

Skyline, Utah By Heather Schenck

Best Time to Visit:

January- March for the deepest snow and powder conditions, with an extended season from December- April. Skyline is consistently windy November-April.

Typical Winter Conditions:

Skyline’s playground is naturally set up to work with any wind direction, and with a few feet of snow, most of the mountain is open to ride by December. Wind rolls over the ridge at least five days a week, typically from the southwest. Storms can bring northerly winds along with potential whiteouts. During high pressure, easterly winds provide light wind sessions on the lee side of the hills. Skyline is located at an elevation of 10,000 feet on the exposed Wasatch Plateau, which lines it up perfectly for catching valley thermals and upper-level winds almost daily. While it offers consistent wind conditions, it is also set up to grab incoming storms, which can turn a beautiful day into a whiteout. Be prepared for backcountry mountain conditions and drink plenty of fluids to combat the high altitude. Skyline’s snowplow drivers are known as the best in the state, and they diligently work to keep the pass open, but it’s always a good idea to check the forecast and be prepared for the day.

How to Get There:

Fly into Utah’s Salt Lake City International Airport (SLC) and rent a car. Travel south to the outlying town of Fairview, a quiet outpost at the bottom of Highway 31. The riding area is 14 miles up the canyon and will be obvious as you crest the summit ridge of Skyline. The parking lot at Milepost 14 on Highway 31 is the spot to be.

Where to Stay:

Mount Pleasant offers all amenities including a full service grocery store, the county’s only bar, and Utah’s largest kite shop along with the largest hotel in the region. Fairview boasts the closest food and lodging at the base of the canyon to Skyline. Check out Horseshoe Mountain Resort in Mount Pleasant (435-462-9330) or Skyline Motel in Fairview (435-427-3312) and stop by the Home Plate Restaurant for the best food around.

What to Do if No Wind:

Kite Utah offers snowshoe rentals to check out the beautiful scenery or you can rent a snowmobile at Big Pine Sports in Fairview for the day and make your own adventures. Skyline is a huge destination for snowmobiling. You can also bring your own backcountry skis and tour across Skyline’s 100-mile ridge.

Contact for More Info: Kite Utah (www.kiteutah.com) is the local shop and school. Kite Utah is the only authorized school in the region and holds a permit from the US Forest Service to teach at Skyline. Kite Utah will be offering camps throughout the winter of 2009/2010 hosted by Chip Wasson, Guillaume Chastagnol, and Heather Schenck, along with private instruction (dates listed at www.FlyOzoneUSA.com). Kite Utah is located on the backside of the Triangle Bar, another kiteboarder-owned establishment. 4 0 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

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The Big Hole Valley is a high-altitude remote valley that holds varying snowkiting opportunities. With only three small towns and 900 residents populating this 60-mile swath of land in southwest Montana, the Big Hole offers up a snowkiting experience that is unique to Montana. The valley is surrounded by three separate mountain ranges with ample terrain on public lands accessible by car, hiking, and snowmobile. The valley floor is mostly open rolling hills and gullies on private ranch land that can be accessed with landowner permission. The elevation ranges from 6,000 feet at the valley floor with some of the surrounding peaks reaching over 10,000 feet. The locals are friendly and there is a long history of winter recreation in the area. At the northern tip of the valley is the well-established Mount Haggin. Its miles of open and challenging terrain make it one of the premier kiting areas in Montana. At the south end is Big Hole Pass, which produces consistent thermal wind and is a launching point to some bigger terrain. In recent years, most kiting has remained on the outer boundaries of the valley with much of Big Hole left unexplored. The massive landscape combined with consistent wind and snow make the culturally rich Big Hole Valley a unique snowkiting destination.

Best Time to Visit:

The winter kiting season can begin as early as October and last into May, but the best time is February-April.

Typical Winter Conditions:

The Big Hole is a high-altitude valley, so it can get pretty cold. The valley is fairly remote and unpopulated. You can kite all day and only see the occasional snowmobiler, hunter, or rancher. Prepare as if you’re going into the backcountry in the middle of winter. Snowshoes are a good idea as the snow can get fairly deep.

How to Get There:

The Big Hole Valley is a 60-mile-long valley in southwest Montana. It consists of three small towns, Jackson, Wisdom, and Wise River. The valley has two state highways intersecting it, MT43 and MT278, and can be accessed from Interstate 90 from the north and Interstate 15 from the south and east or Highway 93 from the west. The nearest airports are in Butte, MT (BTM) or Missoula, MT (MSO). A four-wheel-drive vehicle is suggested. The roads can get drifted in fast and the snowplows take their time getting around sometimes. Some parts of the Camas Valley remain unexplored by snowkiters. What will you discover? Photo Aaron Beck

Camas Valley, Idaho

Where to Stay:

There are two small towns in the heart of the valley, Jackson and Wisdom. Jackson Hot Springs (www.jacksonhotsprings.com, 406-834-3151) has great accommodations with a lodge, restaurant, bar, and terrific natural hot spring pool so you can soak after a long day of fun. In Wisdom, there’s the Pioneer Mountain Lodge (www.bigholevalley.com/Pioneer_ Mountain_Lodge.html, 406-689-3229), which is located in the center of the valley with kite spots nearby in every direction. In the northern tip of the valley, the Sugar Loaf Lodge (www.sugarloaflodgeandcabins.com, 406491-3748) is located on the boundary of the Mount Haggin Wildlife Management Area which is one of Montana’s premier snowkiting locations.

What to Do if No Wind:

The Big Hole Valley has a long history of winter recreation. There is ample opportunity for snowkiting, cross country skiing, snowmobiling, and snowshoeing in almost every part of the valley. Every year, there are multiple events going on in the area during the months of February-April, including Winterfest in Wisdom, a Nordic Ski race at Mount Haggin, and the Montana Snowkite Rodeo at Jackson Hot Springs, March 29-April 4, 2010.

Contact for More Info:

For snowkiting info, contact Montana Kite Sports (www.montanakitesports.com, 406-459-6898). For more information on the Big Hole Valley, check out www.bigholevalley.com

Big Hole Valley, Montana There are only 900 residents in the 60-mile-long Big Hole Valley. Photo Joel Beatty

By Joel Beatty

By Monty Goldman We are still exploring the Camas Valley and will be for many years to come. What makes this area unique and draws people from all over the world is the consistent wind and an unlimited variety of terrain. Rolling hills give way to mountains and beginner-friendly flats follow the road for miles. You can easily access spots with no trees, deep snow, and steady wind from your car. It is not uncommon to ride over 100 miles in a day. Many mountains and hills are positioned for perfect ascents with your kite. Often, what looks like the top of a mountain is actually another large expanse of ideal snowkite terrain with more peaks and features looming in the distance. No matter how far one riding area is from another, it all seems interconnected. Once you discover a few ideal places to ride, the real fun is connecting the dots and getting to ride where no one has ever ridden.

Best Time to Visit:

Head to Idaho late December-March for the best conditions.

Typical Winter Conditions:

Expect lots of snow in January and February with plenty of sunshine between storms to keep you smiling. Temperatures plunge at night and remain in the 20s on most days. In March, spring kiting is in full swing with lots of sun and snow. This is snowkiting, not resort riding, so bring clothing that keeps you warm but doesn’t restrict your movements. Remember, even though your body is in constant movement, your extremities aren’t. In Idaho, the snow can get deep so a wider ski with lots of contact under the foot can keep you laughing on the surface. Alpine Touring (AT) bindings have releasable heels which make setting up your kite easier and keeps you safe for return treks to the car if the wind shuts down. Snowboarders should take advantage of the boards with reverse camber recently released by kite companies, or grab your resort board and make modifications on your stance. Releasable snowboard bindings work wonders for all ability levels and can be picked up for next to nothing. Advanced skiers should bring touring skins and advanced snowboarders should bring a split board or snowshoes. Small snowshoes, while

convenient, may not be the most reliable means of transport. Opt for a larger size to keep from getting stuck. Kite sizes range from 6 to 14m with the majority of days spent on the 12m.

How to Get There:

Boise (BOI) and Sun Valley (SUN) airports are close to the Camas Valley. From Sun Valley, take Highway 95 north and Highway 20 east (about an hour and a half ). From Boise, take Highway 84 east to Mountain Home and then Highway 20 west to the Camas Valley (about an hour). There are no markers or signs that say “Camas Valley,” but most of the kiting is west of Hill City. We only started naming areas to kite a few years ago. Just look for kites in the sky and pull over or pop your head out of the car and find your own sweet spot. For a map, check out www.snowkitesoldier.com

Where to Stay:

The resort town of Sun Valley offers a large variety of accommodations for all budgets. The Prairie Inn in Fairfield (www.theprairieinn.com) is the most convenient. Mountain Home is 30 minutes away with lots of cheap places to rest your head.

What to do if No Wind:

Soldier Mountain Ski Area is 10 minutes from Fairfield and offers great riding. The mountain operates Thursday - Sunday so look for amazing powder days on Thursdays. Sun Valley Ski Resort is world-class riding at its best and is only a couple of cups of coffee away.

Contact for More Info:

Snowkite Soldier (www.snowkitesoldier.com, 208-484-1620) offers a variety of programs to suit all abilities, ranging from basic snowkiting techniques for crossover kiteboarders and newbies to backcountry-guided services. You can also contact Idaho Mountain Sports (www.idahomountainsport.com). t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 4 3


Minnesota is an amazing place for snowkiting. The When you’re done hitting this kicker on Swede Lake, open the door and get accessibility for snowkiting here is unmatched with over inside as it doubles as a warming shack. Photo Ben Berndt 10,000 lakes that freeze over and offer the perfect environment for snowkiting. The frozen lakes allow kiters to drive out onto the ice and rig right next to their vehicles. On Lake Mille Lacs, Lake Minnetonka, and White Bear Lake there are normally ice roads from the fisherman that you can use to get on the lake without a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Swede Lake By Nathan “Northstar” Borer does not have many fishermen, so the NorthStar Kiteboarding crew plows their own road and sets up a terrain park with a variety of rails and kickers, including one huge kicker that also serves as a warming shack. Minnesota hosts a range of events including the Red Bull Kite Freeze, Mille Lacs Crossing, and the Snowkite Rally. You can also check out the north shore of Lake Superior, which offers awesome skiing and snowboarding with great lake-effect snow at the Spirit and Lutsen Mountain Resorts. If you are up for a cold-water challenge, bring your drysuit for some kitesurfing or surfing on Lake Superior, as the jet stream brings in north winds which kick up huge swell in Duluth and surf on the points of the north shore.

Portage Lake offers flat frozen-lake riding and amazing freestyle terrain on the far side of the lake. Just remember to take an avalanche transceiver with you if you venture far from the car. Photo Loren Holmes

10,000 Lakes, Minnesota

Best Time to Visit:

The best conditions are in late January until early March.

Typical Winter Conditions:

Minnesota has a bad rep for being cold and well, it is. In the winter you can expect below-freezing temperatures and blisteringly cold winds. A vigorous jet stream brings high and low pressure systems through quickly, which causes large temperature variations over a short period of time. In mid to late February, Minnesota starts to get zonal flows in the jet stream, which bring warmer weather and a nice break from the cold, so it’s really not that bad. Bring all of your gear because the weather changes quite often, but the most common kite sizes are 10-13m. Make sure to bring your serious winter gear as this is as close to the North Pole as you can get in the Continental US!

How to Get There:

Fly in to the Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP), located across the street from the Mall Of America. The NorthStar Commuter Rail can take you to downtown Minneapolis and 40 miles west of the cities. The airport is connected to several major highways for easy access to your destination.

Anchorage, Alaska

Where to Stay:

In Lake Mille Lacs, try the Garrison Inn (www.garrisoninnsuites. com), and the Country Inn and Suites (www.countryinns.com/ plymouthmn) for Lake Minnetonka and Swede Lake. If you are looking for night life, downtown Minneapolis has an abundance of places to stay, but prepared to spend a few extra dollars.

What to Do if No Wind:

Don’t worry about a lack of wind, as Minnesota is a winter wonderland filled with many outdoor activities such as hockey, ice climbing, ice fishing, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing, and of course skiing and snowboarding. Visit www.exploreminnesota. com/snow-activities for more info on winter activities. If you are into urban snowboarding or skiing, Minnesota is one of the best states in the US. Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth are filled with hits everywhere and many pro snowboarders are making it a destination to film and ride. If you want to get out of the cold for a day, head to the Mall Of America where they also have the Water Park of America with a wave machine and a wave pool. Minneapolis also has a thriving music scene (www. minneapolismusic.com/minneapolis-venues.htm) and is home to a lot of local talent including Brother Ali, Atmosphere, and Molly Maher, who is hometown Slingshot rider Laura Maher’s sister.

Contact for More Info:

For more info on snowkiting in Minnesota, visit www.northstarkiteboarding.com, www.velocitykiting.com, www.midwestmtn.com, www.scubacenter.com, www.lakawa.com, or www.mnadventure.com 4 4 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

By Tom Fredericks Anchorage, Alaska, is the last major city on the Northern Frontier. Within a twohour drive, you can find endless snowkiting opportunities. The wind in Alaska is very dynamic and changes from day to day. The weather here is very complex because of the mountains and mountain ranges that surround Anchorage. Generally, you can expect to snowkite during frontal and high-pressure winds. Located about an hour from Anchorage, Portage Lake is a great place to kite because of the pressure difference between Turnagain Arm and Prince William Sound that creates a dependable wind flow combined with an annual snowfall of 240 inches. At Portage Lake, be aware of open water and thin ice. If you don’t mind riding a mile and a half upwind to get back to your car, the far end of Portage Lake offers mind-blowing freestyle terrain. If you venture to the far side of the lake, wear your avalanche beacon. If Portage Lake is too windy, head to Turnagain Pass, 20 minutes towards the town of Seward. Turnagain Pass is a natural snowkite park. There are fun terrain features everywhere to play on, including quarter-pipes, table tops and glide slopes. Avalanche transceivers are a requirement here too, because of the natural avalanche chutes that rise above Turnagain Valley.

Best Time to Visit:

Head to Alaska in February-June for the best conditions. Portage Lake is best from January until the beginning of April.

Typical Winter Conditions:

Conditions will be cold. There is a chance that the afternoon will be sunny and warm, but the weather will soon become very cold again. Plan to dress like it will always be below freezing. Bring ski clothes, a down Jacket, three pair of gloves (one pair of light gloves), warm socks, thermals, a helmet, pads, backpack shovel, avalanche beacon, avalanche probe, skis with skins or a splitboard, sunscreen, hand warmers, and twoway radios. If you are heading for the backcountry, also pack a four-season tent, stove,

water bottles, and a sleeping bag rated for below 0°. Bring two kites, one 12m or larger and a 6-8m and you should be covered.

How to Get There:

Fly to Ted Stevens International Airport (ANC) in Anchorage, Alaska. Anchorage has all of the amenities you will need.

Where to Stay:

There are a number of choices for places to stay in the area. Portage Lake is a 20-minute drive from the town of Girdwood and an hour drive from Anchorage. In Anchorage, try the Spenard Hostel (www.alaskahostel.org) or any hotel near the airport. In Girdwood, you can go for a budget hostel (www.hostelgirdwood.com or www.alyeskahostel.com) or rent a cabin (www.alyeskaaccommodations.com, www. alyeskamountainchalet.com, or www.girdwoodhotel.com).

What to Do if No Wind:

If you get skunked for wind, you can go skiing at Alyeska Resort (www.alyeskaresort.com) or give skiing the backcountry a try by snowcat or helicopter (www.chugachpowderguides.com).

Contact for More Info:

Contact Alaska Kite Adventures (www.alaskakiteadventures.com), the local experts on snowkite instruction, guided snowkite trips, and local knowledge. For information on weather and snowkiting in southwest Alaska, visit www.eastofanchorage.net


California:

El Niño events are infamous for bringing greatly increased amounts of precipitation resulting in disastrous flooding, especially in the January to March timeframe. However, impacts to the winds are less obvious. In El Niño years, the jet stream tends to split with the storm track dipping more southward than in typical winters. This split weakens the strength of storms, resulting in plenty of precipitation, but less storm-driven wind. After analyzing data from the last several years across the iKitesurf.com weather network, an interesting pattern emerges regarding El Niño winters. San Francisco winds tend to be generally weaker across the central coast, Bay, and Delta, due to cooler, cloudy, and rainier weather. However, springtime winds, especially across the Bay, begin to ramp up faster than normal. For instance, over the last three El Niño events at 3rd Ave. Channel (see Graph), the month of April has had 21 to 28 days in which the peak afternoon wind average was over 20 knots. Meanwhile, in non-El Niño years, the number of times in which the winds reached over 20 knots was only in the teens. The impact of El Niño to southern California also tends to weaken winter winds. This is because of slightly cooler than normal weather and increased cloud cover that accompany additional rainy days. As a result, there are less thermal wind days. El Niño is likely to bring a wet winter with more clouds and cooler days, resulting in less of a chance for solid winds. However, El Niño winters generally lend themselves to a faster strengthening of springtime winds (April/May) across the San Francisco Bay (especially the Central Bay and Peninsula sites). Additionally, during El Niño winters the Sierra Nevada typically receive abnormally heavy snows, making for great snowkiting conditions.

Texas: El Niño brings abnormal amounts of rainfall to the Gulf Coast, especially to

south Texas. In fact, over the last century, rainfall during El Niño events has been nearly double that of non-El Niño winters. The increased rainfall means more clouds and generally cooler weather. Since Texas beaches are largely dependant on thermallydriven sea breezes for winds, it is easy to see how El Niño tends to impact the region with lower winds. This impact is particularly notable in the early spring months (late February to April). For example, over the last 10 years, South Padre Island has seen 2025 days where winds peak at over 20 knots in the month of April in non-El Niño years. However, in El Niño years, April has usually only seen 14-16 days where winds reached above 20 knots.

El Niño: Blessing or Curse for Winter Kiting?

Will this year’s El Niño give you more or fewer days on the water this year? Photo Andrew Schwarz

By Benjamin Miller, Ikitesurf.com Meteorologist

El Niño

has been the scapegoat of weather phenomena for years. In fact, the Peruvian fishermen who are credited with discovering El Niño in the early 1500’s viewed it as a curse. And not without reason, for the arrival of El Niño marks the beginning of an extended period of poor fishing for these generally productive waters. More recently, climatologists and meteorologists have recognized that El Niño brings many abnormal and adverse weather conditions to North American winters as well. Most well known are the destructive floods across California and the unusually warm temperatures across the Northern Rockies and Plains. But El Niño has been linked to many more subtle effects too. Just how will it impact your winter kiting plans?

WHAT IS EL NIÑO? Put simply, El Niño is a disruption in typical ocean and atmosphere interactions. Ordinarily, easterly trade winds keep the warmer surface water piled up across Indonesia and north Australia, while cooler water upwells along the South American coast. However, this buildup of water can only last so long before the warmer surface water beings to propagate eastward. This sets off a series of shallow ocean waves called Kelvin waves, which help to transport the warmer water toward Peru and Ecuador. Once the warmer water arrives along South America it begins to spread northward and southward and impacts to North American weather patterns become more prominent. The biggest impacts are generally in the winter and spring months. 4 6 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

Hawaii: During El Niño winters, the North Pacific High dips farther southward than in ordinary winters resulting in a weakening of the northeast trade winds that prevail across the Hawaiian Islands. Because of the sagging North Pacific High, the jet stream is able to dip farther southward as well. This tends to allow storms to get closer to the islands. These storm systems don’t bring much rainfall (moisture gets shoved eastward and drought is a common problem in Hawaii during El Niño winters), but they do bring bigger than normal waves to the North Shore and stronger stints of northeast to northwest winds. What adds considerable uncertainty to any extended forecast is that not all El Niño’s are created equal. However, preliminary data from the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) buoy network and the majority of El Niño climate models indicate we’re in for a moderate El Niño for the 2009/2010 season. So, in general, the effects this season should be a bit muted compared to a strong El Niño year. El Niño will likely impact Hawaii with weaker than normal northeast trade winds, but stronger stints of winds from passing storm systems. El Niño brings cooler air temperatures and less thermal-driven wind.

El Niño brings abnormally wet winters to the Gulf Coast. This is particularly noticeable in south Texas. With cloudier and cooler days, solid days of wind will be fewer and farther between. This is especially true in the early spring when the more solid sea breezes are generally slower to return compared with non-El Niño years.

Florida:

Baja: iKitesurf.com meteorologist Mike Godsey has spent

several winters in Baja and reports that the more southerly storm track of El Niño winters results in two significant impacts. First, Baja experiences cooler air temperatures and more cloudy days, meaning fewer moderate, or even mild, thermally-driven wind days. Second, the more active winter weather pattern, coupled with the more southerly position of the Four Corners high, results in a greater frequency of El Norte wind days, which typically lasts three to eight days. With the more active El Niño-driven storm track, these events will likely be more in the three to five day range. However, one other factor is that the North Pacific High is generally farther south during El Niño winters somewhat negatively affecting the El Norte wind. As northwest winds come off the North Pacific High, they tend to drive the north-northeast El Norte winds farther from shore. In general, look for kiting conditions to be more challenging as stronger winds tend to remain away from the beaches. Baja’s famed El Norte wind is often more frequent during El Niño but other factors during this weather pattern can make these winds more gusty and unsettled near shore.

Impacts from El Niño on the Sunshine State are similar to the rest of the Gulf Coast region. Florida sees more precipitation during El Niño versus a non-El Niño winter. However, climate data reveals an interesting trend. Temperatures actually tend to remain above normal through mid-January. So, although El Niño brings additional rainfall and generally more clouds, winds tend to remain comparable to non-El Niño winters, at least through mid-January. Then, temperatures tend to cool and thermally-driven sea breezes weaken a bit. Springtime winds (mainly March and April) during El Niño years have been historically a bit weaker across Florida. The lower wind impacts are greater for the Gulf Coast beaches than the Atlantic Coast. El Niño brings increased precipitation, but tends to impact the winds mainly in the spring. Effects seem to be fairly small for the Atlantic Coast, but greater for the Gulf Coast. If you’re planning to go kiting during spring break, I’d say stick to the central or south Florida coast.

CONCLUSION:

El Niño is an irregular event that varies in intensity with each occurrence. Wind is driven and effected by countless mechanisms both large and small scale and El Niño is just one such mechanism. To say that El Niño will specifically cause or prevent a windy day is beyond any forecaster’s skill. Your best bet for maximizing your water time is to monitor the forecasts, wind trends, and real-time data for your favorite areas. iKitesurf.com is a powerful FREE weather service which includes access to over 45,000 weather stations and accurate model forecasts for riding spots worldwide. A premium service is available which includes precision weather stations and Meteorologist forecasts. Visit www.ikitesurf.com/thekiteboarder to receive your discount on a premium ikitesurf.com membership! t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 4 7


La Ventana Classic and KiteXpo 2010 Schedule of Events

JANUARY 17-20:

DAY TRIPS, CLINICS, EARLY DEMOS: Surf/Strapless Clinic at Coast by Brendan Richards/ Caution Kites, Mark2Dog/Baja Joes/North and Niccolo Porcella/Wainman Hawaii: Head to the coast and experience a different part of Baja just two hours away from La Ventana. Get schooled and tips to help you in the surf and your strapless board skills, plus try out demo gear from Caution, North and Wainman. If forecast is not good for any day between January 17-20, the clinic will be held somewhere in La Ventana with ‘extras’ to make good for not going to coast. Cost is $100. Minimum 4 people, maximum 12 people. Price includes transportation, snack bar food and drinks.

All Day Girls Clinic at Isla Cerralvo with Laura Maher/ Slingshot and Marie Leclerc/Baja Joes/North: Girls of all levels welcome but if you can’t go upwind, you have to return in one of the boats! Spend a day at Isla Cerralvo, the starting point of the 11.5 mile crossing. At the end you’ll do a dry run of the crossing and finish the day with Happy Hour at Baja Joe’s. Get tips from the pros and try out the new 2010 gear from Slingshot and North. Cost is $100. Minimum 4 people, maximum 12 people. Price includes transportation, snack bar food and drinks.

www.Live2Kite.com Freestyle Clinic with Shawn Richman: Mystic/RRD pro rider Shawn Richman should be no stranger to most of you. A fluid style all to his own and a treat to watch in action, let Shawn help you finally nail that trick you’ve been trying to perfect! Cost is $95. Minimum 4 people, maximum 12 people.

www.Live2Kite.com Race Clinic with Johnny Heineken: The third place winner of the 2009 World Kite Racing Championship in San Francisco, CA, this Mystic/RRD pro rider is a world class sailor which helped him place in his first competition over far more seasoned riders. Learn Johnny’s secrets and find out the latest and greatest in the race world to give you a competitive edge. Cost is $95. Minimum 4 people, maximum 12 people.

All clinics dependent on weather forecast. Final decision for clinic locations, date and meeting time based on the forecast will be posted the evening of Friday, January 15 at www.palapasventana.com/lvclassic.aspx

JANUARY 20-24: THE MAIN EVENT!

Get ready for our island crossing 12 mile kite race, course racing, freestyle contest, Paddle Royale – SUP race including a 12 mile island crossing challenge, biggest KiteXpo ever, food, bands, parties, and fun—all in the name of raising money for the local schools in La Ventana! Important skippers meeting Wed, January 20, 7p at Palapas Ventana Restaurant. Comp dates, times will be set at skipper’s meeting based on forecast.

Participating demo exhibitors: Best • Cabrinha • Caution • North/Amundson SUP • Epic F-One • Genetrix • Wainman Hawaii • Hotline Wetsuits/ Doc Ear Plugs • Isle Surfboards (SUP) • Litewave • Mystic Ocean Rodeo • RRD • Slingshot • Underground

Free Beach Clinics: Look on the big board at registration for clinic days and location, based on forecast at Skipper’s Meeting January 20. These are condensed versions of the early-week clinics on the beach only in demo area. Damien Leroy Race Clinic: No stranger to racing, Damien and Cabrinha have been leading the charge in pushing its limits with the Cabrinha Race Series. Get racing advice from Damien and find out the latest trends in the sport.

Shawn Richman Freestyle Clinic: If you missed Shawn’s freestyle clinic earlier in the week, you still have a chance to get pro riding tips from one of kiteboarding’s most fluid riders.

Brendan Richards/Niccolo Porcella Strapless Clinic: Pros and instructors, here’s your opportunity to get schooled in strapless riding skills to take your riding to the next level.

Raffle: Tons of swag will be given away daily! Best Kahoona Kite • Genetrix Origin Kite • Caution Mayhem Kite • Two Stand Up Paddleboards • Kiteboards • Board Bags • Cool Apparel • Gift Certificates to Local Eateries and Hotels Complete and daily updated information at www.palapasventana.com/lvclassic.aspx Jan 19 - all hands beach and arroyo community cleanup 9am at the police station - come and help give back to the town! t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 4 9


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Beachfront rooms at the heart of La Ventana village Free wireless hi-speed internet Yoga & relaxation in our unique TEMAZCAL (sauna) Paddle boards, kayaks, bicycles for getting around town KITEBOARDING LESSONS Transportation for downwinders

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“The Best of Baja”

AWESOME KITING

Ventana Bay Resort:

ON THE BEACH

Located halfway between the main town and the Hot Springs, Ventana Bay Resort is an upscale, eco-friendly property featuring unique, dome-roof casitas nestled in the desert or beachfront rooms, all decorated with authentic Mexican hand-carved furnishings and colorful woven materials. Lodging includes delicious gourmet food (breakfast/lunch) served in the open air clubhouse overlooking the beach, and the option of reserving dinner, a culinary experience that you must try at least once. Steps to a semi-private beach for convenient launching/landing, the wind often blows here up to an hour earlier before the bay fills in further downwind. High speed wifi in the clubhouse and a true getaway experience await you at www.ventanabay.com

COZY CASITAS La Ventana • Mexico

INCREDIBLE FOOD

Also Available Internet, Massage, Fishing, Restaurant and Bar, Kayaking, SUP, Snorkeling, Spearfishing, SCUBA Diving and Certification

Baja Joe’s:

The center of activity in La Ventana, owners Joe and Angie Cheek opened Baja Joe’s in 1997. Featuring comfortable bungalows directly on the beach, the property also has two large community kitchens, convenient gear storage in their huge beachfront shed, demo and rental gear from North and Caution, usage of kayak, SUP boards and bikes, and the largest retail store for all your kiteboarding needs. A great espresso bar/internet, on-site masseuse, and IKO affiliated school Elevation Kiteboarding, featured in the instructional video, My Sessions, round out the list of services offered by the property. Baja Joe’s beachfront is taken over every year in January by the La Ventana Classic and KiteXpo as this area offers the largest rock-free, sandiest strip of beachfront in the area. It is also the home of LV PAWS, which will pay for local animals to be spayed/neutered, and help, if needed, with transportation costs when you adopt a dog to take back home. www.bajajoe.com

For Reservations or Information Call: 310-594-3483 (USA) Skype: palapasventana Email:contact@palapasventana.com

www.palapasventana.com

Guide to

B aja Businesses:

Palapas Ventana:

Founders of the La Ventana Classic Race, a charity event which gives back to the local community, owners Tim and Jimena Hatler’s property is located upwind of the main riding area where waves often break when there’s swell or a strong El Norte. You’ll know you’re at the property when you see the palapa roofs of their quaint casitas with large porches, each overlooking the Sea of Cortez and Cerralvo Island. Lodging includes authentic, home-cooked meals (breakfast/lunch) served at the convenient restaurant/bar located just above the launch area. With a central location to riding, area markets and restaurants, Palapas Ventana’s warm atmosphere will make you feel like you have a home away from home. Sport fishing, diving excursions and day trips to the Island also available. www.palapasventana.com

Captain Kirk’s:

Captain Kirk’s founded La Ventana’s first resort and windsport school in 1993. “Above the Crowd” is their slogan as the property is literally located 1/4 mile upwind of the central action. With plenty of room and a nice break out front when conditions are right, the wind is clean and the feel is low key, comfortable, and authentic Baja. Lodging is

5 2 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

spread out over a large area so each guest gets a feeling of space and privacy, as well as a spectacular view of La Ventana Bay. Guests are free to make use of the large, community kitchen at their convenience equipped with everything a gourmet chef could want. Owners Kitty and Kirk Robinson invite you to hang out in your own space, or join other guests at the Clubhouse Casita, the Captain’s Deck, and of course the beach! www.captainkirks.com

Casa Verde:

Centrally located in the main riding area of Ventana Bay, Casa Verde is just steps from the riding action. Offering bright, comfortable new rooms with private bathrooms and showers, mini fridges, ceiling fans and comfortable new beds, each comes with a TV and DVD/ VCR player and the use of a great movie library. Guest rooms open to decks with great ocean views. Also available are casitas with kitchens and budget teepee camping with use of the two kitchens, communal Palapas and large bathroom with hot showers, as well as high-speed wireless for guests that need to stay connected. www.bajmajal.com

Ventana Windsports:

In the middle of the action but seemingly a world apart, Ventana Windsports offers a casual, laid back atmosphere in an intimate setting with super comfortable rooms. With a large launch/land directly in front of the property and a 2,000 gallon hot tub for soaking after your session, you’ll also enjoy healthy, gourmet meals (included in accommodations), thick futons, feather beds, and fine bedding and furnishings, along with plenty of hammocks and lounge chairs for your “Baja Deluxe” holiday. Lodging also includes wifi and use of sports gear (SUP boards, kayaks, bikes). www.ventanawindsports.com

La Ventana Builders:

La Ventana Builders founder Mike Donahoe has been involved with land and real estate in the La Ventana/ El Sargento area since 1996. Mike’s many years of experience have provided him with a wealth of local, trustworthy contacts to assist people in locating, building, purchasing or selling their ideal piece of property or home in Baja. Whether building your dream home or retreat or representing your interests in real estate, La Ventana Builders’ 13 years of experience will provide you with a single point of contact and save you many potential headaches. www.laventanabuilders.com

Vela/Dare2Fly:

Vela/Dare2Fly has been creating and perfecting the windsports resort experience for nearly 25 years. Whether you are looking for long tropical beaches with reliable side-shore winds, perfect flat water or good surf breaks, Vela offers stand alone or packages with gear, lessons and lodging options at many locations around the world. Check out their website for their full offering of destinations with wind reports from their center managers, videos and feedback from other travelers to give you a sense of what to expect. www.dare2fly.com

Baja Kiteboarding:

An IKO school based in Los Barrilles, just 45 minutes outside of Cabo San Lucas, Baja Kiteboarding offers radio helmet lessons in a private or group setting with boat support. Stocked with the latest gear from Cabrinha, Dante will also guide day trips to nearby riding spots and help you find the right place for your style and budget. www.kiteboardingbaja.com

Exotikite:

Ian Sanders and Megan O’Leary are the founders of ExotiKite Kiteboarding School (EKS), the first school on the East Cape of Baja in Los Barriles. Together, Ian and Megan offer over 20 years of teaching experience. EKS features IKO trained, CPR and first aid certified, professional instructors using the latest techniques and equipment from North and DaKine. Jet-ski assistance is available and radio helmets are used providing the comfort of knowing your instructor is with you. Day trips and accommodation services also available. www.exotikite.com

Kitemasters:

Kitemasters is an IKO affiliated center which provides a variety of services including lessons, day trips to the coast or island, and lesson/lodging packages. Conveniently located south of the main campground right at the beginner’s kite launching area with a huge sandy beach, owner Arnaud Vuillermet and his crew offer lessons in English, Spanish or French and teach with state-of-the-art radio helmets, utilizing the latest gear from F.one and Mystic. The school is also a demo center for F.one boards and kites so be sure to stop by and try out the new gear! Arnaud is also a co-organizer of the annual La Ventana Classic Kite and SUP Expo and founder of www. thebestoflaventana.com, a great resource guide for everything you could possibly want to know about La Ventana. www.kitemasters.com

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O f f th e Ma p On a windy and unusually foggy day, Kinsley ThomasWong and I set off to find an unknown kiteboarding spot on the California coast. The cryptic directions to this spot describing “a hole in a fence and a path leading to the horizon” came from kiteboarding boat captain Kevin Windfield and led to several long hikes ending in rocky overlooks and disappointment. When one long hike into the fog ended at a sandy beach, we rigged up, not knowing if we had found the spot described to us. Just before we hit the water, the fog lifted, slowly revealing our surroundings and giving us our answer: We had found it.” Words and Photo: Mike S. at www.killedthewind.com

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t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 5 5


Th e Se cret Sp ot No, this photo of Jan Schiegnitz was not shot at Maui’s Kite Beach like we immediately thought when we noticed the trees in the background. Instead, this shot comes from what we were told is a Secret Spot on Oahu. If you land a move at a secret spot, does that mean it didn’t really happen? Or is it a secret? Probably not if there’s a photographer there to capture it. Photo John Bilderback

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Gn a r l y B ombs While Mavericks was going off 45 minutes away, Santa Cruz kiter Hal Turner charged some of the gnarliest coldwater bombs locals have ever seen. Not only was Hal dealing with the giant waves, but the water here never gets above the 50’s and is home to more great white sharks than anywhere else on the California Coast. Photo David DeVries

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O n a Pe d e sta l Lou Wainman’s status in the kiteboarding world could be described as beyond legendary. Are there riders out there better than him? Sure there are, but Lou’s history of pushing kiteboarding into new directions and helping it become a legitimate board sport combined with his eccentric personality have put him on a pedestal so high that it’s doubtful that another rider will ever be thought of so highly. Photo Chris Tronolone


BEST KITEBOARING

9

product watch

New Products to check out

DAKINE

Renegade

The Renegade waist harness from Dakine features a pre-curved panel that forms to the natural curve of your back and combines with a compression molded lumbar pad for a snug, comfortable fit. Integrated handle and leash attachment and easy-to-reach key and/or knife pockets round out the safety features. The trusted Power Clip buckle system, coupled with an optional spreader bar hold-down strap, provides a simple, and secure connection. SIZES: XS to XXL Colors: Black, white, red MSRP: $110 www.Dakine.com

Shortstick 5’6 and Spacekraft 5’11

Two new directional boards for most riding conditions. Lightweight EPS cores, CNC milled from hand shaped prototypes. Built with tactical glass reinforcements, progressive rail profiles and supplied a la carte so you can rig either of them to ride strapped, strapless, with padded deck or waxed up. The 5’6 is designed for smaller sloppy/choppy conditions and a little bit of light wind flat water use while the 5’11 is made for taking out into heavier waves and overhead hollow sets. SIZES: 5’6” Shortstick, 5’11” Spacekraft Colors: n/a MSRP: $720 - $739 www.bestkiteboarding.com

firewire

Felix Pivec Pro Model

Firewire has teamed up with top kitesurfer Felix Pivec to launch the Felix Pivec Pro Series with three Firewire boards built specifically for kitesurfing. Felix started riding Firewire boards over two years ago after buying them from retail stores in Hawaii and then reached out to Firewire to see if there was any interest in collaborating on improving the boards for kitesurfing. The Pro Models represents the best of both worlds, taking the incredible shapes and foils of Nev Hyman’s 35 years in surfboard design, Firewire’s Future Shapes Technology and combining that with extensive R&D to ‘tweak’ the surfboard construction for added durability without sacrificing weight or optimum flex. The boards also include inserts for those who like riding with straps. SIZES: 5’11”, 6’0” and 6’2” Colors: N/A MSRP: $799 with inserts and fins (no pads or straps) www.firewiresurfboards.com/kitesurfing

JIMMY LEWIS Flight Deck

Why does the Flight Deck perform when the conditions won’t? Because Jimmy made it with a shape and finish that maximizes efficiency and speed. Those are the keys to light wind riding — not surface area and float. The board with the least drag will keep up with a forward moving kite, keeping that kite in the power zone, and keeping you moving. The hand-polished clear coat finish repels water like a waxed car. The deep concave and handshaped rails give this board one sweet ride. SIZES: 147 x 48 cm Colors: Piano Gloss Black MSRP: $799 www.jimmylewis.com 6 2 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

MAJOR LEAGUE KITEBOARDING

Kiteboarding Apparel

Major League Kiteboarding (MLK) is coming on strong for 2010. Based out of Hood River, Oregon, MLK offers a wide range of post session apparel including T’s, hats, hoodies, and jerseys. MLK is an equal opportunity vendor, not biased on any one style of riding. Whether it’s on the snow, in the surf, or freestylin’ the flats, MLK has all bases covered. Share the stoke, experience the comfort of Major League Kiteboarding. SIZES: T’s (XS to XL), Hats (one size fits all) Colors: T’s black/white, rasta red, white blue; Hats black/white, rasta MSRP: T’s - $24, Hats - $30 www.mlkiteboarding.com

NPX

2010 Zealot

The 2010 Zealot is so warm, NPX claims you can use a 4/3 Zealot when you’d normally be wearing a 5/4/3. They back this up with their newly developed Matrix Mesh, a revolutionary neoprene with a 3D matrix of air chambers that traps heat to keep you warmer. The inside of the Zealot’s chest and back is covered with the insanely toasty Hotcell insulation. Other features include bamboo charcoal anti-microbial lining, pullover no-flush entry, water-releasing Aquavents in the calves, P-skin taped seams, and grip-lock wrists. SIZES: S to XXL Colors: n/a MSRP: $289 www.NPXwetsuits.com

LIQUID FORCE KITEBOARDING

TwinSkim

The Liquid Force Twinskim hones skim design specifically for riding behind a kite making it super easy and fun for kiting. With a skim rocker that is equal on each end and twin design, this board goes both ways with ease and without the need to jibe. The tips vary slightly, providing you options on the tail; wider for big pop and ollies and a narrower diamond tip for slashing. LF wake construction provides ultimate durability on and off the water. An excellent choice for a light wind board to mix things up. SIZES: 51” x 20” Colors: Black and white MSRP: $299 www.liquidforcekites.com

RRD

Fatal Wave Classic

TRASCEND APPAREL

Jesse Richman Signature T

New from Transcend, the Jesse Richman Signature shirt is printed on a newer softer material. Made from high quality 3.5 ounce 100% combed ring-spun cotton, it’s a premium fitted t-shirt that is very light, super soft and breathable. Check out this new T along with other pro signature T’s, hoodies and hats at Transcend Apparel. SIZES: S to XL Colors: Black, white MSRP: $21.95 www.transcendapparel.com

RRD introduces two brand new surf shapes developed with the help of Abel Lago, their wave specialist. The new Fatal Wave Classic’s are precise, fast and radical kite-surfboards that combine the latest development in boards designs with a state of the art composite technology, mixing the “surfmagic” of PU foam and polyester resin with hi-density sandwich heel reinforcements. The 5’8” shape was developed for smaller waves. The fins are set more in a back position compared to the Fatal Wave Classic 6’0”, which is a faster board developed for top performance in the bigger stuff. The Fatal Wave Classics are available three different constructions: X-Tech (EPS/Wood/Glass/ GC Polished sandwich) which is the same sandwich construction used to make Fatal Wave Sandwich boards but is lighter, stiffer and stronger; Wood (Wood Veneers sandwich) construction makes boards even stronger, and stylish; and Classic (PU/HD foam heels/Glass/Polyester). SIZES: 5’8” (174 x 45.8 cm) and 6’0” (182 x 45.8 cm) Colors: n/a MSRP: $799.95 WWW.robertoriccidesigns.com t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 6 3


analyze this

designer’s corner cont.

best waroo

Eclipse surge

TESTED: 11m AVAILABLE SIZES: 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15m STYLE: Delta – Wingtip design TESTED IN: Corpus Christi, TX, 20–28mph winds

TESTED: 9m AVAILABLE SIZES: 5, 7, 9 and 11m STYLE: C-Kite TESTED IN: Corpus Christi, TX, 27–30mph winds

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

The Surge is a come back from where it all began. This is not your daddy’s C-kite! We are happy to introduce you to the new generation of C-kite. The Surge, a 4-line kite, was designed by Felix Pivec and Bill Hansen. We wanted to bring you the next generation of ultimate kite performance. So if you are a pro rider or a person who is looking for a rush, then the Surge will be your choice for those big power moves and kite loops. Don’t let this kite fool you this C-kite offers the true performance all freestylers and wave riders desire while rivaling the depower and safety of today’s SLE kites.

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

Completely redesigned, the 2010 Waroo pushes the free-ride concept further than ever before. An all new Delta-Wingtip Design replaces the previous SLE kite layout. Providing Kahoona-like ease of use and Nemesis NXG aerodynamic performance, the new Delta-Wingtip layout ensures that the Waroo remains the ultimate “do anything, ride everywhere” kitesurfing kite.

THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

Out of the Box: The Waroo’s tribal graphics now cover a smaller portion of the kite along the wingtips and trailing edge. The Waroo is designed as a delta–wingtip kite, unlike previous generations of the Waroo which were SLE kites. The bridal system incorporates stainless steel rings that the bridle travels through instead of using pulleys. Our test kite came with a traditional separated inflation system with a designated inflation and deflation valve on the leading edge (non-one-pump), but the Waroo is also available with EZPump, the Best Kiteboarding version of a one-pump system.

• This 2010 Waroo has increased pop, better low end grunt and much improved water relaunch ability. • The kite has notable less bar pressure than previous generations of the Waroo, but nothing dramatic. The bar pressure is still light-moderate.

CONS:

• The stainless steel rings on the bridle may cause the bridle to be a little more prone to wear than with pulleys. • This is a completely new shape for the Waroo, so riders who really liked the previous Waroo may need to spend a little time getting use to a newly designed kite.

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THE VERDICT:

Although the 2010 Best Waroo is designed differently than previous versions, don’t second guess its potential. The changes in turning, jumping, bar control and relaunch ability still make the 2010 Waroo the best allaround kite from Best.

Control System:

Bar: Standard, non-convertible Grip/Feel: Smooth but grippy with a small diameter Depower: Above the bar depower strap, easy to use but may be bit long for some Center swivel: Standard center line swivel that has come on the Best kites a few years Safety/leash connection points: Below the bar and above the bar safety system connection points.

8  Keep an eye out for bridle wear caused by the stainless steel rings.

8 In lighter winds the kite flies efficiently

when moving, but may need to be a little depowered when standing stationary on the beach to remain stable.

Control System:

Bar: Eclipse’s standard 2010 four line bar with 5th line added Grip/Feel: Small diameter easy to hold with a smooth textured grip Center swivel: None Depower: Below the bar, easy to use and works well Safety/leash connection points: Below the bar, outside line has a ring for an above the bar connection point Depower ability: Good depower offering a really smooth transition on the chicken loop

8  Don’t be afraid to throw the kite around

Tips

PROS:

Out of the Box: The Eclipse Surge showed up just in time for one of the coldest fronts to hit South Texas this season. The Surge wingtips are wide with battens incorporated into them. Graphically, the kite looks cool with hand prints around the size label and the overall outline of the kite really ties the look together. This four line C– kite doesn’t come with a one-pump system. The struts need to be inflated individually while the leading edge has a dedicated inflation and deflation valve.

Tips

On the Water: Riding the new 2010 Waroo, it became immediately apparent that this is kite is quite different from the previous designs. While the kite seemed to pivot in the turns, it was easy to control and handle throughout the window. The Waroo’s jumping performance, with its lofty feeling, is more similar to the Nemesis than the old Waroo, but the kite’s handling is different than the Nemesis. Re-launching the kite was simple and easy due to the delta shape of the wingtips.

THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

in the air while riding in the surf. The kite has solid control even when hitting the lip and falling down the face for a big bottom turn.

8 This is a C-kite so just letting go of the bar doesn’t completely depower it.

On the Water: When you first try the Surge, you will immediately notice the direct response of the kite. The bar pressure is moderate and easy to turn while the kite flies through the window. The kite is designed with a lower aspect ratio and wide wingtips that help its responsiveness. The Eclipse Surge offers solid pop, power, and follow through when riding freestyle, wakestyle, and surf. Re-launching the Surge after a crash seemed to take a little finesse, true to a traditional C-kite.

PROS:

• This is a true C -kite from Eclipse that provides solid freestyle performance for intermediate to advanced riders. • The Surge gives great feedback through the bar and offers excellent control going into any moves where the kite may or may not need to move quickly.

CONS:

• Construction could use some beefing up in high wear areas. •  This is a true C-kite, so riders coming from riding bow or the newer SLE kites need to take time getting used to it.

THE VERDICT:

The Eclipse Surge is a well balanced, easily controlled C-kite that offers a diverse style of riders a solid feeling kite for surf, freestyle, and wakestyle.


TESTED: 55”AVAILABLE SIZES: 52” and 55” FINS: One 2.5” Removable Fin TESTED IN: San Diego, 8 to 16m conditions and medium to huge surf For those looking for fun options and variation in light wind kiteboarding, Slingshot brings you the all new 2010 Scud skim style kiteboard as the latest addition to the Lightwind Collection. The Scud skim style board is a great addition to any quiver for an intermediate to advanced rider looking to maximize their time in marginal conditions. Features such as the custom shape, removable fin, skim style front and rear pads, and Slingshot’s proprietary FRT core construction make the Scud an effortless decision for light wind riding.

liquidforce

THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

havoc

Out of the Box: The Slingshot Scud arrived at our test center in Corpus Christi only to find no wind, so off to California it went. At first glance, the Scud looks similar to a standard skim board, with the addition of a 2.5” center fin on the tail. The Scud has very little rocker (almost all of the rocker is in the nose), very hard rails, and a moderately wide pin tail. Our test board did not come with traction pads, but future boards will ship with skim-style pads. We simply waxed up the deck and headed to the beach.

TESTED: 12m AVAILABLE SIZES: 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16m STYLE: Delta – Wingtip design TESTED IN: Corpus Christi, Tx. W/15 – 17mph winds

On the Water: We were very surprised (and initially frustrated) when we first rode this board, only to repeatedly fall down like we just learned to ride. The Scud is a skim board, and it rides like one. Even with the center fin, the Scud is loose. If you try to ride this board like you would ride a twin tip or surfboard, be prepared to slide around all over the place. However, once you begin to figure out how to properly ride the Scud, a whole world opens up. The Scud feels much like a skateboard. After initially struggling on the Scud, we were going for shove-its and strapless airs. The looseness of the board is very forgiving for skate-style tricks and the moderately wide tail offers a lot of pop. Even with the fin installed, the board can be ridden backwards as long as you put a lot of your weight on your back foot. The Scud’s flat rocker and wide outline kept us going and having fun when the wind began to die. We had fun on the Scud, but also fell down a lot.

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

The Havoc is the ultimate, refined performance SLE! The 4th generation Havoc takes another leap ahead of the pack. The Havoc’s canopy enhancements and removal of the center strut provide a light feel, faster response, increased lift, and more raw low-end power.

THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

Out of the Box: For 2010 Liquid Force has removed the middle strut from the 4th generation Havoc, creating a lighter kite. The graphics look similar to last years, but the wingtips now sport a cool Gucci-like look. The kite still incorporates Velcro tabs for the option of neatly storing the bridle after your sessions. The new Havoc comes with the Liquid Forces Union Pump Inflation System along with their Diamond Wingtips. The overall build of the kite is solid with its MCP Canopy construction and beefy leading edge seams.

PROS:

• This fourth generation of the Havoc has improved upon durability, stability, and overall performance compared with the 2009 Havoc. • The control system is solid and efficient with a well balanced bar and a consistent depower in the chicken loop.

CONS:

• The Havoc’s bridle is a little long and may wrap up around a wingtip if the kite is underinflated. • When releasing the quick release, unless you are using the donkey stick, you may lose the chicken loop, but it does come with a float.

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THE VERDICT:

The fourth generation Liquid Force Havoc is a solid kite for any rider looking for a setup that is easy to learn on and progress with. Intermediate to advanced riders will most appreciate its capability of performing at an advanced level while beginners will like the fact that they can learn and grow on this kite.

• This is a very fun and unique board to add to your quiver. It offers a very different ride compared to surfboards and twin tips. • The light wind abilities will keep you having fun when other riders are slogging.

CONS:

• The Scud takes some time to learn how to ride. You will fall down a lot for your first few sessions on this board. • This is not a replacement for a surfboard, but a totally different ride. If you aren’t willing to spend time learning how to ride this board, you will not enjoy it.

THE VERDICT:

The Scud isn’t going to be for everyone, but if you are willing to spend a little time learning how to ride it, it’s an absolute blast. Its light-wind abilities will keep you going when other riders cannot.

8  Keep your weight over the board. If you try to turn by throwing your weight into the rail of the board, it will slide out. Bend your knees and stay over the board.

8 When getting up, put a lot of weight on the tail to keep the nose out of the water until you are up and going.

nobilenhp TESTED: 130X40 AVAILABLE SIZES: 125, 128, 131, 134 and 137cm STYLE: Twin Tip TESTED IN: Corpus Christi, TX, 26-30mph winds Control System:

Bar: Standard, non-convertible Grip/Feel: Smooth with a little texture, comfortable to hold and easy to grab. Depower: Below the bar depower, easy to use/smooth Center swivel: No swivel Safety/leash connection points: New CPR below the bar quick release works with either hand from front or back of bar, with 90 to 100% depower options.

Tips

On the Water: Can a good thing get better? Yes! Now in its fourth generation, Liquid Force has improved upon the Havoc series of kites. Right off the beach the kite had great control with little bar pressure. The kite only has four struts and does offer a little more low-end power when compared to last year’s Havoc. For wakestyle, this kite offers great pop while the freestyle jumping is also good and solid. You can tell this kite is designed for a rider that really wants to throw down.

PROS:

Tips

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

8  Keep the kite inflated with plenty of pressure to ensure the kite’s water relaunching efficiency.

8 In steady light winds try using the different pigtail settings to find the kite’s sweet spot.

FROM THE MANUFACTURER

The new 2010 3D Construction shaping now makes it possible to accurately control the flex both longitudinally (tip-to-tip) and laterally (side-to-side) through the board. Stiffer with less flex along the longitudinal axis helps hold the edge for longer before exploding from the water (necessary for huge air), while softer flex across its width makes fast, dynamic, and comfortable landings possible. The stiffer and straighter tips also aid to provide better speed, earlier planing, and an almost complete reduction of spray.

THE KITEBOARDER REPORT

Out of the Box: Nobile’s new NHP definitely stands out right out of the box with its 3D construction and graphics that flow around the rails. Down on the bottom of the board, Nobile has added a three stage concave and 55mm G-10 epoxy fins for traction. Pads and straps are easy to install and adjust. The foot straps do tighten up to fit smaller feet. The board has a minimal rocker while the structure of the board carries solid flex throughout it. On the Water: Nobile’s NHP flex helps the board to softly ride through the chop and also affects the performance of the board’s pop. As you’re landing from any jump, the flex of the board really helps to soften the impact. The 55mm G-10 epoxy fins definitely have some bite to them and can make switching your stance a little tough at first. Riding upwind with this board takes no more effort than being powered and just standing up on it — the concave and large fins help the NHP rides upwind like a champ! The board incorporates harder rails which also help the board release from the water easily and also carve efficiently.

PROS:

• The flex throughout the board really helps to soften those hard landings. • The fins offer great traction for optimal upwind performance and when boosting for freestyle moves.

CONS:

• The NHP’s hard rails can allow the board to momentarily skip out in overpowered conditions and choppy water. • The pads and straps are one piece with no adjustment to allow for different toe in/out settings.

THE VERDICT:

With the Nobile NHP’s ability to flex and ride upwind effectively and fast while also being easy to pop off the water for freestyle, this is a board designed for more of an intermediate to advanced rider.

Tips

analyze this

Slingshotskud

8  Remember to release the fins when switching stances to keep from going into a face plant.

8 In lighter winds you can stand up straight on the board and use the fins and flex a little more than your rail for cruising upwind.

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epic

caution

The Renegade is Dimitri’s all-around kite for his new kite company, Epic Kiteboarding, best suited for riders that want a kite that performs well in a variety of conditions and riding styles. Photo Helen Trotman

’s

r e n or

Des

C

er ign

Designer

’s

Corner The biggest change to the 2010 Zombie was to make some slight shaping modifications to get a little more performance out of the wing without sacrificing stability. Photo David DeVries

Designer Profile:

Name: Peter Schiebel Age: 32 Location: Santa Cruz, CA Job Title: Owner/Head of Kite Design Designing: 20 + Kiteboarding: Since the beginning

Product name: 2010 Zombie Product category: SLE Sizes available: 4, 6, 9, 12 and 15m Release date: Fall 2009

The Zombie is a next generation kite from Caution. Where does it does it fit in your product mix? The Zombie is our free-ride line; it’s designed to offer high performance flying characteristics while still delivering userfriendly handling. Why would a rider prefer the Zombie over the Mayhem X? An intermediate kiter would prefer the Zombie because of its super stability and user-friendly qualities, which will help riders excel through the various stages of kiting. Some of our team riders prefer the Zombie in the waves because of its turning dynamics and increased drift for down the line wave riding. Although the Mayhem X is slightly faster in turns and across the window, overall, the Zombie boasts well above average input response with super stable flying dynamics. The Zombie excels in freestyle as well, with really impressive hang time and good unhooked sheeting. What were you main goals in changing the Zombie for 2010 and what are the most significant changes that a 2009 Zombie rider will notice? The biggest goal for the 2010 Zombie was to make some slight shaping changes to get a little more performance out of the wing without sacrificing stability. We also made some minor construction changes with a few additional reinforcements to increase the Zombie’s already bomber reputation. By experimenting with some

Josh Nehf, Team Rider

tested

the The 2010 Zombie is by far my favorite kite. The 12 meter is without a doubt an best kite I have ever flown in that size. The 9 meter has insane range, with it is when well responds and performs still kite the where end, high amazing sheeted out and way beyond the kite’s ideal power range. All the kites have ” a nice even power delivery, work really well in the waves and are “sh-weet lift and really for unhooking. The Zombies are super fun to jump because they have awesome definitely what that’s and August since Zombies 2010 of quiver a had I’ve time. hang e impressiv I will be riding through this winter and spring. 7 0 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

subtle shape changes, we were able to get a little more performance out of the wing without making any sacrifices in stability or float. What are some of the other key product features and performance characteristics? For 2010 we are introducing a new bar, which is a complete redesign. We took input from our riders and started from the ground up to build the 2010 bar, which is now getting rave reviews. The 2010 Bar has a spectra trim line, an on-the-fly stopper ball for cruising on long tacks, a variable length bar so that one bar fits all kites, and a new spring activated quick release for easy and uniform release. What are the safety features on your bar? For 2010 we took a look around at what was on the market and we came back to the conclusion that simplicity and functionality is the key to keeping our riders safe. We did substantial testing with a new spring activated quick release, spent some time dialing in the spring tension, and ultimately found a system that is easy to access with a crisp and clean release, while eliminating unwanted or unexpected releases. Any other key features you want to point out about your control system or lines? Riders have been raving about the new sliding stopper ball. Being able to set and then hold the kite’s trim comes in handy at point breaks where you are taking long tacks out to get back to the top of the peak. I would also like to point out the advantages of our above the bar power adjustment strap. Although the concept has been around since the beginning, it offers the best leverage for adjustment, minimal wear, and can easily be adjusted to be in reach of all riders. What style/level of rider do you think will get the most out of this product? We have seen instructors and intermediate kiters give rave reviews about the kite’s direct feel and stability, and at the same time we have team riders that have chosen the Zombie as their main kite. Ultimately, it comes down to rider preference, and a demo is the best way to make the best decision. What is your warranty policy? The fine print says 90 days on defects, but we always do our best to take care of the riders that support us. What do you believe differentiates your product from your competitors? We are located in one of the windiest regions of the world, with a large number of our kites getting daily abuse in our own backyard. This allows us to keep tight control over quality, design and durability and with 10 years of experience on both the design and the manufacturing side, we know how to make a product that both performs and lasts.

Epic Kiteboarding may be a new brand to the kiteboarding world but you and Dimitri are industry veterans. What do you hope will first come to rider’s minds when they think of Epic? Dimitri started Epic in order to bring the best quality, performance and customer service to fellow kiters. As you said, he’s been in the kiteboarding world for a long time now and has been fortunate enough to try all different types of kites and gear. He is using that knowledge to bring you, the riders, the best possible kiting experience. You are introducing two kites, the Screamer and Renegade. What level of rider, what style and what conditions is the Renegade best suited for? The Screamer was designed for big hang time, big jumps, big handle passes, big boards off and you can do at least four moves in one jump due to the hang time. If this is your style of riding, then the Screamer is the kite for you. It is also a fantastic kite for racing. If you are looking for more of an all around kite, then I think the Renegade will suit you best. It is excellent for teaching, for unhooked moves, wake style, wave riding, big jumps , big kite loops and also freestyle. It’s a very stable kite offering super easy relaunch — you’ll feel right at home on it as soon as you try it. What were you main goals in developing this kite? I wanted to make this one of the most durable kites on the market with the best quality and amazing performance. Our goal is to make customers happy. We like to see customers excited when they see the kite for the first time and see how well built they are. Also we love when they take it for a test drive and we get to hear their comments once they get out of the water. The expression on their faces is the fuel that makes us want to come up with the best thing on the market. If you could choose one standout performance or new construction feature to highlight, what would it be? The quality is outstanding and the performance will blow your mind. What are some of the other key product features and performance characteristics? I made sure that all the attachment points on the LE were EVA-protected so when sitting on the ground it would protect the Leading Edge and also will be easy to grab in the snow. Once you fly the Renegade, you will be amazed with its performance and how easy it is to relaunch, how stable it is and of course the amazing power it has. Just check the testimonial videos on www.epickites.com and you will see what people are talking about.

Describe the safety features on your control bar. The XTEND bar we are using is an amazing bar that works for 45cm to 55cm so no need for two bars any more. One bar works for every kite you own. With the help of Yaron from Blade in the design, the Chicken Loop is very simple and very easy to use. Check out the videos on the bar by clicking www.epickites.com Any other key features you want to point out about your control system or lines? We made this bar to be a very simple user-friendly bar with lots of safety. It is kook proof so there is no mistake to make when you set up the lines. Also the lines come in 20 meter plus 4 meters extensions. So if you like to use 20 meters all you have to do is remove the 4 meter extensions. What is your warranty policy? We will have a standard 12 months factory manufacturers defect warranty, and also we are working on additional EPIC guarantee. What do you believe will differentiate your products from your competitors? Just try the kite and you will get your answer. Anything else you want to point out about Renegade? Yes, once you try the Renegade, make sure to try the Screamer next!

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Designer Profile: Name: MoMi Age: 48 but feel younger thank God to Epic Kites Location: Haif Bay - Israel Job Title: Kite Designer Designing: 14 years Kiteboarding: 9 years

Product name: Renegade Product category: SLE/Hybrid-C Sizes available: 6, 9 and 11m Release date: 12/25/09

AJ Morgan, www.kitetricity.com

t pair of shoes or gloves. The Renegade What can I say, the kite fits like a grea st lot of steady pull, and was the easie a had kite, ng turni fast 9m was a very g. I feel that the kitin of s year 10 my all in d nche kite that I have ever relau kite for anyone who is getting into Renegade will be the best all-round is very simple to use, easy to relaunch, kiteboarding for the very first time. It set up right out of the bag. I have very to le simp very was has a very nice safety system and when I had the kite in my hands strap trim the h to reac short arms, and it was hard for me with just a simple and very fast ter shor could be made for the first time. I was shown that it kites from 6m to 14m and can fits I also like that one bar adjustment on the chicken loop line. be easily adjusted in seconds. t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 7 1


f-one

F-One tweaked the rocker and added double concave to the Acid’s shape resulting in a board that absorbs landings better, earlier planning, increased upwind ability and an overall smoother ride, especially in choppy conditions. Photo Shal Jacobovitz

Designer Profile:

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Name: Raphael Salles Age: 46 Location: Montpellier, France Job Title: Boss – R&D Manager Designing: 32 years kite & windsurf Kiteboarding: 12 years

Now in its third year, the Acid III is F.One’s new school board. What are the most significant changes that a previous Acid rider will notice when riding this new board? For 2010, the new Acid is more responsive and better absorbs vibrations, thanks to changes made to its rocker and the addition of double concave to its shape. The higher rocker offers better landings and easier riding in choppy conditions. “New School” boards used to be built and tested on perfect flat water conditions but the reality is often quite different. The double concave gives a better overall ride, allows better upwind ability and is quicker to plane than earlier releases. All this comes from the experience gained on the R&D spent on another F-One twin-tip, the Trax.

Product name: Acid tip freestyle/new school Product category: Twin x39 and 132x40 cm Sizes available: 127x37, 130 ! Release date: Available now

Why would a rider prefer the Acid III over the TX (freeride) or Trax (freestyle) twin tip boards? The Acid is designed for new school freestylers. The board is shorter and wider than the Trax or the TX. Does this board easily accommodate boot bindings for hardcore new school riders? We don’t have special inserts set up for boots but if you find bindings that can fit the existing inserts, yes it’s possible to accommodate boot bindings. What is the footpad and foot strap system like? All F-One twin-Tips are equipped with our double density, very comfortable and fitted Platinum pads. In addition, our straps use the strap Lock 2 for easy setup. This system is key for a freestyler as they keep your feet locked in but with no extra pressure. The double density pads are great as they absorb shock and hard impact landings. They will give you confidence and allow you to ride longer. If you could choose one standout performance or new construction feature to highlight, what would it be? At F-One, we have been using wood core construction since 2002 and we know how to control the flex and the twist, which is the key in giving the rider a better control for edging the board and ultimately get the best pop. What is your warranty policy? One year.

Evan Fairchild, Team Rider

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What do you believe differentiates your products from your competitors? Our deep and extensive knowledge with full wood core technology used in snowboard construction to build boards gives us an edge in providing the best flex and twist control technology in our product line.

load the The 2010 Acid is an awesome board for F-one’s new school line. I can noticed quickly I pop. insane with back it give will it and want I as board as much easier. The how well the Acid3 makes landing with loads of speed and power new school Acid3’s flex and concave bottom make it a great platform for trying weapon of tricks. Last year’s Acid was a great board but wasn’t quite the freestyle has more rocker which Acid new The rocker. flatter its of because for hoping was choice F-one want to get the most and freestyle about serious you’re If nce. improves the board’s performa utilize the board’s flex on out of the Acid 3, set your straps to the widest stance possible. It will ride it hard. landings and give you better overall balance. Take this board out and 7 2 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

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Tell us a bit about Genetrix and your background? I started designing kites in 1998 when Eric Saurré and I made the first flat kite with a four line depowerable bar system. At the time, nobody was very interested in our design because the major manufacturers had already invested in the Legaignoux patent and were looking to get some return on their investment. I kept working on R&D and brought the concept to market when I started Genetrix in 2005, and launched the first Hydra v1. We built Genetrix’s reputation on the Hydra, which is totally unique and still has the biggest wind range on the market, even four years after we introduced the Hydra v1. For instance, when Sébastien Cattelan smashed the 50 knot world record, he was flying a 9m Hydra v3 in 45 knots of wind! The Origin is a brand new freestyle kite from Genetrix. Where does it fit in your product mix and what were you main goals in developing it? We wanted to complement the existing Hydra by offering a brand-new design dedicated to wave riding and freestyle. For these disciplines, fast/smooth turning and auto relaunch were of prime importance, along with a good wind range and easy handling. Our experience with the Hydra also really helped us. For instance, we integrated one aerodynamic design feature (double center struts) from the Hydra, which gives the kite better stability and a much greater projected surface to the wind which in turns creates more power and a bigger wind range. What was your biggest challenge during the prototype phase? To make a kite better than the Hydra! I spent two years prototyping and testing before putting the Origin on the market. What are some of the key product features and performance characteristics? Quality, power, quick response, and performance. We use Teijin’s polyester fabric exclusively for all our kites. It is the most expensive material on the market and many brands don’t use it. We go the extra mile because we know that even after two or three years, a Genetrix kite still holds a lot of value, which is important to our customers. Freestylers will love the ease of unhooked moves. At arms length, the power in the kite is easy to control and the bar feels light. What are the safety features on your bar? The clean and efficient quick release (which conveniently incorporates the swivel), below-the-bar leash attachment, and no bulky QR with metal parts which can get in the way when doing unhooked moves.

Any other key features you want to point out about your control system or lines? The bridle on the Origin is ultra clean and compact – all adjustments are made at the bar with custom tuning options on the wingtips where the rear lines attach. We deliberately avoided the use of any pulleys. What style/level of rider do you think will get the most out of this product? The Origin is a kite that will perform well for beginner to advanced riders and for those that are taking freestyle and wave riding to the next level. The fact that it practically bounces off the water when dropped makes it great for riders of all abilities.

genetrix

New to North Americans, Genetrix, a French company, is now being distributed in the United States. The Origin is a brand new design from the company, best for wave riding and freestyle. Photo Zinou Guiri/www.adrenaline-kitesurf.com

Designer Profile:

Name: Martial Camblong Age: 43 years Location: Biarritz & Leucate, France Job Title: Founder, Boss Designing: 12 Years Kiteboarding: 12 years

What is your warranty policy? We warranty our products for one year from the date of purchase. We proudly stand behind our products and want to make sure that the Genetrix name in the US has the same great reputation we’ve developed in Europe over the last five years. What do you believe differentiates your product from your competitors? Quality is synonymous with Genetrix. You can tell the quality of our kites from just looking at them on the beach – but you have to try them to understand how the advanced design features translate into world-beating performance.

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Product name: Origin Product category: SLE Sizes available: 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15m Release date: Available now

Marc Antoine Martin, Team Rider

a lot freestyle and wave riding. It also has The Origin is a versatile kite both for d shape, it roun its With t. poin gest stron its not of hang time even though this is riding! h is an incredible advantage in wave relaunches quickly and easily whic rate mode is sure pres bar The . rms very well In freestyle new school, the kite perfo smooth throughout the and le gent g bein e whil kly quic and the kite turns very lines to the neutral , I found it is ideal to attach the rear wind window. For 9m or smaller kites forward setting to slow down the kite’s turning speed. the position on the wingtip setting or even power greater than tained but the kite has a substantive Above 11m, the maneuverability is main for kite loops – the kite moves back to the top as soon llent the 5, 7 and 9m. Its design is also exce as it has finished its rotation. t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 7 3


liquid force

The Shadow is Mystic’s all new lightweight harness designed for ultimate flexibility and comfort, yet still offers great back support, like Mystic’s popular Warrior II. Photo www.mauitoast.com

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Designer Profile:

Name: Sheldon DeCosse Age: 36 Location: Cranbrook, B.C Canada EH! Job Title: H.M.F.I.C. DeCosseCustoms Ltd Designing: Most of my life in one way or another, perhaps not always well. Some go cart wheels may have fallen off….. Kiteboarding: Long enough to have ridden a Pickle Fork

Product name: Liquid Force/DeCosse Alliance Snowboard Product category: Kite Snowboard Sizes available: 159cm Release date: Available now in limited quantities

Liquid Force is releasing a snowboard in its 2010 board line up. How did you get involved with the company and what is your experience? I met Gregg Gnecco from Liquid Force at an event. We got to talking about snowkiting as he knew we were building kite specific products for the Euro kids making the snowkitefilm.com movies. I sent him out a sample, the guys rode it, things blew up from there and have been on fire ever since! Experience? I practically lived on a ski hill growing up and I feel my training started then. I was a Pilot/Engineer for 12 plus years in the Canadian arctic. I flew a lot of interesting aircraft, and did lots of design in Advanced Composites. Eventually, my love for sports and my inspiration and experience in design and composites led me into the custom ski and snowboard business. Why did Liquid Force decide to add this product? Does it see that much potential in snowkiting or a demand for this type of board from snowkiters? Liquid Force is first and foremost a board company and has a 15 year legacy as the leading brand in wakeboarding as well as a solid history producing kiteboards dating all the way back to the first production twin tip over 10 years ago, the LF Pickle Fork. They see a growing market in snowkiting and their Envy and Havoc Kites perform amazing in the snow environment. It’s a way to show their dedication to the snow side of the sport by producing and delivering a complete package including kites and now the kite-specific snowboard.

Jason Slezak, Team Rider

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and I have been snowkiting on standard snowboards since the winter of 2001 meters 30 first the In exist! would shape exact this that day have dreamed of the e I knew that Sheldon had nailed it. The biggest and most noticeable differenc in the Alliance from any standard snowboard is the sidecut. It is a kite specific single radius sidecut that allows for easy tracking in a straight line while carving transitions using the pull of a kite, but also has enough of a radius to allow for smooth spent a few days we protos, Alliance the testing While or just laying out turns with the kite. would lack some doing some gravity fed snowboarding. I was skeptical, at first, that the board well it carved with performance for regular snowboarding. But, I was super surprised how had in the park! such a large radius sidecut, and also how much pop and response the board 7 4 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

Mystic

The Alliance will give you that extra edge needed for snowkiting that a regular snowboard can’t, and also performs excellent with no wind for regular mountain boarding. Photo Greg Gnecco

How does this kite-specific snowboard differ from an off-the-shelf performance snowboard? Why would a rider just not use or rent a regular snowboard? In traditional snowboard design, a board has a directional stance and sidecut optimized to turn against the hill when you apply pressure to the edge. In snowkiting, we need to be able to ride a steady line edging against the kite and to have the ability to load and pop. Also, on a snowkite board, you need to have a centered stance and true twin symmetrical outline and sidecut, otherwise you’re constantly compromising when riding in one direction. We modified traditional snowboard side cuts slightly, the board has more torsional stiffness between the feet, and a totally different flex than traditional boards. However, we didn’t take the mods too far. The 159 Alliance still kills it on the mountain and is fun and easy to turn while riding downhill, but will also handle much more speed with ease than a normal 159. DeCosse Customs has been selling a pile of the 159 Tantrums to the all mountain free ride crowd! Can you also use it without a kite? What are its benefits and drawbacks? You sure can! There are no drawbacks other than it’s probably too stiff for the core jibbers on the ski hill rail park, but for everybody else it rocks and will hold an edge at speed, and carve trenches on par with a much longer directional big mountain board. If you could choose one standout performance or new construction feature to highlight, what would it be? Thermoformed full wood Canadian Hardrock Maple and Poplar core tip to tail, complemented by timeproven design geometry. What are some of the other key product features and performance characteristics? This board was designed for kiters that want to have great pop, and ride hard in a wide variety of snowkite conditions. We kept quite a bit of sidecut in this product so you don’t need to take two boards everywhere you go, just in case the wind doesn’t blow. We also designed this product to have incredible range, performing well for beginners and pro riders alike, while being optimized to perform for a wide range of rider sizes. What is the warranty policy? One year covering any manufacturing defects. Anything else you want to point out about the new product? I just want to be clear, this is not a cheap, mass produced product. They are quite hard to build and all individually hand made, but the performance gains are over the top. Look for the LF motor home, and find myself, Tekko, or any of the LF Crew at an upcoming snowkite eventand we will set you up!! After riding ‘traditional’ mountain snowboards with a kite, you will understand what all the buzz and performance is all about on the first dive of your kite and within your first 100 feet, when you can set your edge and ride like you are kiteboarding on the snow!

All new for 2010, the Shadow is the latest harness addition to Mystic’s line. Where does it fit in Mystic’s harness products? The Mystic Shadow harness has a unique positioning in our line of harnesses as one of the top-of-the-line harnesses. It is almost as supporting as the Warrior II 2010 but it offers a more affordable price point for our customers. What do you think is the biggest advantage of the Shadow harness compared to the Warrior II and Spike waist harnesses? Flexibility and comfort for sure! We created a harness with very flexible edges and shape, which makes it lighter and softer on the body. Additionally, we kept the support technology of the Warrior II which offers maximum support with its anatomically designed features for all kind of riders. What are some other reasons why riders would prefer the Shadow? The Shadow is designed with ultralight materials. When riders put this harness on, they will immediately feel the weight difference compared to any other harness. Additionally, the Shadow has neoprene cuffs on the side of the harness, which allows you to put your webbing away so your straps aren’t flopping around while you’re riding. Besides this, we created new D rings which are adjustable and can open, making them very easy to add or replace your ideal handle pass system. Finally, a redesigned Clicker Bar system with the knife under the spreader hook, and a swivel on the Handle Pass leash system on the back of the harness complete the rich features of the Mystic Shadow. Was any new technology introduced into Mystic’s harness line with new Shadow? The main new technologies that are used on the Shadow are the new harness outline which offer both support and incredible comfort, the new ultralight materials which make it feather-light and comfortable, and the new foam on the inside of the harness which hugs the body and won’t ride up. Finally, the D-rings on the back of the harness open so riders can use their ideal HP leash. Did its development and design spur any innovations or advancements that you are experimenting on in R & D? During the design process of the Mystic Shadow we researched and experimented a lot with new ultralight materials, as well as with new leather and foam. Some of our findings were integrated in the Shadow harness.

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What kind of back support does the Shadow offer compared to Mystic’s other harnesses? The Mystic Shadow harness shares the same type of 3D anatomically moulded back plate as the Warrior II. How does the spreader bar work? The Mystic Shadow harness has a new Clicker Bar for 2010. The release works smoothly, and we also incorporated the Mystic safety knife underneath the spreader hook for easier access. To release the Clicker Bar, first loosen up the webbing on the right side of the harness to release the tension of the bar, then press the red ring with two fingers for opening and just click the metal piece back in for closure. Make sure the spreader down system is attached to ensure your harness doesn’t slide up while riding.

Designer Profile:

Name: Max Blom Jr. Age: 24 Location: Netherlands Job Title: Marketing Director Designing: 3 years Kiteboarding: 5 years

What is included with the harness? The Shadow harness includes the Clicker spreader bar, spreader pad, safety knife, handle pass leash system on the back, and a heavy-duty swivel for your leash attachment. What differentiates the Shadow from what else is available in the marketplace? It’s the lightest harness with the most comfort and back support! And the price is very reasonable which is nice in these days.

Product name: Shadow Harness Product category: Accessory/Harness Sizes available: XXS to XXL Release date: Available now

Anything else you want to add regarding this new product? Just try it! You will discover it yourself and will not even notice you are wearing a harness.

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Shawn Richman, Team Rider

I am new ultralight harness, the Shadow! My harness of choice is Mystic’s ne anyo to it nd mme reco itely defin and so happy to ride the Shadow harness am I up. ride ’t won that ess weight harn looking for a super form-fitting, light that back support while you can’t even tell continually amazed at the incredible harness I have any of on moti of e rang most the you are wearing a harness. It has waves to freestyle. the Shadow in any conditions, from tried due to its unique outline. I ride difference. With it huge a s the hold-down strap as it make Make sure you remember to attach attached, the Harness will not ride up. t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 7 5


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Co-founder Tony Logosz shows us first hand the versatility of Slingshot’s new Arcane “trunk” board, the most adaptable and user-friendly directional in the company’s 2010 line up. Photo Jeff McKee

Designer Profile:

Name: Tony Logosz Age: Wise beyond my years Location: Hood River, Oregon, USA Job Title: Chief Designer Designing: 29+ Kiteboarding: Forever!

The Arcane is a light wind surfboard new to Slingshot’s 2010 board line. How does this board differ from a traditional directional made for kitesurfing e.g. what makes it light wind specific? The Arcane differs due to its shape, volume, concave characteristics and fin configurations. The combination of features such as its single to double concave, concave deck, and down-rail with wing swallow make it very different than our other boards such as the Ben Wilson Pro, Celeritas and Verve 22. It is by far the most versatile surf style board we produce and the most user-friendly. So if the board is light wind specific, how will it perform in powered conditions differently from a traditional kitesurfing or regular directional? What wind range is the Arcane ideal for? The Arcane, due to its surf styling, will excel in surf conditions as well as in light wind. Because of its volume, it will float and hold edge in light wind glassy conditions. When the wind does pick up, it will transform itself to a deck that sits on edge, holds its rail and releases for effortless turns.

Product name: Arcane Product category: Surf and Light Wind Sizes available: 5’0” Release date: What are some other specifics that make January 2010

this board different from other directionals offered in Slingshot’s 2010 Surf Program? The Arcane is a true “trunk” board that excels in surf and light wind. Its versatility can’t be beat.

Jason Clack, www.gokiting.com

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For those of you who ride in chop or in mushy waves, the versatility of a strapless is a directional like the Arcane and its light wind capability as an all-in-one board of varieties different with board this tune easily can You quiver. your to addition great contact more like you if up waxed it ride just always can you or pads and fin options urers against the board so you can really feel it under your toes. Various manufact to it which I feel is a keep trying to create the lightest board possible but this board has more weight a potato chip under like feel doesn’t it so feel beefier a and drive more it giving better, the for change pad in back, and stock feel, skatey loose, a for fins dual just with tuned Arcane your feet. I have my really helped has board this the on time Spending front. up wax up front. Stock pad in back and wax breeze. me to smooth out my strapless footwork and the wide platform makes jibing a 7 6 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

Can this board only be ridden strapless, are there inserts for straps or does it have Slingshot’s new Fastrack system integrated into it? The Arcane is made to be ridden strapless. It does not have inserts or the Fastrack system. It does however have surf style pads and can be ridden with surf wax if desired.

Corpus Christi, Texas April 22-25, 2010

What kind of fin system does the Arcane have and are fins easily replaced if broken? The fin system is Mini Tutle — we chose this due to its durability and performance. The Arcane is offered with three custom fin options for maximum versatility: 2.0” Quad fin set up (stock, easiest to ride and stable); 2.0” twin fin set up, variation using stock fins (“skatier” and easier for learning spins), and option three with a 4.5” and 2.0” combination set up. The 4.5” fins are after market Slingshot surf specific fins. This is the ideal surf set up for more hook up, speed and a solid feel. This is what you want for surf.

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Are there any tech, design or construction innovations that came out of this board that Slingshot is experimenting on for its 2011 line? There are a few items that we are working on and regardless of the outcome, the R&D is always beneficial. A few highlights you will see in the Arcane include a concave deck (lowers center of effort and allows you to grip deck better for ollies and maximum board control), single to double concave (transitions towards the tail resulting in speed, drive and control from the bottom), down rail with wind swallow (for speed and release in the turns, makes the board highly responsive, effortless and smooth), the box wing, pulled in ‘swallow’ tail style (give tight radius surfing not usually associated with retro fish type boards). and surf-style volume (board has “weight” to deliver solid momentum and drive to pump all day long). Riders will notice, due to the volume of the Arcane that to successfully start up, they will need to set it on its side.

Anything else you want to add regarding this new product? You have to try it to feel what it has to offer! Surf style, speed and release, plus volume and float for light wind. Ben Wilson said it best: “This board is the Holy Grail for sloppy surf with an occasional nugget and it is the Ollie champ, great for learning airs, and goes upwind like a jet.” Ben has been riding this board for years.

TREME WATER SPORTS

The Fourth Annual Texas International Boat Show, will take place from April 22nd–25th, 2010, at the Corpus Christi Downtown Marina. This event will be the largest and most exciting in-water boat show yet seen in this part of the USA.

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The 2010 event will also include Texas treme Water Sports: • The Texas International Wakeboard Competition – A WWA sanctioned event. • The Texas International Kiteboard Competition - An IKA World Cup event. • The Texas Power Boat Shoot-Out – An APBA sanctioned event

What is your warranty policy on this product? Please see www.slingshotsports.com/support What do you believe differentiates the new Arcane from what else is available in the marketplace? The Arcane is heads and tails above what is offered due to its versatility. It’s a killer “trunk” board. In other words, when you only have room for one board and a range of possible conditions from light wind to surf, this is what you want to take with you. It’s compact yet stands up to anything you can dish out.

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For more details please contact: info@TxIntlBoatShow.com or telephone 561.842.8808

Official Publications: Alliance Wakeboard Magazine The Kiteboarder Magazine

Each four day event will consist of one practice day, one day of heats leading to semi-finals and the finals. Corpus Christi, with its fabulous spectator facilities will enable each event to be organized for maximum spectator impact. This will be one of the richest events in the 2010 Extreme Water Sports calendar with participation by many of the top wakeboarders, kiteboarders and powerboat drivers.

See You There! www.TexasInternationalBoatShow.com


A little kite karma goes a long way. Next time you see someone struggling, see if they need help. Courtesy of www.thekitehouse.com

By Paul Menta

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ost of us have experienced seeing another rider whose kite is down and is having trouble relaunching. Here’s my question: Did you consider helping out, or did you just watch as the kiter thrashed around, thinking to yourself that they’ll be OK? In the past few months, I have done more tow-ins, assisted relaunches and rescues than I have done in the past few years. For whatever reason, I have noticed that more riders seem to be getting themselves into more trouble. We are all out for the same reason and we all rely on each other to stay safe. If you see someone in trouble, you should want to help out, just as you would want someone to help you out if it was you struggling out there. Too many times I have watched kiters struggling while no one helps out. This bothers me, so I started asking people why they don’t help riders that are in trouble. I was surprised to find out that most riders simply don’t know how to help someone out. This is a valid point; why risk getting in trouble yourself because you don’t know what you’re doing? There are many ways to help out, a few of which are described below. Remember, a little kite karma goes a long way.

Assessing the Situation Signs to look for:

u Kite down for more than three minutes and no attempt

to relaunch u Seeing an emergency system activated, such as a flagging or completely released kite u Kite in neutral for a long time and no attempt at riding u Shape of kite on water not normal, i.e. deflated u F  riend of kiter on beach looking panicked; go ask them what’s wrong u Body dragging back and forth multiple times, more than likely they can’t get to or find their board

What kind of trouble is the person in?

u If they look injured or are not moving at all, the first thing you must do before you or others

go to assist is to call 911 to let them know what’s going on so they can have professionals there as soon as possible. u R  ide out to the person and look over the situation. They may only need a little advice to be able to return to shore on their own. A bit of moral support is very comforting when you’re out there on your own. u T  alk to the person to determine what kind of trouble they are in. Are they calm or panicked? Ask them if they need help and start coming up with a plan.

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Body dragging a rider back to safety using your board as a rudder and with them holding onto your shoulders is a much more efficient and controlled way to bring someone back to shore than riding back with them holding onto the back of your harness strap. Courtesy of http://imagesbydoc.com/

Towing a Kiter In

If the person needs to be brought in because they aren’t going to be able to make it themselves, you will possibly need to bring something with you to tow them in. The best piece of equipment to have is a lifeguard buoy, which can be left on the beach for anyone to use in case of a rescue. The buoy should have 4-5 feet of line with a carabineer at the end of it. If you tow someone too close behind you, they will tend to be pulled underwater. Also, the buoy is great because if someone is panicked, you can toss it to them first. Once they have something that floats to hold onto, they will probably calm down. Be careful when approaching a panicked person in the water, as they may try to grab onto you and this could get you into trouble as well. If you don’t have access to a buoy, then they can hold onto you. Do not have them hold onto your harness, as they probably won’t have the strength to hold on and will also have water coming over their head. Instead, have them grab your shoulders so they are at the same height as you. This will allow them to easily hold on and you will be able to quickly body drag in.

Approaching by Kite

When heading out to help on your kite, make sure you have some kind of plan in your head before you get there. If you are approaching a person with a downed kite, stay upwind of them. u Being upwind, you stay clear of their lines and they won’t drift into you. u You can speak to them so they can hear you since you aren’t yelling into the wind. u If you are having trouble hearing each other, use simple hand signals, like thumbs up or thumbs down. The OK symbol works as well. Make sure you both understand what is going on and what you will do to get back.

Plans for Pick Up

Kite is down, person is exhausted and needs help: Give them something that floats (a lifeguard buoy or your board) and then have them release their kite. You can recover the kite later after you make sure the person is safe. Once they are comfortable, go to them and get set for the body 8 0 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

drag. When a person sees you and hears your plan, they will feel safer and things will go smoothly. Tow them in with the lifeguard buoy or body drag with them holding onto your shoulders.

Kite deflated in the water, person OK: Once you come upwind and can speak to the person, find out if they need support to float. Next, have them wrap their lines up to the kite and then roll up the kite as best they can. While this is going on, you should be riding around the person, watching them and giving advice or encouragement. If they can’t manage wrapping up the lines, simply release the kite and bring them in as the kite is going nowhere. Once the person is set, ride up to them and body drag them back in. Kite down, but can’t relaunch: OK, this is always a tricky one. Ride upwind of the downed rider and find out what the problem is. If you feel safe flipping their kite over, make sure the kiter knows which direction you will try to relaunch them, so they can be ready and will turn the bar the correct way. 1. Ride down towards the kite and ride by a few times to see if the lines/bridles are tangled and to sort out how you will approach the kite. 2. Ride below the kite and sit in water with your board on. As you drift by the kite, grab the skin of the kite or part of leading edge to pull it over. As you continue drifting by, the kite should roll over. If it doesn’t work, don’t try again until you ride back up wind and drift by again. It is easier to take another try then to be past the kite and trying to hang on. 3. If the kite relaunches, ride away from the kite as quickly as possible. Keep your eye on the rider until they are back to the beach.

Tip: Use the tension in your kite as you drift by to help you gain leverage to pull the kite over as you go by. In other words, just grab the kite, hold on for a second, and let your kite pull you away as you roll the kite over.

Kite released, rider and board only: Send someone

downwind after the kite. As long as the wind is not offshore, the kite will make its way in. Ride up to the rider in the water and tow them in with the lifeguard buoy or body drag them in on your shoulders. If you have practiced it, you can tow them in while both of you ride your own boards.

Retrieving a loose kite or board: This is a move for advanced riders only. For this article, we wanted to focus on bringing attention to a possible situation and how to address it. We will follow up in detail with instructional on how to safely retrieve a loose kite or board in the April 2010 issue. As with anything, practice makes perfect, so it would be great to practice these techniques with a friend on a light wind day. To prepare for rescue situations: u P  ractice rescue techniques so you aren’t trying to figure them out in an emergency situation. u M  ake a rescue buoy for the beach that all kiters know about and can use. u Body drag a friend around, so you see what it feels like. u Tow a friend behind you on a surfboard to see how it feels. I have been doing this since the 90s in Maui when it was a common practice to retrieve a kite or person. You didn’t even think about it. If another rider needed help, you helped. Let’s get back to helping out someone in need; it will bring you good karma and lots of friends. Remember, we all end up getting rescued at some point. t h e k i t e boar d e r . com 8 1


Davo Hidalgo representing in Ecuador. Photo courtesy of Davo Hidalg

David Comp throws down at Kite Beach, Maui. Photo Justin Slattery Paul Jaffe goes GoPro on the Potomac River near Alexandria, VA. Photo Paul Jaffe

Localhomies Local Homies is all about everyday, local riders sharing the stoke at their home kiting spots. Kurt Shmeizer goes for a huge kiteloop handle pass. Photo courtesy of Kurt Schmeizer

winning photo Submit your photos of “local homies� riding at your home spot and you could win a killer T-shirt from Transcend Kiteboarding! E-mail ryan@thekiteboarder.com

Grom enjoys board short kiting in SPI. Photo Dallas McMahon

Jamie Deardoff rips the first blow of the season at Santa Clause Lane, in Carpenteria, CA Photo Dustin Deardorff

Jeanice Stone rides better than most of the boys. Marathon, Florida Keys. Photo Mike Oleness Donald Witkowski enjoys a summer session at Sandy Hook, New Jersey in 45 mph. Photo courtesy of Donald Witkowksi

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rk o w nch be

e Kite s Pag

1.

Leading edge or strut casing repairs – Any casing tear, cut or rip in the Dacron that covers the internal bladders on any kite should be repaired by an AKRC. These areas take a very large amount of stress and load and if not repaired correctly can turn into a major problem or damage down the road.

2.

Canopy repairs – Repairs to the canopy area that do not exceed 5 to 8” and do not intersect with the LE or struts can usually be repaired using sail repair tape applied to both sides. Anything other than this should be taken care of by an AKRC.

3.

To Fix or Not to Fix? That is the Question! By Jeff Howard, www.fixmykite.com

Face it! At some point every kite will have to be repaired, either by you,

your grandma and her machine, or in most cases, an Authorized Kite Repair Center (AKRC). How do you determine what you can fix yourself and what you should leave to the pros? Following describes some of the most common repairs needed and a suggestion on how you should go about dealing with them. 8 4 th ek i t e b o a r d e r . c om

Bladders – In most cases the hardest part of repairing bladders is removing and re-installing them correctly. As for fixing a cut or blowout, up to about 5” can be easily repaired with the correct material and process. For removal and repair check out the DIY section on www.fixmykite.com. Other then that in most cases simply replacing a bladder can be easier and guarantee that there are no leaks.

4.

Bridles – Bridles are a very important, but highly overlooked part of a kite. If a bridle breaks and is not replaced or repaired correctly, not only will the kite not fly at optimized performance, but your safety could be compromised. If you notice any wear or tear to a bridle line or pulley, I recommend getting a replacement, and any true AKRC can build you one or as many lines you need.

Many small repairs are DIY, but leave the big stuff to the AKRC’s — we know how to do it and do it right. Here at www.fixmykite.com we have guaranteed all repairs since day one, even if you sell your kite. If you’re looking at doing your own work, we carry everything you need. Feel free to give us a call if you would like some guidance.

California

Action Watersports (318) 827-2233 Airtime Kiteboarding (818) 554-7573 Aquan Watersport (650)593-6060 Australian Kitesurf Academy (714) 955-7832 Bay Area Kitesurf (415) 573-2619 Board Sports (510) THE-WAVE Board Sports (415) 929-SURF CaliKites (619) 522-9575 Captain Kirk’s (310) 833-3397 Delta Windsurf Company (831) 429-6051 Helm Sports (650 )344-2711 Inflight Surf and Sail (562) 493-3661 Kite Country (619) 226-4421 Kitesurfari (562) 596-6451 KiteWindSurf (510) 522-WIND

CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA CA

HOW SAFE IS YOUR INSTRUCTOR?

Is your instructor or school insured? Have they been through an internationally recognized, certified instruction program? While insurance and certification don’t guarantee you quality, safe instruction, they can help you better qualify your choices. Introducing the TKB Certified Schools program. Look for the symbols by the listings! For complete info or to be recognized as a TKB Certified School, see www.thekiteboarder.com and click on the TKB Certified School graphic.

The Kiteboarder Certified Schools

LEGEND d

Certifie

TKB Certified

Insurance

0THER OTHER

IKO

Pasa

Live2Kite (415) 722-7884 CA Long Beach Windsurf Center (562) 433-1014 CA Mako Surf Skate Snow (949) 367-1300 CA Malibu Kitesurfing (310) 430-KITE CA Manta Wind & Water Sports (858) 270-7222 CA Monkey Air (310) 457-6896 CA Murrays (800) 786-7245 x23 CA Offshore Surf Co. (760) 729-4934 CA Kite School (650) 960-1721 CA Solutions (805) 773-5991 CA Soul Performance (310) 370-1428 CA Sky Kitesurfing School (925) 455-4008 CA VELA (800) 223-5443 CA Wind over Water Kiteboarding (650) 218-6023 CA Kite Island (925) 212-2915 CA Xdream Sportz (858) 481-9283 CA Xstreamline Sports (310) 518-1972 CA Xtreme Big Air (805) 773-9200 CA

Colorado

Colorado Kite Force (970) 485-3300 GAYLAN’S (720) 887-0900 GG Wind Kiteboarding (970) 389-0683 Into the Wind (303) 449-5906 Larson’s Ski and Sport (303) 423-0654 Fuze Kiteboarding (303) 683-5033 PKS (970) 376-3159 Snowkite Steamboat (970) 819-2997

CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO

Connecticut

Orbit Marine Sports (203) 333-3483 Tri State Kites (800) 510-0865

Florida

CT CT

7 Kiteboarding (305) 664-4055 FL Ace Performer (239) 489-3513 FL Bloodline Boardshop (321) 254-4668 FL Big Kite Miami (305) 303-4107 FL East Coast Kiteboarding (954) 295-5778 FL Emerald Coast Kiteboarding (850) 235-2444 FL Extreme Kites (904) 461-9415 FL Extreme Sports

(321) 779-4228 FL Jupiter Kiteboarding (561) 373-4445 FL Key West Kiteboarding (305) 407-6748 FL Kiteboarding Tampa Bay (813) 389-3683 FL Ft. Lauderdale Kitesurfing Co. (954) 410-5419 FL Island Style Wind & Watersports (941) 954-1009 FL Island Surf and Sail (954) 927-7002 FL Kiteboarding Tampa Bay (813) 389-3683 FL Kite Surf the Earth (888) 819-5483 FL Kite World (321) 725-8336 FL KGB Kiteboarding (904) 434-8987 FL 1st Coast Kiting (904) 424-2721 FL Learn 2 Fly (386) 986-9637 FL Liquid Surf & Sail (850) 664-5731 FL KiteMare (877) 829-0015 FL Miami Kiteboarding Inc. (305) 345-9974 FL Otherside Boardsports (305) 853-9728 FL The Kite Shop (305) 361-0168 FL Sandy Point Progressive Sports (386) 756-7564 FL Ski Rixen (954) 429-0215 FL Tampa Bay Kiteboarding (727) 798-2484 FL Triton Kiteboarding (727) 453-9577 FL Watersports West (888) 401-5080 FL XL Kites (866) 955-4837 FL Xrated Kiteboarding (888) 401-5080 FL

Georgia

All Out Kiteboarding (912) 234-8260 GA High Tide Surf Shop (912) 786-6556 GA Locus Kiteboarding (404) 509-4229 GA Hanag20 Kiteboarding (912) 223-7856 GA

Hawaii

Action Sports Maui (808) 242-8015 HI Aloha Kiteboarding Academy (808) 637-5483 HI Caveman Kitesurfing (808) 389-4004 HI Extreme Sports Maui (808) 871-7954 HI Hawaiian Island Surf & Sport (808) 871-4981 HI Hawaiian Watersports (808) 262-KITE HI

Hawaiian Surf & Sail (808) 637-5373 HI Kailua Sailboards (808) 262-2555 HI Kite High (808) 637-5483 HI Kiteboard Maui (808) 870-2554 HI Hawaiian Ocean Sports (866) 488-5483 HI Kitesurf Maui (808) 873-0015 HI Maui Kiteboarding Lessons (808) 242-8015 HI Naish Maui Pro Center (808) 871-1500 HI Naish Hawaii (808) 262-6068 Off Da Lip (808) 255-6255 Second Wind (808) 877-7467 Vela Maui (800) 223-5443

(508) 259-2728

HI

H2AIR Productions (302) 227-1105

HI

Michigan

HI HI

Idaho

Groud Zero (208) 265-6714 Fly Sun Valley (208) 726-3332

ID ID

Illinois

Windward Sports (773) 472-6868  Chicago Kiteboarder (312) 804-5482

Massachusetts

MA

Maryland

IL IL

Air Support Kiteboarding (866) Kite-Cod MA Kitesite.net (508) 398-1333 MA Skyhigh Kiteboarding School

MD

Broneah Kiteboarding (231) 392-2212 MI Detroit Kiteboarding (248) 245-5016 MI Grand Bay Kite Co. (231) 929-0607 MI Great Lakes Kiteboarding (586) 822-6511 MI MacInaw Kite Co. (800) 622-4655 MI Tawas Board Riders (989) 362-9906 MI Motor City Kiteboarding (586) 943-5172 MI Sharkless Kiteboarding (269) 639-SURF MI Uncle Doug’s Kiteboarding (810) 985-3732 MI

Minnesota

Scuba Center Wind/Kite (612) 925-4818

MN


North Star Kiteboarding (612) 940-6639 Midwest Mountaineering (612) 339-3433 LAKAWA Kiteboarding (651) 428-4121

MN MN MN

Mississippi

Get Air (228) 209-1204 Gulfport Boardsports (228) 596-1936

MS MS

Montana

Underground Kitesports (406) 546-2709

MT

North Carolina

Blowing in the Wind (910) 763-1730 NC Cape Fear Kiteboarding (910) 201-4002 NC Kiteboarding Hatteras (252) 995-5000 NC Kitty Hawk Kiteboarding Centers (877) FLY-THIS NC Outer Banks Kiting Certified (252) 305-6839 NC Real Kiteboarding (866) 732-5548 NC Wind Toys USA (910) 328-5483 NC Wind Toys II (252) 393-1300 NC

New Hampshire

Powerline Sports (888) 987-WIND

NH

New Jersey

Extreme Windsurfing (610) 807-9493 Green Hat Kiteboarding (718) 577-1256 Heritage Surf & Sport (609) 263-3033 Island Surf and Sail (609) 494-5553

NJ

Oklahoma

Thomasons Sports Kites (580) 796-2359

OK

Oregon

2nd Wind Sports (541) 386-4464 OR Air-Time (541) 387-3910 OR All Surf Industries (503) 239-8973 OR Big Winds (888) 509-4210 OR Brian’s Windsurfing/Kitesurfing (541) 386-1423 OR Cleanline Surf (888) 546-6176 OR Floras Lake Windsurfing (541) 348-9912 OR Gorge Surf Shop (800) 957-4978 OR Hood River Waterplay (541) 386-WIND OR Kite-Line (888) 714-9849 OR Kite the Gorge (541) 490-4926 OR Lincoln City Surf Shop (541) 996-7433 OR New Wind (541) 387-2440 OR Pacific Wave (503) 861-0866 OR Storm Warning (800) 492-6309 OR

Northwind Sports (401) 254-4295

RI

Washington

South Carolina

Half Moon Outfitters (843) 881-9472 Catch Some Air (843) 388-9300

SC SC

South Dakota

Pro Peak Sports (605) 341-5445

Southeast Expeditions (877) 943-8548

SD

Texas

Air Padre Kiteboarding (956) 299-WIND TX Pro Kitesurf (361) 883-1473 TX South Coast Kiteboarding (361) 949-3278 TX S. Padre Island Kiteboarding (956) 245-8343 TX S. Padre Kiteboarding (956) 761-1434 TX Warming Hut Ski & Board (972) 234-6088 TX XL Kites, Dallas (817) 676-7842 TX XLKites, Houston (877) 955-4837 TX XL Kites, Padre Island (866) 957-2373 TX Zero Gravity Kiteboarding (361) 949-0266 TX

Bellingham Kiteboarding (360) 441-7577 VA

North by Northwest Surf Co. (360) 452-5144 WA Seattle Kiteboarding Center (206) 779-3272 WA Urban Surf (206) 545-9463 WA Wiley’s Water Ski Shop (206) 762-1300 WA Wind Flow (877) 211-3524 WA Evo (206) 973-4470 WA

WA

Wisconsin

Adventure Kiteboarding WI (414) 760-1493 Coontail Watersports (715) 385-0250 WI Kite-Riders (608) 273-1817 WI Southport Rigging Company (262) 652-5434 WI The Board Shop (262) 248-1703 WI

Wyoming

Hoback Sports (307) 733-5335

WY

Utah

Puerto Rico

Kitesurfing Puerto Rico (787) 728-8716 Kitesurfing (787) 374-5329

Virginia

Rhode Island

PR PR

Cloud 9 Soaring Center (801) 576-6460 UT Kiteutah.com (435) 462-5303 UT

NJ NJ NJ

Nevada

Kitesurf Vegas (702) 493-9245 Windsports (702) 220-4340

NV NV

New York

Best Kiteboarding Center (631) 691-0793 NY Curtis Sport Connection (716) 627-2247 NY Island Riders (631) 583-3019 NY Main Beach Surf & Sports (631) 537-2716 NY Myers (716) 751-6511 NY Skywalk Kiteboarding (631) 324-4450 NY Windsurfing Hamptons (613) 283-9463 NY Rick’s Surf Shop   (631 )581-9424 NY

Ohio

Red Sky Surf & Snow (419) 536-3204 River Sports (440) 333-8138

OH OH

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rd a Y le sa

When three sports collide in San Quintin. Photo Paul Lang

THE

TOP

Break dancing on water at Luderitz Speed Challenge. Photo Roger Hislop

CRASHES IN FRONT OF THE

Bruno gets tea bagged in Phuket,Thailand. Photo Dave Barnes

LENS

G o t a g r e at w ip e o u t sh o t ? Email:ryan@thekiteboarder.com

Grom Gormly tests his new high performance kite skis in the Gorge. Photo Carol Bolstad

The Orange shirted bandit shows why you do not jump close to shore. Photo Unknown

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Eugene Zaharescu got a little too deep on this one at Dewey Beach, Delaware. Photo Karine Aigner

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The Kiteboarder Feb 2010 Online Magazine