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B LO E M F O N T E I N CA P E TOW N DURBAN E A S T LO N D O N GABORONE KIMBERLEY LUBUMBASHI LUSAKA WINDHOEK GEORGE

HOEDSPRUIT JOHANNESBURG P I LA N E S B E RG MAFIKENG PO RT E L I ZA B E T H RICHARDS BAY W A LV I S B A Y HARARE

Indwe July 2015 YOUR FREE COPY

Making the Most of

Mandela Day

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contents

Features 28

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Making the Most of Mandela Day

South Africa’s Market Insights Guru Lebo Motshegoa

Savouring a Taste of History Val de Vie Estate

The Business of Brandy Spirited Economics

Wellbeing on the Cheap Budget-Beating Health Secrets

Embrace Being Abroad Top Tips for Going Overseas

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A History of Brilliance Baume & Mercier

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Reeling With Talent Riel Dance Revival

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The Man With the Midas Touch Zack Rasego

Cover Image:

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Š Freepic.com

On the Cover It was at his 90th birthday in 2008 that Mandela made a global call for people far and wide to address social injustices and to help change the world around them for the better.

Airline Content 14

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CEO Letter

SA Express Route to Pilanesberg Launched

Meet the Crew

SA Express Fleet

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We Fly For You: Our Visions and Values

Safety and Route Map

Flight Schedule

Passenger Letters


contents

Regulars

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The Karoo’s Best Kept Secret One Night in Hanover

Events North, South, and In Between

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The Living Desert Namibia

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Business

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Travel

Motoring

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Bits & Pieces Travel Tips & Gorgeous Goodies

Bites Restaurants & Taste Experiences

Gadgets Must Haves for Technophiles

Books New releases and Must Reads

Safari Chic SA’s Game Lodges of Distinction

Renovated Holidays in KZN Relive Childhood Destinations

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Ka-Ching! How to Become a Wealthy Freelancer

Box, Stack, Unpack Making the Most of Your Move

Dig Your Way Out of Dept Sound Money Advice

Engineered Elegance Audi A6 and Audi A7 Sportback

The Perfect Companion to Wanderlust Toyota Fortuner


ceo I want to use this space to update you on some important developments at SA Express. But before doing so, I want to take the opportunity to apologise profusely to all of our customers – our passengers, tour operators and agents – for the inconvenience caused by flight delays and cancellations. Over the last few months, we have been experiencing a range of operational problems. These have resulted in delays and flight cancellations. These problems, which are currently being addressed, are the result of a combination of factors, including unplanned maintenance, as well as scheduled reductions relating to tighter trading conditions. I am also aware that our communication of these last-minute changes hasn’t always been timely. I assure you all that we are working hard to minimise these incidences and to improve communication. Once more, please accept our apology for the inconveniences these delays may have caused you. In recent weeks, our shareholder – the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) – strengthened our leadership core by appointing new board members. These new members are: T. Abrahams, R. Naithani, J.N. Nkabinde, P. Ramosebudi and G.R. Sibiya. They join the existing members, including G.N. Mothema, P.E. Mabyana and B.P.B. Dibate. The two executive directors are myself and the Chief Financial Officer (CFO). We have loaded their pictures and profiles onto our website at www.flyexpress.aero. As part of this change, Mr George Mothema, a lawyer by training and one of our longest serving board members, assumes the position of Chairman of the Board. This is important, as it will provide continuity of leadership from the old board. The new members bring a wealth of corporate governance and leadership experience to our board. Boards are a critical layer of leadership. They represent shareholders’ interests, and act as a link between the executive management of the company and the shareholders. On shareholders’ behalf, they play an overseeing role, ensuring that management executes an agreed corporate strategy. Even though you, as passengers, don’t often see them on our flights, and accordingly never get to interact with them as you do with some of us, such as our cabin crew, their role is as vital as that of the ground operations staff. Every time we take off and land on time, it is because our board has performed its task of holding us, as management, to our performance measurements. The success of any entity is evident when all these various role players – shareholder, board, executive management and

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ordinary employees – fulfil their respective roles and work in harmony with one another. Of course, at the centre of everything these role players do is you, our customers. If we all forgot who we serve, we would be doomed. And I can assure you that nothing matters as much to us as your flying experience. We want this to be as safe, pleasant and enjoyable as is humanly possible. I also invite you to take a minute to ask our cabin crew about some of our policies, including our baggage policy. This is important in ensuring that you plan your travel well and avoid any inconvenience. I’m pleased to announce that our acting CFO, Mark Shelley, has now been confirmed to this role permanently. This brings much needed stability to our finance portfolio – a key area of the business. In this position, Mark, a very experienced chartered accountant, will also sit on both the Executive Committee and the Board of Directors of the company. Finally, this month we celebrate Nelson Mandela Day. 18th July, which is Madiba’s birthday, was declared International Mandela Day by the United Nations in celebration of our late icon’s enormous contribution to humanity. Each one of us can contribute something – especially our time – to any of the many causes that Mandela cared about. At SA Express, we have lined up a range of activities to commemorate this day. Apart from corporate activities, my colleagues and I will be rolling our sleeves up to volunteer our time to some social development initiatives. I urge all our stakeholders, suppliers and customers to do the same on this day.

Sincerely, Inati Ntshanga

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SA EXPRESS Communications and PR Officer Boitumelo Tlala Tel: +27 11 978 9900 Email: Btlala@flyexpress.aero Customer Care Department Tel: 0861 729 227 Email: customercare@flyexpress.aero Twitter: @flySAexpress Facebook: SA Express Airways Reservations Support Tel: +27 11 978 9905 Email: groupsales@flyexpress.aero Group Reservations Tel: +27 11 978 5578 Email: reservationslist@flyexpress.aero Sales Office Email: sales@flyexpress.aero INDWE Images © iStockphoto.com & Quickpic General Manager and Associate Publisher Letlhogonolo Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Publisher Bernard Hellberg | bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Marketing and Communications Manager Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za Editor Nicky Furniss | nicky@tcbmedia.co.za Senior Designer Lindsey Steenkamp | design@tcbmedia.co.za DIRECTORS Bernard Hellberg l bernard@tjtmedia.co.za Obed Sealetsa | nolo@tjtmedia.co.za Pam Komani | pam@tjtmedia.co.za ADVERTISING SALES Tel: +27 12 425 5800 National Sales Manager Bryan Kayavhu | bryan@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 785 6691 Manager: National Sales & Business Development Chantal Barton | chantal@tcbmedia.co.za +27 79 626 0782 Senior Account Managers Nikki de Lange | nikki@tcbmedia.co.za +27 83 415 0339 Calvin van Vuuren | calvin@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 5826873 Gertjie Meintjes | gertjie@tcbmedia.co.za +27 82 757 2622 DISCLAIMER: All material is strictly copyrighted. All rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without prior permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Indwe Magazine are not necessarily those of SA Express.


Events North Accessible Art 16th to 19th July

The Turbine Art Fair, Turbine Hall, Newtown, Johannesburg The Turbine Art Fair (TAF) is a platform for galleries, curators and art organisations to promote emerging and established talents in an accessible and enjoyable way. In doing this, the TAF aims to promote new work and talent and to create a new art audience and collector base. Exhibitors – whether galleries, collectives or dealers – have been invited to exhibit contemporary artwork priced below R40,000. Visitors to TAF15 can expect to see over 50 galleries and exhibits showcasing the best contemporary and emerging African talent. Visitors to the fair can also look forward to live music daily, artisan food and drinks, books and publications, and a children’s programme. Visitors will also be able to take part in the daily talks programme with influential speakers in the world of art and design. Tickets are available from www.webtickets.co.za. // www.turbineartfair.co.za

Décor by Design 6th to 10th August

Decorex Joburg, Gallagher Convention Centre, Midrand Branded as the “Home of Great Ideas”, this year’s Decorex exhibition promises to bring visitors more inspiration than ever before: Plascon will be unveiling the very latest colour trends for 2016, Caesarstone will showcase the innovations taking place in world-class engineered surfaces, and many more exhibitors will be sharing new products and services for homeowners and decorators alike. The first two days of this year’s show will focus on giving the décor and design trade unprecedented access to the latest experts and innovations, while the rest of the weekend is dedicated to giving visitors a great day out for the whole family – brimful of ideas to improve and enhance your living environment. Highlights include: the Dining & Entertaining Theatre; the Private Property Trend House with ideas from Gauteng’s top décor experts; and the Consol Gourmet Food Market and many more cafés and bars serving delicious drinks and eats all weekend long. // www.decorex.co.za

A Feast for the Senses 23rd to 26th July

Good Food & Wine Show, Ticketpro Dome, Johannesburg Cook, author and raconteur Tom Parker Bowles, UK MasterChef judge John Torode and Australian pâtissier Adriano Zumbo are just three of the headline attractions at this year’s Johannesburg Good Food & Wine Show. Tom Parker Bowles may first have come to the public attention thanks to his royal connection – he is the only son of Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall – but he is also a foodie who is in huge demand around the world for his food demonstrations and talks. John Torode – along with Gregg Wallace – launched the updated BBC show MasterChef in 2005 and continues to be the UK’s MasterChef co-judge. By 2011, the show had been sold to 25 countries and was named “the biggest food-related television show worldwide”. Adriano Zumbo is best known for his croquembouche tower, V8 cake and fairytale house creations on MasterChef Australia. See these foodie greats, as well as a host of other delicious offerings this July. Tickets are available through Computicket.

// www.goodfoodandwineshow.co.za 18 Indwe


Events South Did Anyone Say “Baguettes”? 11th & 12th July

Franschhoek Bastille Festival, Franschhoek Dust off your berets and dress up in your finest red, white and blue for this year’s Franschhoek Bastille Festival. Visitors will be able to sip, sample and savour some of Franschhoek’s superb wines in the comfort of the Food and Wine Marquee, situated at the Huguenot Monument with its exquisite mountain backdrops, and ample parking within walking distance. You can also treat your taste buds to a gastronomic feast with delicious fare from some of the town’s well-known restaurants. Kitted out in its finest French flare, the town will be a hive of activity, which includes the popular Franschhoek Boules Tournament, the Delta Valley Entertainers, as well as the Porcupine Ridge Barrel Rolling Competition.Tickets are available from www.webtickets.co.za. // www.franschhoekbastille.co.za

July

A Musical Interlude

22nd – 23rd

Ben Howard Live, GrandWest, Cape Town Double Brit Award winner and platinum selling artist Ben Howard will be performing live in South Africa for the first time this July. Catch him in Cape Town for two shows at the Grand Arena, GrandWest on 22nd and 23rd July and for one night only in Johannesburg at Zoo Lake on 25th July. With sold-out shows across the globe and a whirlwind rise through the charts, Howard’s famous songs include “The Wolves”, “Keep Your Head Up”, and more recently “I Forget Where We Were”, which have all ensured that Ben Howard has quickly become a firm favourite both abroad and locally. Tickets are available from // www.weareseed.co.za or Webtickets.co.za.

What a Lot of Laughs 1st July to 1st August

Comedy Festival, GrandWest, Cape Town Comedy fans can brace for outrageous, laugh-’til-you-drop fun with some of South Africa’s foremost comedians at GrandWest this winter. On the bill for the Comedy Festival at the Roxy Revue Bar are Loyiso Gola, Dave Levinsohn, Kagiso “KG” Mokgadi, Conrad Koch and Chester Missing, Kagiso Lediga, Mel Jones, Martin Evans and Dalin Oliver.The month-long festival of laughs kicks-off on 1st July 2015 with Loyiso Gola’s hit one-man show, Loyiso Gola Live. Next in line to dish out the funnies is Levinsohn in LAUG# @ ME between 8th and 11th July, followed by Conrad Koch and Chester Missing in Gagging Order from 15th to 18th July. Kagiso Lediga can be seen in A Wordy Purpose from 22nd to 25th July 2015, and then the festival culminates with the hilarious Martin Evans in War Donkey from 29th July to 1st August. Tickets are available from Computicket.

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Events In Between Make Your House a Home 23rd to 26th July

Port Elizabeth Homemakers Expo, Boardwalk Exhibition Centre Presenting the latest trends on the home front to create, decorate and renovate your home, the Port Elizabeth Homemakers Expo will include market leading exhibitors who will provide visitors with a vast range of products to equip your house with everything you need to turn it into your dream home. Follow the coffee aroma to the Eastern Cape Barista Championship at the Coffee Lovers’ Theatre, browse through the Gourmet Garage where you can sip and savour a banquet of ready-to-eats, or head to the trendy Décor Lane for the latest in décor living trends. Visitors also have the chance to enter the Dream Home Competition to stand a chance of winning the Easy Life Kitchens 2015 Show Kitchen to the value of R180,000. // www.homemakersonline.co.za

Make a Splash! 17th to 19th July

Durban International Boat & Lifestyle Show, Durban Marina Durban’s biggest boating and outdoor lifestyle event is back in July. The boating side features everything from one man dinghies to luxury catamarans and the latest marine accessories, while the lifestyle element features rugged off-road vehicles, caravans, off-road accessories and so much more. There are great attractions at this year’s show, including cardboard boat racing, wild rides on the SAS Raptor, free massages on a luxury catamaran, the “Simply Sailing” Regatta, hobie cat racing, and the amazing semi-submersible Sea Breacher. Taking place over the school holidays, there are also activities and play areas for the kids, along with restaurant and food stalls. Kids under 12 get in for free when accompanied by an adult.Tickets are available at the entrance.

Fodder for Film Buffs 16th to 26th July

36th Durban International Film Festival, Durban Africa’s premier film event, the Durban International Film Festival (DIFF), which is hosted by the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s Centre for Creative Arts, will present its 36th edition this year. Considered the continent’s biggest film event, which attracts both film-lovers and industry representatives from across Africa and beyond, the DIFF is a ten day celebration of world class cinema which screens new feature, documentary and short films from around the globe, but with a special focus on African film. The festival also includes the Wavescape Surf Film Festival as well as important industry initiatives featuring a programme of seminars and workshops with notable industry figures. The festival is an unmissable date for both industry representatives and lovers of film. // www.durbanfilmfest.co.za

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Bits & Pieces

A South African Icon Inspired by a true South African icon, Larry Brown and the Browns design team decided to create a truly remarkable piece of jewellery to commemorate former president Nelson Mandela. They chose tanzanite for its rarity and exclusivity to Africa and the “guardian angel” design because, like Nelson Mandela, it is a symbol of guidance and protection. We honour the man who fought against oppression and believed in equality and freedom for all. The spectacular neckpiece showcases an astounding 25.7 carat pear shaped tanzanite, complemented by 174 round brilliant diamonds, and weighs 3.52 carats in total. The earrings hold two perfectly matched pear shaped tanzanites weighing 35.27 carats in total and surrounded by a combination of round, marquise and pear shaped diamonds weighing 5.52 carats in total.

// brownsjewellers.com

Explore SA with Avis As part of Avis’ global “Unlock the World” campaign, Avis is encouraging all South Africans to get out and explore the most beautiful natural sites that our country has to offer. The Unlock the World competition allows all Avis customers renting or purchasing an Avis vehicle, opting to be driven in style by Avis Chauffeur Drive and Avis Point 2 Point or renting an Avis Van or Avis Truck, to stand a chance to win a starlit gourmet dinner for one winner and five friends among Namaqualand’s flowers on 19th September 2015, hosted by well-known chef Justin Bonello. The competition will run until 31 August 2015 with all completed rentals, transfers or purchases using the Avis worldwide discount number (AWD) L506801, qualifying for an entry into the competition. The prize includes return flights for a winner and five friends from Cape Town, Durban or Johannesburg to Upington and two nights’ accommodation at Naries Namakwa Retreat.

// www.avis.co.za

The Write Stuff While the pleasure of writing by hand comes from the quality of the writing instrument, it is also enhanced by the special accessories placed on a desk to create the finest writing environment. Montblanc presents its new collection of desk accessories: Leather pieces designed to deliver a complete writing experience by combining elegant aesthetics with thoughtful functionality. Drawing on its leather expertise, the Montblanc Desk Accessories Collection is crafted from the finest Italian full-grain leather and includes a desk pad, letter tray and pen tray which are embellished with intricate stitching. The collection also features a letter opener which pairs the sleek texture of ruthenium with a wooden inlay and a polished lacquer finish. With streamlined and durable designs, Montblanc Desk Accessories transform the work space into a productive and organised, yet elegant environment.

// montblanc.co.za/boutiques.html

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Bits & Pieces

Hello, New York City! To celebrate the launch of their exciting new flavour range, Lindt Hello is asking consumers to put their best pitch forward for a chance to experience the city that inspired the Swiss chocolatier’s trendiest brand: New York. This year sees the addition of three bold new flavours to the Hello range – Dark Chocolate Cookie, Sweet Popcorn and Coffee Blast – which are all set to become crowd pleasers. And if that wasn’t enough to make a song and dance about, the Lindt Hello #SINGHELLO competition certainly is. The contest will see entrants challenging their friends to perform the most innovative renditions of classic hits for a chance to win the ultimate trip to New York. Available in both 100 g slabs and 39 g sticks, the new range of Lindt Hello flavours is available from Woolworths, Pick n Pay, Spar, Dischem and Clicks stores across the country. // lindt-hello.co.za

An Escape From the Airport OR Tambo International Airport is the gateway to Africa for many foreign travellers, who often find themselves stuck in the airport for several hours on end before the next leg of their journey. To this end Birchwood Hotel & OR Tambo Conference Centre’s exclusive wing, Silverbirch, has launched a unique “Recharge Package” to cater especially for daytime clientele wanting to refresh and recharge in comfort for a few hours. Situated less than ten minutes away from the airport and with an hourly complimentary shuttle bus service, the Recharge Package offers travellers the opportunity to catch up on sleep, or work at the large designated work stations with free and fast Internet in quiet surroundings. The package also gives visitors access to the hotel’s restaurants, the swimming pool, gym facilities and large gardens, as well as a R100 Mangwanani Spa voucher.

// www.birchwoodhotel.co.za

Sending Shockwaves Perfect for the sophisticated explorer demanding quality and style, Samsonite Lite-Shock is strong and dependable, with great design credentials. The lightest Samsonite hardside collection to date, LiteShock uses Samsonite’s exclusive Curv material and components that have been engineered for maximum strength and minimum weight (the cabin size Spinner 55 weighs in at just 1.7 kg). The Lite-Shock shock-absorbing shell design is based on the ripple effect that occurs when a stone is dropped into water. This not only gives extra strength to the case and its corners, but ensures that your valuables travel safely. The collection is available in four sizes and features integrated ID tags, a built-in TSA approved lock and four multidirectional spinner wheels. The Lite-Shock range comes in four eye-catching colours: petrol blue, sand, silver, and black.

// www.samsonite.co.za 26 Indwe


bites Flights of Fancy Tea “Pure Chamomile f lowers, rose with French vanilla, Italian almond and pure peppermint” conjures images of relaxation and ultimate enjoyment, which is exactly what you will experience when savouring the new Quills Afternoon Tea at the InterContinental Johannesburg OR Tambo Airport Hotel. Already well known for their breakfast, lunch and dinner service, the hotel now offers guests a relaxing space filled with sweet or savoury delights and a selection of finely brewed teas. Travellers can now pop across from the airport building to the hotel while waiting for their f lights and enjoy the Quills Afternoon Tea which includes delicious sandwiches, warm tartlets, fruit kebabs and a variety of bite-sized chocolate snacks, including brownies and chocolate cakes. Besides the trusted Earl Grey Original tea, there is also a host of loose leaf and tea bag selections to choose from.

// www.tsogosun.com.

Taste Escapes Visitors to Anthonij Rupert Wine Estate, situated in the Franschhoek Wine Valley, can now look forward to two new tasting experiences. Indulge the senses with a delectable Italian Cheese and Wine Tasting at the Terra del Capo Tasting Room. This interactive, fun and educational tasting will include information about how the cheeses have been made and their places of origin. The fine cheese selection comprises both local and imported artisanal cheese, made in true Italian style. Tea enthusiasts can look forward to an elegant Tea Tasting at the Anthonij Rupert Tasting Room amidst exquisite mid-nineteenth century art and décor. The Premier Grand Cru or Specialty Rooibos Tea tastings are recommended to be enjoyed in conjunction with the estate’s High Tea offering. Visitors can choose between either the Rooibos Tea Tasting, which includes traditional Rooibos as well as delicious flavoured versions, or Grand Cru Prestige teas from the TWG Luxury Tea Company. For bookings, email tasting@rupertwines.com.

Your Next Port of Call Calitzdorp, South Africa’s port capital and home to the award-winning range of De Krans fortified wines, has also become known as the ideal terroir for Portuguese grape varieties, which flourish in its climate. These include the Tinta Roriz, Touriga Nacional and Tritonia. Not only are these used as the blending components for the De Krans ports, but they are also available as stand-alone wines, superb in their own right. The De Krans Tinta Roriz 2013 displays a complex nose of dark fruits and spice, with fresh mulberries, black cassis and vanilla on the palate. The De Krans Touriga Nacional 2013 is a complex wine with flavours of dark berries, violets and cacao. It boasts a lingering aftertaste of dark chocolate. The flagship De Krans Tritonia (Calitzdorp Blend) 2011 has flavours of violets, cloves and red fruit and stands up well to venison dishes.

// www.dekrans.co.za

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g n i k a M

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a M of

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Text: Bronwyn Wainwright Images © iStockphoto.com

W

hen former president Nelson Mandela was released from prison on 11th February 1990, he appeared before thousands of hopeful South Africans on the balcony of Cape Town’s City Hall and declared: “Our long march to freedom is irreversible.” While many were sceptical of what the new era would hold, Mandela believed in a victory based not on exclusion and conquering division, but on inclusion and the full participation of all citizens.

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THE new constitution reflected Mandela’s vision of a transformed nation with no outcasts or oppressed among its citizens. He showed us the power of one leader to unite a country with human rights for all, despite its brutal past. Yet he also never lost sight of the small actions and the ability of ordinary individuals to direct the future of humanity on a daily basis. It was at his 90th birthday in 2008 that Mandela made a global call for people far and wide to address social injustices and to help change the world around them for the better. “It is time for new hands to lift the burdens,” he said. “It is in your hands now.” A year to the day later, International Mandela Day was launched via a unanimous decision of the UN General Assembly. Mandela said at the time that he would be “honoured if such a day could serve to bring together people around the world to fight poverty and promote peace and reconciliation”. It starts with a simple concept: By giving 67 minutes of your time (one minute for every year of Mandela’s public service) on 18th July each year, you can contribute to the unbending vision of a global movement for good. From creating a community vegetable garden or sponsoring a guide dog for the blind, to providing for an underprivileged child’s educational needs,

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there are countless ways to make a difference. Speaking at the launch of this year’s Mandela Day activities at the Nelson Mandela Foundation’s offices in Johannesburg, the foundation’s CEO Sello Hatang highlighted the three principles according to which Mandela lived his life: free yourself, free others, and serve every day. He said that the campaign emphasises the need for education, food security, shelter, and volunteerism. Over the past six years, the campaign has grown to include initiatives from all over the world that strive to fulfil these needs. If you’re looking to join an established cause on the day, the campaign’s website (www.mandeladay.com) contains scores of options. In South Africa, FoodBank SA will be holding a hamper packing day at their warehouses in Cape Town, Durban and Johannesburg to reach the 11 million South Africans who suffer from food shortages. Anyone can enter a team into the hamper packing event and see how many hampers you can pack, and how many lives you can touch in 67 minutes. In Khayelitsha, the Mdzananda Animal Clinic is calling on volunteers to help build kennels for pets to keep them warm this winter. The Mdzananda Animal Clinic is the only non-profit organisation (NPO) animal hospital in Khayelitsha, and serves up to 1,000 pets per month while educating the community.


Lessons to Learn From One Man During his lifetime, Mandela strove to inspire leaders and citizens to live as selflessly as he did. While it is true that few people have had as much of an impact on realising the ideals of equality, democracy and human rights, Mandela himself was only a man, and his achievements are not beyond the grasp of ordinary individuals. He did not leave us without imparting the wisdom he learned over the course of his life, and perhaps the greatest commemoration of his life would not be found in erecting statues, but in living the ideals he promoted. His words remain: • “Everyone can rise above their circumstances and achieve success if they are dedicated to and passionate about what they do.” • “Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.” • “A fundamental concern for others in our individual and community lives would go a long way in making the world the better place we so passionately dreamt of.” • “No one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.” • “For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others.”

There’s no need, however, to wait until 18th July, as you can spend 67 minutes on any day, spring cleaning your home and putting aside unwanted or unused household items to donate to The Charity Stores in Kelvin, Sandton, Fontainebleau, Randburg and Roodepoort. Items are donated directly to supported organisations, provided free of charge to the destitute, or sold to raise funds for feeding projects. The power of Mandela Day lies not in just 67 minutes of service, but in finding ways to incorporate the ethos behind the day into our everyday lives. Trevor Manuel also spoke at this year’s launch and stressed that the campaign is not about “parachuting” into activities, but rather about building relationships. It is also not about doing something and standing back – it is about continuity of action. At a time when we are left cynical about leaders who seek to prosper at the expense of the people and who continue to divide society, Mandela’s legacy reminds us that inclusive freedom for all is in our hands. Mandela Day is more than a celebration of that legacy; it is a global drive to change the world for the better. Make every day a Mandela Day and drive the change you want to see in your community. Find out more about Mandela Day partners and how to pledge your time by visiting www.mandeladay.com.


Pezula Tree House Game Lodge

Safari Chic SA’s Game Lodges of Distinction Text: Julia Lamberti Images © Supplied

Gone are the days when going on safari meant “roughing it”. Today, our country boasts game lodges that rival some of the world’s best hotels. We explore some leading local hotspots.

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Mpumalanga Bush Magic Home to the two million hectare Kruger National Park, and appropriately known as “Paradise Country”, Mpumalanga is one of South Africa’s most scenic and popular tourist destinations. This picturesque province is also home to some of the most exclusive game lodges in Africa, and is the go-to getaway for local and international visitors seeking an

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Shamwari Private Game Reserve

indulgent bush adventure. Widely considered to offer the best game viewing in the region, MalaMala Game Reserve provides guests with a traditional safari experience and a range of accommodation options to appeal to every type of traveller. Choose between the family-friendly MalaMala Main Camp, the more intimate Sable Camp, or the ultra-luxurious, “Out of Africa” themed Rattray’s on MalaMala. Not only will you marvel at the quality of your quarters, but you will be equally blown away by the incredible wildlife sightings at this special place. Situated right next to MalaMala, in the Sabi Sand Reserve, is the lavish Londolozi, which was the first game reserve in the world to be accorded Relais & Châteaux status. This gorgeous lodge was also recognised as the #1 Hotel in the World in the Conde Nast Traveler’s 2014 Readers’ Choice Awards, and is renowned for its commitment to conservation, as well as its luxurious accommodation, fine cuisine, and exceptional service. Meaning “place of little fear”, Ulusaba is Sir Richard Branson’s private game reserve, located in the western sector of the Sabi Sand Reserve. The reserve features two luxury lodges, Rock Lodge and Safari Lodge, which both offer visitors an exceptional African safari experience and service synonymous with the Virgin brand. Also situated in the Sabi Sand area of the Kruger Park is the world famous Sabi Sabi reserve. Here guests can choose between four separate lodges, which represent Africa’s

se e f l i g ht s ch e du l e f or more in f ormat ion .

Living It Up in Limpopo With an abundance of indigenous wildlife, lush bushveld and breathtaking scenery, Limpopo offers visitors some of the best lodges and game viewing in the country. In the Hoedspruit region of Limpopo (only 45 minutes from the world famous Kruger National Park) sits the exclusive tree house game lodge of Pezulu. This intimate camp accommodates a maximum of 30 guests, and offers well-appointed suites, delicious cuisine, Big Five game viewing, and a magnificent rock swimming pool. Royal Malewane is another noteworthy Hoedspruit retreat which is ideal for guests who crave all-inclusive luxury, attentive staff, and superlative game viewing. At Royal Malewane, you can relax in a beautiful suite, enjoy game drives with informative rangers, and dine on delicious dishes while overlooking a waterhole teeming with wildlife. Situated in the unspoilt Thornybush Game Reserve, this heavenly haven also features an airconditioned library, gym, spa facilities and curio shop.

Sun City

Sa ex p r e ss co nn ec t s y ou to ho e d s p r uit

Game Reserve SamaraSamara PrivatePrivate Game Reserve


Shamwari Private Game Reserve

past, present and future. The romantic Selati Camp offers an experience of the past, while the Bush Lodge and Little Bush Camp have a more contemporary look and feel. However, it is the innovative Earth Lodge that offers guests a taste of tomorrow, and pays tribute to nature through its earth inspired décor and groundbreaking design. Another gem situated in the Sabi Sand area is Singita Ebony Lodge, which continues to win international recognition for excellence. Situated among huge trees on the banks of the Sand River, this lodge blends European elegance with African earthiness, and is an idyllic retreat for the many guests who keep returning to Singita.

The Cream of the Cape There are a number of luxury game lodges scattered across the Western and Eastern Cape. One of the largest reserves in the country lies in the Graaff-Reinet region of the Eastern Cape. Described as “heart-stoppingly beautiful”, the multi-award winning Samara Private Game Reserve is home to the colonial-style Karoo Lodge, the exclusive Manor at Samara, and the Rustic Mountain Retreat. Located on 70,000 acres of land and surrounded by mountains, the reserve offers guests an opportunity to walk with wild cheetah, view an array of wildlife, enjoy gourmet food, indulge in massages, or make use of its tennis court and pool. Shamwari Private Game Reserve

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Singita Ebony Lodge


is another Eastern Cape reserve that is malaria-free and is home to the Big Five, as well as the Born Free Foundation’s big cat sanctuaries. Shamwari also features seven luxury lodges and a spa, and is considered to be one of the country’s premier safari locations. Villa Lobengula and Bayethe Lodge are particularly plush, and a number of suites include satellite television, hammocks, private fireplaces and plunge pools. Guests are also encouraged to visit the cat sanctuary, and enjoy epic game drives across this magnificent 25,000 hectare reserve. Situated in the Little Karoo, around three hours away from the city of Cape Town, is the five-star Sanbona Wildlife Reserve. This gem, in the heart of the Karoo, pays tribute to the San people who have made the area their home for centuries, and offers a tranquil respite for guests who long to relax in secluded luxury. The reserve’s Dwyka Tented Lodge, Gondwana Lodge, Tilney Manor and Sanbona Explorer Camp offer visitors a range of accommodation options, from beautifully appointed tents to luxury suites complete with all the amenities one could wish for. Few experiences can compare to watching African wildlife up close and enjoying the distinctive sights, sounds and smells of the bush. Luckily, with a wide array of private reserves and choice lodges across the country, you can immerse yourself in the beauty of Africa without scrimping on luxury and exclusivity.

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MalaMala Game Reserve 40 Indwe


At Home in the Bush

Elephant Point Estate Text & Images © Supplied

The call of the fish eagle as it soars across the mighty Sabie River, and the sight of trumpeting elephants as they wend their way through the scarp and vale African bush is an “Out of Africa” experience that many can only dream of. For property owners at the exclusive Elephant Point Estate, however, it’s an integral part of the natural lifestyle on offer, now that the estate’s shared boundary with the Kruger National Park has been opened up to allow the Big Five to roam freely within the development. JUST five hours’ drive from Johannesburg – 20 minutes from the new Skukuza Airport – and situated on a verdant 290 ha private reserve, the residential project offers a rare investment opportunity. “The property takes its name from the large number of elephants resident in the region that are often seen drinking on the banks of the Sabie River, with the surrounding area renowned for its natural diversity and concentration of wildlife,” says project spokesperson Ewan Dykes. Now a limited edition collection of just 47 private bushveld lodges will be built along 5 km of the river’s banks, with the first phase of 25 stands almost sold already. These spacious luxury lodges with rich African tone textures and stone clad external walls blend unobtrusively into the environment. Buyers, explains Dykes, have the option of self-building or a turnkey managed construction through the developer. A selection of designs enable owners to express their personal taste and style, while ensuring all essential amenities are incorporated. Adds Ewan: “Legacy Hotels will also be operating the rental pool, enabling owners to generate an income when their home is not in personal use.” The focal point of the estate’s amenity mix – a planned five-star, 60-room hotel – will also be managed by the group, along with a luxury spa, gym, floodlit tennis courts, fine dining restaurant and pool, as well as dedicated nature trails, game drives, and mountain biking opportunities, to name a few. Beyond the nature reserve, the estate is also the perfect

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launch pad for exploring the wider Lowveld and its many homespun attractions, including the gold panning town of Pilgrim’s Rest, the Sabi Sands Game Reserve, and the Blyde River Canyon, not to mention a coterie of top-notch golf clubs in and around the area. Adds Ewan: “Catching a glimpse of the Big Five here is a magical moment. Better still, owners at Elephant Point get a front row seat from the comfort of their very own bush lodge.” Boasting an up close encounter with the Big Five, the launch of Elephant Point Estate heralds a new dawn in residential tourism in Mpumalanga. Whole ownership and fractional ownership opportunities are available. For further information, visit www.elephantpoint.co.za or call Ewan Dykes on +27 83 755 8944.


South Africa’s

Market Insights Guru Lebo Motshegoa Text: Wilma den Hartigh Images © Supplied

W

hen Lebo Motshegoa decided to start a business at only 22 years old, he had no idea that he would one day become known as South Africa’s market research guru who understands black South African consumers better than anyone else. His small start-up, which he operated from his bedroom in his Soweto home, grew to become one of South Africa’s leading black consumer insights agencies. NOW, ten years later, Foshizi (which means “for real”) is the go-to agency for big-name clients such as Coca-Cola, MTN, South African Breweries, KFC, Standard Bank, Nando’s and Tiger Brands for relevant insights about South Africa’s black consumer market. Foshizi was also the agency behind the research for Oscar-winning South African film, Tsotsi, and these findings were later published in a book, How

to Become a Tsotsi. To add to Motshegoa’s already extensive list of credentials, he also made a name for himself when he wrote South Africa’s first S’camto Dictionary of Township Lingo in 2003. S’camto is a cross-cultural language which combines elements of Sotho, Tswana, English, Afrikaans, Xhosa and Zulu. Following its success, he went on to publish a revised version,

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Township Talk Dictionary, in 2005.

What Drives This Effervescent Businessman? “It’s really simple. I decided early on in my career that I don’t want to spend my entire life doing something that I’m not good at. I believe you should do what you love and the rest will follow,” he says. While he was finding his feet he spent many years as a generalist in the advertising and media industry, but now at 33, he’s completely settled into his niche. Looking back, he’s also glad that he never studied law. “I was great at debating, but I knew that it wasn’t what I wanted to do,” he says. Instead, he decided to study marketing. “But the work I did as a student was described as odd by some of my lecturers, because I wrote my assignments in township English,” he recalls. Despite this, he never allowed any criticism to hold him back.

Messages With Impact What his lecturers described as an “odd” approach to marketing wasn’t strange at all, since even as a student Motshegoa was already wired to understand the nuances of the black consumer sector. Like any sharp businessman, he spotted a gap in the market when he realised corporates didn’t have accurate market insights that could be crafted into messages that would resonate with a changing consumer market.

Things You Might Not Know Motshegoa says their research shows that black consumers have changed, and it is important for brands to realise that they have to stay current. “Throughout various research projects we were able to see just how pervasive the use of the Internet had become in daily township life, even within the lower LSM 4 and 5 markets,” he says. This trend has a significant impact on how marketers approach consumers. People are also becoming increasingly health

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conscious across townships nationally. He says this can be attributed to various factors, such as living with a chronic illness or with a another person who has just been diagnosed with a chronic illness. “It is also imperative to always show consumers that a brand is not just about making money from its customers. The market should feel that campaigns are building their communities. A good example of this is the OMO door-to-door promotion,” he explains.

Understanding Consumers Outside South Africa Foshizi is also expanding into other African markets, as many multinationals and South African brands are trying to grow their business in African countries. What companies are noticing is that they aren’t achieving the success they would like, because they are applying South African strategies to those markets. “We have done extensive research on what makes the economies of Nigeria, Botswana and Kenya thrive,” he says. For companies to gain market share, they have to understand how people like to do business in these countries, how consumers relate to brands, what influences the way they make decisions (both culturally and in business), and how marketers, corporates and brands can capitalise on these insights.

A Fresh Approach to Business and Life What he’s most proud of is that he’s established the kind of company that he would like to work for. “I believe that one of the biggest mistakes a company founder can make is to think of themselves as a business owner. I see myself as an employee who earns a salary, and I do this to stay disciplined,” he explains. And he’s having so much fun. “You have to enjoy what you do to be truly successful. You have to do other things that bring balance to your life and allow you to step back, because this will also give you the perspective you need to run your business effectively.”


Renovated

Holidays in KZN Text: Nicky Furniss Images © The Blue Marlin Hotel & Ingeli Forest Resort

KwaZulu-Natal has always been a popular place for family holidays, so much so that many hotels and resorts have not only formed part of many people’s happy childhood memories, but also their children’s. These are the kinds of places we think back on lovingly and hope will never close. But that’s not to say that they can’t improve a little. We recently found two old favourites that are now offering guests a revamped experience – whether you’re after a beach or a back-to-nature holiday. 48 Indwe


The Blue Marlin Hotel When I was a child, school holidays were always spent on the KwaZulu-Natal South Coast, and near the little seaside town of Scottburgh in particular. I have vivid memories of exploring the rock pools that lined the beach, eating sickly sweet-smelling soft serve ice cream from the Wimpy and begging my parents to let us ride on the little train. And all the while, The Blue Marlin Hotel stood on its hill and watched over the beachy proceedings. To say that the hotel has become an institution in Scottburgh is an understatement. It’s been around since the 1950s and, while the Wimpy and the little train are long gone, it still remains. Like any grande dame, the hotel became a little faded and frayed at the edges over the years, but then, what would Scottburgh be without The Blue Marlin? And so Dream Hotels and Resorts, in partnership with the owners, launched a R35 million renovation programme which began two years ago, the effects of which were recently unveiled. It’s safe to say that the hotel is once more on top of the hill, and not just location-wise. The hotel’s reception area, lounges and restaurant have been made over in a cool palette of blues, greys and whites, which gives it a breezy Mediterranean feel. The lush green lawns and the refurbished pools beg for barefoot exploration and a midafternoon dip respectively, followed by an afternoon nap in the smart new rooms which boast the same sophisticated and beachy feel as the rest of the hotel. What was once

dated and a bit shabby has been reborn into a sophisticated and slick hotel that feels significantly fancier than its three star grading would have one expect it to be. That said, the hotel is still very much aimed at the family market, and there is plenty to keep the kiddies busy while mum is being pampered at the spa. There is a fully kitted out play room, a giant outdoor chess board, and even a regular evening reptile show where the kids can get up close and personal with some scaly creatures from the nearby crocodile park (even if mum and dad recoil in horror). Then of course, there’s always the beach, which is a short walk from the hotel, complete with plenty of golden sand for castle making and warm Indian Ocean to splash around in. Speaking of splashing, the hotel has the added, and very enticing, draw card of also housing Crystal Divers. The dive operation runs a professional shop – located conveniently in the lobby of the hotel – for those wanting to add to their scuba diving gear, and also offers scuba diving courses and fun dives. They couldn’t be more ideally situated, as the hotel is just a short boat ride from the famed Aliwal Shoal, considered by many to be one of the best dive sites in the world. As you drop below the surface, it’s not hard to see why. Blessed with great visibility in which you can see every brightly coloured piece of coral and neoncoloured school of fish, we were also thrilled to spot a large, lumbering potato bass, several stone fish and not one, but two very large turtles! That certainly goes down as a great

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Ingeli Forest Resort “Wow, it’s so beautiful!” was the mantra of our drive that afternoon. Heading past Ixopo and towards Kokstad, in the heart of KwaZulu-Natal, we passed row after row of rambling green hills, dotted with little houses bathed in the kind of gentle afternoon light that is every photographer’s dream. While this area may be the enclave of farmers and foresters, it is some of the most picturesque of this pretty province, and has been largely overlooked by tourists. But now there is definitely a good reason for families looking for fresh air and outdoor pursuits, and couples looking for roaring fireplaces and romantic seclusion, to wind their way past the little towns and through the trees to Ingeli Forest Resort, a little haven surrounded by trees. The original lodge was built here in the 1960s, and since then Ingeli has been a long standing and well known

stopover for those who have business to attend to in nearby Kokstad or the surrounding timber and farmland. In fact, my father remembers staying at Ingeli many years ago during his days in the civil service. Even today, the resort is still popular with government and business, not least of all due to its professional conferencing facilities. However, the last few years has also seen the resort push its tourism potential, and with its abundance of fresh air and forested surroundings, it’s surprising they haven’t done it sooner. The most appealing thing about Ingeli is its absolute seclusion from the craziness of city life. Things happen at their own pace here: the buffet breakfast is a slow, extended affair; the fires are lit from early in the morning to facilitate the languorous settling in, with cups of coffee and a good book or a conversation partner; the days amble along at a sedate pace to be filled or unfilled with activities as the heart choices; hell, even the mist that dusts the top of the surrounding forest rolls in with little attention to speed or time. One can quite easily lose a day here – as we did – strolling around the resort in between hearty meals, reading books, playing the odd game of chess, and enjoying a pint in the very quaint and often lively Forester’s Bar. These are all perfectly acceptable pastimes here. It would be a waste not to dedicate at least one day to getting out and about, though, as the area’s surrounding forests are well worth exploring. There are a number of walking trails in the area, varying in length and difficulty from gentle ambles to more strenuous hikes. Most go

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day of diving in my books, and was made even better by the quick boat ride home and being able to hop straight into a lovely hot shower in my room. While I will always have fond memories of my childhood holidays in Scottburgh, The Blue Marlin has ensured that I can now add an adult one to that list, and, no doubt, it will be adding to many happy memories for the many visitors who will spend their own family holidays here. For more information on the hotel, visit www.bluemarlin.co.za. To book a dive course or a fun dive, visit www.crystal-divers.co.za.


through indigenous forest, where you will be rewarded with brightly coloured butterflies, sprouting toadstools, impressive trees, and that unmistakeable and deliciously earthy smell that can only be experienced by lacing up your hiking boots and getting outdoors. The area is also becoming renowned for its excellent mountain bike trails, which attract not only resort guests, but also mountain bike enthusiasts from around the province who head here for a day of testing their skills and elevating their adrenaline levels out on the trails, which once again offer a variety of conditions for both novices and experts. For littlies who may not be up for a 15 km cycle or a 10 km hike, there is an adventure golf course on site, as well as a kiddie’s playroom. After a day of getting back to nature, there’s nothing better than retiring to your cosy room or log cabin (the resort has both) and snuggling into bed, with not a sound to be heard. Ingeli may seem like it’s in the middle of nowhere, but considering the fact that even Oprah Winfrey took some time out here, I think that’s exactly the point. For more information, visit www.ingeliforestresort.com.

Special Reader Offers • The Blue Marlin is offering Indwe readers a 20 % discount on the B&B rate of R750.00 per person per night sharing. • Visitors to Ingeli Forest Lodge will pay only R1,999 for a two night stay for two adults and two children under the age of 12 (sharing with their parents). This will include breakfast, a bottle of house wine with dinner and a R30 adventure golf voucher. For both offers please quote the word Indwe when making your booking. Terms and conditions apply.


Savouring a Taste

of History Val de Vie Estate

Text & Images © Supplied

As author and television personality, Clifton Fadiman, once described: “To take wine into our mouths is to savour a droplet of the river of human history.” Located on ground that was originally granted to a descendant of the Huguenots in 1783, Val de Vie Estate in the Paarl-Franschhoek Valley certainly has plenty to offer in the way of history, and wine. WHAT you’ll discover in a glass of Val de Vie vino is the unmistakable flavour of skilled winemaking that is deeply rooted in French culture – an art that has been passed on from decade to decade on South African soil, in “The Valley of Life”. At the base of the Simonsberg mountain, the climate ideally lends itself to winemaking, with south-easterly winds that sweep coolness through the vineyards in the heat of summer and north-westerly gales that blow thirst-quenching rainclouds over the valley in the winter months. These contributing factors have meant that over the years, Val de Vie has been able to expand its wine production to such an extent that 11 different Rhône varietals are now grown on two 25 ha farms that form part of the estate. Mirroring the south of France, vines are furthermore interspersed between homes, adding to the allure of the estate and to the laid-back atmosphere that residents enjoy. With a passion for winemaking and his own wine label, Ryk Neethling, Marketing Director at Val de Vie, is “pleased to see the extent to which the estate’s wines have attracted attention from near and far, locally and across borders”.

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However, it’s not only the wines that spark interest from around the globe. Neethling adds: “Val de Vie has won numerous international property awards and we are in the process of developing new residential areas that will see the expansion of the estate and all that it has to offer, including another 61 ha farm and 17 Gentlemen’s Estates ranging from two to four hectares each.” Whether it’s property one has an interest in or the wine collection, exciting polo matches held in warmer months or a taste of the valley’s history that one wishes to experience, guests are warmly welcomed to savour a taste of “the life worth living”. To indulge in a decent portion of this lifestyle, Polo Club Restaurant, situated on the estate’s grounds, provides guests with the opportunity to dine on its excellent cuisine together with the best of Val de Vie’s wines as part of its newly launched pairing menu this winter. The menu is available for groups of ten to 20 patrons, at R350 per person. To book, contact +27 21 863 6174 or email restaurant@valdevie.co.za. For more information, visit www.valdevie.co.za.


s ' o o ar

K t e e r Th ept Sec K t s Be

One Night in Hanover Text & Images © Wilma den Hartigh

The small village of Hanover, tucked away in the middle of the Northern Cape, must be one of South Africa’s best kept secrets. There are no bright lights, artsy shops or golf courses here. Instead, simplicity and history are its main attractions. THE first time I heard of Hanover was when I was looking for a halfway stopover on the N1 highway, en route to Cape Town. This little Karoo town really is the most central place in South Africa. It is halfway between Johannesburg and Cape Town, halfway between Cape Town and Durban, and halfway between Upington and Port Elizabeth. As a result, even before cars became a common mode of transport, most travellers and stage coaches passed through here.

Immerse Yourself in Karoo Architecture If you are interested in South Africa’s architectural history, Hanover is a great place to visit. The best way to explore it is on foot – which will also come as a welcome relief if you’ve been stuck in a car for hours on the road! Many of the town’s buildings date back to the 1800s. The streets are lined with distinctive Karoo cottages with tin roofs and wraparound verandas. It’s quite romantic, really – many of the houses have beautiful doors, rocking chairs with large cushions on the stoep (veranda), and rose covered arches welcoming you at the garden gate. The original farmstead of the area now houses the Hanover Museum. If you want to take a look inside, talk to one of the locals. It is run on a volunteer basis and isn’t open all the time. Most of the artefacts it houses were donated by the people of Hanover.

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You’ll notice that most of the houses are built facing the street. This was a strange requirement which originated from medieval Germany. Gardens were cultivated behind the houses and a stoep tax was introduced around 1875 when the first erven were sold, and is still payable by residents today. If you feel like more walking, head up to the top of “Trappieskop” to get a few snaps of the view. This is also where South Africa’s first observatory was stationed. It has since been moved and now forms part of the observatory at Sutherland. While walking around you’ll also notice that there are furrows in many of the streets. This is to accommodate a powerful spring situated in the town which releases about 205,000 litres of water per day. The furrows that were used for irrigation in the 1800s are still in use today.

Home to Prominent People in History The town is 161 years old and, in its heyday, many historic figures lived in these houses. One of them was the home of Olive Schreiner, women’s rights pioneer and author of the acclaimed novel, The Story of An African Farm. She lived here with her farmer husband, Samuel Cronwright, from 1900 to 1907 on the corner of Grace and New Street. The history books say that the Karoo air relieved her asthma and she often wrote letters to her


s e e f l igh t s ch e du l e f or more in f ormat ion .

True Karoo Hospitality Just about everyone knows each other by name. After all, there are only about 4,500 people living here. Agriculture in the area revolves mainly around sheep farming, while a handful of people work in the post office, small general dealer, and the other shops in the town. Ask the locals if you’re looking for a place to have something to eat, or if you just need a refreshing drink. The owner of the guesthouse where we stayed phoned ahead to the pizza pub across the street to find out when they are opening that day and what was on the menu. A Little Touch of Karoo Madness comes highly recommended. The small pub is known for its large pizzas with generous toppings which you can enjoy while sitting on the stoep. And while you’re here, don’t be in a hurry – chat to the locals and watch the Karoo sunset in the distance. Hanover lost its bustling town status when the railway opened in 1884 and effectively took away much of the town’s through traffic. It might not be an economic hub anymore, but I think the town has taken on a serene character that many of us city dwellers would love to experience. Do visit, and stay the night, if you can.

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friends saying that Hanover was “the prettiest village I have ever seen”. Zwelinzima Vavi, former general secretary of the Congress of South African Trade Unions, was also born on a farm in the Hanover district.

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A History of

Brilliance Baume & Mercier Text: Deidre Theron Images Š Baume & Mercier

Baume & Mercier began as a family business back in 1830, when brothers LouisVictor and CĂŠlestin Baume opened a watch dealership or comptoir horloger in Les Bois, a village in the Swiss Jura. The company soon earned itself a reputation for excellence, creating models that incorporated cutting-edge innovations of the time. Indwe 59


ACUTELY aware of the potential that new territories represented, the company, which was growing rapidly, set up a branch in London under the name “Baume Brothers”. Before long, this had expanded throughout the British Empire, including India, Africa, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, and Burma. By the late 19th century, Baume had built a solid international reputation and was considered a noted watch making player abroad, and the brand best known for its chronographs and grand complications, which included minute repeaters, calendars and tourbillons. wAs well as being beautiful and highly complex, Baume watches also demonstrated a rare degree of precision, setting accuracy records and winning various timekeeping contests, most notably the precision timing trials held by the Kew Observatory near London. In 1892, Baume won the precision timing trials with a chronometer pocket watch fitted with a tourbillon movement the precision of which remained unrivalled for more than a decade. Other accolades under Baume’s belt at this time included ten

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Grand Prix awards and seven gold medals at international exhibitions and shows in Paris, Melbourne, Zurich, London, Amsterdam, and Chicago. In 1919, the company was awarded the highest international distinction of the time: the Poinçon de Genève or Geneva Hallmark, a token of exceptional craftsmanship and quality. In the early 1920s, William Baume, the company director, joined up with Paul Mercier to found Baume & Mercier, Genève. The firm soon became one of the most active in the field of wristwatches by offering remarkably balanced, shaped models (shaped meaning other than round, which wristwatch faces traditionally were at the time). During the entire Art Deco period, the brand firmly asserted its style and left a lasting imprint on the field of watch design. It also launched the iconic Hampton range, inspired by a rectangular watch. Paul Mercier knew how important it was for the brand to evolve with the times and, during the¬ 1940s, taking its lead from the profound understanding of femininity that


had come to the fore during the roaring twenties along with female emancipation, Baume & Mercier launched one of its most successful models: the Marquise, a jewellery watch with a bangle-style bracelet. Fuelled by this new source of creative ingenuity, the company began designing additional new models for its ladies range. During the 1950s and ‘60s, in pursuit of the equilibrium which the Greek letter Phi symbolised (also the current Baume & Mercier logo), the company laid the groundwork for what is now considered the archetypal, traditional round watch. It also launched numerous chronographs equipped with functions such as moon phases or triple date displays, in addition to a collection of round watches with a simple design and pared-down dials. These emblematic “Golden Fifties” watches allowed the brand to return to its roots and use the past as a muse to create collections such as the Capeland, Classima and Clifton. During the 1970s, Baume & Mercier offered unusually

A High-speed Collaboration Automotive manufacturer and entrepreneur Carroll Shelby is one of the world’s most famous and successful high-performance visionaries. Baume & Mercier is famous for its attention to every detail, and celebrates its 185th anniversary this year. Together, these two companies have decided to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the FIA World Endurance Championship with a collection of exclusive, limited-edition timepieces, which will form a part of the Capeland collection. The limited edition Shelby-themed timepieces are available at select authorised Baume & Mercier retailers.

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shaped timepieces such as the Galaxie and Stardust models, both of which won prestigious international distinctions like the Golden Rose of Baden-Baden. In 1973, Baume & Mercier anticipated societal changes by presenting the Riviera, one of the world’s first steel sports watches. The firm joined the Richemont group in 1988, enriching its collections with several successful models, which immediately established themselves as the brand’s flagship lines. Baume & Mercier currently offers five collections: Hampton, which includes shaped watches for both men and women; Capeland, which includes chronographs and Worldtimer watches; Classima, for those with a penchant for minimalist design; Linea, for elegant and dynamic women; and finally, the new Clifton collection, matching the expectations of urbanites looking for a classic, but contemporary timepiece.


g n i v i L e h T t

r e s e D

Text & Images Š Keri Harvey

Sand deserts may appear barren and lifeless on the surface, but in reality they are thoroughly alive. You just have to look a little closer to meet their inhabitants.

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TOMMY Collard has been in love with deserts all his life, and since 1997 he’s been running unique tours into the Namib Desert near Swakopmund. Every day he has his feet in the sand here, sharing his passion for desert life with guests doing his Living Desert tours. By the time the tour ends, everyone on board Tommy’s vehicle will have a new fascination with deserts. It’s a given. Tommy is sun kissed and muscular, which is not surprising, since he’s in the desert every day, running in thick sand and hunting down critters to show his guests. “Let’s read the Bushman newspaper,” he says as he turns off the tar road just outside Swakopmund and heads into the desert dunes. “Every plant and animal and track gives you clues as to what’s happening in the immediate surroundings, so you need to be observant and study these details closely – it’s like reading the day’s news.” Because the dunes are constantly changing, navigating in the desert requires experience and skill. Dunes move two metres per year, and there’s no roadmap for them either. We’ve been driving for just a few minutes when Tommy stops the vehicle, takes off his sandals and bales out of the driver’s seat. He immediately dives headlong into a sand dune alongside the vehicle, then stands up and dives back into the same dune in a different place. All of us watch in silence, with quizzical expressions on our faces. What on earth is he doing? He returns to the vehicle holding a tiny creature, grey-beige in colour. “Jump out and take a look,” he says with a smile on his face. “It’s a shovel-snouted lizard.” Its snout is flattened just like a shovel, which allows the lizard to dig itself into the sand at lightning speed. “And they are super fast runners too,” adds Tommy. “They are the Ferraris of the Namib. They run up a sand dune with their feathered feet like it’s level ground.” He puts the lizard back on the dune slope to show us, and the shovel snouted lizard takes off like a Formula One reptile. They need to be fast because they’re prey for sidewinders, which don’t need a drop of water to drink because they draw moisture from the lizards they eat. There’s a dream-like beauty to the desert, with its softly curving dunes and pure silence. Wind fans sand off the crest of a dune as we drive by, and another dune has patterns of white sand that look like a river course down its windward slope – it’s desert art and it’s constantly changing with the wind. Dune sand here is mostly quartz and it reaches 75 °C in summer, yet life somehow survives here. We stop again, this time to see the Dollar Bush with leaves that look like money. It lives just from the fog moisture that reaches into the desert from the Atlantic Ocean a few times a year. Rain in these areas is rare and will measure just 3 to 15 mm annually, which is hardly enough to damp down the sand. Close to the Dollar Bush, Tommy’s expert eye spots a Namib specialty: a Namaqua chameleon. This is the only chameleon in the world that lives in a desert. These survival specialists turn pure

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S a e x p r e ss c o nne c t s yo u t o walv i s b ay

white to reflect heat when the desert gets too hot, and then transform into pitch black when the temperature changes and cools. It’s now late afternoon, so the chunky Namaqua chameleon we’re looking at is pitch black in a bid to absorb the last heat of the day. And nearby are some baby Namaqua chameleons. At 7 cm long and weighing just 2.6 g they are tiny and difficult to spot. In the wild, though, these quirky creatures can live for up to 14 years. Further along, Tommy stops to show us some FitzSimons’ burrowing skinks, which are finger length and look like small snakes. They are blind because they live under the sand and therefore don’t really need eyes. “They find each other using vibrations,” explains Tommy, “that’s the beauty of living in quartz. Now let’s look for a sidewinder and a scorpion.” Most of us are grateful that no sidewinder is found. But Tommy does jump out of the vehicle at breakneck speed to catch a black scorpion he spots. We watch from a distance, and are then diverted to the blazing orange sunset dousing the dunes in soft light. Just beyond is the Atlantic, but still there’s not a drop of moisture in the air. So we have a sundowner instead and savour the experience. To contact Tommy’s Living Desert Tours phone +264 81 128 1038 or email tommys@iway.na. For more information, visit www.livingdeserttours.com.na.

s e e f l igh t s ch e du l e f or more in f ormat ion .

Namibia


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g n i l e Re t

n e l a T With Rev Riel Dance

i va l

d th e u p e w il l a tt en o tr ce n a d el a n ri th . , a S o u th A fr ic rn ia th is m o n ry fo to li a is C h in in e d m el b ei n g h F o r th e fi rs t ti th e y o u n g fo lk a m p io n sh ip s, e, h p C a s C rt A rn g te in es eW W o rl d P er fo rm u p p er th a l in th st a n ce st o rs . ie W f rl o ea t r le u m o a h to t li n k s th e ti n y l tr a d it io n th a H a il in g fr o m ra u lt cu a f o rt d a n ce rs a re p a ith Bain

Text: Ke Keith Bain

lied, Images Š Supp

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THEY dance as if possessed by otherworldly forces. Their bodies gyrate wildly as their toes click the ground with the speed and precision of sewing machine needles, kicking up miniature dust bowls that threaten to engulf them. Sometimes they drop to the ground, then sit-dance with their legs outstretched, bums bouncing in the sand as they wave their hats around their heads. Then they’re back on their feet, toes lighter than ever, heels clicking as if to produce clacks of lightning. At times the fleet-footed dancing recalls the feverishness and energy of a whirligig, only it’s combined with mind-boggling footwork more akin to a raw, primal Lord of the Dance routine. The riel, as it’s called, is a form of dance drama that finds its home in the rural villages and farming outposts of the Karoo, Namaqualand and Kalahari. That it’s even possible to watch it today makes it one of the biggest comebacks in dance history. Considered the oldest indigenous dance form in South Africa, it traces its origins to the millennia-old trance dance traditions of the San, Khoi, and Nama. Those people performed their ancient steps around the fire and are said to have danced all night, working themselves into ecstatic states as they celebrated the hunt, enacting scenes with vivid, ritualised representations of animals. Its modern incarnation took hold when the ancient rhythms were augmented with lively, quick-tempo steps from Scottish and Irish reels. The two styles weaved together, evolving into a folk dance popular with people who found themselves scattered through the country’s arid regions, typically working as sheep shearers, fence menders and farm labourers. This traditional riel developed and thrived and was very popular in the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s, but then became neglected, and almost disappeared altogether. Over the last decade it has been revived, largely through the efforts of writer and storyteller Elias Nel of the ATKV (Afrikaans

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Language and Culture Association). Thanks to Nel, the ATKV introduced a nationwide riel dance competition in 2006, which was aimed at reviving interest in the style and hoping to ensure its survival. Nel, who danced the riel as a young boy living in the remote reaches of the Northern Cape, says that in ancient times this was an expressionistic dance centred mostly on the San’s observable world, and was therefore laced with depictions of wild creatures, including birds, insects and reptiles. All the jiving, manic hip-gyrating, jerky, emphatic gesturing and knock-kneed syncopation forms part of a visual language centuries in the making. Its key elements include “nifty footwork and energetic, mesmerising dance steps”, he says, but thematically it evolved to include elements relevant to the farm-working communities who practiced it. One moment a dancer might be a farm worker raising the dust with his head held high, the next he transforms into a stallion, prancing (or pronking) across the veld. Often the dances revolve around tales of courtship, brought to life as satirical enactments of animal mating rituals or fights over a potential mate. In some sequences, the men or boys perform miniature dance-offs, vying for the attentions of the women and girls. Then, suddenly, couples will come together and there’s a waltz-like two-step. They’ll dip and weave in the manner of a courtly European dance before breaking out into a jive, all the time their feet churning up the dust. The dust, of course, is vital. David Kramer, whose interest in discovering old Afrikaner music led him to discoveries of riel dancing in remote desert towns, says that the Afrikaans expression “dans lat die stof so staan” (dance so that the dust rises) comes out of this tradition. “In fact,” he says, “they danced until there was so much dust they could no longer be seen.” “Proper riel music,” says Nel, “has an ancient rhythm that


makes your feet involuntarily rattle and hum.” Traditionally, it’s a fast, syncopated style of music with emphasis on the second beat of the bar of four pulses, and comparable with traditional vastrap music. Instruments include banjos, guitars, antique accordions, and mouth organs, but there’s often the odd blikviool (tin violin) joining in. Homemade instruments are not uncommon, and the music is typically accompanied by deeply plaintive voices performing lyrics in ultra-colloquial variations of Afrikaans. According to Kramer, it’s the pitch of the voices that clearly indicates the provenance of these singers, who come from places where the sun and dust have a direct impact on the way people talk and sing. “You notice unusual, sharp, wiry voices, scratched by the dust, pitched quite high and issued from faces hardened by the sun with eyes that must squint to see through the glare of day,” he explains. The riel dancers’ outfits hint at efforts to resurrect a period when their style of dancing was in its prime. Women wear Victorian smocks, abundant skirts in radiant colours, and large, frontier-style bonnets; men don Voortrekkerera cowboy hats adorned with feathers, their patchworkmended trousers held aloft by braces, and waistcoats tying together a timeless pastoral look. Over 50 teams with competitors aged four to 82 take part in various regional competitions for a shot at the ATKV’s final dance-off, that happens beneath Paarl’s Taal Monument every December. The competition is the most important event of the year for riel dancers such as Die Nuwe Graskoue Trappers, a talented troupe comprising youngsters from Wupperthal and its surrounds. The group made its debut by being crowned Junior ATKV Riel Dance Champions in 2013, and repeated the victory in 2014. Then they took several gold medals at the South African Championships of Performing Arts in April. Besides winning the “Ethnic Folk” dance category for their riel performance, their scores earned them the Grand Champion Award for the best showing by any group. Plus they earned the chance to attend this month’s World Championships of Performing Arts in Long Beach, California. The troupe’s manager and dance coach, Floris Smith, who is executive chef at Bushmans Kloof, a luxury lodge near Wupperthal, says that the achievement signifies “the dawn of the riel dance revival”. The revival, of course, goes beyond the achievements of one team. Nel believes this revival can play a critical role in the lives of the communities where it’s practiced. He says that the revival of the riel has brought hope to the invisible communities in impoverished rural areas, restoring a sense of belonging to people who for a long time were treated as third-class citizens. “It’s part of the culture of a people who have often bounced around hopelessly trying to make sense of other people’s cultures,” he says. Today, children are being taught the dance in schools, making up for where it’s fallen out of fashion in homes infiltrated by modern distractions like television with its imported cultures. Those who do it say the riel is in their soul, and in their blood. More than anything, though, as I watched these youngsters stomping in the dust, I realised that their love of riel is pure, visceral, inherent – it raises their spirits and makes them feel alive. As I stood at the edge of the dance arena watching the dust rise to a cloud that threatened to consume us all, I felt my own feet tapping, unbidden, to the beat. Follow Wupperthal’s young riel stars at www.facebook.com/RielDieNuweGraskoueTrappers.

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Tourner avec talent Le renouveau de la danse Riel Texte : Keith Bain Images © Supplied, Keith Bain

Pour la toute première fois une troupe sud-africaine de danse riel va se produire aux Championnats du monde des arts du spectacle qui auront lieu en Californie ce mois-ci. Les jeunes danseurs folkloriques du hameau de Wupperthal dans le Cap occidental, font partie d’une tradition culturelle qui relie les sud-africains à leurs ancêtres les plus lointains. LORSQU’ILS dansent, on les dirait possédés par des forces surnaturelles. Leurs corps tournoient frénétiquement pendant que leurs doigts de pied tapent sur le sol avec la précision et la vitesse d’une aiguille de machine à coudre, creusant des trous poussiéreux qui menacent de les engouffrer. Le riel, est une forme de drame rituel dansé qui se pratique dans les villages ruraux et les avant-postes fermiers du Karoo, du Namaqualand et du Kalahari. Ses origines remontent aux danses trances traditionnelles des tribus San, Khoi et Nama datant de millénaires. Son incarnation moderne est enracinée dans des rythmes anciens enrichis de pas de danse au tempo rapide émanant de danses

traditionnelles écossaises et irlandaises (reels). Le mélange des deux styles évolua en une danse folklorique devenue populaire auprès des gens éparpillés dans les régions arides du pays. Le très populaire riel traditionnel se développa et s’amplifia dans les années 40, 50 et 60, puis fut laissé à l’abandon pour ensuite quasiment disparaître. Depuis une dizaine d’années elle connait un renouveau certain grâce aux efforts d’Elias Nel, écrivain et conteur de l’ATKV (Association pour la langue et la culture Afrikaans). Grâce à Nel, l’ATKV lança en 2006 une compétition nationale de riel ayant pour but de raviver l’intérêt dans ce style de danse

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en d’en assurer la survie. Nel dit qu’autrefois le riel était une danse expressionniste qui reflétait essentiellement le monde comme il était perçu par la tribu San et qu’elle était de ce fait parsemée de représentations de créatures sauvages incluant oiseaux, insectes et reptiles. Il explique que les éléments clés de cette danse incluent « un jeu de jambes habile et des pas dynamiques et ensorcelants, » mais que la thématique a évolué en incluant des éléments pertinents aux communautés rurales qui la pratiquaient. Les danses sont souvent pleines d’histoires de séduction mises en scène de façon satirique et simulant des rituels d’accouplement d’animaux ou des combats entre rivaux. Dans certaines séquences, les hommes ou les garçons performent de mini épreuves de danse, faisant tourbillonner la poussière de leurs mouvements de pieds, et se disputant ainsi l’attention des femmes et des filles. La poussière est bien évidemment essentielle. David Kramer, dont l’intérêt pour la vieille musique afrikaner l’amena à découvrir le riel dans des villes perdues du désert, raconte que l’expression afrikaans « dans lat die stof so staan » (danser pour faire s’élever la poussière) découle de cette tradition. « En fait, » dit-il « ils dansaient jusqu’à ce que l’on ne puisse plus les voir à cause de la poussière. » La vraie musique riel inclut l’utilisation de banjos, de guitares, de vieux accordéons et d’harmonicas, mais le blikviool (violon dont la caisse de résonnance est en fer-blanc) est aussi souvent utilisé. Les instruments « faits maison » ne sont pas rares et la musique est typiquement accompagnée de voix chantant des lyrics en dialectes afrikaans. Les costumes des danseurs de riel font sous-entendent que des efforts sont faits pour essayer de relancer la dance comme à l’époque où ce style était très répandu. Les femmes portent des sarraus à smocks victoriens, des jupes aux couleurs vives et de grands bonnets ; les hommes portent des chapeaux de cowboy ornés de plumes, des pantalons raccommodés façon patchwork et des gilets. Plus de 50 équipes composées de compétiteurs âgés de quatre à 82 ans prennent part à des compétitions régionales variées pour essayer d’arriver en finale du championnat ATKV qui prend place chaque année au mois de décembre. Ce championnat est l’évènement le plus important de l’année pour des danseurs de riel comme par exemple la troupe Die Nuwe Graskoue Trappers composée de jeunes talents venant de Wupperthal et de ses environs. Lors de leurs débuts en 2013 ils furent couronnés Champions Juniors de danse Riel ATKV, cette victoire s’étant répétée en 2014. Ce succès fut suivi de plusieurs médailles d’or aux Championnats sud-africains des arts du spectacle en Avril. En plus d’avoir gagné dans la catégorie de danse « folklorique traditionnelle » pour leur performance de riel, ils obtinrent le Grand prix pour la meilleure prouesse parmi tous les groupes présents. Cela leur a donné la chance d’assister ce mois-ci aux Championnats du monde des arts du spectacle à Long Beach en Californie. Floris Smith, le manager et entraîneur de la troupe, qui est aussi chef exécutif à Bushmans Kloof, un lodge de prestige se trouvant près de Wupperthal, explique que cet accomplissement marque « l’aube du renouveau du riel ». La renaissance de cette danse va bien au-delà des exploits de la troupe. Nel croit que cette relance pourrait avoir un

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impact majeur sur les communautés qui la pratiquent. Il pense que le retour en force du riel donne de l’espoir aux communautés rurales pauvres oubliées, et qu’il redonne un sentiment d’appartenance aux gens qui ont pendant trop longtemps été traités comme des citoyens de troisième ordre. Ceux qui dansent le riel disent qu’ils l’ont dans le sang, et que leur âme lui appartient. Mais plus que toute autre chose, on réalise quand on regarde ces jeunes piétiner la poussière que leur amour du riel leur redonne confiance en soi et leur apporte du bonheur. Suivez les jeunes stars de « riel » de Wupperthal sur Facebook à www.facebook.com RielDieNuweGraskoueTrappers.


The Man With the

the Midas Touch Zack Rasego

Text: Mike Wilson Images Š Supplied

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T

his month, Soweto-born golf caddie Zach Rasego returns to the Old Course, St. Andrews, with a South African course winner, but it’s not the man he helped win the fabled Claret Jug back in 2010. Five years ago, Rasego’s boss was Mossel Bay boy Louis Oosthuizen, this time it is Branden Grace from Pretoria. So, asks Mike Wilson, can history repeat itself for the man with the Midas touch?

SUNDAY 18th July 2010 will last long in the memory of millions of South Africans, but for three in particular: golfer Louis Oosthuizen, his caddie Zack Rasego, and the man who played a key role in the development of both, nine-time Major winner Gary Player. Coincidentally, on a day redolent with emotion, it was also the 92nd birthday of former president Nelson Mandela, adding to the strong South African synergy of the occasion. Oosthuizen, following a run of poor results, confirmed that he was about to sack Rasego when the young and old, white and black partnership went on to win the Open, golf’s most prestigious event, the Claret Jug, the sport’s most iconic trophy, and a bumper pay day worth R14 million, with Rasego’s share a reported 10 %. The Sowetan’s memories of the day are a measure of a shy man: “I was so pleased for Louis. I was happy we won the Open at such a special place as St. Andrews [but] going down the 18th with such a big [seven-shot] lead, I let him hit the driver off-the-tee, then I stayed away from him, to make sure he got all the exposure. It was very special, on Madiba’s 92nd birthday, and at the ‘Home of Golf’. These are memories that will stay with me for the rest of my life,” reflects Rasego. But the caddie’s life is a precarious one, with the winning partnership coming to an end not long

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afterwards, though Oosthuizen was fulsome in his praise for his compatriot, saying: “Zack is a class act, a great caddie, and I’ll never forget us winning the Open Championship together at St. Andrews.” A cross between a rollercoaster, a merry-go-round and a dating agency, caddies and players come together and then split up, often trying several pairings before finding the correct combination. When Rasego eventually teamed up with another rising South African star, Branden Grace, the impact was almost immediate. Grace won back-to-back events at the start of 2012 – the Joburg Open and the Volvo Golf Champions – on home soil. He then went on to win twice more that season at the Open Championship of China and the Dunhill Links Championship at St. Andrews, which took him into the top 50 in the world, thereby joining the sport’s elite. “Zack is a calming influence, but he’s got great experience too. He has been around a long time and knows most of the golf courses we play,” says Grace. “He knows what to do, and when, is well organised, and he works incredibly hard.” On life as a bagman, Rasego is philosophical, observing: “As a caddie, you just have to learn that no matter who you work for, at the end of the day, he’s your boss and the one who is going to pay me, and respect for your boss goes a long way.”

First Page: Rasego and Grace enjoy each other’s company on the course, but both know who’s boss Above: Branden Grace consults Rasego on distances and wind speed and direction.


And on his relationship with Grace, Rasego says: “It’s all about confidence in what you and your player do and I try to be positive at all times. If there is something I don’t like out there, I have to be honest, and the judgement we do together – it might come out all right, it might not, but together we are doing our best, and trusting each other’s judgement is essential.” Four wins for Grace in 2012 took him to sixth on the European Tour’s Race to Dubai Rankings, which earned him R35 million that year, with Rasego’s R3.5 million beyond his wildest dreams as a young man growing up in Soweto in the late sixties and early seventies. But, in keeping with golf’s turbulent lifestyle, constant travelling, and living out of a suitcase, pressure mounts on relationships, and in 2013, the Grace/Rasego axis ended, despite its success. But Rasego was philosophical as ever. “As a caddie, along the way, you know that if your boss feels like he needs a change, that’s what you do, you move on. Branden needed a change, and it did him good. For me, I went back home for a year and came back fresh.” The winning partnership was back together again towards the end of last year, and again the impact was immediate when Grace, without a win since the split, won the Alfred Dunhill Championship at Leopard Creek, and three weeks later clinched the prestigious Qatar Masters. Branden Grace is quick to recognise the change of fortunes following his re-engagement of Rasego, commenting: “It was a deliberate move to get him back. Things happen for a reason. We stopped working together and things went a little bit south. I made a mistake and things are back to normal,” admits Grace. “I enjoy working with Zack because he is a professional on and off the golf course. It’s great to have Zack

back on the bag, and he might just be that little bit of a thing I need to be successful. We feel comfortable around each other and if you feel that way, you can really get things going.” And now the pair are gearing up for the 114th Open Championship at St. Andrews, returning to the quaint Old Course where they won together in the autumn of 2012, and where Rasego struck golfing gold with Oosthuizen two years earlier. And the portents are good, with three top ten finishes during springtime and two on the notoriously tough USPGA Tour. So can history really repeat itself? Rasego, reserved by nature, says: “We’ll see, but we have won there as a partnership and I’ve experienced an Open Championship win at St. Andrews, but it’s not going to be easy.” And Grace isn’t getting carried away either, saying: “It’s nice to know I’ve won there before with Zack, and I’d love to lift the [Claret] Jug at the end of the week. Zack has been there before, winning the Open with Louis. He’s got those memories, but when any South African wins something that big, we all feel we’ve won it, we feed off each other.” “But,” concludes Branden Grace, “it’s a tough one. We’ll see how the weather goes, the luck of the draw and if I can get into position come Sunday. Both I and Zack know what’s required.” The last word goes to the most unlikely South African golf superstar, Zack Rasego, who was voted by his peers as Caddie of the Year in 2012, on the man, his boss, who is less than half his age. “He is my master and I’m glad he listens to me carefully on how to play. This team works well for us and I feel a little bit like his lucky charm.” All will be revealed on the late afternoon of Sunday 19th July at the Home of Golf, St Andrews, Scotland. For more information, visit www.theopen.com.


The Business

of Brandy Text: Eugene Yiga Images © Supplied

It all began in 1672. This was when South Africa’s first brandy was distilled on Pijl, a Dutch ship anchored in Cape Town. FAST-forward over 300 years to 1984 and the establishment of the South African Brandy Foundation. This Stellenboschbased non-profit organisation represents over 95 % of the local industry and aims to promote the long-term growth of South African brandy. “It takes about five litres of wine to produce one litre of brandy,” explains Christelle Reade-Jahn, Director of the South African Brandy Foundation. “As such, the South African brandy industry has a symbiotic relationship with the wine industry, increasing local manufacturing value and stimulating local job creation.” The South African brandy industry has long played a major role in the economy. It is estimated that South Africa is the world’s seventh largest brandy producer. And while the majority of brandy is consumed within the local market, the industry is looking to accelerate its export growth. “The market demand for brandy has a significant impact on the primary wine producers in South Africa,” Reade-Jahn

says. “Low sales of brandy lead to a ‘wine lake’. And if this excess wine isn’t sold, the result is either job losses or wine sold in bulk. Selling wine in high volumes undermines the efforts to create a global image of top quality South African wines.” In other words, the brandy industry has to succeed in order for the local wine industry to flourish. According to a study, commissioned by the SA Wine Industry Information and Systems (SAWIS) and published in January 2015, around 300,000 people were employed in the wine industry in 2008. The South African Brandy Foundation supports this platform. The Bureau of Economic Research (BER) shows that for every 1 % increase in South African brandy sales volumes, the price of distilling wine to South Africa’s grape producers increases by 0.9 %. This means that growth of the South African brandy industry will positively influence the profitability of South African wine producers, who are

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significant local employers. “The economic value added multiplier for South African brandy has been estimated at 1.30, the Government tax multiplier at 1.44, and the employment multiplier at 6.85,” Reade-Jahn says. “This shows that for every R1 million increase in the demand for brandy, economic value added in the economy will increase by R1.3 million, Government tax revenue from excise and VAT will increase by R1.44 million, and 6.85 jobs will be gained. The economic growth potential from a world class local product such as South Africa’s brandies is substantial.” But there are challenges. The cost of producing quality South African brandy is far higher than that of spirits produced from grain or sugar cane. And yet brandy and whisky have the same excise duty. On top of this, South Africa’s legal requirements for the production of brandy are superior to most other brandy-producing countries. These strict standards make it even more expensive to produce. “In his budget speech, [Minster of Finance] Nhlanhla Nene announced that they are considering giving us a preferential excise duty,” Reade-Jahn says. “This is the result of continuous open dialogue between the brandy industry and various Government departments around the unique challenges facing wine producers and cellars.” Looking ahead, the South African Brandy Foundation will use its dedicated projects – such as Fine Brandy Fusion, the Urban Brandy Cocktail Route, and Brandy Homes – to promote brandy as a quality spirit with the power to last another 300 years. Learn more at www.sabrandy.co.za.

A Brief History of the South African Brandy Foundation • September 1984: The South African Brandy Foundation is established in Stellenbosch. • April 1985: The Foundation considers the possibility of allowing for brandy with 38 % ABV (alcohol by volume). • May 1991: The new Liquor Products Act makes provision for potstill brandies with a minimum ABV of 38 %. • May 1992: The first members are inducted into the Brandy Guild. • August 1997: The first Brandy Route is launched. • March 2007: An isotopic database is developed by the Agricultural Research Council to identify illicit brandy products. • May 2008: The Goodlife Brandy Festival takes place in Sandton. • May 2012: Fine Brandy Fusion debuts in Sandton. • March 2013: The Urban Brandy Cocktail Route is launched. • May 2013: Fine Brandy Fusion debuts in Cape Town. • October 2014: Brandy Homes launched. • April 2015: Brandy Bar and Reuben Riffel menu launched at Abalone House in Paternoster.

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Engineered Elegance Audi A6 and Audi A7 Sportback Text: Bernard Hellberg Sr Images Š Motorpress

Subtle design tweaks to Audi’s mid-sized executive sedan and Sportback ranges blend seamlessly with high output power and innovative design.

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IN a well considered move aimed at retaining customer loyalty by not introducing radical exterior design changes which will instantly date existing models and antagonise owners, the latest iteration of the Audi A6 and A7 Sportback has gone the route of greatly enhanced power outputs, cutting edge, lightweight construction and redesigned interiors which are now more user-friendly. Even the “baby” in the range, and arguably a car with one of the longest names in motoring history, the Audi A6 1.8 TFSI ultra S tronic (140 kW) has, despite its generous proportions (4,944 mm in length), the ability to outsprint most so-called hot hatches. Falling just short of the dream benchmark of 100 kW per litre, this A6 is capable of 233 km/h, and will see off the 0-100 km/h sprint in a mere 7.9 seconds. Given that the new range of engines is the major talking point, the slightly altered headlamps and taillights, as well as the redesigned bumper and grille, run the risk of not being noticed. Yet, these styling tweaks are all part of Audi’s ongoing refreshing of their cars’ interiors and exteriors, and even the instrument clusters now make more sense and are intuitive and easy to operate. Paying homage to the principle that beauty is more than skin deep, the other major improvements are to be found in the materials used in the car’s construction. A good example are the doors (all aluminium), which result in a mass of 1,570 kg. This is still fairly hefty, and proof that Audi engineers seem to have hit it spot on in finding a balance between performance and solid construction. Enter the all wheel-drive S6 4-litre TFSI Quattro, some 325 kg heavier than its 4-cylinder cousin, but with a 4-litre V8 that delivers 331 kW and tears up the 0-100 km/h sprint in only 4.6 seconds – placing this four-door passenger car in the supercar league. Even the top speed of 250 km/h is reached

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effortlessly before the electronic anchors are dropped. Perhaps it is unfair to compare the road feel of a front wheel-drive 4-cylinder with a mighty V8 endowed with Audi’s rally-tried and tested all wheel-drive quattro system. To its credit, however, while noticeably less lively than the V8, the 1.8 litre offered virtually the same sense of directional stability, pin sharp handling, and confidenceinspiring braking as the bigger-engined Sportback with its 331 kW of power. Even the seven-speed automatic gearboxes (high fives for the Audi engineers in this respect) are very similar in feel and function. The 1.8 has a hydraulically operated dual clutch transmission, while the 4-litre has a direct-shift S tronic system with cog swops so smooth that they’re hardly noticed. In addition to driving these two models during the recent launch in Cape Town, we also had a go at the A7 Sportback, which is exactly two inches (50 mm) longer than the A6, but offers the identical engine and gearbox. Although the A7 Sportback’s styling speaks to a different audience, it doesn’t make much sense from a financial point of view when one considers that these two more inches will cost you an additional R122,000. The A7 also weighs 60 kg more (1,955 kg), while providing only five litres of luggage space (535 litres) more than the A6. In conclusion, the Audi A6 and A7 Sportback remain at the forefront of German engineering excellence. Every model in the range offers a superlative blend of performance and safety, as well as uncompromising build quality. These cars ooze elegance and are supremely driver-friendly. Their capabilities in terms of handling will make even the most average of motorists feel like an expert behind the wheel. All Audi A6 and A7 Sportback models are sold with the brand’s standard five-year/100,000 km freeway plan.


Ka-Ching!

How to Become a Wealthy Freelancer By Eugene Yiga/Finweek Images © iStockphoto.com

Freelancers. Consultants. Independent contractors. Call them what you will, but solo professionals are on the rise. “If you have the skills, talent and knowledge that are valuable to potential clients, you can create a freelance business that provides you with the projects, clients, income and lifestyle you want,” write Pete Savage and Steve Slaunwhite, the authors of The Wealthy Freelancer . Here are the book’s 12 secrets to a great income and an enviable lifestyle:

industry associations, read trade publications, sign up for LinkedIn Premium, or try Google’s site-specific search.

Master the Mental Game

Create Your Amazing Buzz Piece

“As a freelancer, you’ll encounter your fair share of challenges and setbacks. But they needn’t stop you from achieving the lifestyle of your dreams.” Success requires effort, so don’t give up when obstacles arise. Instead, set clear and challenging goals that will guide you through your temporary dark days. And stay focused. Your winning mindset will ensure you emerge stronger and wiser in the end.

“Using a buzz piece in your marketing and other selfpromotion activities can double the results you get.” Find the challenges and needs your potential clients have that your freelance services could address. Then create a special report or how-to piece around a topic that would interest them. This will position you as the go-to expert at what you do.

Simplify the Process of Getting Clients “Attracting and landing clients is, without a doubt, one of the toughest challenges for freelance professionals, regardless of their level of experience.” Create a list of 150 high-quality prospects from organisations or industries you understand. Focus on companies that are growing, changing strategy, or acquiring competitors. You could also join

Employ High-Impact Prospecting Tactics “Wealthy freelancers concentrate their time, effort and budgets on prospecting tactics and approaches that provide the best results for the time and money invested.” Start with people you already know. Just because your family and friends can’t use your services, doesn’t mean they don’t know people who can. You could also approach your previous employer’s competitors or clients, as long as you’re not violating a non-compete agreement.

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Cultivate Repeat and Referral Business

Boost Your Productivity – Without Perspiration

“Getting repeat business and referrals from existing clients is easier, faster, and less costly than landing new business from brand new clients.” Be a professional who delivers outstanding work. When it’s clear that you’re a joy to work with, offer to contribute even more. Your clients won’t know the full range of your services if you don’t tell them. And they won’t put you in touch with other people unless you ask.

“You don’t have to keep your nose to the grindstone until it bleeds, to be productive.” Being self-employed brings tempting distractions. But don’t lose focus. Work for 50 minutes without interruption and then take a 20 minute break. Just because you don’t have to put up with agenda-less meetings that waste everyone’s time, doesn’t mean you can’t use a diary to better schedule your day.

Nurture Prospects Perpetually

Construct Your Own Work-Life Reality

“Much of the difference between just getting by and earning an executive-level income as a freelance professional lies in what you do with prospects who are not ready to hire you today.” Just because the perfect prospect isn’t ready to hire now, doesn’t mean they’re not interested. So don’t forget about qualified leads. Keep in touch (with relevant updates, not annoying pleas) once a month. You’ll be top of mind when the timing is right.

Price Your Services for Success “How you price your freelance services can mean the difference between a business where you’re consistently working on great projects that pay well, to one where your schedule is filled with low-paying work – or no work at all.” Billing by the hour penalises you for becoming faster and better at what you do. But charging a fixed project price shatters your income ceiling. Create a fee schedule that outlines a range for your services. And never drop a price just because a client objects; negotiate an exchange of value instead.

Bring Focus to Your Freelance Business “When you bring focus to your business, your business-generating activities become far more efficient and effective.” It’s a waste of time to think of everyone as a prospect. Instead, figure out what you do, for whom you do it, and what makes you different. A clear, unique selling proposition will attract quality clients and let you do more of your best work.

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“Work-life balance is not something you pursue. If you perceive your own search for balance as a quest, it will remain one.” You don’t have to spend equal time on work and life to feel balanced. Decide whatever ratio works best for you. But even though you’re working hard, don’t forget to make time for the leisure activities you enjoy.

Create Alternative Streams of Income “Your traditional freelance service isn’t the only way you can earn income. In fact, exploiting alternative active and passive income streams can dramatically increase your earnings.” There are only so many hours in the day that you can spend working. But you can boost your income without adding more to your workload by charging for the little extras you already do for free. You could also create and sell information products (like e-books and audio programmes) that your clients need.

Live and Work in the ‘Wealthy Triangle’ “Whether you’re an employee, business owner, or freelance professional, one of the biggest struggles you’re likely to face is the trade-off between time and money.” You don’t have to be a stressed-out executive, high on money and low on time. Nor do you have to be a starving artist with endless free days but no money to pay the bills. You can live in the “wealthy triangle”: doing work you love, making a good living and having the freedom to live life on your own terms. I’ll see you there! Copy courtesy of ‘Finweek’. Call 0860 103 911 to subscribe.


The Perfect Companion

to Wanderlust

Toyota Fortuner Text: Monique Vanderlinden Images Š Ryan Abbott

From Euro-centred cities to bushveld, to seaside, as South Africans we rarely have to cross our borders to experience the likes of different parts of the world. The everyday adventurer, the city scaper, the nature lover and the family guy all yearn for the freedom to explore these far flung spots, and we need a tough vehicle to take us there. 96 Indwe


SOUTH AFRICANS are spoilt for choice when it comes to multi-purpose, 4x4-capable SUVs. Yet, the Toyota Fortuner comes up trumps month after month, regularly selling an average of 900 units, taking a huge 50 % share of the market. There are many reasons why the Fortuner is the country’s most popular SUV and, to test its durability and family-friendly nature, the Indwe team recently headed out on a much-needed day trip away from the office. Barely an hour’s drive from Cape Town, we left the hustle and bustle of the city behind. We started our daytrip from Franschhoek on the R45 en route to Caledon, via the N2 to Stanford, where we took a turn on the R316 to our secret location – a stone’s throw from Gansbaai. The Fortuner took us jaded city dwellers to a picturesque getaway spot nestled within a private beach and fynbos estate, among the sand, sea and rock formations that are so distinctive of the picturesque southern coast of South Africa. Feeling the sand beneath our feet, breathing the fresh sea air, and seeing the vast beauty surrounding us makes one feel immensely privileged to live in a country with such abundant natural beauty. Toyota’s staple SUV is often described as the all-inone vehicle. Built alongside its Hilux sibling, the Fortuner might be as tough as nails, but it offers all the creature comforts you need to find your freedom. While large SUVs are often too cumbersome to be enjoyed on the long road, the 120 kW and 343 Nm of torque of our 3.0 D4-D test model made the journey up the coast an effortless experience. Toyota’s recipe of practicality-meets-style, while at the same time offering a proposition that represents sheer value for money, makes the Fortuner an undeniable choice for on- or off-road, city, bush, or seaside driving.

One of the most endearing qualities of such a formidable vehicle as the Fortuner, is that it makes you feel as capable as the car itself, giving you the freedom to go further and explore more. Our car’s four-speed automatic helps even amateur off-road drivers smooth out moderately tough terrain. The Fortuner’s capable 220 mm ground clearance makes it an effortless task to move over rocky terrain to reach that perfect destination. The Fortuner features the expected standard equipment, which is always helpful and handy to make a long drive that is more comfortable, including leather upholstery, stability control, a centred touch screen, Bluetooth, climate control, auto headlamps and iPod connectivity, among other things. Whether you are alone or with company, the 4x4 vehicle poses a perfect opportunity to disappear from your natural habitat and into the unattained spaces of the country. For many, there is truth in the notion that you are what you drive, and this is especially true in the case of the Fortuner. From the bush to the beach, it is South Africa’s true adventurer. For the Fortuner driver, freedom is always a possibility – the only thing you need is the wanderlust to make it happen. Toyota describes the Fortuner as a true bush and boulevard vehicle – capable on almost any terrain – with the same “go anywhere, do anything” attitude of its Hilux sibling. Firmly placed at the top of the most popular 4x4s list by South African buyers, it offers practicality, versatility, value for money, reliability, and impeccable off-road credentials. Take it on any terrain, from the familiar to the unseen, and enjoy every moment of your newfound freedom.

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Box, Stack,

Unpack

Making the Most of Your Move Text: Property24 Images © iStockphoto.com

Moving into a new home can be an incredibly exciting prospect. Whether you’re moving out of your parents’ house, relocating for a new job, or simply looking for a change of scenery, a new abode represents an invigorating opportunity to start afresh. Yet the process of moving itself is never as simple as it seems. Uprooting your entire life and all of your possessions is an enormous undertaking which, if poorly managed, can end up being extremely stressful, expensive and time-consuming.

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BETWEEN packing boxes, deciding what to keep or throw away, and locating all your belongings once in your new home, it’s no wonder that moving is widely considered to be one of the most stressful experiences you’re likely to undergo in your lifetime. However, a little foresight and a lot of planning can make the difference between an ordeal and an enjoyable experience, so take note of the following tips by Property24 in order to ensure that your next move is free of stress and hassles.

Make an Inventory Creating a comprehensive list of all your household items will not only help you to get a more competitive moving quote, but will also prove invaluable should your belongings go missing. When creating an inventory, it’s easier to list the items by the room they belong in and then list them according to quantities. In your kitchen, for example, your inventory list will include one kettle, eight pots, two chopping boards, and so forth. In addition, if you wish to take out transit insurance, which can protect you against potentially costly losses, a thorough inventory will prove useful, and will allow you to accurately assess the cumulative value of the items in your home.

Choose Your Movers in Advance Putting your belongings in the hands of a moving company can be nerve-wracking, as family heirlooms and one-of-a-kind items are irreplaceable, no matter what level of transit insurance you opt for. To put your mind at rest ahead of your move, make sure to research a number of moving companies, taking into account recommendations from your friends, family and estate agent. Make sure you are familiar with the various offerings on the market, considering variables such as payment methods and seasonal discounts, especially if you’re considering moving on a Friday or over a weekend. These times are often popular and you may end up paying more or have trouble finding a moving company which is available. By selecting a reputable moving company well in advance of your move, you’ll be able to enjoy peace of mind as you set about your packing efforts.

Stock Up on Moving Supplies Before you start the packing process, you’d be well advised to make sure that you’ve stocked up with sufficient boxes, tape, bubble wrap, scissors and rope

if you need to secure furniture. Many of us make the mistake of underestimating the number of boxes required to pack up an entire home, so rather err on the side of caution and go for too many, rather than too few. Also remember to keep aside an additional box or two once your packing has been completed, to make provision for lastminute items such as cleaning supplies.

Pre-Pack Unnecessary Items Packing the items you don’t use regularly well ahead of time can greatly reduce stress as moving day draws closer. Anything that you can afford to be without on a daily basis should be packed in advance, so as to allow you more time and energy to focus on your day-to-day essentials.

Lighten Your Load Many of us tend to stockpile, often ending up with masses of unused gadgets, clothes and equipment. Rather than carrying around items that you’re unlikely to use again, why not consider donating them to charity? Not only will this result in your longforgotten belongings being put to good use, but will also greatly reduce the number of boxes you’ll need to pack.

Label Your Boxes Sifting through poorly marked boxes can be a frustrating and strenuous task, and one that can be easily avoided by implementing a simple labelling system. Make sure that all of your boxes are clearly assigned to a specific room, as this will not only make it easier for the movers to know where to put things, but will make the unpacking process infinitely easier and less stressful.

Plan Beyond the Move Be creative and make a floor plan of your new home to map the layout of your furniture and décor. This will help you on your moving day, limiting unnecessary confusion or box build-up. After a long day of moving, it’s unlikely that you’ll be in the mood to unpack everything in one fell swoop. So go prepared, and set aside everything you might need in your first 24 hours in a clearly labelled box. Make sure you’ve included bedding, cooking utensils and whatever else you can’t get through the day without. You’ll thank yourself later. For more moving tips, visit our Movers Guide on Property24.com.

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Dig Your Way out of

the Debt Trap Text: Katherine Graham Images © iStockphoto.com

If you’re battling to keep up with your credit repayments, there never seems to be enough money to go around and you’re taking out new loans just to pay off the old ones, you’re caught in a debt trap – and you need help. WHEN Sue and Ken Williams* decided to move into a larger house in a nicer suburb, it was a leap of faith. Ken had been given a modest promotion at work and they hoped that his income would be able to keep up with the bigger bond repayments. Three years later, they are still struggling to rid themselves of debt. Because their combined income cannot cover their expenses, they rely on their credit cards to bail

them out every month, with the result that their debt accumulates. “Whenever Ken gets a bonus, we flatten our debt, but then it creeps up again in the months that follow,” Sue explains. Sue and Ken are not alone. There are millions of South Africans caught in the same debt cycle. According to the South African Human Rights Commission, half of the country’s

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19 million credit-active consumers have impaired credit records, which means that they are in arrears by three months or more.

Over-Indebtedness Is a Major Concern “Debt in South Africa is a very serious issue, compounded by increasing electricity, fuel and transport costs, as well as high rates of unemployment,” says Laurence Hillman, MD of 1Life. He says that the country’s debt-to-income ratio is alarmingly high, with indebted consumers using 75 % of their net salary to pay off debt. “What’s even more concerning is that the more indebted consumers are, the more they seek further financial assistance, which very often results in further debt creation.” The scope of the problem has not escaped Government’s notice, with many experts pointing to reckless unsecured lending as a major factor in the Marikana labour unrest of 2012, as well as in African Bank’s collapse last year. Unsecured lending, where loans are granted with no collateral, quadrupled from R40 billion in 2008 to R172 billion in 2014, according to the National Credit Regulator. In response to this crisis, Government has amended the National Credit Act, which now forces lending institutions to carefully assess customers’ disposable income before granting them loans. Frank Magwegwe, head of Momentum Personal Advisor Services, believes that there are three underlying causes to the problem. “Firstly, there is a culture of buying on credit instead of saving up to buy with cash, and secondly, there is easy access to credit, despite tighter legislation on lending. Finally, there is poor financial education that leads to poor money management skills.” Compounding this is the fact that salaries are not keeping up with inflation because of the rising cost of living, with food, energy, transport, school and housing costs all sharing the blame.

Escaping the Debt Trap But it’s not all doom and gloom. If you are struggling with debt, it’s never too late to seek help and find a way out of the mess you’re in. “The first step is to analyse

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your expenses to understand where your money is going every month,” advises Magwegwe. You’ll be surprised what trends you start to pick up and how easy it is to spot where you can save money – like ditching takeaway meals, not buying new clothes, and cutting back on cell phone usage, for instance. The next step is to draw up a detailed and accurate budget. You can either do this using a spreadsheet or an online tool, or download an app for your phone. Using the money you’ve freed up, set aside money every month to pay off your debt. “Every cent you save should go into the shortest term, highest interest rate loan first,” says Hillman. “Once a loan or credit card is paid off, move on to the next one until you are left only with the longer term, lower interest rate loans like your mortgage.” By sticking to this strategy, it will only be a matter of months or a few years before your debt is repaid. If you are battling to meet your debt obligations, it’s advisable to let your bank and other creditors know the difficulty you’re facing. Many are often willing to restructure your debt to make repayments more manageable. If you suspect you have a judgement against you, you can approach a credit bureau and request a free valuation, but bear in mind that bad judgements can only be cleared in a court of law. If, despite all your efforts, you’re still not coping, you may have to consider debt counselling, a legal process involving the consolidation and restructuring of your debt. But it is advisable that you exhaust all other options first, as this is a lengthy process and there are costs involved. For couples like Ken and Sue facing a mountain of bills and unpaid debt, there is hope. “I have counselled people who managed to repay their debt within six, 12 or 18 months, depending on the size of their debt,” says Magwegwe. “They all had this in common: They acknowledged they had a problem, they sought the help of a financial advisor, and they made the necessary sacrifices to pay back their loans. Most importantly, since becoming debt-free, they are committed to sticking to a monthly budget, building up their savings, and spending their money more wisely.” *Not their real names.


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p a e h the C Bud

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ea n th a t y o u r m ’t n es o d , y h t h ea lt ta in in g n o m y is n ’t th a o ec e th cr et s fo r m a in se u se a ss le ce ri J u st b ec p p lo re ec k . b a la n ce in ch o w su it . W e ex k ll n fo a b ld r u u o o y sh g y in bod h il e st il l k ee p berti y o u r h ea lt h , w Text: Julia Lam Images © iStock

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Ditch the Junk Buying fast foods, fatty snacks and pre-packaged meals seems convenient when you are hungry and hectically busy. However, these foods tend to be devoid of nutrients and are packed with too much salt, saturated fats and sugars. They also drain your wallet as quickly as they expand your waistline. Thus, replacing highly processed meals with whole foods will not only save you money, but also promote healthy weight loss.

Plan Properly Proper planning will allow you to budget for and prepare quick, cost-effective and delicious meals, and avoid unhealthy spur-of-the-moment takeaway meals and mindless munching. Taking the time to prepare healthy meals that can be frozen and served later is another way to enjoy nutritious, convenient and budget-friendly meals at any time.

Wet Your Whistle Wisely What you drink can be as detrimental to your body and bank account as what you eat. Dehydration is often mistaken for hunger, which can lead to overeating and weight gain. Thus, it is important to swap pricey and calorific soft drinks and juices for water. “Water is free and luckily South African tap water is some of the best quality in the world,” says Lila Bruk, Registered Dietician at Lila Bruk & Associates, in Johannesburg. “Therefore, there really isn’t a need to buy bottled water,” she adds. Try to also limit or eliminate alcohol, as boozy beverages are costly, calorific, contain zero nutrients, and lower your inhibitions around food. Alcohol can also negatively affect your blood sugar, which leads to an increase in appetite, cravings and energy dips.

Be a Protein Pro Protein keeps you feeling fuller for longer, feeds muscle tissue, and is an essential but often expensive part of a healthy diet. A good cost-cutting strategy is to reduce your consumption of expensive red meat and replace it with chicken or cheaper fish choices like hake, tuna and pilchards. Stocking up on dried and canned beans, soya and lentils will also give you the protein you need to feed a healthy body on a budget. These cheaper protein sources are also rich in fibre to keep hunger at bay and maintain a healthy digestion. Combining smaller portions of lean proteins with larger servings of salads and low kilojoule vegetables, can also boost the nutrition of each meal and ultimately help save money.

Shop Smart In order to eat well on a budget, you should plan and

research healthy meals that you can prepare cheaply, and then create a shopping list. This will help you to avoid unhealthy impulse buys or purchase expensive foods. Buying whole foods in bulk and freezing them will also save you money, and ensure a regular supply of healthy meals. “Healthy protein options like chicken breasts or extra lean mince can be bought in bulk and then portioned out into smaller servings, before freezing at home,” says Lila. Low kilojoule frozen fruit and vegetables (which are pre-washed and pre-cut for convenience) are also very nutritious and economical. Another way to save money and eat well is to purchase “no name” store brand products, which offer the same quality but save you money on packaging and advertising.

Embrace the Outdoors Gym memberships, personal trainers and pricey equipment can make you avoid exercise when money is tight. Luckily, we live in a country with a great climate and huge open spaces. So, why not get outdoors to keep in shape? Walking, for example, not only burns kilojoules, raises the heart rate and tones muscle, but is also a cheap cardiovascular exercise which can be enjoyed all year round. Jogging and cycling (assuming you have invested in a bike) are also fun outdoor options to get your heart pumping without the price tag.

Strength Train & Save An ideal fitness routine should combine strength training with cardiovascular exercise. With a few basic pieces of equipment, you can enjoy a workout that equals an expensive gym session. For example, purchasing a few – or all – of the following pieces of equipment will allow you to set up your own gym at home: • A Swiss ball • Resistance bands • A set of dumbbells • A bench However, if you are really pressed for money, use cans of beans or bottles of water as weights, or use your staircase as a step, and old pantyhose as a resistance band. Buying fitness DVD’s is another cheap way to get a guided workout without the expense of a trainer. Lastly, if you enjoy the social interaction and structure of classes, look for lower-cost (or free) fitness classes at your local school, community centre or sports facility.

Savour Seasonal Produce Try to only opt for produce that is in season, because these tend to be cheaper. “Seasonal produce also tends to be higher in nutrients,” adds Lila. A great idea is to scout for seasonal bargains at farmer’s markets and chain store food sales. It really is possible to thrive on a tight budget and to make smart lifestyle choices that will enrich your body as much as your bank account. So, try incorporating some of these budget-friendly health tips into your routine today and reap the rewards of your efforts, both physically and financially.

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Loose nails

or Fungal Infected? From Ugly Nails to Beautiful Ones Text: Fix-4-Nails Image © iStockphoto.com

Loose nails are not only aesthetically unsightly, but can also be the precursor to fungal infections. Fix-4-Nails, however, aids the re-growth of beautiful, healthy nails. Read this. It may change the way you think about “loose nails” and “fungal infected” nails! What Is a Loose Nail? A loose nail is not necessarily fungal infected and usually starts from minor trauma such as an injury to the nail, or from jogging, nail biting, aggressive manicuring, and also from contact with irritants or excessive exposure to water. (There are exceptions which may need medical attention, but these are rare. You can read more about this more at www.loosenails.com.) A nail is loose when it becomes separated from the nail bed, but remains attached around its edges. The first sign of a nail becoming loose is usually a change in its colour from pink to yellow or cream. The nail bed of a separated nail becomes dry and is no longer flexible, and this causes the colour change. If ignored, such nails will most likely degenerate to the point where they become a major aesthetic issue. Loose nails are therefore mostly of aesthetic importance, and often only the forerunner to fungal infected nails, but this can be prevented if addressed correctly and in time. And this is why Fix-4-Nails is so important.

What is Fix-4-Nails ? A loose nail cannot be glued back onto a dry nail bed. It

has to re-grow, which takes time. Oral and other anti-fungal treatments, although effective in obliterating fungi, are mostly not formulated to promote the re-growth of nails, and once a nail is loose, it needs to re-grow together with the nail bed in order to become a new, beautiful nail. For this to happen, favourable conditions need to exist under the nail, such as the nail bed being both soft and flexible and free from fungi. Fix-4-Nails is a liquid which is applied under the nail and contains, among other ingredients, salicylic and benzoic acids. These, in combination, not only have known anti-fungal properties, but the salicylic acid, in this concentration, also softens the often accumulated keratin under the nail plate and with it the nail bed, which then regains its flexibility. Fix-4-Nails is therefore the ideal aid in “restoring by regrowth” loose and/or degenerated nails. Small nails take on average three months, while big-toe nails can take up to18 months to two years to re-grow. There is simply no quick fix, but Fix-4-Nails certainly aids the process. Fix-4-Nails is also useful for the protection and maintenance of beautiful nails, with a recommended usage of two to three days a month as part of one’s usual nail care routine. Visit www.loosenails.com for more information.

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Embrace

Being Abroad Text: Supplied Images Š iStockphoto.com

Travelling abroad is very exciting, but coming across inconveniences like getting sick, being unsure of how to spend your free time, or suffering from homesickness could put a dampener on your trip. 108 Indwe


CHARLOTTE Quenet-Meintjes, head of Workaway International South Africa, has some tips to ensure that you stay happy and healthy while travelling or working regionally or internationally.

Be Prepared Before travelling, a trip to your local GP is advised. If you are on medication, you need to take enough to last you for your time away or take a script with you so you can get your medication wherever you’re travelling. Pack cold and flu remedies that you normally take when you are sick, as this reduces the risk of taking medication you may have an adverse reaction to. Ensure you take vitamins every day to build up your immune system and to ward off any viruses.

Eat and Drink Properly Staying hydrated is vital to being healthy. Make sure the water is safe to drink, or stick to drinking bottled or boiled water. It is also important that you get enough nutrition from your food. Try not to drastically change your eating habits and eat as much fresh fruit and vegetables as possible. Quenet-Meintjes suggests being your own chef: “Cooking your own food gives you the power to control the ingredients and portion sizes, and it could also be cheaper!”

Exercise Getting exercise and fresh air is essential, so pack your running shoes as a reminder to keep fit. Being active helps you to feel better physically and mentally. “Exercise strengthens and boosts your immune system, and helps ward off any nasty illnesses that could otherwise leave you feeling dreadful,” explains Quenet-Meintjes. There are many easy ways to keep active and enjoy your new surroundings, including hikes, guided walking tours, running along the beach or cycling.

Socialise and Step Out of Your Comfort Zone “You want to meet as many people as possible when abroad, so it is best to start with making friends with the locals, as they will play a big part in helping you to get to know the city,” explains Quenet-Meintjes. You should also try new things you wouldn’t normally do back home. “Go see, do and experience whatever you can for as long as you can!” she exclaims.

Don’t Let Homesickness Ruin Your Experience The combination of culture shock, new people and possibly even a new home, if you have been posted to work abroad, can create homesickness. “This is completely normal and naturally you will feel it from time to time, but try not to let it get the better of you,” says Quenet-Meintjes. Keeping in contact with family and friends will give you the comfort you need when in a foreign place. Beware of Culture Shock and Know How to Handle It “Culture shock is a normal process of adjustment in a new environment,” says Quenet-Meintjes. Watch out for the symptoms or “warning signals” telling you that something is out of sorts. These include depression, exaggerated homesickness, or negative stereotyping of nationals. “It is important to conduct research, read books and gain an understanding of the culture before going to another country.” Once you arrive at your destination, you should build a support system by keeping close contact with family and friends, and don’t forget to show respect to the country you are visiting. “Try to keep an open mind – you will learn something new!” she adds.


Business hub

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gadgets Project Your Feelings Acer recently announced the launch of the K138ST, the world’s first LED projector with an intelligent ambient light sensor. Capable of projecting a 100” image with only 1.7 m distance to the projection surface, the Acer K138ST is an ultra-portable, short throw LED projector with all the essential entertainment features to enable you to enjoy cinema on the go. Smaller than a sheet of A4 paper, and weighing just 0.75 kg, the K138ST has powerful built-in DTS sound audio, so it can easily be carried anywhere without requiring additional speakers. Its world-first intelligent ambient light sensor allows the projector to optimise image brightness and colour saturation based on ambient lighting conditions. The projected image is vibrant and sharp with 100,000:1 contrast at WXGA resolution, while built-in Bluetooth audio connectivity allows it to wirelessly stream audio to a nearby Bluetooth speaker or home theatre. // www.acer.com

Hot and Steamy! For the best of all cooking worlds, Míele has recently released its built-in DGM6800 combi microwave steamer. To generate steam, Míele uses the same MultiSteam technology that is featured in its entire range of steam ovens – a powerful 3.3 kW external steam generator and eight steam inlet ports in the rear panel of the oven interior. The MultiSteam technology ensures fast and uniform steam generation and distribution throughout the oven cavity for optimum cooking results. Microwave power can be called up in seven stages with a maximum output of 1,000 W. Special features include a QuickStart function (for reheating hot chocolate at the touch of a button, for example) and an automatic programme for popcorn. The new DGM6800 combi steam cooker is available in a number of colours and includes four stainless-steel cooking containers, a wire rack, a glass drip tray, two descaling tablets and a steam cooking recipe book. // www.miele.co.za

Active Connectivity For those living an active life the latest Huawei Talkband B1, wearable technology that tracks your health and fitness, is the ideal companion. Featuring activity recordings, sleep tracking, Bluetooth 4.1, as well as Near Field Communication (NFC) fast pairing, the Huawei Talkband B1 is the ideal solution to complement your active life and keep you connected. With the inclusion of NFC, Bluetooth 4.1 technology as well as an earpiece, users can easily sync their smartphone to the Huawei Talkband B1 and take calls no matter where they are. The Huawei Talkband B1 also monitors all of your movements by recording the number of steps you take and the calories you burn. The impressive battery life provides six days of regular use time, seven hours of talk time and 14 days of standby time, and can be used in water or on land, whether you are running, cycling, surfing or swimming. // www.drivecon.net

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books Jimfish By Christopher Hope In the 1980s, a small man is pulled up out of the Indian Ocean in Port Pallid, South Africa, claiming to have been kidnapped as a baby. So begins the odyssey of Jimfish, a South African everyman, who defies the usual classification of race that defines the rainbow nation. His journey through the last years of Apartheid will extend beyond the borders of South Africa to the wider world, where he will be an unlikely witness to the defining moments of the dying days of the twentieth century. Part fable, part fierce commentary on the politics of power, this work is the culmination of a lifetime’s writing and thinking, on both the Apartheid regime and the history of the twentieth century, by a writer of enormous originality and range.

Remote: A Story of St Helena By Lindsay Grattan Cooper IThe small Island of St Helena, isolated in the mid-South Atlantic Ocean, is one of the most remote inhabited islands in the world – its loneliness breeding a phlegmatic populace as famous for its friendliness as the island itself is known for stunning scenery and a captivating history. Small wonder, then, that the author resolved to buy a second family home there in 1999, and found herself living in the island for nearly ten years while her family “commuted” back and forth from Cape Town on the RMS St Helena, the only ship that serves the island.At the same time the British Government’s determination to build St Helena’s first airport and the litany of those frustrating consultations is described with candour, while colourful splashes of the island’s history and breathtaking beauty are painted into day-to-day happenings. All this is woven into an intimate family story of a treasured house, the island’s day-today demands, and coming to terms with a remote lifestyle.

Must Read

Think Like a Freak By Stephen J. Dubner and Steven D. Levitt The “Freakonomics” books have come to stand for challenging conventional wisdom and using data, rather than emotion to answer questions. Now Levitt and Dubner have turned what they’ve learned into a readable and practical toolkit for thinking smarter, harder, and differently – thinking, that is, like a freak. Think Like a Freak offers rules like “Put Your Moral Compass in Your Pocket”,“The Upside of Quitting”,“Just Because You’re Great at Something Doesn’t Mean You’re Good at Everything”, and “If You Have No Talent, Follow Levitt’s Path to Success”.

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North West Tourism’s head, Charles Ndabeni (left), SA Express’s CEO, Inati Ntshanga (centre), and Sun City’s Managing Executive, Mike van Vuuren addressed media and tourism industry stakeholders at a breakfast event held in Cape Town.

SA Express Route to Pilanesberg Launched

Text: Pam Komani Images © Supplied

After a scrumptious breakfast at the Table Bay Hotel, invited guests couldn’t wait to jet off and experience the #FlytoSunCity route launch recently. It has been two months since Sun City and SA Express linked the skies between Cape Town, Johannesburg and the North West Province. Passenger volumes are increasing steadily as travellers take advantage of the opportunity to fly direct to the North West.

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FLIGHTS to Pilanesberg from Johannesburg, as well as from Cape Town have the capacity to accommodate 50 passengers each. The South African community is taking full advantage of the flights to Pilanesberg, accounting for 60 % of sales, while international travellers make up the remaining 40 %. The route opens up a convenient direct channel for these visitors and bodes well for tourism in the province. Sun City Managing Executive, Mike Van Vuuren, says that the availability of commercial flights to and from Pilanesberg has opened up a gateway for easier and faster access to Sun City and the numerous attractions available in the Pilanesberg area. “As a resort we help to create experiences that make lasting memories and investing in ways to make access to Sun City easier for our guests is an integral part of our ethos. The direct commercial flights in and out of both Pilanesberg Airport and soon Mafikeng Airport have tremendous potential to bolster leisure and business tourism in the North West Province and we are excited to form part of this promising opportunity. “In the first month of operation, SA Express’ direct flights to Pilanesberg carried close to 600 passengers into the North West Province. We expect volumes to continue growing as awareness of the service grows. Sun City is committed to the success of the SA Express routes to Pilanesberg, and has value-added packages for people travelling to the resort to help encourage passenger volumes. We would like to see direct flights open between Pilanesberg and Durban as well.” In a landmark agreement announced in March this year, the North West Safety and Transport Department gave SA Express the contract to operate commercial flights from Cape Town and Johannesburg to Pilanesberg Airport and Mafikeng Airport. SA Express’ first commercial

flights to Pilanesberg commenced on 1st April 2015. The airline currently offers return flights to Pilanesberg from OR Tambo International Airport and from Cape Town International twice a week, on Mondays and Fridays, with growth on the horizon. CEO of SA Express, Inati Ntshanga, says: “The two months since the direct commercial flights to and from Pilanesberg commenced, has marked an evolutionary period in our 21-year history and our coming of age. This is the first time in 21 years that we are flying in this province, which makes us a truly regional South African airline that connects practically all of our major cities with small and outlying ones in our country. These flights are also a game changer for the North West, catapulting the province to the premier league of economic players”. Charles Ndabeni, head of North West Tourism, is ecstatic about the trilateral agreement between Sun international, SA Express and the provincial government, and highlighted the potential revenues that could come from investing in the province’s natural treasures. Ndabeni also placed emphasis on how the province is in the process of rebranding and repositioning so that the North West will not only be a home to one of the country’s biggest hotel property groups, but also the most visited place in South Africa by 2020. He also mentioned how they would like to see tourism sites in the province grow so that the province becomes the second most visited destination in South Africa by 2030. Among many other activities, tourists will experience nature under the African sky with less travel hassles. “Are yeng Bokone Bophirima” (Lets’ go North West). Bookings for flights are available through booking agencies and SA Express at www.flyexpress.aero. Follow SA Express on Facebook/saexpress and Twitter @flySAExpress

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Meet the Crew Text & Images © Supplied

Have you ever wondered who is flying the plane when you travel on SA Express? Or wanted to know more about what a job as a cabin crew member is like? Well, now’s your chance! Every month we will introduce a few members of our SA Express family, because by getting to know them, you become part of the SA Express family too. Bruce Lillebo

recurrent training and wet ditching. Each and every cabin crew member is fully trained in these on an annual basis.

years in September.

Have you ever had any funny incidents or encounters in your job? All the time, but the most memorable was back in the

Tell us more about who Bruce is. Bruce is a people’s person

days of SAA. In the early hours of the morning, during a flight, an elderly woman asked how the captain knew where we were flying at night. I asked her to look outside the left window to see a red flashing light, and on the right hand side to see a flashing green light. I told her that as long as we are fly between those two lights we were on course. She was happy with the information!

Chief Cabin Training Instructor How long have you been with SA Express? It will be 17

and a Sir John Adamson High School graduate. I joined aviation in 1971, and have loved it ever since. I started at SAA in 1971, and in 1998 joined SA Express and love it.

What is the most exciting part of your job? The lifestyle, the travel, the training and the people. I must say I have met very interesting people along the way.

What do you find most challenging in what you do?

What will you miss most about your job when you retire? The people, the flying and the training.

Aircraft training on cold, windy mornings.

This is your last year with SA Express. What words of wisdom would you leave cabin crew members with? Flying

Why do you like working for SA Express? SA Express is

is like the weather. Whether the weather be fine or whether the weather be not, we’ll weather the weather, whatever the weather, whether we like it or not.

the company that gave me an opportunity to better and broaden my knowledge about aviation, to train and to make an impact in people’s lives.

What would people find surprising about your job? The amount of knowledge required to perform all the training. This ranges from training safety and emergency procedure training, dangerous goods, live firefighting, aviation medicine, annual

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What does the future hold for you now that you will no longer be at SA Express? I have other opportunities lined up in aviation and I look forward to the road that lies ahead of me. In conclusion, aviation can be a harsh mistress and, like with entertainment, never forget: “It’s showtime!


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Airline information SA Express fleet Canadair Regional Jet 200 BER Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 474 knots/545mph/879kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-3B1 Range: 1,662miles/3,080km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 50

Crew: Two pilots, two cabin crew Wing span: 69ft 7in/21.21m Overall length: 87ft 10in/26.77m Overall height: 20ft 5in/6.22m Maximum take-off weight: 51,000lb/23,134kg Minimum runway length: 6,295ft/1,919m

De Havilland Dash 8 Series Q400 Turboprop Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 360knots/414mph/667kmph Engines: Two Pratt & Whitney Canada PW150A Range: 1,565 miles/2,519km Maximum altitude: 25,000ft/7,620m Seating capacity: 74 Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 93ft 3in/28.42m Overall length: 107ft 9in/32.83m Overall height: 27ft 5in/8.34m Maximum take-off weight: 64,500lb/29,257kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

Canadair Regional Jet 700 Manufacturer: Bombardier Maximum cruising speed: 473 knots/544mph/875kmph Engines: Two General Electric CF34-8C5B Range: 1,477m/2,794km Maximum altitude: 41,000ft/12,496m Seating capacity: 70 Crew: Crew: Two pilots, two

cabin crew Wing span: 76ft 3in/23.2m Overall length: 106ft 8in/32.51m Overall height: 24ft 10in/7.57m Maximum take-off weight: 72,750lb/32,999kg Minimum runway length: 4,580ft/1,396m

SA Express’ aircraft are made by Bombardier Aerospace

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We fly for you About us SA Express is a fast-growing airline business operating primary and secondary hubs between domestic and regional destinations within Southern Africa. Our objective of improving intra-Africa travel is in line with South Africa’s mandate to increase aviation’s contribution towards sustainable economic growth and job creation. The flexibility and reliability presented by the airline’s FACT principle (Frequency, Availability, Competitive rate and Timing of flights) affords both consumers and service providers a unique and convenient service. The FACT principle is important to us as it enhances the country’s prospect as a preferred air travel destination and major trade and tourism capital. Our vision is supported by the airline’s aspirations and strategy. Also underpinning this vision is our set of core values and unique selling propositions that drive profitability. Vision To be a sustainable world-class regional airline with an extensive footprint in Africa. Purpose A sustainable, integrated regional airline connecting secondary and main airports.

Core values Safety first We never compromise on safety, no matter what. Customers Our customers are our most important investors. Partners We partner with people across all operations. Speed & Quality We deliver with speed without compromising on quality.

Improvement We strive for continuous improvement. Simplify We keep it simple.

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Special services Special Meals Passengers with special dietary requirements are provided for through the following special meals: kosher, halal, Muslim, Hindu, low-fat and vegetarian meals. Orders for special meals should be placed at the time of making flight reservations. The airline requires a minimum of 48 hours’ notice prior to departure in order to assist with confirmation of requests. Only available on selected flights. Passengers requiring special attention Requirements for unaccompanied minors (passengers under the age of 12 years) or passengers requiring wheelchairs should be stated at the time of making the reservation. Owing to the size of the cabins on our aircraft types, the airline is not in a position to carry stretcher passengers or incubators. Cabin baggage SA Express will accept one piece of cabin baggage not exceeding a total dimension of 115cm and 7kg in weight. For safety reasons, cabin baggage must fit into approved stowage spaces: either the overhead luggage bin or under the seat. Owing to limited storage space in the aircraft cabin, cabin baggage may be placed in the

We Fly For You SA Express Airways prides itself on aiming to offer incomparable service standards. In addition to building on our motto to express excellence and consistently striving to provide the best service, we know that “you” is the most important word in our airline. SA Express proudly launched its new brand on 2 December 2009 at OR Tambo International Airport. The new brand is set to ensure that it’s distinctive and positioned to build awareness and affinity in the domestic and regional markets. The new proposition “We Fly for You” is set to position SA Express as a premier intraregional African brand. The main objective of the re-brand is to ensure that SA Express is distinctive yet still aligned to the country’s mainline carrier. SA Express’s unique positioning as an airline that provides a bespoke, personalised travel experience was the rationale behind the proposition “We Fly for You”. The new brand mark is in line with the symbol and colours of the national flag, encouraging national pride. The new brand will be applied to all brand touch-points throughout the operation as well as the staff uniform.

Skycheck at the aircraft for hold stowage. Skycheck This is the airline’s special hand-luggage facility that assists with in-flight comfort, speedy boarding and disembarking. When boarding one of our flights, simply place any hand luggage that will not be required during the flight on to the Skycheck cart at the boarding steps of the aircraft. Your hand luggage will be waiting for you as you disembark from the aircraft at your destination. Baggage liability Valuable items such as cameras and accessories, computers – including laptops and notebooks – mobile telephones, perfumes, aftershaves, colognes, legal and company documents and legal tender – including cash, credit cards and cheques – bullion, leather jackets, all types of jewellery and any other items with a value in excess of R400 must be removed from either checked-in or Skycheck baggage as the airline is not liable for loss or damage to these items. Verified baggage claims are settled on the basis adopted by IATA (International Airlines Transport Association): payment of US$20 per 1kg of checked-in luggage, to a maximum of 20kg ($400).

Awards SA Express has won the AFRAA Regional Airline of the Year Award at the end of 2009, and the Allied and Aviation Business Corporate Award. Our airline was also the recipient of the Annual Airline Reliability Award from Bombardier at the end of 2007. Other previous awards include the International Star Quality Award, which indicates our commitment to service excellence, while our prominence as one of the top 500 best managed companies is proof of our success as a business. Onboard service The airline’s onboard service is unique and offers passengers a variety of meals or snacks. The airline pioneered its unique meal-box concept, and meal choices are frequently updated and designed using balanced food criteria: appearance, taste and nutritional value. Passengers can also enjoy a wine and malt service on specified flights as well as refreshments on all flights. Light snacks will be served on selected flights. Our customers can expect a safe, comfortable, quality air-travel experience, with the added benefits of frequency, reliability, on-time departures and unmatched value for money.


Safety Information Health regulations Health regulations at certain airports require that the aircraft cabin be sprayed. The spray is harmless, but if you think it might affect you, please cover your nose and mouth with a handkerchief. Remain seated As a safety precaution, passengers are requested to remain seated with seatbelts fastened after the aircraft has landed, until the seatbelt sign has been switched off by the captain. Portable electronic equipment The use of personal electronic devices (PED’s) will apply to all domestic and regional flights on the CRJ700/200 and DH8 Q400.

Passengers will be permitted to use PED’s such as cell phones, e-readers and electronic tablets in flight-mode.

Cellular telephones Cellular telephones may be used on the ground while passenger doors are open. Cellular telephones, smartphones or any device with flight mode must be switched off as soon as the cabin doors are closed and when the senior cabincrew member makes an announcement on the public-address system. Laptop computers Laptops with CD ROM and DVD drive, handheld calculators, electric shavers and portable personal listening devices may not be used on the ground during taxi but may be used during the flight when the seatbelt signs are switched off and with permission from the captain. Should circumstances dictate otherwise, a public-address announcement cancelling this concession will be made by a crew member.

Prohibited equipment Portable printers, laser pointers, video equipment, CB/ AM/FM/FHF/satellite receivers, two-way radios, compact disc and mini-disc players, scanners, remote-controlled toys and power converters are prohibited for use at any time. Safety pamphlet Read the safety pamphlet in the seat pocket in front of you and take note of your nearest emergency exit. Smoking In accordance with international trends, smoking is not permitted on board any SA Express flights. Seat belts Please fasten your seat belt whenever the seat belt signs are illuminated. For your own safety we suggest that you keep it fastened throughout the flight. Important When in doubt, please consult our cabin crew.

For your comfort and security, please comply with the above safety regulations at all times while on board

Route map SA Express: Johannesburg Bloemfontein Cape Town Durban East London Gaborone George Hoedspruit Pilanesberg

Kimberley Lubumbashi Lusaka Harare Port Elizabeth Richards Bay Walvis Bay Windhoek

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Flight schedule Johannesburg - Pilanesberg Flt No SA 1261

Dep 09:30

Arr 10:20

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Bloemfontein Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1001 1001 1003 1005 1011 1013 1017 1021 1023

Dep 05:55 06:00 08:00 11:20 13:50 14:55 16:45 18:05 18:30

Arr 07:00 07:05 09:05 12:25 14:55 16:00 17:45 19:05 19:35

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

Johannesburg - East London Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1403 1403 1407 1413 1409 1411

Dep 07:15 08:30 13:15 15:00 17:30 18:40

Arr 08:45 10:15 14:45 16:30 19:00 20:10

A/C CR8 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR8

M

Johannesburg - George Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1501 1503 1505 1509

Dep 06:50 08:20 11:25 15:50

Arr 08:40 10:15 13:15 17:40

A/C CR7 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

F

S

S

Johannesburg - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1225 SA 1227

Dep 10:15 12:15

Arr 11:20 13:20

A/C DH4 DH4

M

T

Johannesburg - Kimberley Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1101 1103 1105 1107 1113

Dep 06:00 09:20 13:10 14:25 17:20

Arr 07:05 10:25 14:15 15:30 18:25

A/C dh4 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR7

M

T

Johannesburg - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1453 1455 1457 1457 1459

Dep 07:10 10:00 17:30 17:50 19:35

Arr 08:45 11:55 19:20 19:25 21:15

A/C CR8 DH4 DH4 cr7 cr8

M

T

W

T

pilanesberg - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1268

Dep 16:20

A/C CR2

M

T

W

Bloemfontein - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1024 1002 1004 1006 1012 1014 1018 1022

Dep 06:20 07:45 09:35 12:55 15:25 16:30 18:20 19:30

Arr 07:25 08:40 10:40 14:00 16:30 17:35 19:20 20:30

A/C DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR7 CR7 DH4

M

T

W

East London - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1412 1412 1404 1404 1408 1414 1410 1410

Dep 06:45 06:45 09:15 11:00 15:30 17:00 19:40 19:40

Arr 08:25 08:25 10:45 12:40 17:00 18:30 21:10 21:10

A/C CR7 CR7 CR7 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

George - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1502 1504 1506 1510

Dep 09:20 10:50 14:05 18:10

Arr 11:10 12:40 15:45 19:50

A/C CR7 CR2 CR7 CR7

M

Flt SA SA

No 1226 1228

Dep 12:00 13:55

Arr 13:00 14:55

A/C DH4 DH4

M

No 1102 1104 1106 1108 1114

Dep 07:40 11:20 15:05 16:20 19:05

Arr 08:45 12:25 16:10 17:25 20:10

A/C dh4 DH4 CR2 DH4 CR7

M

F

S

S

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

F

S

S

T

Kimberley - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

T

T

Hoedspruit - Johannesburg

T

Port Elizabeth - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1460 1460 1454 1456 1458

Dep 06:10 06:25 09:20 12:30 20:00

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Arr 17:20

Arr 08:00 07:45 10:55 14:20 21:35

A/C DH4 CR8 CR8 DH4 CR7

M

T

W

T


Flight schedule Johannesburg - Richards bay Flt SA SA SA SA

No 1201 1203 1207 1213

Dep 06:10 08:30 13:15 16:55

Arr 07:25 09:45 14:30 18:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

Johannesburg - walvis bay Flt SA SA SA

No 1703 1701 1705

Dep 07:20 11:55 13:30

Arr 08:45 13:10 14:55

A/C CR2 CR7 CR2

M

T

Johannesburg - windhoek Flt No SA 1731 SA 1731

Dep 05:55 06:10

Arr 07:10 07:25

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

Johannesburg - Gaborone Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1761 1763 1765 1765 1767 1769 1775 1775 1783 1779

Dep 06:55 07:55 09:55 09:55 11:55 13:00 13:30 14:30 15:45 18:10

Arr 07:50 08:50 10:45 10:50 12:45 13:50 14:25 15:25 16:40 19:05

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

Johannesburg - Lubumbashi Flt No SA 1797

Dep 09:20

Arr 11:45

A/C CR7

M

T

CAPE TOWN - bloemfontein Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1081 1083 1087 1091 1091

Dep 06:00 08:00 13:15 16:15 17:15

Arr 07:30 09:30 15:00 18:00 18:45

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 DH4 CR2

M

CAPE TOWN - east london Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1363 1363 1363 1371 1371 1373 1375

Dep 07:00 08:00 08:00 13:05 13:30 16:30 17:20

Arr 08:25 09:25 09:55 14:30 14:55 17:55 18:45

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2 cr2 CR2

M

Cape Town - Pilanesberg Flt No SA 1255

Dep 13:50

Arr 16:00

A/C CR2

M

Richards bay - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1202 1204 1208 1214 1214

Dep 08:05 10:30 15:05 18:40 18:40

Arr 09:20 11:45 16:20 20:00 20:00

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

walvis bay - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1702

Dep 14:45

Arr 16:55

A/C CR7

M

T

windhoek - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1732

Dep 08:15

Arr 11:15

A/C CR2

M

T

Gaborone - Johannesburg Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1762 1764 1766 1768 1768 1770 1776 1776 1784 1780

Dep 08:30 09:25 11:25 13:10 13:10 14:20 14:50 16:05 17:20 19:45

Arr 09:25 10:20 12:20 14:00 14:05 15:10 15:45 17:00 18:10 20:40

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4

M

T

Lubumbashi - Johannesburg Flt SA

No 1798

Dep 12:30

Arr 15:00

A/C CR7

M

T

bloemfontein - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1082 1084 1088 1092 1092

Dep 08:15 10:30 15:40 18:30 19:25

Arr 10:00 12:15 17:40 20:30 21:10

A/C CR2 CR2 DH4 CR2 CR2

M

east london - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1362 1364 1364 1372 1374 1376

Dep 08:00 09:00 10:00 15:10 18:30 19:50

Arr 09:40 10:40 11:40 16:50 20:10 21:30

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

Pilanesberg - cape town Flt SA

No 1254

Dep 11:00

Arr 13:20

A/C CR2

M

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

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Flight schedule Cape Town - Hoedspruit Flt No SA 1241

Dep 10:10

Arr 12:50

A/C CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

CAPE TOWN - port elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1801 1801 1807 1807 1803 1813 1813 1813 1819 1821 1821 1821 1823 1823

Dep 06:00 06:00 10:10 10:10 10:40 13:00 13:00 13:45 15:00 16:00 16:00 16:30 18:30 18:30

Arr 07:30 07:30 11:40 11:40 12:10 14:30 14:30 14:55 16:30 17:30 17:30 17:40 20:00 20:00

A/C dh4 dh4 dh4 DH4 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 DH4 DH4

M

Cape Town - Walvis Bay Flt SA SA SA

No 1721 1721 1721

Dep 11:15 11:15 11:20

Arr 12:25 12:25 12:30

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

durban - East London Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1301 1301 1305 1305 1305 1309 1309

Dep 06:00 06:00 11:00 12:00 12:00 16:50 16:50

Arr 07:05 07:05 12:05 13:05 13:05 17:55 17:55

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

durban - Port Elizabeth Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1330 1334 1334 1336 1340 1340 1348 1348

Dep 06:00 07:15 09:15 09:50 13:35 14:10 17:40 18:00

Arr 07:20 08:35 10:35 11:10 14:55 15:30 19:00 19:20

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

durban - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

No 1850 1852 1854 1858 1854

Dep 06:10 08:00 12:00 15:35 15:00

Arr 08:25 10:15 14:15 17:50 17:15

durban - lusaka Flt SA SA SA

No 1601 1601 1601

Dep 08:00 10:10 10:10

Arr 10:50 13:00 13:00

durban - Harare Flt No SA 1611 SA 1613

Dep 10:20 10:20

Arr 12:45 12:45

Hoedspruit - Cape Town Flt SA

No 1242

Dep 13:20

A/C CR2

M

T

port elizabeth - CAPE TOWN Flt SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA SA

No 1826 1802 1808 1810 1814 1814 1814 1820 1822 1822 1824

Dep 07:00 08:00 12:10 14:00 15:00 15:00 15:25 17:00 18:00 18:10 20:30

Arr 08:40 09:40 13:50 15:20 16:20 16:40 16:45 18:40 19:40 19:30 22:10

A/C DH4 DH4 DH4 CR2 CR2 CR4 CR2 DH4 dh4 CR2 DH4

Flt SA

No 1722

Dep 13:00

Arr 16:00

No 1302 1304 1306 1310

Dep 07:35 10:05 13:35 18:25

Arr 08:35 11:05 14:35 19:25

No 1331 1335 1337 1341 1349

Dep 07:50 11:05 13:40 15:35 19:55

Arr 09:05 12:20 14:55 16:50 21:10

No 1851 1853 1855 1859 1855

Dep 09:05 10:45 15:00 18:15 17:45

Arr 11:05 12:45 17:00 20:15 19:45

lusaka - durban Flt SA SA SA

No 1602 1602 1602

Dep 11:30 13:40 13:40

Arr 14:20 16:30 16:30

Harare - durban Flt SA SA SA

No 1612 1614 1612

Dep 13:25 17:00 17:00

SA EXPRESS RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE, SUSPEND OR AMEND THIS PUBLISHED SCHEDULE WITHOUT PRIOR NOTIFICATION EVERY EFFORT WILL BE MADE TO OPERATE AS PER THE PLANNED SCHEDULE

Arr 15:50 19:25 19:25

S

S

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2

M

T

W

T

F

S

S

A/C CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

A/C CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2 CR2

CAPE TOWN - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

F

W

Port Elizabeth - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA SA

T

T

East London - DURBAN Flt SA SA SA SA

W

M

walvis Bay - Cape Town

*Please note that SA Express may deviate from the published schedule over the holiday period and will operate reduced schedules in December and January

128 Indwe

Arr 15:55


Passenger Letters Dear SA Express I just wanted to share an experience that I recently had onboard an SA Express flight from Harare to Durban. Over the past two weeks I have flown to Harare and back twice with SA Express. All four flights went perfectly. They were on time and the service was brilliant, however, there was one flight in particular that absolutely blew me away. The cabin attendant’s name was Bronwyn Adams and she was absolutely phenomenal in terms of the service she provided. What was so special about this was that she was working alone, unlike the other flights where there were always two cabin attendants. Bronwyn didn’t sit down or stop moving throughout the entire flight and she served every passenger as if they were the only person on the flight that night. She really deserves a medal for her dedication to customer service which is something we often don’t see any more in this day and age. When we disembarked, every single person stopped at the door to thank Bronwyn and the flight deck crew for the excellent flight and service that we received that evening. Well done SA Express. Keep it up. Kind Regards Lance Engelbrecht Congratulations to Lance Engelbrecht, who wrote our winning letter this month. He has won an American Tourister Bon Air Spinner 55 cm valued at R1,399.

Dear SA Express When family are spread out across the country, SA Express makes it that much easier to see them all. My son Connor (five months old) and I flew from East London to Cape Town to visit family and attend a wedding, and we enjoyed friendly service from all the staff, starting with the people at the check-in counters all the way until the air hostess waved Connor goodbye as we descended the stairs onto the Cape Town tarmac. Connor also enjoyed the Indwe magazine and seemed to find it delicious! Thanks again. Karen Galloway

Do You Have Something to Say? Let us know what is on your mind by sending an email to customercare@flyexpress.aero. Letters may be edited, shortened or translated from their original language. The writer of the winning letter in the August edition of Indwe will receive an American Tourister Lock ‘n’ Roll 69 cm spinner valued at R2,795. Lock ‘n’ Roll to your next destination with a suitcase that really has it all, including flashy colours, remarkable lightness, high durability and large volume. Produced in Europe, the Lock ‘n’ Roll collection is made out of 100 % polypropylene which creates the perfect synergy between strength and lightness. The cubic shape provides more packing space than you could ever wish for. The three-point TSA approved locking system also keeps your belongings safe and secure against theft, and offers improved protection against water and dust. American Tourister is stocked at leading luggage stores nationwide. For your nearest stockist, call +27 31 266 0620.

Indwe 129


Africa’s Talent Revealed Autumn in Clarens by Dr Engela le Roux

Redbilled Oxpecker cleaning a buffalo’s ears of ticks in the Sabie Sand Game Reserve by Ilse Gerlach

Zebra Train at Tala Private Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal by Chantal Roberts

If you think you have what it takes, send your photos (1MB each), details of where they were taken and your contact details to nicky@tcbmedia.co.za, with the words “Indwe Photo” in the subject line. We can’t wait to show them off!

130 Indwe


INDWE July 2015  

This Month's issue:Making the Most of Mandela Day.South Africa's Market Insight guru-Lebo Motshegoa.The Business of Brandy.