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Indwe SEPTEMBER 2016 YOUR FREE COPY

WINNER SAPF 2015 - BEST EXTERNAL MAGAZINE - CATEGORY B

B LO E M F O N T E I N

CAPE

GEORGE

TOW N

DURBAN

KIMBERLEY

EAST

LUBUMBASHI

LO N D O N

LUSAKA

Delta dreaming

GABORONE

HOEDSPRUIT

PO RT E L I ZA B E T H

JOHANNESBURG

RICHARDS BAY

P I LA N E S B E RG

W A LV I S B A Y

HARARE


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BOTSWANA

STILL SPARKLING AT 50

Brand Botswana OfficialBrandBW www.bitc.co.bw


FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS TO A THRIVING AFRICAN SUCCESS STORY

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016 - Botswana celebrates 50 years of Independence. The golden jubilee comes at a time when Botswana is hailed as a thriving middle income economy that has grown from very humble beginnings. When she attained Independence, Botswana was a poor, undeveloped British protectorate known as Bechuanaland.

developmental strides, further entrenching herself as one of Africa’s shining examples of democracy, progress, development and good governance. Celebrate with us, as Botswana turns 50

In 1965, Botswana gained independence, with the founding Father of the Nation, Sir Seretse Khama as Prime Minister. In 1966, the country became the Republic of Botswana. The discovery of diamonds in 1967 brought about a new dawn. Over the years, Botswana has steadily developed, mainly through prudent utilisation of her minerals revenues. The country has grown in international stature, and is now recognised as a peaceful and increasingly prosperous democratic state. The economy continues to grow rapidly, with vast investments in education, health, social amenities, social development and infrastructure. As Botswana commemorates her Golden Jubilee, there is indeed a lot to celebrate. Botswana remains one of Africa’s shining and longest standing democracies. Botswana continues to make marked

Botswana Private Bag 00445, Gaborone, Plot 54351, Off PG Matante Road,Central Business District (CBD) Exponential Building Gaborone Botswana T +267 363 3300 F +267 318 1941

South Africa 88 Sandown Mews West Wing Stella Street Sandton, Johannesburg T +27 11 884 8959 F +27 11 883 7798

The Three Chiefs who went to Great Britain seeking protection for Batswana

United Kingdom 6 Stratford Place W1C 1AY London United Kingdom T +44 207 499 0031 F +44 207 7491 8528

India 43 Maker Chamber VI Nariman Point Mumbai - 400 021 India T +91 22 4360 2100 F +91 22 4360 2111


In the July edition of Indwe we neglected to include a credit for this image, which was taken by talented local photographer Lavonne Bosman

Contents 30/

Features 42/

50/

A True Warrior of Light

Dream, Dare, Create

A World of Shopping

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Omeya Golf and Residential Estate

A Tale of Beauty and the Beef

Celebrating 25 Years of Help & Innovation

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Evolution in SADC Payments Systems

Recycling Message Reaches New Audiences

Good Gardening to the Tea

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Rather Put it on the Back Burner

The Cost of the Great Trek to the Cape

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Two Faced?

The Travelling Golfer

Ntombe Thongo

Cointreau Creative Crew

Botswana’s Beefy Exports

A Namibian First

Working with the EU in Africa

94/ Steering Mhlathuze Water Mthokozisi Duze

First National Bank Botswana

House Hide-and-Seek

Things a Seller Might Be Hiding From You

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91/ Using Rooibos in Your Garden

Polyco

How to Avoid Burnout

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Liberty Midlands Mall

How to Spot a Facebook Scam

Mother City Property Prices

Gansbaai Golf Club


Contents / Regulars

/ Travel

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Need to Know

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012, The Capital of Cool

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Bits & Pieces

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Gardens of Hope

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Dinner & A Movie

Sea Point’s Hidden Curiosities

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Turn it Up!

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Books

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Greetings From the Friendly City

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Gadgets

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Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel & Spa

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Exploring the Okavango Delta on Horseback

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Where Houses Become Homes – Romansbaai

/ Airline Info 12/

CEO Letter

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Up Close and Personal With Inati Ntshanga

A Wild (Coast) Legacy

/ Motoring 97/

VW Amarok Double Cab

150/ 153/ Airline Information

106/ Mahindra KUV 100

156/ Flight Schedule

117/ Mercedes-Benz E-Class

Meet the Crew

159/ Passenger Letters

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This edition of Indwe is dedicated to Botswana, which will be celebrating 50 years of Independence in September this year. Why not visit this beautiful country yourself? SA Express connects Johannesburg to Gaborone daily.

Indwe


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Ceo SA EXPRESS Head of Department: Communications Refilwe Masemola Tel: +27 11 978 2540 Email: rmasemola@flyexpress.aero Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 Email: customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways Reservations Support Tel: +27 11 978 9905 Email: groupsales@flyexpress.aero Group Reservations Tel: +27 11 978 5578 Email: reservationslist@flyexpress.aero Sales Office Email: sales@flyexpress.aero INDWE Cover Image © iStockphoto.com Images © iStockphoto.com & Quickpic Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tcbmedia.co.za Marketing and Communications Manager Pam Komani | pam@junecommunications.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za

Celebrating Our Heritage, Our Cultures and Our Diversity Welcome aboard your SA Express flight. Spring is upon us and in this time of renewal, we celebrate a season of abundance and life. In South Africa, 24th September is Heritage Day – when we celebrate our diverse cultures and our roots. Former President Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela famously said: “When our first democratically elected government decided to make Heritage Day one of our national days, we did so because we knew that our rich and varied cultural heritage has a profound power to help build our new nation.” And as a proudly South African airline, it is a breathtaking experience to see our fellow South Africans share a piece of what makes us unique! 2016 is a year of milestones, and sees Botswana celebrate 50 years of independence. This day is a significant one, as in 1966, under the leadership of Seretse Khama, this proud African country became a self-governing republic, and on 30th September we celebrate Botswana Day. This month is also Tourism Month, which, as you know, promotes local tourism, and aims to cultivate a culture of travel amongst South Africans. As #WeFlyForYou, we invite you and your loved ones to visit any of the destinations we fly to. Experience the sunny shores of KwaZulu-Natal, explore majestic Mahikeng, zip into Bloemfontein, and discover the beauty of Richards Bay and Kimberley. The choice is yours! As a regional airline with route networks connecting major South African and regional

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cities, we are proud to play a significant role in the hospitality, travel and tourism industries in Africa. Our brand encourages national pride as we incorporate the colours of the South African flag, and encourage you to experience our beautiful country’s diversity. SA Express can proudly say that we are the most transformed airline in South Africa. We recognise that we are but a small part of a greater community, and it is of utmost importance to us to continue supporting our communities with initiatives that change their lives in a positive manner. On 10th August, SA Express hosted a Women’s Day event and started an initiative, in partnership with The Happy Days Foundation, to provide girls of school-going age with sanitary wear. We collected over 200 sanitary pads to help keep girls in school. Research shows that the average South African school girl misses 384 school days in their five-year high-school career, as they are unable to afford sanitary pads. Our success will help girls for an entire year! It is a truly great feeling to meet and partner with individuals and companies who embrace the spirit of Ubuntu! As always, on behalf of my crew and all the members of SA Express, I wish you a pleasant flight and thank you for choosing us as your carrier of choice. Yours in aviation Inati Ntshanga CEO of SA Express

Layout and Design Renier Keyter | renier@tcbmedia.co.za Features Writers Julie Graham | julie@tcbmedia.co.za Sarah-Claire Picton | sarah@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Bernard Hellberg l bernard@tcbmedia.co.za Pam Komani | pam@junecommunications.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager (Regional & SADC) Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Manager: National Sales & Business Development Chantal Barton | chantal@tcbmedia.co.za +27 79 626 0782 Senior Account Managers Nikki de Lange | nikki@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 415 0339 Calvin van Vuuren | calvin@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 5826873 Gertjie Meintjes | gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 757 2622 DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express. Information has been included in good faith by the publisher and is believed to be correct at the time of going to print. No responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions.


Bloemfontein

Durban

East London

Lusaka

Johannesburg

Hoedspruit

George

Harare

Lubumbashi

Mahikeng

Port Elizabeth

Gaborone

Richards Bay

Cape Town

Kimberley

Pilanesberg

Walvis Bay

17 Destinations all over Southern Africa, non-stop. You could choose other ways of getting to your holiday spot but flying with us is easy and non-stop. Flying with us is also convenient, because we fly to major destinations and smaller cities all over Southern Africa and the DRC, every day. Taking a break? Then make the most of your time o. Because we fly for you.

Visit www.flyexpress.aero for domestic flights to Bloemfontein, Port Elizabeth, East London, Kimberley, Hoedspruit, George, Johannesburg, Mahikeng, Pilanesberg, Richards Bay, Cape Town, Durban and regional flights to Lubumbashi, Gaborone, Walvis Bay, Lusaka and Harare.


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Up Close and

Personal With Inati Ntshanga Winston Churchill had it, Martin Luther King Jr had it, as did Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. Inati Ntshanga, the CEO of SA Express has it too – that sheer presence and charisma that makes people want to follow him, be around him and be influenced by him. He was born to lead. Indwe was privileged to sit down with Inati for a casual chat.

Text & Images © SA Express Indwe: Tell us more about your younger days? Inati Ntshanga (IN): I grew up in little village called kwaNgcobo just outside Port Elizabeth (in the Eastern Cape). Due to the fact that my parents worked far from home, I was raised predominantly by my grandmother and uncle. My uncle, Phakamisa, was my mentor and played a significant role in my life. He was also the head of the village. I’m told that I share a lot of his characteristics, which I can believe, because I looked up to him so much. I matriculated at Nyanga High School and then went on to study microbiology at the University of Cape Town (UCT). My maths teacher at the time read about an overseas scholarship called the Independent South African Education Programme, and recommended me for it. They had over 1,100 applicants from South Africa at the time but could only accept less than ten students. I was ecstatic when I heard that I was one of the lucky few to receive this scholarship and that I was awarded a place at the Phillips Academy Andover, an elite school in Massachusetts, United States, 34 km north of Boston. The Kennedy and the Bush families all studied there. The programme was for one year and you had to make the best of the opportunity, which I really did.

Indwe: How did you end up studying at Harvard University? IN: In the States, it’s not uncommon to apply at several universities to ensure your acceptance, and Harvard was one of the universities I applied at. You can imagine what went through my head as a young boy when I was told that I had been accepted and would be assisted with financial aid! It was during my time at Harvard that I developed a love for economics, and I knew that I wanted to pursue it as a career. Indwe: Tell us about your first ever job? IN: The scholarship from Harvard covered a large percentage of my studies but not all my expenses, so I had to work various jobs to cover the shortfall. I worked as dorm crew where I literally had to clean toilets, but I believe that no job is above anyone and if you need money and earn it honourably, you shouldn’t be ashamed of what you do. My second job was working at the campus drycleaning service and my third job was at an escort service – not the kind you’re thinking of! I worked for the Harvard police to give students free night time transport services because the campus is so massive. Indwe: What skills did you employ at Harvard that you still use today? IN: As a student I ran the dry-cleaning

service as if it was my own business, which taught me responsibility and made me understand deliverables and expectations, and that your efforts determine your outcome. Running three or four jobs simultaneously taught me order, time management, discipline and independence.

Indwe: Did you have the assistance of a mentor to help guide you up the career ladder? IN: Yes, I have had a few mentors. First was my uncle Phakamisa who passed away in 2000. He had been my mentor with regards to anything and everything – professional and personal. The other was Siza Mzimela, the former CEO of SA Express. Indwe: What has been your biggest career accomplishment to date? IN: I wouldn’t describe them as career accomplishments – rather as “Aha!” moments that were bigger to me than anything else in my life. Things like finally understanding fleet management, understanding the aviation puzzle, the links and how they really work. Those were my “Aha!” moments and accomplishments. I can also add that it has been great working as SA Express’ CEO for the past six years. It’s been tough but we’ve managed to hold the ship at very difficult times.

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Quick Questions • What are you reading right now? A book called Five Dysfunctions of a Team by Patrick Lencioni. It talks about how you improve the management of a team. • What is your favourite movie of all time? Scent of a Woman starring Al Pacino. It demonstrates the leadership and mentorship that takes place between an old and a young man. • What is your favourite food? “Umvubo”, which is a Xhosa staple dish. It’s very dry putu pap mixed with amasi. Or, as a takeout, I like Chesa Nyama. • If you could invite any four people (dead or alive) to a dinner party, who would they be? My late uncle Phakamisa; Alexandre Dumas, who was famous for writing The Three Musketeers but also published other work, so I’d like to analyse his strange mind; President John F Kennedy because he was a great leader; and Harriet Tubman, American slave-abolitionist, humanitarian, and an armed scout and spy for the United States Army during the American Civil War.

Indwe: What would you say your major strengths are as a leader? IN: I would probably say my technical competence, understanding and immersing myself in the business to understand every aspect of it. I know it sounds like a cliché but I also really love working with people. Indwe: How do you motivate yourself and others? IN: I’m generally self-motivated but I do read a lot of business books and feel-goodhappy stories. Sometimes people tend to beat themselves down too much, so as a leader, it is my job to look for the positive in the story, to drive positive reinforcement, and to remind them that structure, systems, processes and people work hand in hand. Indwe: Why is it that political parties, the public and media are pushing for stateowned companies to be privatised? IN: There is nothing wrong with state owned companies, but rather with the management of them. If you run a parastatal properly, the ownership shouldn’t matter. It’s time that we start telling the story ourselves, especially about the value state owned companies offer our country. For example, state-owned airlines are the only carriers in South Africa taking responsibility for the development of black cadet pilots and you can see it in our numbers. Almost 20 % of our pilots are black while the rest of the industry is at 2 % -to 8 %! Yes, we do social events and CSI like everyone else, but we exceed expectations because we sincerely

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believe in uplifting the communities in which we operate. To give you an idea, we fly to smaller routes to serve a specific sector of the market. Our competitors wouldn’t consider it because it’s not profitable enough. Government-owned businesses just need to create the expectation, set key performance indicators and ensure that they are met.

Indwe: SA Express is one of the few state-owned companies actually showing a profit. What are you doing differently? IN: I’m very pleased that we were able to report a profit in a highly competitive and challenging environment, where 11 airlines have gone under in the last 20 years. Management alone can’t take credit – success is shared across the system, and an entire team. By working with people who have a transparent vision and clear communication between them, success is achieved together. While I’m proud that we showed a small profit, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done – but it’s all about people. We have good people. We just have to adjust our management and reporting systems, which we are putting measures in place to ensure that these situations don’t arise in the future. Indwe: What did the temporary grounding over the long weekend do to the organisation as the whole? IN: It made us realise that even the Titanic can sink, and not to make assumptions that it “can’t happen to me”, or “I’m exempt”. Nobody is. This grounding reiterated that

we, as management, need to understand all the facts, be geared up and ready for any eventuality. Rather be over-prepared than allow people to fill in their own gaps.

Indwe: What do you foresee as potential challenges going forward? IN: Commodity prices are increasing, which is going to bring with it some challenges for the industry. Fortunately, SA Express has fuel-efficient aircraft but the fuel-guzzlers some of our competitors fly, will definitely feel it. I don’t believe the Rand is going to improve or deteriorate too much, but with increased competition, the consumer will also see a price reduction in tickets, so the yields for airlines won’t be great. Indwe: How can SA Express and the aviation industry overcome these challenges? IN: While we’ve already gone through a major cost-cutting exercise, those initiatives aren’t over yet. We have to recalibrate the business to work with where we are, and we need to strategically navigate the way back to where we need to be. We know what went wrong, what is inefficient, and we’re fixing it. The team and I are dedicated to making it work. Indwe: With all that you’ve achieved, where do you see yourself in five years’ time? IN: I still want to play an active role in South Africa’s aviation space at a leadership level. I want to be part of this group and make sure that it delivers something superior, which I believe it can.


Need to Know

For Lovers of Literature 7 th to 11th September Open Book Festival, Cape Town

This year’s Open Book Festival has something for everyone, including book launches, panel discussions, workshops, master classes, readings, performances and more. From the rock stars of the literary world to emerging writers, the Open Book Festival provides a platform to connect with a diverse range of local and international authors. The more than 100 events are designed to entertain, engage and stimulate ideas and conversations. The programme will again include the popular Poetica and Comics Fest, as well as events for younger readers. This year’s festival will feature authors from Botswana, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Ghana, Holland, New Zealand, Nigeria, Norway, Reunion, the United Kingdom and the USA, as well as an outstanding collection of powerful South African writers. This is also the perfect way to celebrate National Book Week which runs from 5th to 11th September. Tickets are available from webtickets.co.za.

// www.openbookfestival.co.za

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Down the Garden Path 1st & 2nd October Open Garden, Skeerpoort, Cradle of Humankind

The gardens at Mulligatawny Farm, the weekend retreat of interior designer Michael Hogan, will be open to the public for the first time in October in aid of St George’s Turning Point Foundation. This spectacular 16-ha garden draws inspiration from European landscapes and Monet’s water gardens at Giverney. The garden exudes whimsy and romance, and its highlights include over 130 varieties of water lilies, thousands of roses, irises, crab apples and a large collection of bamboo varieties. There is an orchard of heritage fruit trees, a potager, a folly and a grotto. Refreshments will be on sale and visitors will also be able to buy a wide selection of plants. The Turning Point Foundation assists young people who have been brought up in registered children’s homes to make the transition to independent living. Tickets are available from www.webtickets.co.za or at the gate.

//www.turningpointfoundation.org.za

Market Day 20th to 25th September The CY Market, Meerendal Wine Farm, Durbanville

The CY Market is one of the hottest events on Cape Town’s cultural calendar, with a unique focus on empowering local women and giving NPOs the opportunity to help the community. For this year’s theme, “Lapslap Moi”, exhibitors are encouraged to create something that is uniquely personal and illustrates all “the pretty in their lives.” Exhibitors are hand-picked each year, with new exhibitors added yearly to the roster, while old favourites return, bringing loyal customers with them. Parents will take delight in Annapatat Kids, which creates “fun, vintage, personal” styles that both moms and kids can have fun with. The Grizzly Beard Co. offers a range of handmade, all-natural beard products paired with delicious scents that women love too, while former Idols star, Andriëtte Norman, will be exhibiting her range of décor products. Tickets are available at the gate.


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Need to Know

Chukkas and Champions 16th to 18th September The Land Rover Africa Cup, Inanda Club, Sandton

The Land Rover Africa Cup, a unique knockout polo championship, offers an action-packed day for polo lovers, which will include a display of exceptional horsemanship. The 2016 tournament will feature some of Africa’s top polo players and teams up against their South African counterparts in an enthralling weekend of polo. The highlights of the day include entertainment, celebrities, a showcase by Airbus Helicopters, and the exciting Horse vs Machine Race. This year, the race will witness the New Range Rover Evoque Convertible up against the best thoroughbred of the tournament. Fashion aficionados will also enjoy a carefully curated experience as they gather on the scenic Inanda clubhouse terraces to witness quintessential spring trends created by top African fashion designers. Tickets are available from TicketPro.

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Tasty Tipples 24th & 25th September Franschhoek Uncorked Festival, Franschhoek

Celebrate your heritage over a glass of Franschhoek wine, selected by the winemakers, and paired with delicious food cooked over an open flame as Franschhoek prepares to Braai4Heritage. The Franschhoek Uncorked Festival is the ideal opportunity to travel from farm to farm sampling wines from the Franschhoek Vignerons. Visitors can also look forward to amazing festival offerings, perfect for stocking up the wine rack for the upcoming festive season. As an added extra, outdoor enthusiasts will be able to participate in a selection of outdoor activities on offer during the weekend. Avoid the queues and pre-book your Uncorked Weekend Pass through www.webtickets.co.za. Tickets cost R140 per person and allow you access to all of the participating wine farms, as well as a complimentary tasting glass and free wine tastings.

// www.franschhoekuncorked.co.za

Fancy a Sporty Saturday? 1st October Freshpak Fitness Festival, Clanwilliam

Commemorate three decades of fitness, wellbeing and family fun against the scenic background of the Cederberg. Providing all the features of a true multisport event, the annual Freshpak Fitness Festival marks its 30th anniversary this year in Clanwilliam. Athletes can take part in the various sporting events, including open water swims, a duathlon, biathlon and triathlon, while family, friends and visitors enjoy the festive atmosphere. There are also kiddies races for young fitness enthusiasts. CANSA is the official beneficiary and will receive a percentage of the proceeds raised from entry fees.

// www.freshpakfitnessfestival.co.za


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Need to Know

A Ballet Fairytale 30th September to 9th October Cinderella, Joburg Theatre, Johannesburg

A dazzling night, a glittering ball, something wonderful is sure to happen when the ultimate fairytale, Cinderella, returns to the Joburg Theatre for just ten performances. Choreographed by Joburg Ballet’s artistic director Iain MacDonald, Cinderella waltzes across the stage with Johann Strauss’s champagne-infused melodies providing the perfect musical setting for this ultimate rags-to-riches tale. Andrew Botha’s glittering designs frame the action, while the full company will set the stage alight in a production full of charm and magic in the classical tradition. Booking is open via Joburg Theatre (0861 670 670) or online at www.webtickets.co.za.

// www.joburgballet.com

Hope Begins with You 16th September Sunflower Day, Nationwide

16th to 18th September Darling Wildflower Show, Western Cape

The Sunflower Fund is dedicated to creating awareness, educating the public and handling the registration process for people to join the South African Bone Marrow Registry (SABMR). Along with the tagline “Hope begins with you”, the organisation is launching Sunflower Day for the first time this year, which will be celebrated annually on the third Friday of September. The organisation’s iconic bandana has also undergone a significant change, with the creation of the Tube of Hope (Tope), an affordable, multipurpose article of clothing that can be worn as a headband, mask, scarf, cap or armband. It can be used in a wide variety of sports or outdoor activities and will be available in six eye-catching colours. It comes in child (R20) and adult (R25) sizes and is available from Pick n Pay stores nationwide, Round Table and several other retailers.

The Darling Wildflower Show celebrates an integral part of the Cape Fynbos Kingdom where more than 1,200 different species of flowers can be found. The Flower Show will be offering a variety of activities to entertain young and old, including the Landscaped Hall depicting the flowers of the area in their natural habitat, a free ride on a tractor-drawn wagon to see the pristine wetland at Oude Post, a craft and gourmet food market, a display of vintage tractors and cars, and an entertainment tent featuring live music from the famous Swartland band, Klassik, and other local acts. Kids will also have a weekend of fun in the playpark area with entertainment ranging from facepainting to rides, whilst adults can relax in the Mini Wine Route & Beer Tent. Tickets are available from www.quicket.co.za.

// www.sunflowerfund.org.za

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Floral Splendour

// www.darlingwildflower


Bits & Pieces

A Sparkling Heritage The latest diamond engagement ring from Browns The Diamond Store looks a lot like the first the company produced. Named 1934 in celebration of the company’s long history, this vintage-inspired engagement ring is a tribute to over 80 years of fine craftsmanship. From the crown to the foundation, every part of the ring is an elaborate work of art. The ornate design of pavé set diamonds, fine millgrain and filigree work is reminiscent of the jewellery style of a bygone era. An 18ct Rose Gold Browns Angel rests below the centre diamond as a symbol of guidance and protection, while the side profile of the band is inspired by French lace.

// www.brownsjewellers.com

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Heritage Nature’s on Display Wonderland in Nelson Mandela Bay There is no shortage of museums in Nelson Mandela Bay, so why not take advantage of the tours and facilities available to explore this destination’s fascinating history this Heritage Month? The Port Elizabeth Museum, now called the Bayworld Museum, is not only the oldest museum in Nelson Mandela Bay, but also the third oldest museum in South Africa, having been established in 1856. What makes Bayworld Museum such a unique place is that as well as showcasing artefacts from a bygone area, it also provides education on marine life and reptiles. The Red Location Museum is an Apartheid museum in New Brighton, built as a tribute to the liberation struggle. It was designed by South African  architectural partnership  Noero Wolff Architects  and has won a number of prestigious international architecture awards. Travel back in time with renowned blogger Anje Rautenbach for more information on Nelson Mandela Bay’s Museums by visiting blog.nmbt.co.za.

From the dusty plains of Moremi Game Reserve, stretching as far as they eye can see, where the animals meandering around the centralised waterhole keep onlookers excited, to the wonderland that is the Okavango Delta, where the hippopotami rule and the mokoro is the way of transport – this is where you will fall in love with all that is majestic in Botswana. A charter flight over the delta, a sunset cruise offering a picture-perfect view, bush walks with giraffes – these are but a few of the memories to be made here. Tuskers Bush Camp, Afrika Ecco Mobile Safaris, and Xobega Island Camp are three destinations that set the bar high for adventurers, travellers and holiday makers alike.

// www.sundestinations.co.za


Dinner & A Movie

A Warming Winter Plate Kleine Zalze’s onsite restaurant, Terroir, is a Stellenbosch must-visit – especially this chilly season for its Winter Plates offering. The fact that Terroir has been honoured nine times with a Top 10 award in the Eat Out Mercedes-Benz Restaurant Awards is testament to Chef Michael Broughton’s incredible culinary skills. Available until the end of September, Terroir’s Winter

Plates menu includes a delectable main course (choices include potato gnocchi with Ciboulette sauce, confit pork belly, and venison with braised cabbage, ginger, and bacon) along with an amuse bouche, artisanal bread board, and a glass of a Kleine Zalze vintage – all for R195 per person. For more information, visit www.kleinezalze.co.za.

War Dogs War Dogs follows two friends in their early 20s (played by Jonah Hill and Miles Teller) living in Miami Beach during the Iraq War. They exploit a little-known government initiative that allows smaller businesses to bid on US Military contracts. After a humble start, they begin raking in big money

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and are living the high life. But the pair gets in over their heads when they land a $300 million deal to arm the Afghan military – a deal that puts them in business with some very shady people, not the least of which turns out to be the US Government.

Ellie Inspired Amarula Cream is asking travellers everywhere to celebrate the gentle giants of Africa (the African elephants), and their conservation with a new bottle which will be launched through travel retail stores. Affectionately named “Jabulani”, which is Zulu for “rejoice”, the bottle inherits its name from a South African elephant that was abandoned as a baby but later rescued and adopted into a new herd. The new bottle features sleek new curves inspired by the shape of the African elephant. While the bottle shape has changed, Amarula Global General Manager, Dino D’Araujo reassures fans of the cream liqueur, that the liquid inside the bottle is still the same Amarula Cream they have come to know and love. Amarula is available at reputable liquor outlets, nationwide.


Turn it Up!

Medicine Boy

Drawn to the fine line between the calm and chaotic – inhabited by the likes of Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds and Spiritualized – Lucy Kruger and Andre Leo, of Cape Town’s Dream Noise duo Medicine Boy, have conjured a sound from deep within the reverb tank, where lonesome lullabies and screeching strings find comfort in one another. Since the band’s live debut in September 2014, they have supported The Black Lips, Allah-Las and Golden Animals on their respective tours of South Africa; played shows across the country in support of their debut EP,

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More Knives; and performed at most of the major national festivals. The band also toured Europe and the UK for three months last year – no small feat for an alternative band from Africa – showing a fierce commitment and dedication to their craft. Kinda Like Electricty , Medicine Boy’s debut LP, was recently released in partnership with Permanent Record and Roastin’ Records. The album is a natural collection of influences, from soaring psychedelia and fuzzed-out noise to primal blues rhythms and country/folk balladeering.


r o i r r a W A T rue t h g i L of ngo Ntombe Tho

soul and uch passion, m as ith w er m rn and ross a perfor al healer, bo one comes ac and tradition n ia ic us m It is not often in a John’s the ongo – th in Port St as Ntombe Th ou m nt le er ta iv R te fu na in ar the Ntafu all village ne raised in a sm Eastern Cape. ham ape Town Text: Julie Gra ham & Tedx C ra G lie Ju © Images

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Ntombe Thongo performing at TEDx Cape Town last year.

Thongo’s electrifying stage presence, colourful beaded costumes, commanding singing voice and incredibly skilful instrumental work have been engaging audiences around the world for over a decade, and one cannot help but feel connected to the magic of his music for a long time after each performance. After witnessing this for myself during his captivating performance last year at TEDx, Cape Town, I simply had to meet this eccentric, bold yet gentle human being who had touched my heart through his musical genius, in order to hear his remarkable story. Born in 1977 in the small village of Mthambalala, Ntombe Thongo (who then went by the name of Dibanisile), was immediately identified by the people in the village as having something special about him. Even as a baby, those around him felt he had a unique calling, and so they observed and waited for answers that they were confident would be revealed in due time. In 1983, at the tender age of six, the little boy started speaking of strange dreams – dreams that were clearly callings from the ancestors. His older sister, who was already in training to become a sangoma,

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immediately took Thongo under her wing as a Khankatha – an assistant to someone who is in training to become a traditional healer. During this time, Thongo attempted to attend school but unlike the other children in the village, his calling had come early and the training to become a sangoma was of greater importance. During his training, he had a dream that changed his life forever. “At around 10 or 11 years old, my great grandmother came to me in a dream with something that looked almost like a saw with a stick on the side of it. She said, ‘Here! Play it!’ I didn’t know what it was and had no idea how to play it. So she grabbed it back from me and started to play. She played so beautifully. And then she gave it to me again and said, ‘Here – this is only the beginning.’ I didn’t know what it meant,” he recalls. After telling his teacher about the dream, she explained that the instrument was a uMrhubhe, a traditional mouth bow. She made Thongo his own mouth bow and he started to play, making funny noises at first, but within four days, he was playing as if he had been practising his whole life. “I believe that is where my musical future began,” he says.

In 1993, Thongo graduated as a traditional healer and the youngest sangoma in the Eastern Cape. He attempted to return to school, but he was ostracised by the other children because of his traditional dress, and he also found that his connection to the ancestors and the spirit world hindered his ability to focus on what was being taught. “As a sangoma, I am a sensitive person. I sense and feel and get visions about the things around me. So it was a hard time. To be surrounded by all these children from different families and backgrounds sitting all around me, I would sense all their energy and it would affect me. It was very, very intense. So I gave up. I stopped going,” he explains. Thongo stayed in the village for the next few years, learning more about his role as a healer. He was particularly impressive during the gatherings of the sangomas, where he would dance with vibrant energy and rhythm and attract large audiences – he was a natural performer. Then, on Christmas day in 1998, while walking to his brother’s house, Thongo passed a group of young men who were playing music. They called out to him and invited him to join them. “I had no idea


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what a guitar looked like. I had never seen one in my life. I’d never seen a keyboard either – the place I grew up in didn’t have music at all. So I went to join them and I looked at these foreign instruments and they looked nice but I had no idea what to do with them,” he recalls. One of the men, affectionately referred to by his peers as Zero Wally, took Thongo under his wing, teaching him how to play the instruments and, after noting an incredible talent, buying him instruments of his own. Shocked at how Thongo could pick up an instrument, spend a few days with it and then be able to play it like a pro, he gave him everything, from guitars to a keyboard and even a seven piece drum kit. “I was learning very fast. Once I created one song, I just knew – it was like it was in my heart. I would just listen to records and cassette tapes and then I just picked it up from there. Once I had learnt all the instruments and could play them all well, I realised that I could start teaching others. So I got some young boys and girls from the village to come and join me and learn. I started with two young guys teaching them to pay bass lines and drums for me. I had no idea what I was doing but this all made sense to me,” he says. Thongo and his newly-formed band started to perform all over the Eastern Cape and he was soon spotted by renowned Cape

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Town playwright and artist, Brett Bailey, who asked him to come to Cape Town to share his music with others. Before he knew it, Thongo was performing at major festivals around Cape Town and even went on to play in large theatres in London. “It was crazy! It was so, so crazy! And so beautiful,” he laughs. Separating his role as a sangoma and a musician was a challenge at first as Thongo would find that, because of the nature of his songs, his ancestors would

“Music helps me realise how real the world is. And that I can change the situation in my heart and the hearts of others just by listening to it or playing it. Because music heals. And that is how I heal.” – Ntombe Thongo appear to him during his performances – which was somewhat of a distraction. “So, I asked my ancestors if they could allow me, and us as a band, to use this platform as a career.” And they did. But that didn’t stop Thongo from using his talent and role

as a healer in conjunction with his music. “Seventy percent of the things which I sing about come from my dreams,” he explains. “Music and healing go together. I am healing those who listen to my music.” Ntombe Thongo has achieved major success and has touched the hearts of all those who have had the privilege of seeing him perform. His debut album, Thokozile, which was released in 2012, went on to win the South African Traditional Music (SATMA) Award as best isiXhosa album of 2012. He was also nominated for a South African Music Award (SAMA) for best Maskandi album in 2013. His musical style, which he refers to as “Transkhanda”, is a traditional type of trance music from the Transkei. His style is completely unique and his incredibly beautiful voice, bold dance moves, colourful beads and, on occasion, mini skirt and heels, have captivated audiences in South Africa, Europe, Asia, North and South America. Exceptionally skilled at a number of traditional instruments such as the mouth bow, uHadi (a bow attached to a calabash) and a 12-string guitar, Ntombe Thongo is a force to be reckoned with as he captures the hearts of audiences worldwide, healing the souls of all who hear him play. For more information, contact Ntombe Thongo on thongolam@gmail.com.


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01C2apital The of Cool

ale. Billed l Capital Bienn oo C nd co se ent puts of the festival, the ev es the launch se gn ia si or de et d Pr an , orks rilla art This month pop-up artw ted, DIY, guer ith an array of w ’s first uncura ity ld un or w m d, e m or th as Craff its creative co usiast, Carla the hands of Pretoria enth d an er the city into ph at this year’s l ra ita ts. Photog Cool Cap t en ev en e es iv pr at re in y to and imag avelled to Ital cool. e team that tr es Pretoria so ak m t was part of th ha w r he d ale. We aske Venice Bienn in Text: Keith Ba lied pp Su Images ©

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001. It Has Awesome Views & Purple Hues Our warm, sunny, dry winter days are followed by long-awaited spring rains in October and November. Every October, Pretoria puts on her purple finery and a sweet perfume fills the air. By late spring, the city is filled with colour – in the city gardens and on streets lined with Jacaranda trees. It’s impossible to grow tired of Pretoria sunsets. The city sits at an altitude of around 1,340 m and is surrounded by hills, so there are multiple viewpoints. But for something extra-sublime, visit the botanical gardens and ogle breathtaking Highveld views from the koppie. www.sanbi.org/gardens/Pretoria 002. It Offers Historical Insights A visit to Freedom Park is an opportunity to reconcile with our nation’s turbulent past. “It’s a chance to come to terms with who we are,” says Carla. Situated on Salvokop, Freedom Park tells the story of the African continent, focussing on South Africa from the dawn of humanity through various epochs, including the tragic phases in more recent history. Its architecture and exhibitions celebrate the many cultural differences and similarities within Africa. The interactive museum, //hapo, unravels the complex tale of Africa across both time and space, and its Wall of Names remembers the many heroic figures who have helped our nation achieve freedom. www.freedompark.co.za

003. Artists Are Everywhere “Pretoria produces more artists than any other place in our country,” says Carla. “By far the best place to see good contemporary art is at the Fried Contemporary Gallery (friedcontemporary.com), where discerning exhibitions happen all year round. Nearby is a smaller gem, Trent Gallery (198 Long Street, Waterkloof), with almost weekly openings showcasing the diversity of the local art scene. Adjoining Trent is Long Street Art Lovers, with an exquisite collection of locally made jewellery. In Arcadia, Harrie’s (harriespancakes.com) on Eastwood Street is famous for delicious pancakes, but is also worth visiting for the art on display – a new collection goes up every three months.” 004. Its Statues Are Solid… Thanks to having the largest number of foundries in the country, Pretoria can be considered South Africa’s sculpture capital. Angus Taylor’s Dionysus Sculpture Works is the most technologically advanced we have, and Renzo Vignali, which opened in 1931, is the oldest. Plus there are public sculptures everywhere. At the Union Buildings, a towering 9 m bronze of Madiba gazes at Coert Steynberg’s statue of former president General Louis Botha. The first Cool Capital Biennale in 2014 included the Sculpture Capital project which aimed specifically at creating a legacy of sculptural

works in Pretoria. Among this year’s flagship projects is Saadjies, celebrating this year’s Biennale theme of “small is big”. The aim is to produce a travelling sculpture exhibition comprising tiny sculptures – none of them will be taller, wider or deeper than 180 mm. 005. …and Modern Architecture Abounds Pretoria is packed with architecture representing a diversity of styles and influences, and there’s a particularly fine collection of Modernist and Brutalist buildings constructed between World War II and the 1960s. In the city centre, worth checking out are the second Netherlands Bank building and Polley’s Arcade, both by famed Pretoria architect Norman Eaton. On the campus of the University of Pretoria, about 100 years’ of architectural styles are represented and it’s as though the Modern era never ended. Among the most beautiful examples are designs by architect Karl Jooste, who was born in Pretoria in 1926. He worked for Eaton before going solo and one of his finest buildings on the university campus is the Musaion Theatre (up.ac.za). 006. There’s Fine French Food… Pretoria has quite a happening dining scene. Another Karl Jooste building, the Waterkloof Ridge home he designed for himself and lived in until his death in 1971, has been transformed into one of Pretoria’s

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First Page Top: African history is celebrated at Freedom Park. First Page Bottom Left: One of Tswhane’s famed Jacaranda-lined streets. First Page Bottom Right: Artisanal ales at Capital Craft Beer Academy. Second Page: An event at African Beer Emporium. This Page: Scenes from Market @ The Sheds, possibly Pretoria’s coolest monthly gathering.

most impressive fine-dining venues, Brasserie de Paris (www.brasseriedeparis.co.za). The French-influenced menu celebrates Jooste’s connection with French master architect Le Corbusier – expect to find classics like steak tartar, chateaubriand and crème brûlée, as well as a wine-paired degustation menu. 007. …and Hipsters Can Eat, Too! The city also has its share of casual dining spots and hipster hangouts. In Lynnwood, Lucky Rodrigo is a “hipster” bar with a funky 1970s design and a menu that includes burgers with a gourmet twist (luckyrodrigo.co.za). Clever-sounding fusion burgers with names like The Three Stooges and The Lance Armstrong are the mainstay at Burger Bistro (burgerbistro.co.za), a chain with a branch at The Village, a restaurant “hotspot” that opened in Hazelwood at the beginning of the year. For pizza that’s in a class of its own, go to Toni’s in Menlo Park (tonipizza. co.za). Or to feel the buzz of the latest rugby match, head for Thirst @ 28° East (012/991-3261), a sports bar in Faerie Glen that never seems to close its doors. 008. It’s Youthful and Lively “The most obviously cool thing about Pretoria,” says Carla, “is its diversity of cultures and its youthfulness.” You get a sense of this mix of bright young things at U-The Space, a lively venue that recently relocated to the city centre (146 Minnaar Street). “It offers the best of excellent and unpretentious local bands and is a hub of young artists, great coffee and local flavour,” says Carla. “It’s a must for the curious and young-at-heart.” Showcasing local bands in front of a hip and happening crowd, Park Acoustics (parkacoustics.co.za) is a monthly concert held at Fort Schanskop, part of the Voortrekker Monument Nature Reserve. It’s the city’s most energetic live music event, held in a marvellous outdoor setting. 009. It’s Creatively Hip Aside from serious coffee and good comfort food, the tiny +27 Café in Hatfield also serves up jazz performances and

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exhibitions of art and design. The +27 design brand was started by siblings Hannes and Riaan Visser, an architect and an engineer respectively. Their cosy café courtyard features shared tables and free Wi-Fi, plus a chance to try out the brothers’ furniture and other design work – they even have their own men’s fashion range in the shop attached to the café (www.plus27design.com). 010. You’ll Never Go Thirsty You can taste and quaff the best of locally produced beer at Capital Craft Beer Academy (capitalcraft.co.za). The bar in the Greenlyn Village Centre hosts fantastic food events and has over 220 different beers on offer. Or, for a slightly different atmosphere, head to the African Beer Emporium (africanbeeremporium.com) in the CBD. It’s a fresh-looking indoor-outdoor restaurant

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and bar where it’s possible to get insight into culinary traditions from different parts of the continent. Plus, of course, there’s a vast range of beers and ales from across Africa. 011. Mornings Are a Joy… Along with several other excellent weekend markets, a great place to imbibe Pretoria’s rich mix of cultures, fashion, music, food and beer is at 012 Central’s monthly Market @ The Sheds in the city centre (marketatthesheds.co.za). In July, the market also played host to Pretoria’s first early-morning Secret Sunrise event. Mindfully combining yoga, meditation, make-believe and dancing, Secret Sunrise is a playful gathering designed to kickstart the day on a high note – participants are given wireless headphones and guided by a team of fun-loving, far-out instructors


tasked with encouraging everyone to simply let go and have a blast (secretsunrise.com). 012. …and Everyone’s Welcome to Join In Cool Capital is a DIY event, encouraging participation. 2014’s inaugural biennale saw some 250 creative pop-up art and design projects infiltrating the metro, showcasing the vibrant and creative side of the city. One group of guerrilla artists “fabric bombed” Pretoria’s Fountains Circle at 03h00 on a Monday morning. Another creative project saw Paul Kruger’s statue being pimped up with a covering of tin foil, and one project bedecked the Voortrekker Monument in pink and purple lighting. The festival’s mission is to give everyone a chance to explore opportunities for creative expression whether through art, architecture, public installations, urban and graphic design, film screenings or musical performances. Anyone wanting to express their love for the city, or showcase ideas about how to improve it, is encouraged to participate. It’s all happening between 23rd September and 31st October 2016. Visit www.coolcapital.co.za for more information./

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Gardens of

Hope

The Thornybush Collection is Giving Back The Thornybush Luxury Game Lodge Collection comprises 11 lodges dotted throughout The Thornybush Game Reserve and one in the Sabi Sands. Thornybush prides itself on providing unparalleled experiences in nature, as well as luxurious yet laidback accommodation at every lodge. It is also passionate about uplifting and assisting the reserve’s neighbouring communities.

Text & Images © Lynette Botha Apart from employing a large majority of its staff from the surrounding area, the directors of The Thornybush Collection wanted to find other ways in which to help the communities and assist the people of the area to become self-sufficient. One such project is The Thornybush Collection Community Garden Project, which consists of three gardens, spearheaded by one of Thornybush’s directors, Glenn van Heerden, and lead by Community Gardens Manager, Gavin. “It is not enough for us to just employ people from these communities at our lodges; we also need to aid them in leading better lives. Our community gardens not only assist in earning salaries for those involved, but we are able to provide fresh produce to two schools to feed the learners, as well as to the Hlokomela Clinic, on a daily and weekly basis respectively,” Glenn says. The remaining produce is sold to nearby game lodges and stores, with all income generated from this going directly back into the project to buy more plants and equipment, as well as to pay wages. Any remaining fresh fruit and vegetables are sold cheaply to the local community within which the gardens are located. “It’s all about sustainability,” Glenn adds.

“The main aim is for the communities to become self-sufficient, creating enough crops to nourish themselves and to earn an income from.” All produce grown is regional and seasonal – plants that thrive in the Lowveld climate, such as beetroot, lettuce, spinach, chilli and an array of herbs and edible flowers. The project has not been without issues. “Like with many things in life, you learn through trial and error,” Glenn explains. “When we first started the gardens it took a long time for us to learn how to protect the produce from the intense heat; the netting we initially had surrounding the gardens was not enough to shield the fruit and vegetables – we lost a lot of good harvests due to sun damage. But now we use a more dense netting that perfectly defends the food from UV rays. We also found that while the ladies were washing and packing the produce outdoors in the sun, the goods were wilting, so we had to build a place in which they could wash, dry and cool the vegetables before packing them, to ensure they remained fresh. We can’t supply lodges with poor quality produce, or else they won’t support these gardens. And this all costs money. We still need to put up fences to keep livestock from eating

the crops too – it’s ongoing.” The Thornybush Collection Community Garden Project is solely funded through donations from The Thornybush Collection, as well as generous donors, who include visitors to the reserve as well as big businesses. The project also receives immense support from Simbambili Game Lodge, which is part of the collection and located the closest to the gardens. “We are very lucky to have people who support this project, and in order for us to keep it going – and to start more community initiatives – it’s important for us to continue fundraising and creating awareness about what we are doing. There’s a great team behind this initiative, from the ladies who work in the gardens to those who train, oversee and mentor them from Thornybush’s side. It really is a combined effort, which has produced great results,” Glenn concludes. Donations can be made directly on the Thornybush website. Accounts for these growing community initiatives are available upon request and updated annually. For more information contact nic@thornybush.co.za or visit www.thornybushcollection.co.za.

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Nadia Turton

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Dream, Dare,

Create Cointreau Creative Crew Iconic triple sec brand, Cointreau, is supporting the creative spirit in South Africa though the Cointreau Creative Crew.

Text: Paula Rabeling Images © Cointreau

Passion and creativity are what defines Cointreau. This comes as no surprise, as Edouard Cointreau needed both when he created the orange liqueur in the 1800s. Earlier this year, I spoke with Alfred Cointreau, the Heritage Manager of Cointreau and the sixth generation of the Cointreau family, and the words he used most often were those two. Edouard Cointreau’s wife, Louisa, was a women’s rights activist who used her status to develop women’s freedom and creativity. Her values also became part of the Cointreau brand. Today, Cointreau continues to uphold these values by supporting and empowering women through the Cointreau Creative Crew (CCC) initiative, a communication platform and competition empowering women to develop their creativity by encouraging them to Dream, Dare, Create.

“We want to help people to express their creativity through personal projects. With the CCC, we provide a grant to help people to create something; to help them realise their dreams,” says Alfred. After a very successful campaign in Europe, Cointreau recently brought the CCC to South Africa. The grand prize? R100,000 to turn your dream into a reality. If you have a passion project that you think encompasses the criteria of Dare, Dream, Create – anything that expresses creativity and passion in your area of expertise, whether it be art, music, design, film, food, or even creating cocktails – then enter on the Cointreau website. The Cointreau Creative Crew Grant Scheme Grand Finale will take place early next year, where the South African Grand Jury (also known as the Creative Crew) will meet with finalists and crown the winner.

Dare, Dream, Create The entries will be judged on Dare, which is the authenticity and substance of the project and the strength of the idea – the style, as well as the originality of the idea. Secondly, Dream: the motivation behind the project and the personal fulfilment that comes with it. Lastly, the Create criteria are used to judge the idea on its potential success and whether it will have a significant impact. The Creative Crew From chic designers to acclaimed performers and photographers, the Creative Crew – the panel that will be judging the ten finalists next year – is a group of successful, inspirational South African women.

Karabo Moletsane A Gold Craft Loerie award-winning

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Tamika Sewnarain

Manthe Ribane illustrator and designer from Pretoria, Moletsane has her own creative agency, Mother Tongue – Creative House. She is inspired by fashion, city sub-cultures, handpainted signage, urban entrepreneurs, and everything that makes African countries unique. She believes in the importance of remaining open to education and learning.

Manthe Ribane Ribane is not only a talented artist, she is also a dancer and performer. At the age of eight, Manthe performed in front of Nelson Mandela at the FNB Stadium for his birthday. While working as a graphic designer at 113 Studios, she has found time to: make her vocal debut with musician, Okzharp, in the play, Dear Ribane, directed by Chris Saunders; pose for renowned photographer Akinbode Akinbiyi; and dance on tour with Die Antwoord.

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Lisa Ting Chong Lisa Ting Chong Capetonian graphic designer, Lisa Ting Chong, loves capturing the beauty and distinctiveness of life’s everyday moments and objects in a simplistic style. This has earned her quite the impressive Instagram following – over 16,000 and counting. Chong was selected as one of the first Instagrammers to exhibit at the Johannesburg Photo and Film Expo in 2013 as part of Snapgram. She is involved in many Instagram movements, and has also worked with international consumer lifestyle brands. Tamika Sewnarain On top of being a marketer, actress, fashionista, and dreamer, Sewnarain is also the Brand Manager for Cointreau South Africa. When she is not working on Cointreau’s marketing strategy in

South Africa, Sewnarain is acting on stage as part of the Amdram Fraternity. Her mother taught her that education and independence are very important for women, and this inspired Sewnarain to take on the world. She feels strongly about female empowerment: “Women can do anything. They are strong, they are brave, and they have an innate desire to survive and succeed.”

Sue-Ann Allen A private chef, co-author of awardwinning cookbook, Gourmet Sisters, runner-up in the first season of Master Chef South Africa, and a presenter on Hashtag Radio, Allen is taking the culinary world by storm. Allen has been featured on Top Billing, Pasella, and Expresso, and is the cofounder of Soundbites, a pop-up dining and music pairing event in Cape Town.


Nadia Turton Owner and creator of women’s wear brand, LABEL Collections, Turton is inspired by the need to create stunning things, experiencing other people’s creativity, as well as being surrounded by like-minded, creative people. To her, this creates a positive, persistent energy that she thrives on.

Karabo Moletsane

For more information, and to submit your dream to the CCC, visit www.cointreau.co.za.


RICHARDS BAY A unique and inviting retreat just two hours north of Durban, come and experience the relaxed hospitality and convenience of this centrally situated hotel. Indaba Lodge Richards Bay combines the beauty of this warm, lush, subtropical region with the rolling savannah of the many game reserves. Take in the experience of Zulu traditionalism along with tranquil walks on miles of pristine beaches along the TuziGazi Coast.

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Home Away from Home INDABA LODGE, RICHARDS BAY І C/O LAUNDER & DAVIDSON LANE, MEERENSEE, RICHARDS BAY

Phone: +27 35 753 1350 | Email: gm@indabarichardsbay.co.za | Website: www.indabarichardsbay.co.za


Sea Point’s Hidden

Curiosities Sea Point’s modern-day miles of beautiful seafront promenade appeared vastly different in the 1800s.

Text & Images © Supplied

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First & Second Pages: Images of modern day Sea Point, where the Winchester Mansions Hotel is still a favourite attraction. Third Page: The Winchester Mansions Hotel in the early 1980s.

Before the sea wall was established, mounds of beach sand dipped gradually down to the edge of the Atlantic’s funnelled ridges of dark volcanic rock. Its few coastal structures included the historic and elegant grand dame of a hotel, Winchester Mansions, which existed as a seaside apartment block. Originally built in 1922, the block shared space with a row of sea-facing residential establishments, mostly built in the architectural splendour of the Victorian style. When Mrs Harvey purchased the block of apartments in 1958, she subsequently converted it into a hotel in 1960, which is run today by a company called Francon Investments, owned by the late Mrs Harvey’s family, the Wainfords. Under the guidance of Managing Director, Murray Nell, Winchester Mansions is still an iconic Cape Town landmark. The hotel has undergone numerous renovations over the years, while still maintaining its history and charismatic charm. The four-star hotel’s 25 loft style rooms and 51 suites are elegantly and tastefully decorated with spectacular sea and mountain views. Amenities include a health and wellness spa, as well as a heated pool and sundeck. Its tranquil courtyard

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and outdoor restaurant area – which was a turning circle for vehicles in the 1920s – is now a beautiful green space with a babbling fountain and colourful flourishes of climbing bougainvillea. Today, the hotel is a vestibule of historic interest bearing witness to some curious facets of Sea Point’s hidden past, offering interesting viewing for visitors to the establishment. Formula 1 racing driver Kimi Räikkönen, the band TOTO and French actress Juliette Binoche are just a few of the international celebrities who have stayed there. To discover the area’s secrets, one has to look no further than the hotel itself and its immediate vicinity. In 1898, a villa named Bordeaux was built on Sea Point’s Beach Road by Mr Pieter Marais, a wealthy businessman who had ties to the wine industry. His wife, the “Lady of Bordeaux”, was wheelchair bound, and would watch passers-by from the top windows of the Villa Bordeaux. During the 1920s, social stigmas about disability abounded and as such, Mr Marais constructed a pathway for wheelchair access for his wife from the villa straight over the rocks to a private pool with a wall erected in front of it. There she would bathe, concealed behind the wall, away

Sa express connects you to cape town

from prying eyes. When the family fell on hard times, they sold the villa to Mr Jacobus Graaff. The Graaff family would walk from their palatial villa to the pool in their silks, without having to interact with common society, and so the pool was later named Graaff’s Pool. The story of the “Lady of Bordeaux” has long been associated with a mysterious tunnel through which it was believed that family members secretly accessed the pool. One can still view the remnants of the blocked tunnel and view the old path to the demolished pool. Eventually the bathing area was opened to the public in 1929, but its slow demise started in 1995 when the gates were shut at sunset in order to control anti-social activities. Its final demolition in 2005 had a powerfully positive impact on the general upliftment of the area. The Villa Bordeaux was later converted into a hotel and, in 1959, just a year before Winchester Mansions’ inception, it was demolished to make way for what is today Sea Point’s largest block of beachfront flats, aptly named, Bordeaux. Because of its beautiful sea views, Sea Point has always been a favoured recreation destination. The original swimming baths, built in 1895 and located at the foot of


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Church Road, were destroyed by a storm in 1911 that flooded Beach Road – even tearing the ballast from the railway line. These baths were never rebuilt, but the Sea Point Pavilion was constructed in 1913 providing an outdoor cinema, tea-room and stage, and is still fondly remembered. The tremendous green belt that frames Winchester Mansions’ view is ex-railway land. A passenger railway line was extended from Cape Town to Sea Point in 1905, but closed in 1929. This became public property and thankfully could not be built upon. After the lines were lifted, the land was left open. A short walk from Winchester Mansions Hotel along the promenade leads to remnants of the old line which are embedded into the walkway close to the sea wall. Today the promenade bustles with life, offering something for everyone. Signal Hill, the sharp mountain peak that is Sea Point’s backdrop, is the starting point for paragliders who land on the promenade in front of Winchester Mansions. The hotel is situated conveniently close to the V&A Waterfront shopping district, which is also the point of departure for City Sightseeing, an open-top, double-decker red bus tour company offering tours of Cape Town and the surrounding areas. Walks along the seafront offer visual art installations, cycling, an outdoor gym, picnic areas, sea kayaking, ocean strolls and playparks. For those wanting to enjoy the view, Harveys Bar and Winchester Mansions’ sun-drenched terrace is the ideal spot to people-watch or to enjoy a cup of coffee, cake or a meal, while breathing in the atmosphere of the area. Visit www.winchester.co.za for more information. *Source: ‘Below Bordeaux: Hidden Histories in Sea Point’, thesis by A Malan

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A World of Shopping at Liberty Midlands

MALL

With its unique design influenced by indigenous African culture and one of the largest retail offerings in KwaZulu-Natal, Liberty Midlands Mall boasts over 168 stores and provides regular retail therapy to approximately 700,000 shoppers every month.

Text & Image © Supplied

Behind the scenes, the mall’s centre management is constantly refining and refreshing the retail and leisure offering so that it appeals to the entire family and offers something for everyone. Over the years, Liberty Midlands Mall has invested significant amounts in order to ensure that the mall remains a high quality retail and entertainment experience, as well as a preferred shopping destination, providing the very best customer experience – with all the best stores and brands under one roof. As such, a number of new outlets have been – or soon will be – introduced. Some existing stores are also improving their layouts and several stores have been relocated or upgraded. These include: Life, Burger King, Sorbet, Toys R Us, Forever New, Refinery, Nandos, Elna, MAC (Truworths), Ginger Mary, Foto First,

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Flight Centre and Westminster Pies. Infrastructure investments take place on a regular basis. These have included new state of the art generators so that electricity outages don’t put a stop to shopping. While Liberty Midlands Mall is trying to increase the number of feet through the door, it is also trying to minimize its carbon footprint and impact on the environment, and prides itself on receiving numerous waste minimization awards for recycling waste on site. The mall also recently installed energy-saving lights across the centre, and in anticipation of a break in the current drought and good summer rainfall, it has installed a rainwater harvesting system that will store rain water, treat it to a potable standard and use it to supplement the mall’s municipal water supply. Giving back to the surrounding

community is something that is a top priority, through strategic partnerships with the Pietermaritzburg Community Chest, and support for organisations such as CANSA, Hospice and Zimele (a female empowerment charity which teaches women from disadvantaged communities skills they can use to secure a sustainable income). This Mandela Day, the mall made a handsome donation to the “Stop Hunger Now” initiative and greatly assisted them to exceed their target of packing two million meals in three cities in just one week – in honour of Nelson Mandela’s legacy. 100,000 meals were packed at Liberty Midlands Mall in one day. Many of the mall’s marketing campaigns centre on community involvement and contain CSI elements, placing the mall firmly and fondly in the hearts of its shoppers.


Business as

l a u s u ) n u (

Business travel is work, so let Liberty Midlands Mall take care of play. With over 165 stores to choose from, and a host of entertainment and restaurants on offer, you’ll be spoilt for choice!

(033) 341 9570 |

www.midlandsmall.co.za

facebook.com/MidlandsMall |

twitter.com/LibMidlandsMall

Your shopping world in one


k c e e r d W acy g e L ) t s a o A Wild (C

rism dgcumbe African Tou Text: Will E a thought ley & South g n La n va , but spare e ty B au Š e s b e te ag o Im is rem nt side of th g due to its more viole is appealin e t th as o d have C e c rs n ild e e W break experi eople, the who have d pounding s e an ri s tu For most p rm n e o c ill st e can st be s, wild ilors over th ese vessels dden wind th su f s, o ar o for all the sa ye tw r 0 . r 50 One o nothingness oastline. Fo ery grave. wed up into w to a wat stretch of c lo re c al s sw it d ly ri d, ee a vessel an disappeare sent many ave simply h st o m t u ,b seen today

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The remoteness of many parts of the shoreline, as well as questionable record keeping over the centuries, mean that there are likely many more wrecks than we’re aware of. The ones we do know about are still mysterious in many ways, having long since vanished beneath the waves. Nevertheless, these wrecks have left an indelible mark on the area. It is said that the name Coffee Bay is derived from a ship which sank with a load of coffee beans on board, while it’s also believed that the wreck of the 16th century Portuguese ship Sao Joao gave Port St Johns its name. Much of the allure – and history – of the Wild Coast is wrapped up with the myths surrounding its wrecks, and the stories of the brave men who made it to shore and survived to trek hundreds of kilometres to settlements, or who were allegedly assimilated into local tribes. The Portuguese Paid a Heavy Price Being one of the major seafaring powers in the 16th and 17th centuries, Portuguese ships regularly sailed up and down the Wild Coast on voyages between Europe and the Far East, with the coastline claiming a staggering number of ships – many in poor condition and overloaded with cargo. These include the Santo Alberto (1593) which ran aground just north of East London, and the Santo Espirito (1608) which is the vessel the wreck at Morgan’s Bay is attributed to. Double Mouth’s Bead Beach is so called because of the beads and shards of porcelain beach combers have picked up over the years, supposedly from the wreck’s cargo. Then there’s the Nossa Senhora de Atalaia do Pinheiro (1647), a carrack which was wrecked near Cefane while sailing from India to Portugal (a trip almost as long as the vessel’s name). The ship’s naval guns and bronze cannon were salvaged in 1980, and the cannon is now on display in the Atalaia Gallery at the East London Museum (www.elmuseum.za.org). The museum’s Maritime Gallery also houses an informative collection of relics and artefacts recovered from some of the many shipwrecks near East London.

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Modern Wrecks The relentless pounding of the waves means that most visible wrecks don’t last all that long, but the best preserved wreck along the coast is that of the Jacaranda at Qolora Mouth. Now little more than a rusty bow, the 2,000-ton vessel ran aground due to strong winds on 18th September 1971, despite the crew dropping two anchors to stabilise it. The wreck makes for a good photo opportunity, so be sure to bring your camera. The Oceanos is probably the most famous modern wreck along the Wild Coast. On the evening of 3rd August 1991 it sailed from East London to Durban, but rough seas and the neglected state of the ship resulted

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in the engine room flooding. The captain and crew fled in panic, leaving it to the onboard entertainer, Moss Hill, to radio for help and coordinate the rescue effort, which saw all 571 people on board saved. The following day the vessel rolled over and sank, and now rests at a depth a little over 90 m, some 5 km offshore of Coffee Bay. Though divers have visited it, the depth, strong currents and sharks in the area make diving the wreck a risky proposition. The Disappeared But it’s the ships that have disappeared or can’t be reached that have especially captured the imaginations of people over

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the years. The SS Waratah – referred to by some as “Australia’s Titanic” – was a 500foot steamer that disappeared en route from Durban to Cape Town in July 1909. There are many theories as to why it went down and where, but a watcher from the shore claimed to have seen a large wave hit the ship, after which it disappeared, most likely having capsized. As big a mystery as the SS Waratah is, it pales in comparison to the Grosvenor, an East Indiaman which sank in 1782 after running aground on an outer reef 400 m from the beach at a spot about 50 km north of Port St Johns. What happened next was South Africa’s most famous castaway


First Page: The Phoenix was wrecked just north of Durban a few years back, but is illustrative of the kind of fate vessels have met on the Wild Coast. Second Page Insert: The cannon from the wreck of the Nossa Senhora de Atalaia do Pinheiro (1647) is now on display in the East London Museum. Second Page & This Page: Double Mouth in Morgan’s Bay is said to be the resting place of the Santo Espirito (1608). Double Mouth’s Bead Beach is named for the beads and shards of porcelain found on the beach, supposedly from the wreck’s cargo.

account. Although only about 14 of the 150 crew on board drowned, of the rest of the sailors who made it to the beach, just six managed the trek south to a frontier farm near Port Elizabeth, and the resultant rescue expedition found just 12 more survivors. After that, however, rumours persisted that other survivors were living with local tribes, having assimilated rather than attempt the hazardous journey south. What makes the wreck even more famous are the speculations that it was carrying a great treasure of bullion and silver. Despite this rumour being unsubstantiated, over the years many costly and dangerous recovery schemes were embarked upon,

making use of dredgers, high-pressure water jets and even the construction of an undersea tunnel – the excavations for which can still be seen today just north of the Tezana River mouth. And still the wreck of the Grosvenor lies just offshore, tantalising treasure hunters, nestled in a dangerous gully and likely to hold on to its secrets for all time.

Treasure Hunters Beware In case your interest is piqued by the thought of a sunken treasure, be warned – all shipwrecks are protected by South African law, and it’s illegal to remove any part of a wreck or object associated with it.

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Omeya Golf and Residential

Estate

Set on a 245 ha privately owned piece of Namibian bushveld, a mere 30 km from the city of Windhoek, Omeya Golf and Residential Estate is the first purpose-built golf and residential property development in Namibia, catering for a variety of people – from young families to busy professionals, couples scaling down to retirement and those in need of frail care or assisted living.

Text & Image © Supplied

“Omeya” means “water” in the local dialect of the Oshiwamba. A Windhoekbased business couple, André and Sonja van der Walt, bought the Omeya property in 2006 with the vision of developing the land into a golf estate and homestead development for families to live safely and securely in peace and harmony with nature. New ground was broken when Omeya was proclaimed a town on 30th December 2011. Development of the Peter Matkovich designed golf course, infrastructure and services for the first 300 plots started without delay. 2016 saw Omeya clothed in a new jacket when well-known South African businessman and highly commended wildlife breeder, Bernard Groenewald, went into partnership with Omeya. As the owner of the very successful Castle de Wildt, an exclusive auction house for game species in Limpopo, Bernard is well known as an industry leader and trend setter in all aspects of business.

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Bernard’s vision for Omeya is for it to become a true oasis where family values can be cultivated and nurtured – a vision which he hopes will be shared by all who choose Omeya as their future home. To complement the harmonious living conditions, the Omeya Village – with purpose-built pedestrian roads – will boast such commodities as a bakery, butchery, liquor store, bistro, grocer and chapel. In addition, a private school equipped with only the best technology will be built to accommodate learners from Grade RR through to Grade 12. 138 two- and three-bedroom Parklands apartments are the ideal “scale-down” houses for persons from the age of 55 years who still want to lead an active life. The units are ideal to “lock up and go”, and offer luxury lifestyle elements such as state of the art appliances, double garages, solar technology and luxurious fittings. Optional extras include interior design and golf cart parking fixtures.

Building of the Golden Greens Care Centre has already commenced and makes provision for 24 assisted living rooms, eight frail care rooms and six hospital rooms. This Golden Greens Care Centre offers luxurious hotel-style living conditions, in respect to all individuals’ dignity even in the frail stages of life. The most beneficial draw card of Omeya, however, is the peace of mind brought about by a safe environment, 24-hour security, controlled access, immaculately groomed landscapes, undisturbed Namibian bushveld, safe playgrounds for children, sport and recreation facilities and fresh, unpolluted air every day. Omeya Golf and Residential Estate offers a safe investment in a safe country with safe economic growth and political stability. Contact +264 61 302 293, email admin@omeya.na or visit www.omeya.na for more information.


MAXIMIZE AERO ADVANTAGE AND CONTROL


Greetings From the

Friendly City Often referred to as the “Windy City”, or better yet, the “Friendly City”, the city of Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape stretches 16 km along Algoa Bay and is one of the major up-and-coming cities in South Africa.

Text: Monique Vanderlinden Images © Monique Vanderlinden & Lion Roars Hotels & Lodges.

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Shark Rock Pier

True to my Capetonian nature, I generally opt for vacations within the Western Cape. However, this time I decided to go against the norm and instead travel along the eastern coast of the country to PE. This would be my first visit to the most popular city in the Eastern Cape. The beautiful views of the Garden Route from my aeroplane window made me excited for my visit and after touchdown, the sunshine of PE (after cold and wet Cape Town) bade me a warm welcome. From the airport I easily found my way to my lodging for the next two evenings – Singa Lodge, which is situated close to the

seafront promenade in Summerstrand. With its distinctive Balinese décor, this boutique hotel is fittingly named after the mystical dragon-lion of Indonesian mythology, and offers executive as well as luxury suites and fine dining, as well as wedding and conference facilities. After checking in, it was time to explore. My first stop was Richmond Hill – a historical part of town which offers visitors a foodie haven, as well as cultural and historical hotspots. A drinks-after-five ritual at the charming establishment For the Love of Wine is the perfect location to meet and mingle with new people in PE.

Just outside PE is the village of Schoenmakerskop, or Schoemies, where we were greeted by an energetic performance by a number of whales playing about in the water. Beaches are definitely a big selling point for PE and Sardinia Bay Beach in particular promises lovely hikes amid the dunes. It’s basically a photographer’s dream. Unfortunately I missed out on PE’s famous Sacramento Hiking Trail, but there’s always next time! The next day, after an early morning stroll on the promenade and a fascinating historical tour of the city, I had to bid farewell to the affable staff at Singa Lodge to head out

Sardinia Bay

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Sa express connects you to port elizabeth


Singa Lodge in search of the quintessential Eastern Cape bush experience. Not far from the pristine beaches of PE, I took the N2 and found myself – only about 30 minutes later – at the entrance of Amakhala Game Reserve’s four-star Hlosi Lodge, which is located close to the popular Addo Elephant Park. The Eastern Cape is generally overlooked as a safari hotspot, though wrongly so. The

Schoenmakerskop

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tranquil Amakhala Reserve offers intimate and luxurious accommodation in the form of six isolated rooms that lie along a gentle curve of hill above a river plain, with wonderful views from each private deck. Our deck overlooked a waterhole, while picture windows in the bathroom allowed us to keep an eye on all the animal activity while taking a relaxing bath – it is easily the

best way to end a day, I must say. Daily game drives expose guests not only to the Big Five and the other wild animals that inhabit the reserve, but also to the astonishing landscape with its rolling hills overlooking breathtaking bush. Likewise, you can also look forward to awesome animal encounters – our special moment being a close-up, unimpeded view of a


S&

ENT V E S Y MWA A R T E TH

Hlosi Lodge

mother cheetah with her cubs. The main lodge includes an elegant lounge and dining area, as well as a splendid bar overlooking the swimming pool and waterhole. There, I relaxed in the splendour of it all while enjoying a foodie’s dream breakfast, before I had to bid adieu to the friendly manager and staff of Hlosi Lodge (thorough confirmation of the “Friendly City” phenomenon), and head back to PE, admiring the diverse views for the last time before I had to return to a chilly Cape Town. A lovely spring break, a great beach destination, a maze of surprises for any avid adventurer, a relaxation haven, a wildlife aficionado’s refuge, a foodie and cultural fanatic’s choice of topic – PE certainly is a destination worth visiting. Singa Lodge and Hlosi Lodge are part of Lion Roars Hotels & Lodges. For more information, www.singalodge.com or www.hlosilodge.com.

Amakhala Game Reserve


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In the

h ea r t of the City

Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel & Spa If you are planning a Cape Town business trip or a holiday getaway, the Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel and Spa is ideally situated in the heart of the Mother City, opposite the iconic St George’s Cathedral and just a step away from the bustle of Greenmarket Square. It represents a new space in luxury living where you can work and play in a unique environment.

Text & Images © Supplied

The Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel and Spa’s safe off-street parking offers direct access to the foyer. Upon arrival, the welcome starts with the smiles and congeniality of the staff, reflecting the spirit of “ubuntu” which is synonymous with the iconic Mandela name. Space is what the hotel prides itself on – no cramped quarters for its guests! In studio, one or two bed-roomed units – all equipped with elegant en suite bathrooms, with simple, classic designs, open-plan lounges and fully equipped kitchens – guests can entertain, eat in or simply relax with a drink while enjoying the urban landscape. For the business traveller, the hotel’s recent partnership with Regus Office Rentals offers self-catering apartment accommodation to all Regus’ business clientele, as well as a fully equipped office solution to all hotel guests. Heavenly Food The hotel is a foodie haven from the moment you step into the foyer. The newly renovated Doppio Zero restaurant takes you back to Italian food like Mama made, while the trendy Motherland Coffee Company provides great coffee and quick,

tasty snacks. The “new kid on the block”, Raya Kitchen by Kitima, offers Asian fusion cuisine with authentic Eastern hospitality and service. Step outside and enjoy the Earth Fair food market every Thursday which provides tantalising and tempting treats right under your nose in St George’s Mall. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg – the hotel is an easy stroll from a host of other award-winning establishments, offering everything from fine dining to casual street food. Pamper Yourself The Mangwanani Boutique Spa at Mandela Rhodes Place blends traditional African practices and hospitality with Western massage techniques to provide a unique rejuvenating experience which blesses the body and soul. Look out for their Signature Packages on the hotel’s website. These combine a nutritious meal with rejuvenating spa treatments. If that’s not enough, the hotel’s special packages for both business and leisure stays are enticing and include free parking, Wi-Fi and a bottle of red wine. Details as well as terms and conditions can be found on www.mandelarhodesplace.co.za.

Enticing Attractions To enjoy the Cape’s famous wines, plan a visit to the Winelands. Or if beer is your tipple, then the many craft brewers in the city offer tastings for the connoisseur. The Company Garden is across the road from the hotel and ringed with Iziko Museums and the beautiful Parliament buildings. Table Mountain is a short ride away and a must (weather permitting) on any traveller’s list. The Slave Lodge, on the bend of Adderley and Wale Streets, and the District Six Museum on Buitenkant Street offer the chance to learn more about Cape Town’s past. For the night owls, Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel and Spa is just around the corner from the street that never sleeps, Long Street, where clubs and bars abound and the nightlife is pumping! Whatever your interests, Mandela Rhodes Place Hotel and Spa is at the heart of a city that has a unique soul, with staff who are guaranteed to ensure that your stay is tailor-made just for you. For reservations and more information, contact +27 21 481 4000, email reservation2@mandelarhodesplace.co.za, or visit www.mandelarhodesplace.co.za. Alternatively find the hotel on Facebook, or connect on Twitter (@hotelmrp)

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A Tale of

Beauty & the BEef Leeuport Oscar stands four-square in his stall at the 2015 Botswana National Agricultural Show. A ton of prime Simmentaler beef-cake, even without his blue rosette and sash there could be no doubting that he is a ‘Grand Champion’. Tshepo from Bothatogo leans further over the railings, pushes his red Massey Ferguson baseball cap to the back of his head with his motswiri (a Botswana knobkerrie), then clucks in admiration: “Mmm-hmm!” he says, “That is Botswana!”

Text & Images © Supplied

Molepolole’s poster girls

Diamonds might be the economy’s best friend nowadays, but it is still cattle that make Batswana hearts beat faster – a key cultural icon as well as a key part of the country’s export industry. Forget the day job, true Batswana dream of cattle. So it makes sense that while the country’s human population is just over 2.1 million, the national herd is around 2.6 million head. Europe became Botswana’s top export destination for beef in the 1970s, thanks to the preferential access offered under the Lomé Convention. Trade faltered in the 1990s and the future looked uncertain, as the old Lomé relationship with the European Union (EU) wound up, so Batswana beef farmers let out a collective

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sigh of relief when Botswana – together with fellow Southern African Development Community (SADC) members Lesotho, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Swaziland – concluded negotiations for an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union on 15th July 2014. Under the EPA, the EU will open its market of half a billion people to almost all exports (except arms and ammunition) from SADC EPA partners, free of quotas and duties. For Botswana, this of course means beef. Tshepo shares the general enthusiasm for this EU market-opening, although he is not sure it will bring him a better price. “But I do think it provides greater certainty for the future,” he says. With that in mind, he

is looking to upgrade the mainly Brahman herd at his cattle post and is very interested in the message penned next to Oscar’s family tree, which offers semen for sale at P300.00 per straw. “The price is good and Brahman-Simmentaler is a great cross,” Tshepo says. Not everyone is quite so upbeat, however. Nearby, Mohammed is leading prize bullock “Mr T” through the enclosure. “Sure the EPA is good for Botswana beef exports,” he says “but not necessarily for the farmer. We are still stuck with one buyer for our cattle – the BMC.” The BMC is the Botswana Meat Commission – whose mission statement is “To produce quality meat and value-adding products for global markets” – and it is a


Leeuport Oscar, Senior Tooth Grand Champion 2015 household name nation-wide, as is Chief Executive, Akolang Tombale. Quota and duty free access to the EU market is a great opening for Botswana beef, Dr Tombale says, but has to be exploited intelligently. “The EU is still the best market for BMC products, but it demands quality – and that’s good, that’s where we have to fight. Beef is big in Botswana, but we are a little country. Every week JBS of Brazil, which also supplies the EU market, slaughters around one hundred times as many cattle as we do. So we cannot compete on volume or cost. Fragmentation of our supply chain would be suicidal,” he says, in answer to Mohammed’s complaint about the BMC being the sole buyer: “It would be like turning up with lots of little wheelbarrows and trying to compete with JBS and their articulated truck-loads!” Dr Tombale’s message that “BMC must aim for niche markets, which requires quality of product and consistency of supply” is filtering down to the farmer. Molepolole is cattle country. Along the highway there are signs offering easy loans. Elsewhere, these might show flashy cars, motorcycles or TV sets. In Botswana the big draw is a rather winsome looking heifer. Tumelo Paledi, a retired Defence Air Wing Major-General, raises some 100 head on

his cattle-post of around 120 hectares. Like Tshepo, he started with Brahmans and native Longhorns, but is carefully introducing European breeds to bring the beef stock into line with EU tastes. The result, he believes, is beef of a unique quality: “Because the animals roam the land taking what they need and what is good when it is ready and in season, the beef has a very special flavour. As a pilot with the Defence Force I travelled all round the world and I never ate beef as tasty as here at home in Botswana!” Dr Tombale’s belief in the EU market goal of quality over quantity is still not universally popular in Botswana, where size of herd defines social status, but it is gaining ground. BMC are pursuing this aim strategically by working with the GPS Food Group, who advises them on ways to improve the supply chain from farm to fork. Brian Perkins, Director of GPS in London, says that the access to the EU market under the EPA will be “fantastic – the best access you can have”, but not enough in itself. Like Dr Tombale he cites the competition from mega-producers like Brazil and salutes BMC’s determination to “turn a disadvantage into a benefit” by prioritising quality over quantity. And it is working. With GPS’s help, BMC are starting to penetrate new markets in Europe. “Two years ago, when

we started, the UK was the major EU market for Botswana beef, consuming 80 % of EU imports. Today we are selling to customers in 15 EU countries,” says Perkins. This promises to be a happy development cooperation story and a tribute to the EU EPA strategy. The EU offers access to its markets – and Botswana is gearing up to seize the initiative and turn it into real market gains. There is also another important dimension to this success that is rarely highlighted: The EU actively supported the SADC countries in their EPA negotiations and is continuing to do so, through the support provided by the Regional Economic Support Programme (REIS) that was launched in April 2013. REIS, which runs until March 2017, is managed by the SADC Secretariat and funded by the EU, with a budget of €20 million. As well as supporting the EU-SADC EPA negotiations, REIS also supports areas of interest to SADC regional integration, including Investment, Payments, Tax, Technical Barriers to Trade, Sanitary & Phytosanitary measures and Trade in Services. So not only do the negotiations with the EU promise to bear fruit, through REIS the EU is helping Botswana and other SADC EPA Group countries to nurture and pick them. You can’t “beef” about that.

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Celebrating

25 Years of Help & Innovation First National Bank Botswana Our journey started 25 years ago. September 2016 marks FNB Botswana’s 25th Anniversary and 25 years of serving customers with helpful and innovative banking solutions. We are proud of our success and extend our gratitude to all our stakeholders for partnering with us to achieve this milestone. Botswana turns 50 years old in the same month, so 2016 is indeed a special year! Together we are proud of the role we have played in making Botswana a place we can all be proud of as we celebrate 50 years of Independence.

Text & Image © Supplied

Over the 25 years of existence in Botswana, FNB Botswana has built a solid track record of being first to market with electronic solutions that have revolutionised the banking experience. Some of these key achievements include the country’s first Pula-based Visa credit card in 1998. By 2003, FNB had tapped into the power of the Internet and cellphone technology to deliver inContact, Botswana’s first messaging service that alerts customers about any activity on their FNB accounts via SMS or email, in real time, for free! 2004 saw FNB customers getting 24-hour access

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to their accounts through Online Banking, a secure Internet-based service that defies borders. By 2006, the convenience of 24-hour banking was extended through cellphone banking, and today more than 250,000 customers use the channel to pay bills, purchase airtime and electricity, transfer funds and enjoy countless other banking services anytime, anywhere. In 2010, our story of growth continued with the introduction of eWallet and eWallet Bulk Send – a cardless money transfer service that introduced banking to the unbanked, and bridged the gap

between remote and urban areas. The first ever mobile ATM in Botswana further augmented FNB’s efforts to bank the unbanked populace and take banking to the people. The popular ATM Advance hit the market in 2014 offering customers 24/7 banking convenience through real time cash deposits. ATM Advance was a first of its kind in Botswana, and also a first in the FNB Group subsidiaries. We look forward to another 25 years and we welcome more customers to become part of the journey to our next big milestone.


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In the Saddle in a Land

Before Time Exploring the Okavango Delta on Horseback

In 2014, the Okavango Delta became UNESCO’s 1,000th World Heritage Site. Set in an enchanted world, teeming with life and charged with the beauty of abundance, once the summer rains have seeped into Botswana from the north, this – the world’s largest inland delta – transforms into a primordial paradise. It is among the finest locations on the planet to witness nature’s unfolding miracle. And one of the most exciting ways to witness it all is from the saddle Text: Keith Bain Images © African Horseback Safaris

Roughly the size of Texas, Botswana is a vast country with a population of just two million people. But what it lacks in humans, it makes up for with diverse natural beauty, abundant animal life, and the mercurial wonderland that is Earth’s largest inland delta. A vast, fan-shaped floodplain, the Okavango Delta is an astonishing watery wilderness of labyrinthine channels and lagoons, grassy floodplains, palm-fringed islands, clear streams, and Mopane forests. It’s been described as a “water meadow”, a sloshy, fertile Eden that for aeons has served as a life-giving oasis for African wildlife. Botswana’s Delta gives the landlocked country a dramatic advantage over many other safari destinations. In flood it is, perhaps, the finest place on earth to view wildlife. After the summer rains, the delta is ravaged by waters that come streaming in from Angola

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in the north, transforming the floodplains into a soaked paradise resembling a land before time, sodden and teeming with life. Arrive at the start of the season, and you can literally watch as it fills with water, typically reaching its zenith from May through September, when many of the floodplains are full and form an immense network of navigable, island-dotted channels that make for compelling game-viewing. Experts lead game drives and guided walks across the dry bits, and it’s possible to float through the reed-clogged waterways in traditional mokoro dugout canoes, deftly avoiding crocodiles and hippos, while viewing predators, antelope and other beasts from the relative safety of the water. From the dusty frontier town of Maun, at the Delta’s southern end, scheduled and chartered light aircraft zip across to

Sa express connects you to gaborone

bumpy little airstrips scattered throughout the Delta. True adventure-seekers fly in the direction of Okavango Horse Safaris (www.okavangohorse.com), a much lauded eco-savvy operation situated within a 2,500 km² private concession in the western Delta bordering the Moremi Game Reserve. Here, guests spend as many as ten days exploring this immaculate world on horseback. Unencumbered by combustion engines or mechanical whirrs, riding safaris are an incredible way to combine game viewing with a genuine sensation of staying active rather than being passively driven around. Each day, groups of no more than six riders spend up to six hours in the saddle, commencing at the crack of dawn while temperatures are bearable for the steeds. Led by riding experts under the aegis of


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PJ and Barney Bestelink, you ride deep into the wetlands, the horses wading from island to island where the ground is sufficiently firm to pick up pace. And as walk turns to trot and in turn builds to a canter, the breeze you feel whipping through your hair doesn’t just tell you you’re alive, it makes you feel as if you’ve reconnected with the very rhythm of life. Once in the saddle and comfortable with your environment, there’s the chance of cantering across the plains with herds of zebra or giraffe, splashing through the lagoons, tiptoeing around hippos and crocs, and striding alongside water-loving lechwe antelope. You might track elephants and buffalo, and perhaps witness endangered wild dogs on the hunt, as well as listen out for the call of lions and the maniacal laughter of hyenas. The Delta also boasts a checklist of

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over 400 bird species, with such rarities as the Pel’s fishing owl, which spends its days hiding in Mangosteen trees and ebony groves alongside the waterways. You’ll spend mornings in the saddle, and in the afternoons mix up your experience with game drives, bush walks, and trips in those mokoros that bring another kind of romance to the Delta, keeping the whole adventure varied and interesting. Night drives enable you to witness nocturnal creatures, such as aardwolf, aardvark, porcupine, civet, genet, and serval. There are predators and other dangerous animals, of course, which means riders need to be sufficiently saddle fit (and meet weight limits) to be able to ride – at pace – out of harm’s way. You overnight in different locations, starting with Kujwana Camp with its spacious en suite safari-style tents, and then move

on to Mokolwane, where you sleep in “tree houses” some 2 m off the ground. Some nights are spent at mobile fly camps, where the spacious Meru tents demand a tiny degree of “roughing it” in camp beds, with bucket showers and bush toilets. The whole experience gives you a taste of a classic, classy safari without ostentatious luxury. The focus is on the riding and the interaction with nature rather than the glitzier side of African safaris. You’ll hear the endless bush symphony through the walls of your tent at night and wake knowing that you’ve slept in close proximity to the primitive, unspoiled paradise you came all this way to experience in the first place. And for non-rider travelling companions, there are less demanding safari activities so you never feel left out. You’ll be taken on drives, walks and mokoro rides, and catch up with the riding party at the next


overnight camp. If you’re looking for an alternative riding safari experience in Botswana, another excellent operator is African Horseback Safaris (www.africanhorseback.com), located within the scenic Abu Concession and based at top-notch Macatoo Camp, a highly desirable and prestigious property with vintage Africa-style tents in the Okavango’s “wild west”. With over 40 horses and a choice of English or trail saddles, this is another great

choice for riders looking to experience what has often been hailed as the Holy Grail of horseback rides. When planning a trip to this part of the world – whether you’re intending to see it from the saddle or settling on a more traditional safari – it’s worth bearing in mind that Victoria Falls, another of Earth’s great wet wonders, is close to the Botswana border in neighbouring Zimbabwe. Many visitors find visiting the falls a tranquil, relatively effortless

experience after the endless exhilaration and adventure of a full-blown safari. Given enough time, you can explore Botswana’s other wonders, too, including the elephantrich Chobe River banks, or the dry, bakedclay region of the Kalahari in the south. There, ancient baobabs and migrating herds are complemented by a living carpet of pink, formed by some 200,000 flamingos that converge on the Makgadikgadi salt pan at the end of the rainy season.

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Le Botswana est un grand pays qui fait à peu près la taille du Texas mais qui ne compte que deux millions d’habitants. Ce qui lui fait défaut en termes de population est compensé par une exceptionnelle diversité naturelle et une faune abondante. Le delta de l’Okavango est une contrée sauvage humide peuplée de canaux labyrinthiques et de lagunes lacustres, de plaines inondables, d’îles et de forêts de Mopane. Si vous arrivez en début de saison vous pourrez littéralement regarder le delta se remplir, atteignant typiquement son niveau le plus haut de mai à septembre quand de nombreuses plaines sont noyées et forment d’immenses réseaux navigables parsemés d’îlots qui permettent d’admirer la faune. Des experts guident les sorties en voiture et à pied à travers les zones praticables sèches mais il est aussi possible d’ondoyer au travers des voies navigables envahies de roseaux au

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moyen de pirogues traditionnelles du nom de mokoro. Pour ceux qui sont en soif d’aventure, Okavango Horse Safari (www.okavangohorse.com) est une exploitation au label écologique qui se situe sur une concession privée de 2 500 km² se trouvant à l’ouest du delta, adjacente à la réserve d’animaux sauvages de Moremi. Làbas les hôtes passent jusqu’à dix jours à dos de cheval à explorer ce monde immaculé. Les safaris à dos de cheval offrent des sorties sans pollution ni bruit mécaniques, et sont une manière formidable de combiner l’observation du gros gibier tout en procurant une sensation de bien-être grâce à de l’activité physique plutôt que de se faire conduire passivement. Chaque jour, des groups de six cavaliers maximum passent jusqu’à six heures en selle, partant au lever du soleil pendant qu’il

fait des températures supportables pour les montures. Les guides, des cavaliers experts sous l’égide de PJ et Barney Bestelink, vous mènent d’île en île au sein des plaines marécageuses, les chevaux pataugeant et accélérant le pas quand le sol est suffisamment ferme pour y parvenir. Du pas au trot, du trop au galop, le vent dans vos cheveux vous rappelle que vous êtes plein(e) de vitalité et vous donne la sensation de vous être reconnecté(e) au rythme même de la vie. Une fois en selle et à l’aise dans votre environnement, il vous est possible de galoper à travers les plaines parmi les zèbres et les girafes, de patauger dans les lagunes lacustres, de contourner précautionneusement les hippopotames et les crocodiles et d’accompagner les Cobes de Lechwe amateurs d’eau. Le delta compte plus de 400 espèces d’oiseaux, ceci incluant des espèces très rares telles


la chouette pêcheuse de Pel qui passe ses journées cachée dans les mangoustaniers et dans les forêts d’ébéniers situés le long des voies d’eau. Vous passerez vos matinées à cheval, vos après-midis étant réservés aux safaris en voiture et aux promenades à pied en brousse pour de nouvelles expériences. Les safaris de nuit vous permettront aussi de rencontrer des créatures nocturnes comme le Protèle ou loup fouisseur, l’Oryctérope, le porc-épic, la civette, la genette ou le serval. Bien évidemment, on y rencontre aussi des prédateurs et autres animaux dangereux ce qui signifie qu’il faut être bon cavalier (et ne pas dépasser les limites de poids requises) et être capable de galoper pour se sortir de situations difficiles. Vous passerez vos nuits dans différents endroits en commençant par Kujwana Camp, un camp de tentes safari spacieuses avec salle de bain, suivi de Mokolwane, où vous dormirez dans des « cabanes dans les arbres » se trouvant à 2 m du sol. Certaines nuits seront passées dans des camps mobiles munis de tentes Meru équipées de lit de camps, de douches au sceau d’eau et de toilettes de brousse pour passer la nuit très légèrement « à la dure ». L’expérience dans son ensemble vous permet de goûter à ce que sont classe et élégance sans luxe ostentatoire. Et pour ceux qui ne font pas d’équitation, d’autres safaris moins astreignants sont possibles et de ce fait personne n’est laissé de côté. Vous pourrez faire des sorties en voiture, des promenades à pied, des sorties en mokoro, et vous retrouverez les cavaliers à la prochaine étape de repos du camp. Si vous recherchez une autre forme de safari à dos de cheval au Botswana, African Horseback Safaris est une autre organisation d’excellente qualité (www.africanhorseback.com). Ils sont situés dans « l’ouest sauvage » de l’Okavango, à l’intérieur de la concession pittoresque d’Abu et ils sont basés au superbe camp de Macatoo, un domaine prestigieux et hautement convoité qui comprend des tentes de style vintage colonial. Les 40 chevaux à disposition et le choix de selles anglaises ou de randonnée font d’eux un excellent choix pour les cavaliers qui veulent faire l’expérience de ce qui est reconnu comme étant le Saint Graal des excursions à cheval.

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Evolution in

SADC

Payments Systems ‘With around one-third of its countries growing by more than 6 %, Africa has become the world’s fastest-growing continent,’ declares Donald Kaberuka, President of the African Development Bank, in his foreword to their Annual Development Effectiveness Review 2013. This rapid movement requires corresponding change and development of the continent’s infrastructure, in particular in the financial services sector.

Text & Images © Supplied

Across Africa the banking sector has been slow to respond to the changing economic and social circumstances of the 21st century, notably the need for greater “inclusiveness” – reaching out to nontraditional clients, those who have always kept their savings under the bed. Mobile telephony has already stepped up to that challenge, with the emergence of such organic African solutions as Zimbabwe’s Econet Wireless and its EcoCash service, which some predict will make Zimbabwe the world’s first cashless economy. “We do not expect anyone to still be using paper money in a year’s time,” Econet CEO Douglas Mboweni told the UK’s Guardian newspaper in January 2015.

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Kenya has its equivalent, M PESA (“pesa” being the Swahili for money); Botswana has Mascom Money – and so on. All provide rapid, simple, low-cost means of transferring money from one person to another. It is a much safer alternative to keeping savings than the sack under the bed or the pot under the floor. Some services even include facilities for making and taking out small loans. Radical Changes in SADC Payments Systems, Supported by the European Union Meanwhile, the authorities within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) have also been taking measures to address these needs and to make

payment systems safe, secure and efficient. SADC is taking a series of steps intended to revolutionise banking across national boundaries, creating a more integrated financial services sector across the region and encouraging greater business opportunities by facilitating cross-border payment, thereby promoting economic growth. The European Union (EU), SADC’s biggest development partner, has also joined the campaign by funding a four-year “Regional Economic Integration Support Programme” (REIS), with €20 million from the 10th European Development Fund. REIS’s end goal is to promote sustainable and equitable economic growth and poverty reduction in SADC.


REIS supports the modernisation and harmonisation of payments and clearing systems, both domestically and regionally, with the objective of increased safety of payments and efficient settlement and payment processes. Key REIS activities in this field include: • Facilitating the adoption by all SADC Member States of a specialist funds transfer system where transfer of money or securities takes place from one bank to another in real time and on a gross basis – in other words, individually and not as part of a bundle. • Facilitating the implementation of a SADC Integrated Regional Electronic Settlement System (SIRESS). SIRESS is an innovative cross-border payment, clearing and settlement system, which was initially launched as a “proof of concept”, or test version, in the four countries of the Common Monetary Area – South Africa, Namibia, Lesotho and Swaziland – on 21st July 2013. Malawi, Tanzania and Zimbabwe joined the system in April 2014, followed by Mauritius and Zambia in September 2014. • Harmonising the regional legal and regulatory frameworks to facilitate regional clearing and settlement. • Reducing the costs of workers remittances within the SADC region. Since the implementation of crossborder clearing and settlement systems requires combined oversight arrangements, the REIS Programme also supports the

oversight role of the payment systems by strengthening the oversight arrangements, legal and regulatory framework. Modernization of the payment and clearance systems also leads to simplified processing of payment transactions, thus ensuring a safe, secure and cost-effective way of making payments, both domestically and across borders within the SADC. Where transactions previously took two to three days to clear, with SIRESS, they are now settled in real-time, subject to availability of funding at the paying bank. Does it work? Proof of the pudding, as they say, is in the eating. There is a steep rise in the use of SIRESS since its launch in July 2013. The value of transactions has soared, from R10.2 billion in the first month to R2.23 trillion in June 2016. “On the morning of 29th April 2015, SIRESS achieved a huge milestone by reaching R1 trillion in settlement value,” according to Ms Maxine Hlaba, Executive Secretariat at the SADC Banking Association. Predictions are that this trend will continue as SIRESS rolls out across the region and becomes a daily feature in SADC business life. As of June 2016 SIRESS had ten participating countries, while 73 banks settle their transactions through SIRESS. The SADC Payment Project team is continuing to engage with the five remaining countries – namely Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Madagascar and Mozambique – to bring them on board as soon as possible.

And in real life? A good example of a SIRESS customer is Mauritian entrepreneur Nissar Dowlut, who was always convinced that doing business with the rest of Africa was the future, but was worried about the challenges of making and receiving international payments. Now he is able to ship his products across the SADC region, confident in the knowledge that he will receive payment quickly and securely. Where transactions previously took two to three days to clear, now they are cleared within 24 hours and fees paid to non-SADC clearing banks are saved. “The main aim is efficiency and reduction of costs because previously the transactions would go through a correspondent bank. So you are cutting out the middleman,” says Thembi Langa, Senior Programme Officer in the Finance and Investment Unit at the SADC Secretariat. Nissar Dowlut’s company had a workforce of just three in 2001. Today it employs over 100 people, at three wellequipped facilities in Port Louis, and produces posters for local and export markets across Africa. There is widespread agreement that the work done on payment systems has already made a major contribution to economic growth in the SADC region and that contribution will grow ever greater in the future. All concerned can take a bow – the SADC Central Banks, the banking community, the SADC Secretariat and the EU-funded REIS Programme.

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Where Houses Become

Ho mes According to Andrew Goslett, CEO of Remax, property buyers look at four key factors before making a decision to buy a house. Standing in the peaceful surroundings of Romansbaai Beach Estate, I recall Mr Goslett’s first factor: location.

Text: Una Coetzee Neethling Images © Romansbaai Beach & Fynbos Estate

Pondering my current whereabouts, just outside Gansbaai in the Overberg, I am amazed at the tranquil scene surrounding me. Looking forward I see Walker Bay – a big blue “lake”, full of presence, stretching as far as the eye can see – while all around colourful and striking fynbos carpets the estate. Does this qualify as the perfect location? Situated a mere two hours from city lights and street noise, and just half an hour from Hermanus with its galleries, whale watching spots and cosy eateries, it just might. Romansbaai is just three minutes from Gansbaai – a small town with a big heart and a strong sense of community – so banks, shops, and great schools are all a short drive away. This brings me to Goslett’s second key factor: the condition of the neighbourhood. Romansbaai Estate, with its large plots and uncluttered layout, is indeed a neighbourhood on its own – a place where

likeminded people safely share a space, respect nature, cherish wildlife, enjoy the peace and quiet, as well as the beach to which they have their very own direct access. So far this estate has ticked two checks on Goslett’s list. Key factor number three is parking. Goslett is obviously referring to city streets where the hung for safe parking is endless. Although not completed, the developers are aiming to have Romansbaai fully occupied within the next five years. There will be no high walls or boundary fences, no small curbs or houses stacked like matchboxes. Plots are sizeable, thereby offering enough space for a garage and storage facilities. City dwellers may be reluctant to move here, but then how many hours does it take to travel a small distance in a city in peak hour traffic? Instead, you could choose to live here or keep it as a holiday hideout.

Factor number four: unorthodox home renovations. What people can do to damage a property resale is remarkable. Romansbaai Estate, however, has strict building guidelines. Homes must blend in, and there are height restrictions on certain stands. The main philosophy here is maximum living with minimum impact on the environment. All buyers get to enjoy a view, and all of the owners have access to protected nature trails and wildlife on their doorstep. Then there’s the 3 km of fencedoff beach with its white sand, rock pools and gently lapping waves. Four tick boxes ticked. Buyers here aren’t just buying a house – all the houses in Romansbaai are homes. Expect decks with stone fireplaces and large roomy areas in which to hide from the cares of the world; rock pools for little explorers, with footpaths straight back to mom and dad;

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golf cart rides straight to the beach for the retirement village residents; and top-notch security with ClearVu fencing offering even perimeter stands natural views. When does a house become a home? In Romansbaai terms, it happens when surfboards are stacked on sun-filled patios and wetsuits are drying on lawns. It’s laughter and sandcastles. It’s small bowls of seashells on windowsills. It’s the crunch of shoes on walking trails and freshly caught seafood with a glass of locally produced white wine. It’s sunsets with feet under blankets and marshmallows turning on crackling fires. It’s sand between toes and day drives in the Overberg – always coming back to your home, your place, your sanctuary. A home really is where the heart is. Once you stand here and see what this estate is really about, you will find it incredibly hard to leave. Visit www.romansbaai.co.za for more information.

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Recycling

Message Reaches New Audiences The Polyolefin Recycling Company (POLYCO) will be spreading the message about the importance of recycling during the month of September, as part of the local packaging industry’s Clean-Up & Recycle Week SA, which will take place from 12th to 17th September. Text & Images: Supplied

A major focus point for POLYCO has been to reach a wider target audience through its drive to educate South Africans on recycling. “For this reason, we will be making our educational material available to the public in five of our official languages,” explains POLYCO’s CEO Mandy Naudé. POLYCO’s recently launched series of “How-To-Recycle” videos has now been translated with subtitles and is available in English, Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho and Afrikaans. Talking about the recently translated videos, Naudé says: “Our videos were very well received when we launched them on YouTube and Facebook, as well as on our website. They explain why we need to recycle, how to recycle and what

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products are made from recycled plastics. We recognised the need to make the videos available to as wide an audience as possible with the use of subtitles, as these videos need to be accessible to as many individuals as possible in order for our combined efforts to create the significant change needed.” The series will be relaunched during National Recycling Week in September on social media platforms as well as on www.polyco.co.za. “One of the biggest threats to South Africa’s recycling industry is the lack of a consistent stream of clean, recyclable materials. The Industry Waste Management Plan has set a recycling rate target of 35 % by 2020. According to the latest

plastic recycling figures, we are currently achieving 30.8 %. This means that we have to grow polyolefin recycling in South Africa by more than 300,000 tonnes over the next four years. POLYCO is up for the challenge, but we know that the only way we are going to meet this target is through building a strong value chain in which every player recognises the important role and responsibility they have to play,” explains Naudé. For this reason, the importance of educating South Africans about recycling and the benefits of their efforts cannot be over-emphasised. Visit www.polyco.co.za for more information.


Good Gardening to the

Tea

Using Rooibos in Your Garden Rooibos tea, which is rich in antioxidants, is best-known for its health benefits, but according to South Africa’s top gardening gurus, it’s also a must for every garden.

Text: Supplied Images © iStockphoto.com & mediaclubsouthafrica.com

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Margaret Roberts, a prominent figure in the world of gardening and natural health, has been using Rooibos for composting ever since she can remember. She says that Rooibos makes a fantastic natural fertilizer as it contains nutrients and trace minerals beneficial to plant growth. “Instead of throwing away your used Rooibos tea leaves or bags, use them along with other vegetable and fruit peelings to make a balanced compost mix. Our thriving Herbal Centre near Hartbeespoort Dam (North West) keeps compost heaps going in much the same way, with Rooibos tea being among the critical compostable materials. We use it on all our vegetables and fruit in the Herbal Centre gardens that supply our restaurant, and the produce is of excellent quality,” she says. Roberts’ herbal garden is considered to be one of South Africa’s top ten gardens and is entirely

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dedicated to organic farming. Rooibos tea leaves also enrich the soil by increasing nitrogen levels, whilst giving earthworms something nice to munch on. Tanya Visser, gardening guru, TV personality and editor of The Gardener and Die Tuinier magazines, as well as associate editor on the Grow to Eat magazine, does just that. She uses her used Rooibos tea bags to feed the worms in her worm farm. “You can also use tea bags for mulching your garden, but you have to drink a lot of Rooibos tea to get the quantities needed. So I actually buy Rooibos tea mulch for this. I love the courser grain of it, the smell and feel of it is wonderful too and it keeps the goggos away from my plants,” says Visser. Most gardeners prefer Rooibos mulch to bark mulch, as it’s extremely gentle on the hands – you don’t even need to wear gloves to lay it – and since it’s easier to control the

flow, it pours beautifully. Rooibos mulch also forms a crusty layer on the soil after a few waterings. This layer reduces water loss through evaporation and is thus ideal for reducing stress on young transplants, while also contributing to considerable water saving in gardens and pot plants. It’s also ideal for fertilizing vegetable planters and looks beautiful between pavers and dainty flowers. Another of South Africa’s favourite gardeners, JJ van Rensburg, is an equally big fan of Rooibos. “One of the best kept secrets is to break open steeped tea bags and to sprinkle the tea leaves around plants to deter snails and other unwanted pests – it’s a very effective biological pest deterrent.” Van Rensburg adds that contrary to the belief that all tea makes the soil acidic, Rooibos doesn’t. The efficient microbes in the soil (the good bugs) actually thrive on Rooibos tea leaves.


“The tea also reduces germination of weeds through the formation of an insulating layer above the soil, thus facilitating cleaner seedbeds and pot plants. Rooibos is also low in tannins and is beneficial to both plant and root development. Mixed with potting soil, it provides an excellent growing medium. A soil rich in organic compounds, such as Rooibos, will give any gardener a healthy and generous crop that will make them proud,” says van Rensburg. To ensure a bountiful bloom next spring, the experts suggest getting started in autumn already, which is considered the second most important gardening season of the year. It’s vital that gardens are prepared and ready for the cold winter months. For those eager to explore the benefits of using Rooibos tea in their gardens, try one or more of these DIY Rooibos gardening tips

and tricks prepared by the Rooibos Council: • Use Rooibos tea bags for cleaning the leaves of household plants. Since plants absorb the tea through the leaves, they get a real treat. • Steep used tea bags in roomtemperature water until it slightly changes colour and then pour the liquid over the plants. This provides them with extra nourishment. • When potting a new plant, use Rooibos tea leaves or tea bags (dried or steeped) in the drainage layer at the bottom of the pot. Since tea is highly absorbent, it will help absorb water that will then be released slowly back into the plant. • Feed plants by scattering steeped tea leaves into the top layer of the plant’s soil. For more information about the benefits and various uses of Rooibos, visit www.sarooibos.co.za.

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Steering Mhlathuze

Wat e r Mhlathuze Water is one of the leading water utilities in South Africa, providing a world-class service to its customers. Based in KwaZulu-Natal, Mhlathuze Water’s area of supply spans the entire province and operates an inter-basin transfer scheme, a major water treatment plant, and an offshore waste water disposal pipeline. In June 2016, Mr Mthokozisi Duze was seconded to Mhlathuze Water as the interim CEO. He is the current Deputy-Director General: Development & Planning Branch, Department of Local Government and Traditional Affairs. Text & Image © Supplied Born in Hammarsdale in KwaZuluNatal, Mr Duze did his early schooling in Bizana in the Eastern Cape. He then went on to acquire a Bachelor of Arts in Human & Social Studies, majoring in development studies and strategic management. He also holds various internationally accredited certificates, including Development Planning Management (INVENT Germany) and Common Property Management (University of Indiana, USA). Currently he is finalising his Master’s Degree in Public Administration at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He worked as the Head of the Provincial Disaster Management Centre (KZN) for more than five years and was responsible for provincial coordination of disaster management and emergency management support. He also worked as the Chief Director: Special Initiatives (now known as Local Economic Development) to champion strategic management of Government’s special interventions, including Stadia Development & Project Consolidate within Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA). Mr Duze then went on to work in the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) as a community facilitator, and serves in various domestic and international institutions as a nonexecutive director and board member. Currently he holds two senior management positions. The first is as Interim Chief Executive Officer within Mhlathuze

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Water on a secondment basis, for which he is responsible for overall strategic management of the organisation, ensuring that its mission and vision are upheld, as well as for building staff confidence in order to strive in executing the organisation’s objectives with dignity and serving the communities with pride. Mr Duze is also a senior management employee of the Department of Co-operative Governance & Traditional Affairs as the Deputy-Director General: Development & Planning, responsible for strategic management of four chief directorates (Local Economic Development Chief Directorate, Municipal Planning Chief Directorate, Municipal Infrastructure Chief Directorate and the Disaster Management Chief Directorates). All of these chief directorates are at the heart of service delivery within the department and Mr Duze is responsible for strategic management of Government’s special interventions on service delivery enhancement, including corridor development and small town rehabilitation. The projects which are implemented through the programmes mentioned above – as well as many others – have ensured that the provincial manifesto is not only known but also seen as being implemented, and many jobs have been created through these infrastructure projects. This has had a positive impact on improving the lives of community members. The KwaZulu-Natal cabinet resolved that

establishing development agencies in district municipalities would be beneficial, as these agencies would be responsible for local economic development (LED) in their respective jurisdictions. Mr Duze has been responsible for setting up these agencies and board capacity building on issues of governance and service delivery. Amongst other projects that Mr Duze has been involved in, he has been championing various international partnerships with stakeholders for the benefit of the KwaZuluNatal Province. He was responsible for forging a partnership with an NGO from New Jersey (New York), the 911 Fund, that specialises in emergency response, particularly fire fighting. KwaZulu-Natal has benefitted significantly from this NGO as they have provided voluntary training in fire fighting and incident command. As it is now mandatory for all provinces to establish a Fire & Rescue Services Unit, this training has proved invaluable in ensuring that municipalities are educated and skilled in this field. Furthermore Mr Duze has been responsible for research on drought interventions, including water resource management and desalination, as the country is now faced with devastating drought conditions. He led the team that visited desalination plants in San Diego and attended a conference to learn more about this alternative water resource. For more information, visit www.mhlathuze.co.za.


Bakk ie Tac kl es

the Berg VW Amarok Double Cab A 400 km trip from Pretoria to the Northern Berg – the Orion Mont aux Sources Hotel, to be exact – calls for a set of wheels that meets all of the fundamental long-distance travel requirements, namely comfort, economy, safety and performance. The Double Cab Amarok was thus a natural choice.

Text: Bernard K Hellberg Images © Bernard K Hellberg (Olympus E-M1)

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Offering all of the above, and more, I wanted to evaluate the Biturbo 2-litre TDi which develops an impressive 132 kW and is claimed to sip diesel at a rate of 7.9 l/100 km. With the turbodiesel merely ticking over at 2,000 r/min when doing 120 km/h, the secret to this excellent fuel economy lies in the perfect match between the high output engine and the superb eight-speed automatic gearbox. This, along with 19” wheels, also ensures the kind of level of comfort one would expect in a soft-sprung passenger car. Needless to say, the Amarok, with its tonneau-covered loadbay, offered more than enough luggage space for a twoperson weekend, as well as a mountain bike. Tie-down points in the load area also prevented the luggage from sliding around when cornering. Interior The interior oozed luxury and sensible, easy to understand controls, as well as a heating system which made light work of the 2.5 °C temperatures which we experienced on the Oliviershoek Pass on the return trip. Returning to the Highveld just ahead of a severe and snowy cold spell, the Amarok’s 4Motion all-wheel-drive handled the icy and wet conditions with aplomb, with the highgrade Pirelli Scorpion tyres deserving some of the credit. Further enhancing the classy nature of the Amarok, full leather seats and musthave goodies such as front and rear park distance control (essential in a 5.254 m long vehicle) all form part of the specification list. In addition, the stylish dashboard with its elegant “hang down” centre console houses the easy-to-operate RCD 510 radio system which has a six CD changer; is MP3 compatible, and pumps its sound through no fewer than eight speakers. Featuring a large (6.5”) colour screen, the infotainment system boasts a SD memory card slot, as well as an AUX-in socket for fast and easy connection to an external source. A convenient 12V socket is located in front of the gear selector to provide power for items such as your Garmin.

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Radio reception throughout was excellent – only losing some quality when entering the deeper recesses of the Northern Berg. Volkswagen claim that this good quality reception is the result of an integrated antenna housed in the side mirrors – a novel design feature which worked really well. The long-distance trip was also made even more enjoyable thanks to well-shaped seats (height adjustable for shorter drivers), and a multi-function steering wheel that is adjustable for height as well as reach. Should you prefer to keep your luggage inside the vehicle, it’s possible to fold up the back seats for additional storage space. Exterior There’s general agreement that the Amarok, in both double cab and single cab configurations, is easily the most attractive bakkie currently available. With its flared wheel arches, chrome-plated rear bumper, and not thoughtful integrated step at the rear, the Amarok looks both stylish and muscular, thereby addressing the emotional and practical needs of a diverse

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range of customers. Even the typical Volkswagen “face”, with its distinctive front headlights, portrays a powerful character, while the tail lights – an area which designers often neglect – are stylishly angular and highly visible, as was proved under dangerously low visibility and misty conditions on the return trip.

frontal impacts, while anti-slip regulation, as well as hill start and hill descent provide additional peace of mind. This was especially noticeable down the Oliviershoek Pass where automatic braking slowed the vehicle down without having to touch either the brakes or do a manual gear change down.

Safety Offering safety features on par with luxury sedans, the Amarok has conventional ABS as well as off-road ABS for use on difficult terrain. A network of sensors form the basis of the electronic stability programme. This sophisticated programme remains activated with all-wheel-drive, and there’s even an ESP trailer stabilisation function which kicks in when the trailer starts to fluctuate heavily. This system then uses controlled braking and reduced engine torque for increased driving safety. Anyone who has ever seen a trailer swaying wildly out of control will understand that this feature alone is worth having on a bakkie. Four airbags provide additional protection in the event of side and

Overall Impression Having driven Toyota’s excellent Hilux DC on recent extended trips, I was curious to note how the Amarok would compare. It matched the Hilux blow for blow, providing a level of comfort that set it slightly above that provided by the Hilux, while the Amarok’s eight-speed gearbox also stood out. With a vast number of optional extras available and with German carmakers in general rarely, if ever, bringing an “everything included” vehicle to market, I suggest you call the nearest dealership for a quote which will enable you to compare the Amarok with its rivals. An excellent vehicle in every respect, it delivered on every marketing claim, and is highly recommended.


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Rather Put it on the

Back Burner How to Avoid Burnout

Constantly exhausted and irritated? Not motivated to do your best at work, and not enjoying your time at home? We investigate how to avoid a personal meltdown.

Text: finweek Images © iStockphoto.com

Recently, Business Day revealed why the former CEO of ArcelorMittal SA, Paul O’Flaherty, resigned last year. It wasn’t one of the usual go-to resignation reasons: “to pursue other interests” (read: the board back-stabbed him right out of the door and no amount of tie-dyeing in Knysna will ever make him forget that); “personal reasons” (read: her personality was the reason); or the perennial favourite, “to spend more time with his family” (who are not too thrilled about it). O’Flaherty, according to the newspaper, was “burned out” due to a heavy workload. This admission is unusual, but burnout among managers certainly isn’t. According to a number of studies, burnout is on the rise as tough economic conditions and the always-on culture of digital communication contribute to stress and fatigue. Burnout is a state of physical, emotional and mental exhaustion, says Karen van Zyl, a consultant at The Anger and Stress

Management Centre in Pretoria and Sandton, Johannesburg. “Work-related burnout often includes doubts about your competence and the value of your work, and sometimes, yourself. People may experience lack of motivation, enthusiasm and enjoyment in life. Depression and anxiety may be present.” From her experience, Van Zyl says, some people are more prone to burnout – particularly the so-called Type A personalities, in other words those who tend to be very goal-driven, and who are workaholics, competitive and anxietyprone. But perfectionist overachievers aren’t the only ones at risk of burnout. Your job may also be slowly grinding you down, particularly if it’s a poor fit with where your real passion lies, and does not appeal to your interests or make use of your skills. Van Zyl lists some other danger signs at work as being: • Your values and beliefs may not line

up with those of your employer and you may not fully understand what is expected of you. • Dysfunctional workplace dynamics with, for example, office bullies, micromanagers and “winder uppers” may increase your risk for burnout. • Feeling “unheard” or “unseen” at work and not being able to influence decisions that affect your job. Also, if you are constantly facing emergencies, both at work and at home, at some point something will have to give. Here are some ways to avoid being burnt out: Try to take back some personal power and control over your situation. “It may require you to make some really tough decisions and choices – like ending a relationship or finding another job,” says Van Zyl. “It will be worth it in the long run, though. Be assertive and set some boundaries that will honour you. Learn to say no when you

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need to.” Take proper breaks. Sure, you can function on fumes for a while, but if you don’t have deep reserves of mental energy you won’t be able to perform at your best over the long term. Refuel by resting and taking breaks. This means proper holidays of more than two weeks at a time (preferably without cellphone reception), but also taking regular daily breaks away from your desk. A change of scenery will help you gain a fresh perspective on your work. Get enough sleep. Sleep deprivation will make you more sensitive to stress and impair your cognitive functions. A study published

in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology showed that insufficient sleep (usually defined as sleeping less than seven hours for several consecutive nights) and constantly thinking about work during your leisure time are much stronger predictors of clinical burnout than stressful work demands. Daytime naps, if you can get away with it, will also make a world of difference. New research from the University of California, Berkeley shows that a nap can dramatically boost your brain power. According to the scientists, sleep is needed to clear the brain’s short-term memory storage capacity and make room for new information. Australian

researchers say that although an hour of extra sleep during the day will make the most difference, a 10-minute nap between 13:00 and 16:00 packs enough punch to leave you alert and ready to function at a higher level. (Google and other companies now have sleeping pods to accommodate power naps at work.) Schedule free time in your calendar, and don’t allow work to bleed into these blocks of time. Watching reruns of Friends during your free time may seem tempting when you are worn out by work, but experts recommend “restorative experiences” instead. Do something pleasurable that focuses your mind on something else, learn a new skill or take up a challenge, preferably with friends. These experiences will invigorate you much more than “vegging out” will. Limit your device use. Set yourself strict boundaries to not check your email (and social media) after a specific time of the day. Get more social support and speak up to ask for help. Van Zyl says that strong social bonds will help strengthen your resilience in tough times. Focus on finding meaning in your work. A loss of passion for your job is closely linked to burnout. Find new ways of thinking about your work and linking it to larger goals, and try to introduce new aspects and responsibilities that will energise and engage you. Volunteer. Make time in your schedule to help other people. Draw up an escape plan. If you are feeling trapped by your situation at work or at home, take some time and write down as many ways as possible that you can change your circumstances. While you may choose not to pursue many of them, it will help you to change the thinking patterns that lead to negative feelings.

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RFINDDO2015

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g a week-lon undertake to y it the n u at rt th o sus was the opp ral consen cently had e n re e e g w e V d U th In S , 0 act When indra KUV10 allish comp of the Mah ilding a sm u b r re tu c evaluation manufa But was it? est tractor e too far… world’s larg g d ri b a s, as, perhap lookalike w d K Hellberg Text: Bernar uickpic Images © Q

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To make the test period even more intriguing, we were given the 1.2-litre petrol version and the 1.2-litre diesel version by way of comparison. With both featuring quirky three-cylinder engines (for some really gruff sound effects), the two Mahindras quickly displayed their rather divergent natures. The petrol version, for example, felt decidedly underpowered, but still offered a super slick gear change courtesy of an unusual dashboard-mounted gear lever. Presumably to cut costs, both models had rev counters fitted which were red-lined at 5,000 rpm. This made sense for the diesel, but one got the distinct impression that the petrol version was quite capable of running up to 6,000 rpm at the very least. Although identical in terms of build quality, the cheaper petrol version had some shortcomings, such as irritating wind noise intrusion from as low as 70 km/h, while the diesel’s door seals seemed to be

of better quality. Creating a new “sub-section” in the compact and increasingly popular compact SUV market, the Mahindra KUV100 is a cheeky youngster with a taller stance (which will look even better if the current 15” wheels are upgraded to 16”) and offers access to SUV ownership without huge cost implications. Affordability and lower running costs are the name of the game and, while it is still available in front wheeldrive mode only, all models, whether petrol or diesel, will be emphasising the valuefor-money component. Design Built on an all-new monocoque platform and designed in-house by Mahindra, the result is attractive front and rear views, while the side view may be rather too over the top for South African tastes. Too many swoopy crease lines still tend to shout “Indian

design”. The short, tall bonnet and slimline headlights, as well as daytime running lamps (on the top-of-the-range models), standard roof rails and a sporty rear spoiler fix matters somewhat, and add to the overall sophistication of the package. Power to Your Right Foot Two engines are on offer – a 1.2-litre, non-turbo, petrol three-cylinder and an intercooled turbodiesel with the same number of cylinders which also comes in 1.2 litre guise. Having experienced both during the launch drive, I found the petrol engine to be somewhat underpowered at Highveld (1,600 m) altitudes. Its claimed output is 61 kW with 115 Nm of torque. The diesel, on the other hand, was an admirable little performer, capable of some brisk overtaking, and excellent fuel consumption figures thanks to 57 kW and 190 Nm of torque which kicks in at 1,750 r/min and makes all

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the difference. Mahindra claim fuel-sipping figures of 4.4 l/100 km for both models – and I believe them. These excellent figures should offset the disadvantages of the rather silly 35-litre fuel tank. Road holding was fairly good throughout, and the suspension (independent in front with MacPherson struts, and a rear torsion beam at the back) provided a surprisingly smooth and supple ride. Unfortunately, both models required constant steering inputs when travelling in a straight line because of a weaving tendency which could be quite upsetting at times. Another unique design feature of the KUV100 is the completely flat floor (no transmission tunnel, since it is front wheeldrive), and a high-mounted gear lever which worked really well, offering smooth shifts of the five forward gears. Another rather useful feature was the rear underseat storage space. The turning circle is commendably small, making the KUV100 a perfect city car where parking spots are narrow, and the speedometer

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accuracy is the best I’ve encountered in any vehicle, regardless of price. For example, a true 120 km/h is indicated as 121 km/h – a commendable achievement. Safety Considering the pricing – which starts at a very attractive R149,995 for the K4+ entry-level petrol model, and goes up to R197,995 for the K8 turbodiesel – one would expect an interior devoid of everything but the basics. However, the opposite is true. All brakes are ABS-equipped (with EBD), there are two front airbags, all models have air-conditioning, the steering wheel is tiltadjustable, and the more expensive models include an infotainment system with a 3.5” screen and USB plug-in points which are also standard across all models. Luggage space is rather limited, but the rear seats may be folded down to improve matters from 243 litre to 473 litre – which is more than adequate for the young couples which Mahindra will be targeting as buyers.

The value-for-money proposition is enhanced even further with the inclusion of a three-year/100,000 km warranty and a three-year/50,000 km service plan on the top-of-the-range models. More good news is that although the Mahindra diesel engines prefer high-grade fuel (50 ppm), they are rugged and robust enough to survive in environments where only 500 ppm is available. With a dealer presence in all major centres, Mahindra has taken care to ensure that customers have their needs attended to by 55 dealerships strategically placed in smaller towns as well. Coming from the makers of tractors, I had expected the KUV to be somewhat agricultural with longevity as part of the deal, but certainly lacking in sophistication. The KUV100 turned out to be a pleasant surprise and an almost a worthy alternative to the likes of Toyota’s Etios Cross, Renault’s Sandero Stepway, Ford Figo and Hyundai Grand i10.


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30 SEPTEMBER 2016


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The Cost of the Great Trek to

the Cape

Figures show that the migration of residents from other provinces to Cape Town is steadily increasing, but many buyers are facing a harsh reality-check as they come to realise just how much more expensive property is on average in the Western Cape – and how much less they’re likely to get for the sale price they achieve upcountry. Text & Images © Supplied Bantry Bay – R58 million This triple-storey designer villa on the exclusive Atlantic Seaboard is on a 1,482m² plot and offers five bedrooms and five bathrooms.

The reverse Great Trek – this time happening across the racial spectrum – has been steadily gaining momentum over the past four years, according to Lew Geffen, Chairman of Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty. He estimates that more than 30 % of his company’s sales in Gauteng are on behalf of home-owners relocating to the Western Cape. Jill Lloyd, Area Specialist for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in Claremont and Lynfrae in Cape Town, says a few years ago the growing interest from upcountry buyers was merely an emergent trend making up a fraction of the local market. “However, it

has now become a steady flow which shows no signs of abating, as more and more people are drawn to the relaxed outdoor lifestyle, reliable municipal service delivery and perceived safety of the Western Cape.” Lloyd says that despite the migration becoming commonplace, she finds that a significant number of buyers from other provinces are still surprised by the difference in property prices in comparable suburbs. “Some people have a hard time coming to terms with the realisation that they have sold their mansion in Johannesburg but will only be able to afford a smaller, more modest home for the same money in Cape Town.”

Geffen agrees: “Although many people are generally aware that property is more expensive in the Cape, the reality can be a nasty shock, especially when looking at homes in the most sought-after Cape Town suburbs which have been realising record prices well above national averages for comparable homes. The latest FNB property barometer, which includes the first quarter of 2016, has revealed that the Western Cape is once again the clear market leader, emerging streets ahead of the other provinces. Most notable is that, in contradiction to market forecasts of single digit growth in house prices, the Western Cape defied current

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Cape Town, Green Point – R19.25 million This three-bedroom, three-bathroom penthouse with wine celllar, private pool and pyjama lounge, commands 360-degree views.

trends by reflecting an impressive yearon-year price growth of 12 % measured over ten years, which is almost twice the national average of 6.8 %.” The report cites IHS Globalinsight, which estimates over the ten-year period from 2005 to 2014 the Western Cape achieved the fastest growth of South Africa’s nine provinces, narrowly ahead of Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal, averaging 3.4 % per year. FNB Property Economist John Loos believes the Western Cape’s relatively superior residential market performance is due in part to its greater land constraint compared to, for example, land-locked Gauteng. The perception of the Western Cape as having a good provincial and Cape Town metro government could have been another positive factor impacting on the house price growth, in his view. “The same goes for the province’s combination of a good lifestyle as cities go, along with a strong services-dominated economy that provides steadily improving business and employment opportunity,” says Loos. Recent Lightstone reports also confirmed the Cape’s clear status as market

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leader when its research determined that Cape Town is not only home to seven of South Africa’s ten wealthiest suburbs, it also boasts seven of the county’s ten most expensive streets. Steve Thomas, Franchise Manager for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in False Bay and Noordhoek, adds: “Ironically, Cape Town’s market strength is being boosted by the burgeoning number of upcountry investors who now account for up to 20 % to 30 % of buyers in the most soughtafter areas, increasing during the peak of the summer holiday season.” Vivienne Gottlieb, Area Specialist for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in Sea Point, Green Point and De Waterkant, says: “Not only are prices higher in Cape Town, but plot sizes are also generally around 25 % smaller than the national average because of the limited available space between the ocean and the mountain. Areas near the ocean like False Bay and the Atlantic Seaboard are especially limited as the same topography that affords them their spectacular views also severely restricts development.”

Karen Bosman, Area Specialist for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in Benmore, Hurlingham Manor and Parkmore in Johannesburg, says that she has seen a notable increase over the past year, with around 25 % of her sellers now migrating south. “The majority are upper LSM professionals with school-going children who are seeking a better lifestyle for their families. Many of my clients travel to Cape Town regularly and are aware that they are not going to be able to replace the standard of home they enjoy in Johannesburg, but most feel that the trade-off is justifiable.” Pretoria residents appear to be less hasty to join the mass migration, with only around 10 % of sellers in soughtafter suburbs like Brooklyn and Menlopark moving out of the province. So says Karin Petzer, Area Specialist for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty, who adds that most of her clients who move to Cape Town prefer to rent initially to allow them time to get to know the city before deciding on an area in which to buy property. Charlene Leibman, Area Specialist for Lew Geffen Sotheby’s International Realty in


Johannesburg, Robindale – R1,499 million Most suburbs of Johannesburg will offer more house for your money than Cape Town, such as this three-bedroom house in the north of Johannesburg. Senderwood, Bedford Park and St Andrews, says: “We are also seeing an increasing number of migrating sellers retaining a smaller property in Johannesburg to accommodate husbands who still work in Johannesburg and commute weekly.” According to Numbeo, the world’s largest database of user-contributed data about cities and countries worldwide, the cost of sectional title properties in Cape Town averages between 15 % and 37 % higher than in Johannesburg – depending on where you buy. FNB’s estimates put the Western Cape as the province with by far the strongest net inflow of repeat home buyers from other provinces. In fact, since 1999 the province has had a positive net inflow of repeat buyers.

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There are also fewer repeat buyers leaving the province, according to Loos: “The Western Cape has developed a competitive advantage, which appears to be reflected in it having the lowest percentage of repeat buyers leaving the province (7.3 % of total repeat buyers), as well as by far the strongest net inward migration rate of repeat buyers from other provinces.” With the Western Cape’s market strength widening the gap between property values in other provinces, Geffen advises that thorough research is essential for upcountry buyers to achieve maximum bang for their buck. “It is essential for relocating home seekers to do their homework before the final decision to move is even made. Property prices are

higher in the Cape but there is still value to be found and, although the advantages of living here do outweigh the benefits of an extra reception room and enormous garden, comprehensive research will reduce the trade-off by determining which areas and property options offer the best value according to their needs.” Geffen concludes: “I don’t foresee the growing influx of upcountry buyers abating any time soon as, over and above the lifestyle advantages, investors also benefit financially. Cape Town residential property values have consistently out-performed the other major centres in South Africa for a decade and it is now considered the most stable market in the country.”


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Positioned in the most romantic valley on earth, Franschhoek Country House & Villas is an exclusive boutique hotel reminiscent of a village in Provence yet with an elegant Cape sensibility. Set in gardens of lemon trees, lavender and vines – with fynbos draping the nearby mountains – the original, charming country maison includes 14 standard and luxury rooms as well as the award-winning Monneaux Restaurant while the 12 Villa suites are havens of privacy & understated opulence. Swimming pools, a candle-lit cellar, a treatment room and sun-down verandas are all a traveller needs as you live la vie extraordinaire.

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Beautiful and

Smart Mercedes-Benz E-Class

Often the flag bearer for new Mercedes-Benz engineering concepts, the E-Class is revered as the prime example of what an executive sedan should be.

Text: Bernie Hellberg Images Š Quickpic

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Mercedes-Benz arguably holds more trademarks for clever in-car feature acronyms than any automaker in the world. Moreover, there is never a shortage of marketing personnel at a Merc launch event, all poised to overpower you with increasingly complex explanations of ever more cryptic phrases such as Drive Pilot, Evasive Steering Assist, and PreSafe Impulse. Sometimes you’ve got to wonder whether in the hallowed halls of the Stuttgart Betriebsanlage there is a committee whose sole purpose it is to come up with new names for systems yet to be developed. But the Teutonic giants of motoring don’t mess around with phonetics and syntax just for the sake of it. They’re on a mission, all the time, to develop the world’s smartest vehicles, spending countless hours developing new and innovative ways of getting you and yours safely from A to B. The Future is Autonomous It started with the development of the Passenger Safety Cell in the second generation (W110) of vehicles which would eventually become the E-Class range. Soon, the addition of Anti-lock Brakes, Distronic, Park Assist, and others, became the yardstick by which the technological advancement of

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the automobile was measured. Fast forward to 2016, and the age of the smart device. Just as there isn’t a place for the cheerful but ultimately rather dumb mobile phone of yesteryear, it is no longer sufficient for cars just to be clever, they have to be increasingly smart, too. Seven years ago, Mercedes launched Attention Assist, an algorithm that monitored steering inputs and other parameters to detect a drowsy driver. Today, the E-Class has the capacity to orientate itself in its surroundings, consider everything from road hazards to imminent unavoidable collisions and – to a limited extent – act autonomously to avoid them or to minimise potential risk. It’s called Drive Pilot – available as part of the R32,500 Driving Assistance package option – and it does everything a Tesla Model S can do, albeit it in a slightly more civilised way. Although not quite there yet in terms of a usable level of autonomous driving functionality, the system certainly offers a firm foundation upon which MercedesBenz is building a pioneering car-to-X communication system for the E-Class. This will allow future E-Class cars to communicate with each other, and to respond to physical infrastructure signals and broadcasted warnings of impending doom.

The Present is Smart Thankfully, Mercedes-Benz engineers, being the forward-thinking bunch that they are, have brought smart technology forward a few years from 20-whatever into the E-Class. Unabashedly described as “the most intelligent car in the world” by its minders, the E-Class employs another Drive Pilot function when you’re swerving to avoid an obstacle, guiding you through the process with Evasive Steering Assist (ESA), or braking for you with Active Brake Assist (ABA). Although ESA is available as an additional option with the upgraded Driving Assistance package Plus (R41,000), ABA is included with the cheaper assistance option. For the extra cash you also get Pre-Safe Impulse Side thrown in, which sees an inflatable bladder installed on the outside shoulder of the front seats, which will inflate to push you away from the door, once the car has detected an unavoidable side impact. But the innovation doesn’t end there. Taking collision management to the next level, Mercedes has dreamt up another safety system you never knew that you needed. Should it come to the worst, PreSafe Sound plays pink noise (I’m told that it sounds like a television without signal) through the speakers to contract the stapedius muscles in your ears prior to a


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crash, reducing the risk of hearing damage during an accident. It’s Really Quite Bright Almost casting a shadow on the vast safety tech built into the E-Class, the optional Multibeam LED lighting system (yours for R25,000 more) finally takes Mercedes-Benz out of the dark ages of vehicular illumination. Finally, a pair of goggles that can rival, and beat, Audi’s brilliant Matrix system, Merc’s new headlights squeeze 84 individual LEDs into each cluster. Combined with the quickthinking Highbeam Assist Plus system, the E-Class will not dazzle oncoming traffic, almost has the ability to see around corners, and is even smart enough to recognise reflective road signs and avoid casting a full-on high beam at them. Sensation management (surprisingly, not an actual Merc marketing term) is a high priority inside the elegant cabin. Touch controls have replaced standard buttons and toggles on the steering wheel, and a redeveloped touch pad on the centre console allows for easier operation while driving, and it even recognises your handwriting. Optional extras include two brilliant

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next-generation high-resolution displays, each with a wide screen diagonal of 12.3” – unique in this segment. Interior lighting options bring a technicolor rainbow of 64 colours to the ambient lighting setup in the E-Class, lighting up everything from the trim parts, central display, front stowage facility on the centre console, handle recesses, door pockets, front and rear footwells, overhead console, and tweeters (if you’ve optioned your car with the R95,000 Burmester highend 3D surround sound system). It’s a lot of cash to get your tweeters to shine, but hey… Its Powerful to Boot The E-class launches with a brand new family of 2.0-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder mills. In petrol application, the engine makes a slight-ish 135 kW (with 300 Nm of torque) in the E200 – similar to the output achieved by the smaller C200, and it has to cope with an extra 180 kg in the larger saloon. Being turbocharged, it never felt stretched, but the star of the show has to be Mercedes’ new aluminium-block diesel. Generating 143 kW and 400 Nm of available torque, the first application of the new engine is as smooth as silk and virtually

vibration free. In a remarkable about turn the diesel actually sounds more refined than the petrol engine, even if it is slightly louder under hard acceleration. With all its resources combined, the 2.0-liter diesel launches like an oil-burning rocket, but it suffers more than the petrol version when attempting to overtake at speed. However, this is a slight imperfection that is soon forgotten at the pumps, once you realise that the diesel’s 3.9 l/100 km average consumption figure means less filling-up than a Volkswagen Polo. There is also a 2,987 cc V6 E350d that’s good for 190 kW and a whopping 620 Nm of torque. It’s a fine drive that will propel you to 100 km/h in 5.9 seconds, and semisuccessfully gives the E-Class a performance feel, but catapults the E-Class base price to a stiff R958,300. Interestingly, the E350d sips less fuel than the 2.0-litre petrol, coming in at a slight 5.1 l/100 km. All models are equipped as standard with the new 9G TRONIC ninespeed automatic transmission. A work of automotive genius, the new E-Class raises the bar for intuitive executive saloons. Brimming with next-generation technology and market-leading safety systems, this is the car to beat right now.


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House

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Things a Seller Might Be Hiding From You You’ve finally found your ideal home and you’re ready to make an offer to purchase, sign the necessary documents and call the moving company. That’s generally what you’d expect, right? Except if the “makeup” smudges off the walls and all the flaws come through – such as a leaking roof, cracked foundation or even a bug infestation. Here are five things sellers may commonly try to hide during the selling process. Text: Property24 Images © iStockphoto.com

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Leaking Roofs and Ceilings Well maintained roofs can last for many years, but sloppy installations or poor quality can compromise their lifespan. A leaking roof is unfortunately something that most homeowners are all too familiar with and probably one of the many reasons they’re looking to move out. Ask the seller how old the roof is and inspect the gutters and drainage systems to make sure they are in a good working order. If it seems as if the roof hasn’t been well maintained, you might have room to negotiate the selling price of the property, taking into consideration any repairs that might need to be done. Plumbing Systems The plumbing is the internal running system of a home. Depending on the age of the property, the plumbing systems could be very old and any plumbing problems that could surface may not be evident immediately. So when you’re viewing the home again, run the water in the kitchen and bathrooms, flush the toilets and take note of the water pressure and the toilet flushing systems.

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The Real Reason for Spruced Interiors Don’t judge a home by its lovely painted walls. A home may look beautiful, but it could be hiding anything that lurks beneath the floors or behind the walls. Painting can be the biggest giveaway, especially when it only includes one or two rooms. So when you’re viewing a property, look carefully at freshly repainted areas, as they could be concealing damage. Cracks in the Walls or Foundation Cracks in the walls can either be of little significance or a major structural defect, which could have you forking out thousands of rands if not discovered early on. Cracks in the foundation walls can occur within several years of the property being built or due to natural causes, such as the roots of large trees. It is therefore vital to inspect the interior and exterior of the property thoroughly and if any cracks, small or large, are noticed, contact a home inspector to assess these, thereby giving you peace of mind.

The History of the Home Make sure you’re well informed about how old the property is. Poorly executed renovations or bad plumbing might just come back and bite you – well after you’ve signed all the documents. When viewing a home where renovations have been carried out, ask the seller why these were done, when they were done and whether or not reputable, professional and licensed service providers carried out the job. Don’t feel intimidated or forced into making one of the biggest decisions of your life. Before making an offer to purchase your ideal home, be sure that you’re comfortable with the outcome of the inspections. If the seller insists that they’ve already done a home inspection prior to putting the property on the market, request to see the reviews of the home inspection. Don’t be afraid to ask the necessary and important questions. Everything is negotiable, it just depends on whether both the buyer and seller are prepared to compromise. For more property advice, visit our Advice section on www.property24.com.


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Two

Faced? How to Spot a Facebook Scam

Hoaxes are all over Facebook and with users often encouraged or forced via hijacks and hacks to share and like content, it often seem like the hoax has been personally vouched for by your friend, says Carey van Vlaanderen, CEO of ESET Southern Africa. Fortunately, most of the popular Facebook hoaxes are unoriginal and have been seen before in some form or other. So before you click that link, here are five tips to spot a Facebook hoax.

Text: Supplied Images © iStockphoto.com

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Beware if It Asks You to Share First Scammers know that the best way to get you to click their link is if another friend of yours has liked or shared it first. So, often they will ask you to share a video or a picture before you are able to see it. This should trigger alarm bells. If they want you to share it first, the chances are that it almost certainly does not exist – it could be annoying surveys or even malware. Real websites want your page views. Does It Seem Believable? Often, Facebook hoaxes will promise unbelievable things in order to reel you in. Examples from the past include supposed stories of fisherman catching dinosaurs and real life mermaids. Most likely, any video proving their existence will require you to upgrade your video software or will give you some nasty malware when you open it. If you really can’t resist the temptation to view it, step outside of Facebook and Google it – if dinosaurs or mermaids are discovered to be real, reputable news sites will have found time to report on it.

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If I Get a Million Likes People offering to do things if they reach a million likes may be perfectly harmless – if pretty pointless – but they can have a darker side. Likes are a currency of sorts. A page with lots of likes can be sold for cold hard cash. Pages with 100,000 likes can go for thousands of rands, leaving you liking something undesirable, which could do some serious damage once sold. Also remember that if likes promise to do something tangibly good, such as pay for medical bills or similar, they are not real world currency – so move along. Anything That Lets You Use Facebook Differently Facebook has a page full of frequent myths about the site that are often spread as truth. To be clear, it tells you that Facebook won’t ever charge you for your page, and that you can’t change the colour of your pages or see who has viewed your profile. Apps promising to do these things, won’t act as promised but will load you up with spam – or worse. Stay clear.

Shocking Video Clips Scammers know that they need to grab your attention with content you can’t see elsewhere – and it is often violent and grizzly. If you see news sites promising to show you pics or videos of celebrity deaths or people being mauled by animals, you can bet your last dollar that they’re not legitimate websites. Real news sites offer warnings of unpleasant content. If sites are using shocking video clips to grab clicks you shouldn’t trust them.

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The Travelling

Golfer Gansbaai Golf Club

Radical golfer, Heinrich du Preez, will be giving Indwe readers a travelling golfer’s guide to some of the best courses in Southern Africa. In this edition, he visits the Gansbaai Golf Club.

Text: Heinrich du Preez Images Š Supplied

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Who Is Heinrich du Preez? Heinrich du Preez has been actively involved in the golfing industry since 2006 and holds numerous world records in golf, including a few Guinness World Records, such as playing a round of golf on all six continents in just five days. He has also played a round of golf in all nine of South Africa’s provinces in one day… without flying. For more information, visit www.radicalgroup.co.za, or connect on Twitter (@radicalgolfer), or on Instagram (radicalgolfer).

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A couple of years ago I was on a flight to the USA from Australia. I flipped through their in-flight magazine, just like you’re doing now, and came across an interesting read. The article’s header was “Awesome 13”. It was about two golf fans from the USA who had travelled around the world playing what they called the “Awesome 13” golf courses. They had personally handpicked all the courses on the list, which really did include some of the most incredible courses on the planet. Their list included the following categories: highest (I remember this being a golf course in Peru, where you have to take oxygen tablets before teeing off); lowest; most northerly, easterly, southerly and westerly; cheapest; most expensive; hottest; coldest; most scenic; best course in the world; and the most difficult. For any golfer this was a fascinating read, and I’m sure some of the first and business class passengers were already checking their diaries for availability after reading it. Personally, in true Golf Traveller style, I decided to copy this list and customise it for South Africa. And so, this month, I would like to introduce you to the most southerly golf course in South Africa – the Gansbaai Golf Club (a lot of people believe that the Bredasdorp Golf Club is more southerly, but with GPS co-ordinates you will quickly find out that the Gansbaai Golf Club owns this honour). The town of Gansbaai is very well known for its shark cage diving. Many a foreign and local tourist has braved its cold seas to get up close and personal with the great white sharks frequenting this area. The golf course – which used to be called the Kleinbaai Golf Course – was built in the early 1980s, and one of its very first players was former South African president

FW De Klerk. When he arrived to play the course for the first time, his bodyguard accidently broke his putter’s shaft while getting his clubs out of the car. He had to borrow a flat stick from one of the locals, and I’m sure you’ll find this putter framed in some bar area in town! The course boasts nine holes, with 18 tees, and a beautiful parkland design, with spectacular views over the Indian Ocean. For men, the course plays 2 863 m, while ladies would go around in close to 2,504 steps. At first glance the course looks fairly easy, with wide fairways and very few trees. On closer inspection though, you will find the going not all that easy. As with most coastal golf courses, the wind plays a huge role. On the day that I played it, there was a fairly stiff wind blowing, but according to the locals this was just “a breeze”. No real wind to write home about, they said. I hit a 5 iron 160 m into the wind, and that was when I flushed it. For me that was close to gale force! For a small town golf club with limited funding, I was amazed at the condition of the course and the upkeep of the clubhouse and its facilities. The most important factor for me to label a golf course great is the standard of their greens – kudos to the management and golf course staff at the Gansbaai Golf Club for maintaining theirs. As a result, I really enjoyed playing this course. If you are ever in the area, please pop in. It’s a beautiful town, beautiful golf course, friendly people, cheap drinks…what more could you ask for? To get in touch with the Gansbaai Golf Course, contact +27 28 384 1441, or visit them at 212 Perlemoen Street, Kleinbaai, Gansbaai.


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courieritsouthafrica

@Courierit_SA


Business Hub

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Books Is Your Thinking Keeping You Poor? By Douglas Kruger Being rich is not normal: most people never achieve wealth in their lifetime. The very word “rich” describes a state beyond the median, and therein lies an important lesson. To become rich, your thinking has to be radically different from that of the people around you. Do you know what those specific differences may be? Business and wealth guru Douglas Kruger strips away the feel-good hype and gets right down to the practical principles. He leads you through the types of thinking that hold individuals,  families and businesses in generational cycles of poverty. He explores the dramatically different  approaches of the self-made rich and super-rich, showing you which behaviours to begin practising and which behaviours are traitorous to your wealth potential. It all begins with the way you think.

Visitants By Dave Eggers For almost 20 years, Dave Eggers has been travelling the world, chronicling his interactions with the countries and people he has encountered. Visitants is his first collection of travel writing. It spans his entire career and includes pieces on Sudan, China, Cuba and a dozen other destinations. The book begins at 140 km/h, with Eggers being driven across the deserts of Saudi Arabia by a hired driver who declares, “American, boom boom!” This opening sets the stage for the collection’s vast cultural scope and ever-present sense of adventure, inquisitiveness and daring. Globetrotters and Eggers fans alike will find a faithful companion in his unique combination of humour, humanism and empathy.

Double Echo Must By François Bloemhof Read

Ex-cop Paul Mullan has a lot more baggage than the rucksack he’s carrying across the country. He’s trying to get away from that night, that hour when life as he knew it came to an end. When Paul helps wealthy businessman, Bernard Russell, to change his car’s burst tyre near Riebeek-Kasteel in the pouring rain, Russell offers him shelter. But the opulent wine estate Journey’s End is no safe haven, and Paul soon senses that his life is about to resemble a film noir: he is the fallible hero, a young woman in Russell’s household the scheming femme fatale, and the outcome possibly deadly. Filled with tension, secrets and sleight of hand, Double Echo is seasoned Afrikaans thriller writer François Bloemhof ’s exhilarating English debut.

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Shumbalala Game Lodge - An African Dream In the vast wilderness of South Africa’s hot northern plains, adjacent to the famous Kruger National Park, deep within an ancient tapestry of natural wonder, you will chance upon SHUMBALALA GAME LODGE. From your early morning game drive or bush walk in the Big 5 Thornybush Game Reserve to lazy afternoons at the pool and a sunset safari, tales of the day are told in the wine cellar as you prepare for a sumptuous dinner fireside al fresco or candle-lit indoors. Choose from four luxury suites or the Presidential Suite, all of which have private viewing decks and picture window bathrooms. Wake up knowing that each day will allow for the adventure and peace of Africa to enter your soul – in a place where the lion sleeps. Reservations: Tel: +27 (0)11 253 6500 • Fax: +27 (0)11 803 7350 • sales@thornybush.co.za

Lodge: Tel: +27 (0)72 8122172 • Fax: 086 6858902 • info@shumbalala.co.za

w w w. s h u m b a l a l a . c o. z a


Gadgets

Front Seat Driver Day or night, Transcend’s DrivePro 220 Car Video Recorder is your most reliable eyewitness on the road. The recorder’s built-in battery, emergency recording, aperture lens, snapshot feature, and bright 2.4” colour LCD screen ensure an excellent user experience. In addition, with useful features including a GPS receiver, lane departure warning system (LDWS), forward collision warning system (FCWS), speed alarm, and parking mode, the DrivePro 220 aids in ensuring optimum driving safety.

// za.transcend-info.com

For A Fast Bike Bath The Azzuri Portable Washer is a mountain biker’s best friend, as it means no more long waits in the shower queues at races. The washer can be connected to your car as a power source; can hold up to 15 litres of water, and offers a 6m-long hose for comfortable washing. The pressure is strong enough that it will thoroughly clean your bike, without causing any damage to your precious mount. And, you can even use it for yourself too. For more information on the Azzuri Portable Washer email marketing@azzuricycling.com or visit www.azzuricycling.com.

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Going for Gold More than just a speaker, the Gold Phantom emits sound using a revolutionary and inherently superior process created by Devialet engineers. Invented and made in France, the Gold Phantom offers ultra-dense sound experience with physical impact in its most extreme version, similar to being at a rock concert. Connected via Bluetooth, WiFi, Spotify, or even Airplay, and made from titanium with a rose gold finish, the Gold Phantom truly provides an exhilarating, sensory experience.

// en.devialet.com


Meet the Crew Have you ever wondered who is flying the plane when you travel on SA Express? Or wanted to know more about what a job as a cabin crew member is like? Well, now’s your chance! Every month we will introduce a few members of our SA Express family, because by getting to know them, you become part of the SA Express family too. Text & Image © Supplied

Nomvula Phinithi Cabin Crew Member Length of Service: I’ve been with SA Express for five amazing years. Tell us more about yourself. I am 31 years old, from the East Rand and mother to a seven-year-old girl. What is your favourite part of your job? Firstly, being able to travel for free. Secondly, I like to look good and we are expected to be smartly dressed and groomed at all times. I guess if you look good you also feel good. What do you find most challenging about your job? At the beginning it was challenging to deal with difficult passengers in an enclosed space while having an audience. However, over the years, I’ve learned to grow personally and professionally in terms of dealing with different people from different countries and cultures. What do you like about working for SA Express? I like the fact that we have a sense of unity, working together to achieve a common goal. My fellow crew members are always friendly and helpful, and always willing to go the extra mile for our passengers. I like the fact that my company strives to make a difference and contributes to the nation by being involved in events that focus on combating poverty. What would people find surprising about your job? Every year we go for training and exams. The training prepares you to deal with emergency situations. You are required to be able to give first aid when necessary and we are trained to fight fires by following certain procedures. As a cabin crew member you are a nurse, a fire fighter, a nanny, a policeman, a security guard… the list goes on. Have you ever had any funny incidents while working? As per regulations, passengers are asked to switch their cellphones off for take-off and landing. I find it particularly amusing when they only pretend to switch them off. At night, when we turn off the cabin lights it’s completely dark, and then... Hello! What’s that beacon of light radiating there above your head? Calling all lost souls! What passengers really need to know is that we ask you to switch off your phones so that you can be our eyes and ears. You have a better view of what’s going on outside the plane. Should there be an emergency, chances are you’ll see it first, thereby helping all of us. That is, if you are not gazing at your phone, of course. Safety always comes first.

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Airline information SA Express fleet

Safety Information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief.

Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain. Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices domestic and regional flights on the Q400. Passengers will be permitted cell phones, e-readers and electronic

(PED’s) will apply to all CRJ700/200 and DH8 to use PED’s such as tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabin-crew member makes an announcement on the publicaddress system. Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member. Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/AM/FM/FHF/satellite receivers, two-way radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time. Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights. Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight.

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace

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Special services Special Meals Passengers with special dietary requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests. Only available on selected flights. Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators. Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage. Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck

We fly for you About us SA Express is a domestic and regional, passenger and cargo carrier which was established on 24th April 1994. The airline has since become one of the fastest growing regional airlines in Africa with route networks covering major local and regional cities. SA Express plays a significant role in the country’s hospitality, travel and tourism industry and is a vital contributor to the country’s socioeconomic development. SA Express prides itself in aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. With our consistent and seamless service, our customers can be assured of stellar customer service that will exceed their expectations. Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa. Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

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cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination. Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checkedin luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400) We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intra-regional African brand. The main objective of the re-brand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that

provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform. Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Light snacks will be served on selected flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.


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Flight schedule Johannesburg - Pilanesberg Flt No sa 1131 SA 1131

Dep 09:35 12:30

Arr 10:10 13:05

A/C cr2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Bloemfontein Flt SA sa SA SA SA SA sa SA SA SA

No 1001 1001 1003 1005 1011 1013 1013 1017 1021 1023

Dep 06:00 06:10 08:00 11:20 13:50 15:30 15:30 16:45 17:55 18:45

Arr 07:00 07:10 09:05 12:25 14:55 16:30 16:35 17:45 19:00 19:45

A/C cr8 cr8 DH4 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4 dh4 cr2 DH4

M

T

W

Johannesburg - East London Flt SA SA SA sa

No 1403 1409 1411 1411

Dep 07:15 17:30 18:30 18:30

Arr 08:45 19:00 20:00 20:10

A/C CR8 CR2 CR2 dh4

M

Johannesburg - George Flt SA sa SA SA

No 1501 1503 1505 1509

Dep 06:50 08:20 11:30 15:50

Arr 09:00 10:15 13:25 17:40

A/C dh4 dh4 cr2 CR8

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

Dep 10:15 12:15

Arr 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

M

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

Johannesburg - Kimberley Flt SA SA SA SA sa SA

No 1101 1103 1105 1107 1111 1113

Dep 06:00 09:20 13:10 14:25 16:50 17:20

Arr 07:05 10:25 14:15 15:30 17:55 18:25

A/C dh4 DH4 CR2 DH4 cr2 dh4

M

T

Johannesburg - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA

No 1459 1457 1457

Dep 17:30 17:30 17:50

Arr 19:10 19:30 19:50

A/C cr8 DH4 dh4

M

T

Johannesburg - mahikeng Flt sa SA SA sa SA

No 1121 1123 1123 1125 1127

Dep 06:40 07:10 07:10 14:45 15:40

Arr 07:35 07:50 08:05 15:40 16:25

A/C CR2 cr2 cr2 cr2 cr2

M

Flt sa sa

No 1132 1132

Dep 10:45 13:40

A/C cr2 cr2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

Bloemfontein - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA sa sa SA SA SA

No 1024 1002 1004 1006 1012 1014 1014 1014 1018 1022

Dep 06:20 07:40 09:35 12:55 15:25 17:05 17:15 17:20 18:20 19:30

Arr 07:25 08:40 10:40 14:00 16:30 18:10 18:20 18:20 19:20 20:30

A/C DH4 cr8 dh4 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4 dh4 dh4 cr2

M

T

W

East London - Johannesburg Flt SA SA sa SA sa

No 1412 1404 1410 1410 1410

Dep 06:45 09:15 19:20 19:40 20:30

Flt SA SA sa SA

No 1502 1504 1506 1510

Dep 09:20 10:50 14:20 18:10

Arr 08:25 10:45 21:00 21:10 22:00

A/C CR7 CR8 dh4 CR2 cr2

M

Arr 11:10 12:40 16:10 19:50

A/C cr8 CR2 cr2 CR8

M

Flt SA SA

No 1226 1228

Dep 12:00 13:55

Arr 13:00 14:55

A/C DH4 DH4

M

No 1102 1104 1106 1108 1112 1114

Dep 07:40 10:55 15:05 16:05 18:50 19:05

Arr 08:45 12:00 16:10 17:10 19:50 20:10

A/C dh4 DH4 CR2 DH4 cr2 CR7

M

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

Kimberley - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA sa SA

T

T

Hoedspruit - Johannesburg

T

Port Elizabeth - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA

No 1460 1460 1458

Dep 06:10 06:20 20:00

Arr 08:00 08:00 21:35

A/C DH4 CR8 cr2

M

T

mahikeng - Johannesburg Flt SA sa sa sa SA

No 1122 1124 1124 1126 1128

Dep 08:00 08:40 08:45 16:20 16:50

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

156/ Indwe

Arr 11:20 14:15

George - Johannesburg

Johannesburg - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1225 SA 1227

pilanesberg - Johannesburg

Arr 08:50 09:30 09:30 17:10 17:30

A/C cr2 cr2 cr2 cr2 cr2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S


Johannesburg - Richards bay Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1201 1203 1207 1213

Dep 06:10 08:30 13:15 16:55

Arr 07:25 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - walvis bay Flt No SA 1701

Dep 11:55

Arr 14:10

A/C CR8

M

T

Johannesburg - Gaborone Flt sa sa SA SA SA sa SA SA SA SA SA sa

No 1761 1761 1761 1763 1765 1767 1767 1775 1775 1783 1779 1779

Dep 05:55 06:20 06:55 07:55 09:55 11:30 11:55 12:35 14:30 15:45 18:10 18:45

Arr 06:50 07:15 07:50 08:50 10:50 12:20 12:45 13:30 15:25 16:40 19:05 19:40

A/C dh4 dh4 cr2 DH4 DH4 dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 dh4

M

T

Johannesburg - Lubumbashi Flt No SA 1797

Dep 09:20

Arr 11:45

A/C CR8

M

T

CAPE TOWN - bloemfontein Flt SA SA sa SA SA SA

No 1081 1083 1087 1087 1091 1091

Dep 06:00 08:00 12:00 13:20 16:55 16:55

Arr 07:30 09:30 13:45 14:50 18:20 18:40

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 cr2 cr2 dh4

M

CAPE TOWN - east london Flt sa SA SA sa SA SA SA sa

No 1361 1363 1363 1371 1371 1373 1375 1375

Dep 06:00 07:00 08:00 12:25 13:05 16:25 17:20 17:20

Arr 07:25 08:25 09:25 13:50 14:30 17:55 18:45 19:05

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 cr2 CR2 cr2 CR2 dh4

M

Cape Town - Pilanesberg Flt No SA 1255

Dep 11:30

Arr 13:40

A/C CR2

M

Richards bay - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1202 1204 1208 1214

Dep 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40

Arr 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

walvis bay - Johannesburg Flt sa

No 1702

Dep 14:45

Arr 16:55

A/C cr8

M

T

Gaborone - Johannesburg Flt sa sa SA SA SA sa SA SA SA SA SA sa

No 1762 1762 1762 1764 1766 1768 1768 1776 1776 1784 1780 1780

Dep 07:30 07:40 08:30 09:20 11:25 12:55 13:20 14:00 16:05 17:15 19:45 20:10

Arr 08:25 08:35 09:25 10:15 12:20 13:50 14:15 14:55 17:00 18:10 20:40 21:05

A/C dh4 dh4 cr2 DH4 DH4 dh4 dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 dh4

M

T

Lubumbashi - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1798

Dep 12:30

Arr 15:00

A/C CR8

M

T

bloemfontein - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1082 1084 1088 1088 1092 1092

Dep 08:15 10:30 14:15 15:30 19:00 19:25

Arr 10:00 12:15 16:00 17:15 20:45 21:25

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

east london - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA sa SA SA sa SA

No 1362 1364 1364 1372 1372 1374 1376 1376

Dep 08:00 09:00 10:00 14:20 15:10 18:30 19:40 19:50

Arr 09:40 10:40 11:40 16:00 16:50 20:10 21:40 21:30

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 cr2 CR2 CR2 dh4 CR2

M

Pilanesberg - cape town Flt SA

No 1254

Dep 14:10

Arr 16:30

A/C CR2

M

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Flight schedule Cape Town - Hoedspruit Flt No sa 1241

Dep 09:10

Arr 12:30

A/C dh4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - port elizabeth Flt SA sa sa SA SA sa SA SA SA SA

No 1801 1803 1803 1807 1813 1813 1819 1821 1827 1823

Dep 06:00 07:00 07:30 10:10 10:40 14:20 15:00 16:30 17:20 18:30

Arr 07:30 08:15 08:40 11:40 12:10 15:50 16:30 17:40 18:30 20:00

A/C dh4 dh4 cr2 dh4 DH4 dh4 DH4 cr2 CR2 DH4

M

Cape Town - Walvis Bay Flt No SA 1721

Dep 11:15

Arr 13:25

A/C CR2

durban - East London Flt SA sa SA SA sa

No 1301 1305 1305 1309 1309

Dep 06:00 11:30 12:00 16:50 17:35

Arr 07:05 12:45 13:05 17:55 18:50

A/C CR2 dh4 CR2 CR2 dh4

durban - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA sa SA SA sa SA

No 1330 1334 1334 1336 1340 1340 1348

Dep 06:00 08:25 09:15 09:50 13:35 13:35 17:40

Arr 07:20 09:45 10:35 11:10 14:55 15:05 19:00

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 CR2 CR2 dh4 CR2

durban - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1850 1854 1854 1858

Dep 06:10 12:00 15:00 15:35

Arr 08:25 14:15 17:15 17:50

durban - lusaka Flt No SA 1601

Dep 09:10

Arr 13:10

durban - Harare Flt No SA 1603

Dep 09:10

Arr 11:35

Hoedspruit - Cape Town Flt sa

No 1242

Dep 13:10

A/C dh4

M

T

port elizabeth - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA sa sa SA SA sa sa SA SA SA

No 1826 1802 1804 1804 1808 1814 1814 1820 1822 1828 1824

Dep 07:00 08:00 08:40 09:20 12:10 12:40 16:20 17:00 18:10 19:00 20:30

Arr 08:40 09:40 10:10 10:40 13:50 14:20 18:00 18:40 19:30 20:20 22:10

A/C DH4 DH4 cr2 cr2 DH4 dh4 dh4 dh4 cr2 CR2 DH4

Flt SA

No 1722

Dep 14:00

Arr 16:00

No 1302 1306 1306 1310 1310

Dep 07:35 13:20 13:35 18:25 19:30

Arr 08:35 14:35 14:35 19:25 20:30

No 1331 1335 1335 1337 1341 1341 1349 1349

Dep 07:50 10:15 11:05 11:45 15:35 15:35 19:55 20:30

Arr 09:05 11:30 12:20 13:00 16:50 17:05 21:10 22:00

No 1851 1855 1855 1859

Dep 09:05 15:00 17:45 18:15

Arr 11:05 17:00 19:45 20:15

lusaka - durban Flt SA

No 1604

Dep 13:40

Arr 17:40

Harare - durban Flt SA

No 1612

Dep 13:25

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION. EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

Arr 15:50

S

S

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

A/C CR2 dh4 CR2 CR2 cr2

A/C CR2 CR2 cr2 cr2 CR2 dh4 CR2 dh4

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA

F

W

Port Elizabeth - DURBAN Flt SA SA sa sa SA sa SA sa

T

T

East London - DURBAN Flt SA sa SA SA sa

W

M

walvis Bay - Cape Town

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

158/ Indwe

Arr 16:20


Passenger Letters Dear SA Express Recently, my flight from Lubumbashi in the DRC was delayed by almost two hours, which caused me to miss my connecting flight to Cape Town. I was told while I was still on my original flight, that someone would assist us soon as we arrived at OR Tambo International Airport. Unfortunately this never happened. I then went to the SA Express office and a lady by the name of Nthabiseng Shongwe assisted me. She was fully aware that my flight had been delayed, and took me to the SAA offices in order to get me on the next available flight to Cape Town. She was extremely helpful and friendly. She gave me very good customer service. Keep it up and I think SA Express needs more staff like her. Well done, Nthabiseng! Regards Nigel Turner Congratulations to Nigel Turner, who wrote our winning letter this month, and walks away with a Samsonite Octolite 55 cm spinner valued at R3,495.

Dear SA Express I would like to thank Cornelius at SA Express in George for helping my son by calling me to let me know that he was stranded and needed help. Thank you for your kindness and support, you really went beyond the call of duty! Kind regards Peggy Van Rensburg

Do You Have Something to Say? Let us know what is on your mind by sending an email to customercare@flyexpress.aero. Letters may be edited, shortened or translated from their original language.

The writer of the winning letter in the October edition of Indwe will receive a Samsonite Octolite 55 cm spinner valued at R3,495. Taking a new and progressive approach to luggage design, Octolite offers what frequent travellers demand: lighter weight, increased durability, and maximum manoeuvrability. Octolite’s eye-catching exterior is modern, with a striking geometric design and a matte finish. Available in red, white or black, it also features an integrated carry handle, built-in address tag and fixed combination lock. The interior is divided into two halves, one featuring crossed ribbons while the other is secured with a zip-in divider featuring a convenient side pocket. To maximise manoeuvrability, Octolite has a double wheel design that provides smooth all-direction movement. The Octolite Collection is available at leading luggage stores nationwide. To locate a stockist near you, visit www.samsonite.co.za, follow @Samsonite_SA on twitter or call +27 31 266 0620.

Indwe /159


Afric a ’ s Ta l e n t R e v e al e d View from a SA Express flight Port Elizabeth Stef Olivier

in the Snarling leopard taken

Kruger National Park

John Finch

Hungry giraffe, taken in Chobe National Park in Botswana Dr N Hariharan If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line.

We c a n’t wa it to s how t hem off ! 160/ Indwe


Indwe september 2016  

IN THIS ISSUE: A true warrior of light 012 the capital of cool In the land before time Good gardening to the tea